Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pembina in Pembina County, North Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Votes For Women

Road to the 19th Amendment

— National Votes for Women Trail —

 
 
Votes For Women Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2022
1. Votes For Women Marker
Inscription.  Marie Bottineau Baldwin, born Pembina 1863. Ojibwa attorney, suffragist. Stated native women had “virtual suffrage since time immemorial.”
 
Erected 2020 by William G. Pomeroy Foundation. (Marker Number 26.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsNative AmericansWomen. In addition, it is included in the National Votes for Women Trail, and the William G. Pomeroy Foundation series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1863.
 
Location. 48° 58.372′ N, 97° 15.262′ W. Marker is in Pembina, North Dakota, in Pembina County. Marker is on State Highway 59 just north of West Rolette Street, on the left when traveling north. Marker is located along the walkway on the south side of the Pembina State Museum parking lot. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 805 North Dakota Highway 59, Pembina ND 58271, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Also see . . .
1. Marie Bottineau Baldwin.
In the early 1890s, Baldwin moved to Washington, DC, to fight for treaty rights for Native Americans.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
President Theodore Roosevelt appointed her a clerk in the Office of Indian Affairs. When Baldwin earned a degree from Washington College of Law in 1912, she was the school’s first woman of color and Indigenous woman graduate. She helped establish national alliances and networks of Native people as an officer in the Society of American Indians. She participated with other lawyers in the 1913 parade in Washington, DC, and was among the group of suffrage leaders who met with President Woodrow Wilson to enlist his support.
(Submitted on September 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin.
Early in her career, Marie believed that Native Americans needed to assimilate into European-American society to survive. Over time, as she became involved with the suffrage movement and the Society for American Indians (SAI), her views began to change. Instead of assimilation, Marie emphasized the value of traditional Native cultures while asserting her own (and therefore others’) place in the modern world as an Indian woman.
(Submitted on September 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Marie Bottineau Baldwin.
Marie Bottineau Baldwin was successful in her work as an espoused Society of American Indians member who dedicated
Votes For Women Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2022
2. Votes For Women Marker
(looking south • North Dakota Highway 59 in background)
most of her life to advocating for not only the rights of women, but the rights of Indigenous people. Bottineau Baldwin flaunted the modernity of being a Native woman when she said in an interview that she took great pride in being able to say she had been not only in a canoe and prairie schooner to attend the talks she has given, but also in a plane.
(Submitted on September 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Votes For Women Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2022
3. Votes For Women Marker
(looking northwest • Pembina State Museum in background)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 2, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 236 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=205232

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
U.S. FTC REQUIRED NOTICE: This website earns income from purchases you make after using links to Amazon.com. Thank you.
Paid Advertisements
Feb. 25, 2024