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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Macon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Andersonville National Cemetery

 
 
Andersonville National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 6, 2021
1. Andersonville National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  This cemetery began as a burial place for the 12,920 Union soldiers who died in the nearby prison camp. The orderly rows and peaceful setting contrast with the misery and disease within that stockade. When Andersonville National Cemetery was established on July 26, 1865, it became open to veterans of all later wars and remains an active cemetery.

The headstones appear similar, but there are many unique features. Look for the Raiders’ graves, the Monument to the Unknown Soldier, and the different symbols above individuals’ names.

"The introduction of disease into the camp, the pollution of the water supply, inadequate medical care, lack of shelter, short and defective rations, and overcrowding — all these contributed to the terrifying mortality rate, which in August reached 100 a day."
—Walter E. Smith, 16th Connecticut Infantry.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US CivilWomen. In addition, it is included in the Clara Barton, and the National Cemeteries series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is July 26, 1865.
 
Location.
Marker detail: Nurse Clara Barton image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Nurse Clara Barton
Nurse Clara Barton raised the first flag at Andersonville National Cemetery on August 17, 1865. Barton had come to Andersonville with former prisoner Dorence Atwater and a crew of 34 to identify and mark the graves.
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32° 12.086′ N, 84° 7.897′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Macon County. Marker is on Cemetery Road 0.4 miles north of Prison Site Road, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located at the south end of Andersonville National Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 760 POW Road, Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Prisoner Burials (within shouting distance of this marker); Grave Markers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); New York State Monument (about 500 feet away); Massive Monuments (about 500 feet away); Memorial to American Former Prisoners of War Stalag XVII-B (about 700 feet away); The Raiders' Graves (about 700 feet away); In Memory of ... (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Unknown Soldier (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Andersonville National Cemetery. The initial interments, beginning in February 1864, were trench burials of the prisoners who died in the nearby military prison. In fourteen months, nearly 13,000 soldiers were buried here. One of fourteen National Cemeteries administered by the National Park Service, Andersonville National Cemetery remains open and active for burials. Today the cemetery contains nearly 20,000 interments. (Submitted on May 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Andersonville National Cemetery
Marker detail: Approved Symbols image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Approved Symbols
On modern headstones, the Veterans Administration has approved 26 emblems and religious symbols.
. Soldiers who died at the prison had been buried at the site since 1864. Graves were only marked with numbered posts, but a young prisoner who worked at the prison hospital, Dorence Atwater, kept a list of the dead that matched grave numbers with names. After the war, he and Clara Barton teamed up and were able to identify 95 percent of the men buried at Andersonville. (Submitted on May 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Andersonville National Cemetery. The military prison at Camp Sumter, simply known as Andersonville, held more than 45,000 Union soldiers during its 14 month existence. MacKinlay Kantor relates a poignant account of the prison camp, detailing the miserable lives of its prisoners and Confederate guards. Kantor's Andersonville, often ranked among the greatest of America's Civil War novels, won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1955. (Submitted on May 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Marker detail: You Are Here image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: You Are Here
Marker is located on Cemetery Road at the south end of Andersonville National Cemetery.
Andersonville National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 6, 2021
5. Andersonville National Cemetery Marker
(looking north along Cemetery Road toward burial grounds)
Andersonville National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 6, 2021
6. Andersonville National Cemetery
(southeast corner – Civil War Prisoner Burials)
Andersonville National Cemetery Gate image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 6, 2021
7. Andersonville National Cemetery Gate
(Funeral entrance from Georgia Route 49)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 10, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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