Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lisnaskea in Fermanagh And Omagh, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom — Northwestern Europe (the British Isles)
 

Castle Balfour

 
 
Castle Balfour Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., September 21, 2012
1. Castle Balfour Marker
Inscription.  

Castle Balfour, built for Sir James Balfour of Glenawley by about 1620, was one of many castles designed to secure the plantation in Ulster during the 17th century. It is of the Scottish-style strong house type, identifiable by such characteristic features as corbelled stair turrets and parapets, high pitched gables and tall chimneys.

In 1619 Captain Nicholas Pynnar described Castle Balfour which was just being built, as 'a Bawne of Lime and Stone 70 ft square, of which two sides are raised 15 feet high. There is also a castle of the same length, of which the one half is built two storeys high, and is to be three storeys and a half high.' It was also described as being both 'strong and beautiful'.

During the civil war of 1641-42, the castle and town of Lisnaskea were burnt but later reoccupied. In 1689 the castle was once again destroyed by the Jacobite armies but was repaired after the Williamite victory at Limerick. About 1780 the castle was passed on to the Creightons of Crom, after the Balfours left Fermanagh, and was again destroyed by fire in 1803. When placed in state care in 1960, the castle was in a very
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
dangerous condition but it was consolidated by careful reconstruction and conservation during 1962-66.

The hypothetical reconstruction [image] shows the remaining part of the castle and the now destroyed East Wing, which was described as having been built across the end of the church. The position of this church is not known for certain but it is likely to have been in the graveyard just to the north of the present parish church. The whole complex would have been enclosed within bawl walls with flanker towers at each corner to defend them, and would have been entered by a gate, probably in the north wall of the bawn.

A further notice will be found inside the castle.

This monument is in the care of Historic Monuments and Buildings Branch of the Department of the Environment (NI). It is an offence under the Historic Monuments Act (1971) to injure or interfere with it in any way.
 
Erected by Historic Monuments and Buildings Branch of the Department of the Environment (NI).
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesForts and CastlesMan-Made FeaturesWars, Non-US. A significant historical year for this entry is 1620.
 
Location. 54° 14.951′ N, 7° 26.664′ W. Marker is in Lisnaskea, Northern Ireland
Castle Balfour Illustration on Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Unknown, Undated
2. Castle Balfour Illustration on Marker
, in Fermanagh And Omagh. Marker is adjacent to the castle ruins, on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church of Ireland, about 200 west off Main Street (A34). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lisnaskea, Northern Ireland BT92 0LT, United Kingdom. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 18 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lisnaskea Market Cross (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); World Wars Memorial (approx. 16.2 kilometers away); Cole's Monument (approx. 16.3 kilometers away); South Africa War Memorial (approx. 16.9 kilometers away); German 21cm Mortar, 1918 (approx. 16.9 kilometers away); The Watergate and Flag of St George (approx. 16.9 kilometers away); German 77mm Light Artillery Gun (approx. 16.9 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Lisnaskea: Fermanagh's Second Town. (Submitted on January 18, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Castle Balfour, Lisnaskea. (Submitted on January 18, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Castle Balfour Ruins image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., September 21, 2012
3. Castle Balfour Ruins
Castle Balfour Ruins image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., September 21, 2012
4. Castle Balfour Ruins
Castle Balfour Ruins at Holy Trinity Churchyard image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., September 21, 2012
5. Castle Balfour Ruins at Holy Trinity Churchyard
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 24, 2018. It was originally submitted on January 18, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 539 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 18, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=71324

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
May. 19, 2024