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Horticulture & Forestry Historical Markers

 
<i>Acanthus mollis</i> Marker image, Touch for more information
By Devry Becker Jones, January 17, 2020
Acanthus mollis Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acanthus mollis — Artist's Acanthus
According to Dioscorides, the root was good for treating ruptures and convulsions. It was also used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144670) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Achillea millefolium — Yarrow
Yarrow was one of the first herbs brought to America by the colonists. Its leaves were used to stop the flow of blood on cuts and bruises and to deaden the pain. — Map (db m144642) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acorus calamus — Sweet Flag
The Penobscot tribe of Maine believed this plant to have protective powers; they chewed a piece of the aromatic root to ward off disease when traveling or used steam from the root to prevent illness. — Map (db m144624) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Anethum graveolens — Dill
Although used to flavor food, dill was also eaten to help calm upset stomachs and indigestion, especially in children. Seeds were used in pickling and to flavor vinegar. — Map (db m144643) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Apocynum cannabinum — Indian Hemp
Native Americans used the stalk for fiber in the same way Europeans used their hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. Indian Hemp is superior, however, because it is stronger and lasts longer. This herb is poisonous. — Map (db m144567) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia absinthium — Wormwood
This plant was spread across floors and put in between clothes in dressers to repel insects and moths. The plant was thought to prevent disease, as well as expel worms. — Map (db m144556) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Arum maculatum — Lords-and-Ladies
The juice, mixed with oil, stopped earaches and destroyed nasal polyps. It was also used to treat certain cancers and abortion. Drunk with wine, it was an aphrodisiac. The plant is injurious. — Map (db m144661) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asarum canadense — Wild Ginger
The Chippewa used this herb to season food and chewed the root to relieve indigestion. The Iroquois used the roots to preserve meats. — Map (db m144574) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asclepias tuberosa — Butterfly Weed
This plant was one of the most important medicines of the Menomini. The pulverized root was used for cuts and wounds, and was mixed with other roots for additional cures. This herb is potentially toxic if taken internally. — Map (db m144617) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ballota nigra — Black Horehound
Dioscorides reported that the leaves were applied with salt to dog bites, with honey to clean ulcers, and that the ashes of the leaves repressed venereal warts. — Map (db m144666) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calendula officinalis — Pot Marigold
Brought to America by the first colonists, pot marigolds were used to flavor and color stews and cheeses. The Plymouth colony also used the flowers to dye cloth. — Map (db m144640) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calycanthus floridus — Carolina Allspice
The Cherokee used the root of this herb to make a strong diuretic for urinary and bladder complaints. The seeds of this plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144619) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Camptotheca acuminata — Camptotheca, Chinese Happy Tree
Known as the "cancer tree", Camptotheca contains the alkaloid camptothecin that is used to treat ovarian, colorectal, and small-cell lung cancers. It has been used in China for hundreds of years to treat psoriasis and diseases of various internal . . . — Map (db m144682) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ceanothus americanus — New Jersey Tea
The Menomini believed the tea made from the roots to be a cure-all for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144607) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cephalanthus occidentalis — Buttonbush
The Louisiana Choctaws chewed the bitter bark of this shrub to relieve toothaches. They also drank a strong decoction (extract) of it to treat diarrhea. The leaves have poisoned grazing animals. — Map (db m144625) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Chichorium intybus — chicory
During the U.S. Civil War, Confederate soldiers used roasted, ground chicory root as a substitute for coffee, which was scarce during the conflict. Still popular in the southern states, chicory is either mixed with true coffee or prepared by itself. . . . — Map (db m144436) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cladrastis kentukea — yellowwood
The Cherokee used the wood of this tree for building and carving. Early settlers in the southern Appalachians used the root bark for dye and the yellow heartwood for gunstocks. Today, yellowwood is popular in urban settings for its resistance to . . . — Map (db m144694) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Comptonia peregrina — Sweet Fern
The leaves of this herb were thrown on fires by the Potawatomi of Michigan to create a smudge to deter mosquitos. The Ojibwe used the leaves for a tea to cure stomach cramps. — Map (db m144611) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Corylus americana — Hazelnut
This shrub produces a sweet, edible nut. The Cherokee drank a tea made from the bark for hives. — Map (db m144570) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Crocus sativus — Saffront Crocus
The stigmas are used in yellow food coloring and flavoring. Chemical analysis of ancient linens and mummies' winding sheets confirms its use as a dye. Today, it is used more as a spice and in cosmetics than as a textile dye. — Map (db m144652) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cunila origanoides — American Dittany
Native peoples of eastern North America drank a tea of this plant to produce sweating when treating fever and colds. — Map (db m144616) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Daucus carota spp. carota — Queen Anne’s Lace
