Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Whitehouse Landing in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes)

Died 1764

 
 
The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
1. The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker
Inscription.  A Pioneer and Christian father, who with his wife and six of his thirteen children, was a victim of the last Indian massacre in Page County.
 
Erected 1985 by John Rhodes Chapter, National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1764.
 
Location. 38° 38.862′ N, 78° 31.87′ W. Marker is in Whitehouse Landing, Virginia, in Page County. Marker is on Lee Highway (U.S. 211/340) 0.1 miles east of Kauffman's Mill Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3601 Lee Highway, Luray VA 22835, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Historic White House 1760 (here, next to this marker); White House Bridge (a few steps from this marker); White House (a few steps from this marker); Massanutton (approx. 0.6 miles away); Calendine
The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2006
2. The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker
The eastern fork of the Shenandoah Valley leading up to Massanutten Mountain at New Market Gap is in the distance.
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 1.2 miles away); Mauck Meeting House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Luray Caverns (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Beautiful Caverns of Luray (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Whitehouse Landing.
 
Regarding The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes). The Reverend Rhodes was a Mennonite minister. The log home built on the site of the massacre soon thereafter stood until 1994. It was called Fort Roads and is about four miles north of Route 211 on the west bank of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Relative of Rev. John Rhodes
The Reverend John Rhodes had twelve or thirteen children, it was never known exactly how many. They were Joseph, Michael, Daniel, Susannah, Anna, Elizabeth. Esther, and the four sons and one or two daughters killed in the Indian raid. I am related to Michael Rhodes. He was my Great-great-great-great-great grandfather. My grandfather’s mother was Sylvia Edna Rhodes. A cousin of my father did an extensive genealogy of the family. If you have any questions feel free to email me. Ask this website’s editor for my email address.
Fort Roads image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of CDWhip35 - originally received for the Whipkey Family Tree.
3. Fort Roads
Built on site of 1764 Roads Massacre
Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted July 17, 2008, by Lora Denise Bennett of Indianapolis, Indiana.

2. John Rhodes and his family
Original name thought to have been Hans Derik Roodt.(Hans Roth) He was a Mennonite Minister. Settled in Shenandoah Co, VA about 1729 on land adjoining Mart in Kauffman. Killed by Indians in Shenandoah Valley, VA in 1764. Indians said to have been led by Simon Girty. John Rhodes was shot while standing in his doorway. Eve Albright Rhodes and a son were killed in the yard. Five other children were killed. Eight children survived.

On August 31, 1924 at a memorial service at the site of the massacre, a monument was unveiled dedicated to the Rhodes family. The site is on the western bank of the Shenandoah River at the foot of Massanutten Mountain.

Memorial to Rev. John Rhodes (Mennonite) and six children massacred here by Indians, Aug. 1764. Buried on the river N.E. bank. Emmigrated from Zurich, Switzerland 1728. Came to Virginia two years later.

Sources: Massanutten Settled by the Pennsylvania Pilgrim 1726. The First White Settlement in the Shenandoah Valley, by Harry M. Strickler (Book located at the Library of the Museum of Frontier
Fort Roads Cellar image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of CDWhip35 - originally received for the Whipkey Family Tree.
4. Fort Roads Cellar
Fortified cellar with spring flowing through it.
Life, Staunton, VA); Tombstone Inscriptions of Shenandoah & Page Co, VA, by Duane L. Border, p. 192, 1984 by Yates Publishing Co., Ozark, MO; Richard Sallinger of Lynn Haven, FL (internet article)
Narrative by G.W. Hershberger (1848-?) written 11-24-1927, courtesy Nancy Waldo of Page Co., VA
    — Submitted December 27, 2008.
 
Monument image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of CDWhip35 - originally received for the Whipkey Family Tree
5. Monument
Monument to The John Rhodes and his family. Mr. Phillip M. Kaufman, in his 78th year, made the memorial from native limestone. All the more remarkable inasmuch that Mr. Kaufman was a miller by trade, not a stone cutter.
The Reverend John Roads Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Robert Blake Reid, September 10, 2010
6. The Reverend John Roads Memorial
“Memorial to Rev. John Roads, Mennonist, his wife and six children, massacred here by Indians Aug 1764. Buried on river bank N.E. Emigrated from Zurich Switzerland 1728. Came to Virginia two years later. Made by P.M. Kauffman, a great-great-great-grandson, assisted by P.S. Rhodes, and other descendants. Erected Aug. 1924.
The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
7. The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) Marker
The kitchen chimney ruins on Rev Rhodes property image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
8. The kitchen chimney ruins on Rev Rhodes property
The cellar on Rev John Rhodes property image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
9. The cellar on Rev John Rhodes property
This is the main house chimney at Rev John Rhodes property image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
10. This is the main house chimney at Rev John Rhodes property
The stones on the river where the family of Rev John Rhodes was buried image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
11. The stones on the river where the family of Rev John Rhodes was buried
The memorial marker on the river to the Rhodes family image. Click for full size.
By Debbie McLaughlin, October 14, 2011
12. The memorial marker on the river to the Rhodes family
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 24, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 8,052 times since then and 183 times this year. Last updated on May 31, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2. submitted on December 24, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   3, 4, 5. submitted on December 22, 2008.   6. submitted on May 18, 2011, by Robert Blake Reid of Long Beach, Calif.   7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on March 8, 2012, by Debbie McLaughlin of Goodview, Virginia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=174314

Paid Advertisement
Jun. 19, 2021