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Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Peace Jubilee

Friendship and Reconciliation

 
 
Peace Jubilee image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 30, 2006
1. Peace Jubilee
Inscription. In July, 1911, an amazing event took place here at Manassas, Virginia. The Manassas National Jubilee of Peace brought together Union and Confederate veterans fifty years after the first major battle of the Civil War. For the first time, veterans of both sides came together on the same ground in a ceremony of peace and reconciliation.

The idea for the Peace Jubilee, a week-long celebration of national healing and reunion that took place July 16-22, came in a letter to the Washington Post from D. H. Russell, a South Carolina Confederate veteran. He suggested that the fiftieth anniversary of the First Battle of Manassas be one of peace and reconciliation. George Carr Round, a respected community leader and Union veteran who had settled here after the war, read his words and decided to act on them.

The festivities culminated on July 21, the battle’s anniversary. The Union and Confederate veterans fell into opposing lines on Henry House Hill, where fifty years before they had clashed in mortal combat. On a signal, the two sides approached each other, and as they met they clasped hands in friendship and reconciliation. After a picnic on the battlefield, the crowd returned to the Prince William County Courthouse to listen to a speech by President William Howard Taft.

Civil War veterans later held reunions
Photographs from the Peace Jubilee image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 30, 2006
2. Photographs from the Peace Jubilee
on other great Civil War battlefields, but just as Manassas had been the site of the first major engagement of the war, it was also the site of the first reunion of these former adversaries.

Photo Caption (top Center) Peace Jubilee Headquarters at Manassas Battlefield. On the right is George Carr Round, Chairman of the Jubilee and on the left, Lt. Colonel Edmund Berkeley. Round served in the Union forces in the Signal Corps and Berkeley was commander of the 8th Virginia Vol. Infantry, CSA. The banner between the men reads Head Quarters, Manassas National Jubilee, July 21, 1911. “Let Us Have Peace” –Grant. “Duty–the sublimest word in any language” –Lee. Ewel Camp, C.V.; Masassas Picket Post, G.A.R.

Photo Caption (top right) People’s National Bank, corner of Center and Battle Streets, Manassas. The then Town of Manassas decorated buildings with bunting for the event.

Photo Caption (center right) President William Howard Taft addresses the crowd at the Prince William County Courthouse on July 21, 1911.

Photo Caption (bottom right) Governor Mann and staff between veterans of the Blue and Grey lined up for handshake ceremony.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series.
Manassas National Jubilee of Peace image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2007
3. Manassas National Jubilee of Peace
This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 45.129′ N, 77° 28.548′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker is on Lee Avenue just south of Grant Avenue (Business Virginia Route 234), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20110, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fifth Prince William County Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); Prince William County World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Bennett School (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Manassas 1900 (about 700 feet away); Wartime Manassas (about 800 feet away); Ruffner Public School - Number 1 (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. C.V. — Confederate Veterans; G.A.R. — Grand Army of the Republic.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
Manassas National Jubilee of Peace image. Click for full size.
September 27, 2008
4. Manassas National Jubilee of Peace

In Commemoration of the
Manassas National Jubilee
Of Peace

——
The first instance in history
where survivors of a great battle
met fifty years after
and exchanged friendly greetings
here on July 21, 1911, the closing scene was enacted,
The Tableau of the Re-United States.
The president, the Governor of Virginia
and forty-eight maidens in white took part
with 1000 veterans of the Blue and
the Gray and 10,000 citizens of
The New America.

1. National Jubilee of Peace Monument. (Submitted on December 22, 2006, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
2. Newspaper article from 1915 about the unveiling of the Peace Jubilee Marker. The Evening Star article from October 1, 1915 discusses the September 30, 1915 unveiling of the National Peace Jubilee marker in pictures 3 & 4. (Submitted on October 1, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsPeaceWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 22, 2006, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 3,716 times since then and 74 times this year. Last updated on September 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 22, 2006, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   3. submitted on November 16, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on October 26, 2009. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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