Dioscorides noted that a drink of the seeds was a diuretic, a colic neutralizer, and brought on menses and abortion. The seeds or roots, prepared in wine, were effective in treating wounds from poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144674) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus caryophyllus — Clove Pink
The flowers have a sweet, clove-like scent and were used by Greeks and Romans in the making of coronets and garlands. In medieval Arabia, they were used in perfumes. An absolute, a refined form of the essential oil, is used in top-quality perfumes . . . — Map (db m144689) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dianthus plumarius — Cottage Pink
This plant has the same sweet, spicy scent as Dianthus caryophyllus. It has been popular since Renaissance times in nosegays and as an edging plant to scent the garden. — Map (db m144687) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 82218-H — Dioscorea villosa — wild yam
Wild yam contains diosgenin, a chemical compound that can be converted in a lab (but not in the human body) to progesterone. This discovery paved the way for the invention of the modern oral contraceptive pill. Today, wild yam is used to calm . . . — Map (db m144627) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echinacea purpurea — Purple Coneflower
The Plains Indians considered this herb to be one of the most important medicinal plants. Its root was the universal antidote for snakebites and all kinds of venomous bites and stings. — Map (db m144605) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echium vulgare — Viper's Bugloss
The leaves, root, and seeds were drunk in wine for the prevention or cure of snakebite. The entire plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144673) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Erianthus ravennae — Ravenna Grass
Dioscorides reported that Erianthus had much pith and was fit for making books. — Map (db m144664) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eryngium planum — Eryngo
In Dioscordes' time the young leaves of this prickly plant were pickled in brine and eaten as a pot herb. A drink of 'Eryngum' root diluted in honey liquor was said to cure epilepsy. — Map (db m144654) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Euonymus atropurpureus — Burning Bush
The Meskwaki used the fresh outer bark, pounded into a poultice (compress), to heal facial sores. They steeped the inner bark to make an eye lotion. — Map (db m144577) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Joe-Pye Weed
The Menomini used a decoction, or extract, of the root to treat the genitourinary tract. The Potowatomi made a poultice of fresh leaves to treat burns, and the Ojibwe bathed babies in a solution of the root to strengthen them. — Map (db m144569) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Boneset
The northern Iroquois used the leave to make a tea that was considered a tonic and cure for colds and fevers This herb may damage the liver. — Map (db m144612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Galium mollugo — White Bedstraw
The roots produce reds similar to madder (Rubia tinctorum), although they are thin and yield less pigment than the thicker madder roots. The seeds of this plant were imported from France by Thomas Jefferson. — Map (db m144649) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Genista tinctoria — Dyer's Greenwood
The colonists used this plant to obtain a yellow-green dye from its flowers. The leaves, seeds and flowering plant were also used medically as a diuretic and purgative. — Map (db m144557) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Geranium maculatum — Wild Geranium
The Meskwaki of Minnesota pounded the astringent root of this geranium in an animal bladder to make a poultice for hemorrhoids. — Map (db m144596) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Gillenia trifoliata — Indian Physic
The root furnished an effective purge of the bowels and an emetic to induce vomiting. — Map (db m144626) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hedera helix — English Ivy
An infusion of the flowers in wine was drunk for dysentery, and the leaves mixed with fat were used as a burn ointment. Dioscorides believed that drinking the juice caused sterility. The leaves and berries are poisonous. — Map (db m144669) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helenium flexuosum — Sneezeweed
According to Cherokee belief, the roots of sneezeweed and Veronica noveboracensis steeped in warm water acted as a contraceptive by preventing menstruation for two years. — Map (db m144614) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helleborus niger — Christmas Rose
Helleborus was once used to stimulate the heart, expel worms, and promote menstrual flow. It contains cardioglycosides, which help the heart to beat regularly and strongly. Currently regarded as too strong to use safely. — Map (db m144683) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Heuchera americana — Rock Geranium
The root, a powerful astringent, was used by Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek of the Southeast when conditions required an astringent or "puckering" medicine. — Map (db m144613) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Native American medicinal uses of the root included treatment of the eyes and skin and for cancers and venereal diseases. The yellow root provided dye. This plant should be avoided during pregnancy. — Map (db m144572) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Historic use for stomach ailments and inflamed eyes has been confirmed. Its antibiotic property makes it useful for vaginal infections. Its antibacterial property may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis. — Map (db m144681) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ilex vomitoria — Yaupon
Yaupon was a common drink of the Southeastern tribes, taken mainly for its emeting (vomit-inducing) action, which was a means of purification. The fruit is poisonous. — Map (db m144604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Indogofera tinctoria — Indigo
Fragments of indigo-dyed linen from Thebes date back to 3500 B.C. Indigo is just one type of dye in which the color develops in the textile after removal from the dye bath. Upon exposure to the air, fibers change from yellow to blue. — Map (db m144645) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Iris Χ germanica 'Florentina' — Iris
