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Independence in Washington County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Baylor's Survival—

Civil War, Reconstruction, and Baptist Strife

 

— Baylor University —

 
Baylor's Survival Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
1. Baylor's Survival Marker
Inscription.  
The next president, George Washington Baines, former editor of the Texas Baptist, kept the male department open amid tough times. The Confederate Army had taken most of the men from the classroom. Baines' great-grandson was Lyndon Baines Johnson, President of the United States from 1963 to 1969.

In fall of 1863, William Carey Crane was elected Baylor's fourth president. He removed Confederate Army training activity from Windmill Hill and repaired the buildings damaged by military use. After the war's end, male enrollment recovered to over one hundred. In 1866, Baylor's female department was put into a new institution, Baylor Female College, with Horace Clark as its first president.

With negligible finances, President Crane operated a quality institution during the years from 1866 to 1886. Enrollments remained in the vicinity of 90 during the late 1860s and early 1870s but jumped to an average of 115 for the next ten years. Reaching 12 per year, more ministerial students were trained at Baylor during these years than were trained there before the Civil War. These young men were to fill hundreds of Baptist pulpits worldwide.
The Baylor's Survival Marker is the fourth marker from the left of the four markers image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
2. The Baylor's Survival Marker is the fourth marker from the left of the four markers
Baylor's campus at Independence suffered from a lack of rail service as did the surrounding community.

By the 1880s, Baylor University was one of only two institutions of higher learning in Texas—the other being Waco University—to have remained in continuous operation since before the Civil War.

On February 27th, 1885, President Crane died of pneumonia. The trustees names professor Reddin Andrews as the fifth president. Male enrollments dropped and the trustees in 1886 agreed to consolidate Baylor University with Waco University to form a single statewide Baptist institution, "Baylor University at Waco." Texas Baptist leaders merged the two conventions into a singular statewide body, the Baptist General Convention of Texas (BGCT) which would appoint the school's trustees.
 
Erected by Baylor University.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionEducationParks & Recreational AreasWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 30° 18.986′ N, 96° 20.718′ W. Marker is in Independence, Texas, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Hood Hotel Road and Farm to Market Road 50, on the right when traveling east. The marker is located at the northeast
The markers are located in the Baylor Park Pavilion at Windmill Hill. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, January 8, 2021
3. The markers are located in the Baylor Park Pavilion at Windmill Hill.
section of the Baylor Park at Windmill Hill. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brenham TX 77833, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Baylor University Campus on Windmill Hill: (here, next to this marker); In Recognition of the Land Donations to Baylor (here, next to this marker); Baylor University's First Years (here, next to this marker); Founding of Baylor University (here, next to this marker); Windmill Hill (here, next to this marker); A College Town (a few steps from this marker); Houston Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Home Built in 1845 by General Jerome B. Robertson (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Independence.
 
Also see . . .  Baylor University. Baylor University owes its founding to Robert E. B. Baylor, James Huckins, and William Milton Tryon, who in 1841 organized an education society in the Texas Union Baptist Association with the purpose of establishing a Baptist university in Texas. Baylor was chartered by the Republic of Texas on February 1, 1845, and was opened in 1846 at Independence.  Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on February 12, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 13, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 12, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 12, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 3, 2021