Dioscorides said that the root was fit for use against chill, chest congestion, and coughs. A poultice made with orris and roses in vinegar was said to be good for headaches. The rootstock is toxic. — Map (db m144656) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lavandula angustifolia — Lavender
The scent of lavender was much loved, and the flowers were dried and used in linens, in wash water, soaps, oils and powdered. The fragrance warded off evil smells of poor drainage and lack of sanitation. — Map (db m144679) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lindera benzoin — Spicebush
The spicy red fruit added flavor to groundhog or opossum as prepared by the Cherokee. The ground nuts also flavored bread. — Map (db m144565) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lobelia inflata — Indian Tobacco
The common name for this plant comes from its purported use as a Native American smoke. It was used by the Seneca as an emetic (vomit-inducer) and for coughs. The whole plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lychnis coronaria — Rose Campion
According to Dioscorides, the seeds drunk with wine helped those who had been bitten by a scorpion. — Map (db m144672) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 53002-H — Magnolia virginiana — sweetbay magnolia
American Indians used the leaves of this small tree to make a medicinal tea for the treatment of chills, colds, and other ailments. Early American physicians used it as a quinine substitute as well as to treat gout, rheumatism, and respiratory . . . — Map (db m144692) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Malus 'Roxbury' — Apple
Apples were very important to the colonists. They provided a source of fruit for eating, apple butter and cider. Before cold storage, the Roxbury variety was a favorite late winter apple. — Map (db m144440) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Matthiola incana — Stock
These flowers have spicy scent similar to Dianthus, and the fragrance grows stronger at night. They are used in bouquets and potpourri, and the scent was used in early Arab and Greek perfumes. — Map (db m144691) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mertensia virginica — Virginia Bluebells
The Cherokee used this plant for whooping cough and consumption. — Map (db m144608) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mitchella repens — Partridge-berry
The St. Lawrence Montagnai considered the cooked berries a fever medicine. The dried leaves were added to Chippewa smoking mixtures. — Map (db m144622) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare — Oregano
This versatile herb was used by colonists to alleviate toothaches, flavor food and strew on floors, as well as flavor ale. The flowering tops were used to produce a reddish brown dye. — Map (db m144633) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare — Wild Marjoram
The leaves are steam distilled to produce an oil that has a spicy, aromatic scent. The early Greeks, Egyptians, and Arabs all used it in their perfumes. Today, it appears in many perfumes and soaps, especially men's fragrances. The leaves and . . . — Map (db m144686) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum — Greek Oregano
Dioscorides reported that above-ground parts, taken with wine, were good for those who had drunk the juice of the poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) or the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). — Map (db m144663) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmunda cinnamomea — Cinnamon Fern
In the spring, the Menomini limited their diet to the young coiled fern tips (croziers) so that their bodies had the scent of the fern. This allowed them to get close to deer to hunt them. — Map (db m144566) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phlomis fruticosa — Jerusalem Sage
The leaves soaked in water were laid upon swollen, inflamed eyes. Dioscorides also noted that just a knucklebone's length of the root, given with wine, could bind excessive intestinal discharges. — Map (db m144668) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americana — Poke
The Pamunkey of Virginia treated rheumatism with boiled poke berries. Several tribes used berry pigments as a dye. All parts of the plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144571) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polemonium reptans — Jacob's Ladder
The roots were used by the Meskwaki Indians of Wisconsin to induce vomiting. They called the plant 'fine hair woman medicine'. — Map (db m144623) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polygonatum biflorum — Small Solomon's Seal
This plant was called the "reviver" by the Menomini and Fox because inhaling the smoke of the heated root revived unconscious patients. — Map (db m144578) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — Rosemary
Rosemary has an ancient history in the Mediterranean as an incense and perfume. It was the main ingredient in Hungary Water, one of the earliest European perfumes created for the Queen of Hungary in A.D. 1370. The scent became popular throughout . . . — Map (db m144437) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — rosemary
Rosemary contains several volatile oils, tannins, bittering compounds, and resins, which are thought to contribute to the increased potency and extended preservation of beers brewed with it. It has been used medicinally for centuries to improve . . . — Map (db m144695) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rubia tinctorum — Madder
Having been used since at least 2000 B.C., the reddish orange roots contain several dye substances. It was used to dye the British redcoats and was best known as the source of Turkey red on linen and cotton textiles. — Map (db m144650) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ruscus aculeatus — Butcher's Broom
According to Dioscorides, leaves and berries were drunk in wine to encourage menstruation, to break up bladder stones, and to cure jaundice and headache. This mixture could also be used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144657) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia lyrata — Lyre-leaved Sage
The roots of this sage were used by Native Americans to make a salve for sores. — Map (db m144620) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia sclarea — Clary Sage
Clary wine was considered an aphrodisiac in the sixteenth century. The bitter aromatic leaves flavor wine, ale, beer and liqueurs. — Map (db m144693) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja douglasii — Yerba Buena
The Cahuilla of southern California believed a tea made from this plant to be an effective remedy for reducing fevers and curing colds. — Map (db m144618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja montana — Winter Savory
Colonists brought winter savory over to the new world to flavor dishes, stuffings to meat, fish and sausages. Leaves were taken to stimulate the appetite and to aid in digestion. — Map (db m144634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Smilacina racemosa — Plumelily
Smoke from the burning root was used by the Meskwaki to revive unconscious patients, to hush a crying child, and to cast spells. — Map (db m144573) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Solidago canadensis — Canada Goldenrod
The Potowami called it "yellow top" and made a tea of the flowers to treat fevers. — Map (db m144615) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
A lotion or mixture of the fresh or dried leaves or roots was used for bruises, wounds and sores. — Map (db m144676) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
Used for thousands of years to treat bruises and sprains, the plant contains compounds, such as allantoin, that promote healing and other substances that are anti-inflammatory. There is controversy concerning its safety, especially for internal use, . . . — Map (db m144680) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Teucrium chamaedrys — Wall Germander
Dioscorides reported that a beverage of the fruiting plant was drunk for convulsions and coughs. It was taken with wine by those who were bitten by poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144675) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Trillium grandiflorum — Large Flowered Trillium
A decoction of the root was used for female diseases and to bring on childbirth by some tribes; others used it to treat headaches and rheumatism. — Map (db m144606) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vaccinium corymbosum — Highbush Bluberry
The Chippewa made pemmican (high-energy food) by adding dried blueberries to moose fat and deer tallow. Native Americans also made a tea of blueberry roots to treat diarrhea and to ease childbirth. — Map (db m144610) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Valeriana officinalis — Valerian
Tradition says the Pied Piper carried valerian root in his back pocket to help lure the rats out of Hamelin. The root has an offensive scent similar to Limburger cheese, but is also musky and balsamic and is used in perfumery in India and the Far . . . — Map (db m144690) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Periwinkle was used by the colonists to make soothing ointments for the skin. Fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding, externally and internally. — Map (db m144555) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Dioscorides suggested that the leaves be chewed for toothache and applied as a poultice for snakebite. He prescribed a drink of the leaves and stalks in wine for dysentery. — Map (db m144678) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vitex agnus-castus — Chaste Tree
Dioscorides noted that chaste maidens used the plant for bedding. He recommended burning leaves to fumigate venomous beasts. A poultice of the leaves relieved stings. — Map (db m144677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Yucca filamentosa — Adam's Needle
The Native Americans had been using the leaves since time immemorial to make twine and cordage. Men on Raleigh's second voyage to Virginia in 1586 noticed its economic potential. — Map (db m144564) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Zingiber officinale — Ginger
Used as early as 3000 B.C. in China where it was prescribed for colds, fever, and leprosy, among other ailments. It was also used medicinally in ancient Greece and India. Research has identified constituents that have anti-inflammatory qualities, . . . — Map (db m144685) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — An Art Form Is Born
Over a thousand years ago, China's stunning landscape inspired its people to reproduce it in miniature. Using carefully selected rocks and plants, artists recreated the land's rugged mountains, vast horizons, and noble trees on trays and in pots. . . . — Map (db m144342) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Bonsai Pioneer — Yuji Yoshimura — (1921 - 1997) —
Yuji Yoshimura dared to do what no one had done before: He wrote the most complete practical book on bonsai in English and taught Westerners in his native Japan and in other nations to appreciate and practice this ancient art. Drawn to the potential . . . — Map (db m144340) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Branching Out
Though an ancient art in Asia, the practice of bonsai spread through the western world only in the 19th century. Today, all types of people, not just scholars and experienced masters, are learning about and practicing this living art. As artists . . . — Map (db m144348) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Capitol Columns
These 22 Corinthian sandstone columns were among 24 that were part of the east portico of the United States Capitol. Architect Charles Bullfinch oversaw construction of the portico using a design handed down by his predecessors, William Thornton and . . . — Map (db m918) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dawn Redwood from China — (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)
This small grove of Dawn Redwood is somewhat reminiscent of the few stands that occur in its native homeland, China. Known only through paleobotanical records prior to 1945, living specimens of this almost extinct plant were discovered in that year . . . — Map (db m144582) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dioscorides Garden
These herbs planted here are a representative selection from plants listed about 60 A.D by the Greek physician, Dioscorides. The modern science of pharmacology is traced back to his efforts to list systematically the plants that were used for . . . — Map (db m144439) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — If trees could talk...
...this one would tell quite a story. It has grown as a bonsai for so long that it passed through five generations of a single family of bonsai artists in Japan before crossing the ocean to live here. The Yamaki family was well known in Japan for . . . — Map (db m144347) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Medicinal Garden
This garden illustrates the historic and current use of herbs as medicine. Plants have played an integral part in illness and disease treatment for thousands of years. By observation, trial, and error, people learned which plants had healing . . . — Map (db m144438) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Morrison Azalea Garden
Assembled in this garden is a permanent collection of the Glenn Dale Hybrid Azaleas, originated, selected, and named by B. Y. Morrison, first Director of the U.S. National Arboretum. — Map (db m966) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Olallie Daylilies
Dr. George M. Darrow, upon retirement, devoted his life to developing tetraploid daylilies and improving diploid cultivars. His most successful efforts were aimed at obtaining very flowering daylilies using such species as Hemerocallis . . . — Map (db m145887) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Sandstone Sculptures
The sandstone base and capital are from a Corinthian column that once graced the east central portico of the United States Capitol. The columns were dismantled in 1958 to make way for the east front extension, where marble reproductions now stand. . . . — Map (db m7621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Knot Garden
The formal knot expresses the traditional elegance of the garden design which originated in Europe during the 16th century. Knot garden designs are geometrically patterned on a level site with plants arranged so they may be pruned to follow a . . . — Map (db m144435) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — The Man Who Loved Conifers
Would your hobby take you to the four corners of the world? Few private plant collectors have approached their hobby with more enthusiasm than the late William Gotelli who travelled the world in search of unusual conifers, collecting more than . . . — Map (db m144583) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Timeless Trees
Centuries ago the art of cultivating trees in pots traveled across the sea from China to the island nation of Japan. There it slowly acquired a distinctively Japanese style. While the Chinese sought to capture the essence of their wilderness in . . . — Map (db m144344) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — What shape do you see? — (Hint: It is not a tree)
Most bonsai are modeled after natural trees in nature. However, about 400 years ago, it was popular in China to train potted trees into shapes of animals, especially the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac, which includes the dragon. This tree was . . . — Map (db m144343) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 6 — Cameron's Creek and the Rose Garden — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
The home of Thomas Carberry was later sold to James Donald Cameron, former Secretary of War under President Grant. When the U.S. government acquired property here for the Army hospital in 1905, the small stream running through the property was known . . . — Map (db m143703) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 8 — Early Entrepreneurs — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
Apple and Peach Trees once covered the slopes to your left, some 40 acres' worth, all planted by noted horticulturalist John Saul (1819-1897). In the 1870s Saul was one of Brightwood's largest landowners. In addition to these orchards, he . . . — Map (db m143797) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — “The President’s Trees”
Dedicated by Maryland State Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, April 21, 1934. Growing on land that was once a part of Maryland and was in 1790 her gift to the United States of America for the national capitol, the 31 trees in this group . . . — Map (db m4893) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Capitol Square, SW — Historical Information
U.S. Botanic Garden Architecture by Bennett, Parsons & Frost, 1933 Easily recognized by the sparkling glass dome of its Conservatory, the U.S. Botanic Garden, overlooking the National Mall, is located near the U.S. Capitol. Visitors . . . — Map (db m110445) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Green Roof Plants
Soil depth on a green roof determines the types of plants that can be grown, and the depth of the US Botanic Garden roof will average just 3 inches. Green roofs with shallow soils are referred to as 'extensive', and those with soil at 6 inches or . . . — Map (db m110452)
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Kootenai National Forest
The forest is in the extreme northwest corner of Montana and northeast Idaho and includes four ranger districts. The background photo is of the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness with views of Little Ibex, Ibex and Lentz Peaks. Managing vegetation and . . . — Map (db m130381) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — The National Garden Takes Root — 10th Anniversary — National Garden —
In 1986 President Ronald Reagan signed legislation creating the rose as the national floral emblem for the United States. Plans then got underway to find a site to showcase roses in the nation's capital. The U.S. Botanic Garden (USBG) was . . . — Map (db m110456) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — The Pollinator Partnership
Insects, birds, bats, and even monkeys, lemurs, and a lizard! About 75% of the world's flowering plants depend upon these animals for pollination. Most other plants rely upon wind to carry their pollen grains from plant to plant. Pollination is . . . — Map (db m110454)
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — United States Botanic Garden — Directory
Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, including holidays For visitor information call (202) 225-8333 www.usbg.gov The United States Botanic Garden (USBG), established by the Congress in 1820 is one of the oldest botanic gardens in North . . . — Map (db m110451) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Cleveland Park — Tregaron Conservancy
The historic gardens of the Tregaron Estate with pathways, flowing streams and stone bridges are an enduring treasure and place of discovery. Tregaron Conservancy is dedicated to the preservation and rehabilitation of the woodland garden . . . — Map (db m112393) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Growing here — 19th Street Rain Gardens — Gold is Green —
The seed of the Swamp Milkweed contains buoyant white tufts, effective for seed dispersal and once used for pillows and life-jackets during WWII. — Map (db m144512) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Growing here — 19th Street Rain Gardens — Gold is Green —
European explorers were so enamored by the Cardinal Flower that it quickly made its way from the US and Canada to European gardens by the 1630s. — Map (db m144514) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — The National Christmas Tree — President's Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
At 5:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve, 1923, President Calvin Coolidge walked from the White House to the Ellipse and “pushed the button” to light the first National Christmas Tree. A crowd of 3,000 witnessed the inaugural lighting of the . . . — Map (db m130403) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — The National Christmas Tree — President's Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The National Christmas Tree has been located at the site in front of you since 1973. Calvin Coolidge was the first president to light the National Christmas Tree on Christmas Eve, 1923. Since that time presidents have continued the tradition in . . . — Map (db m130405) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — White House Kitchen Garden — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
”. . . Now I shall plant, if at all, more for the public than for myself.” John Quincy Adams, diary entry for July 5, 1826, shortly before beginning the first major planting program at the White House. Massachusetts . . . — Map (db m61677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Victoria amazonica — Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Of all the water lilies grown at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, the Victoria amazonica (formerly named Victoria regia), Victoria cruziana, and the hybrid, Victoria 'longwood' are among the most popular. These lilies . . . — Map (db m141721) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Aquatic Greenhouse #1
Aquatic Greenhouse Built 1913 Used to propogate waterlilies — Map (db m141715) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Aquatic Greenhouse #3
Aquatic Greenhouse Buildt 1913 Used to propogate waterlilies — Map (db m141728) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Display Pools — Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Marketing a wide variety of aquatic plants, especially tropical lilies, contributed to the success of Shaw Gardens. The concrete display pools, also referred to as display ponds, installed between 1912 and 1927, played a crucial role in boosting . . . — Map (db m141730) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Helen Shaw Fowler — Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Helen Fowler took over administration of the Shaw Gardens from her father in 1912. Under her guidance the gardens grew into one of the most extensive water plant businesses in the nation. By 1938, Shaw Gardens encompassed 42 ponds spread over nine . . . — Map (db m141717) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Preserve and Protect — Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
National parks are special places owned by all Americans. Caring for these treasures is everyone's job. Throughout the country, citizen organized friends grouped to get people interested in and involved with preserving natural and cultural . . . — Map (db m145319) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Massachusetts Heights — All Hallows Guild — Washington National Cathedral
In recognition of the contributions made by generations of All Hallows Guild members since 1916 to the gardens, oak grove, and grounds of Washington National Cathedral a haven of peace and refreshment a revelation of God’s beauty and a . . . — Map (db m71205) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Klingle Mansion — Rock Creek Park
This Pennsylvania Dutch style structure was built in 1823 by Joshua Pierce. The west side was added in 1843. It encloses ten rooms within its three stories. A utility house and potting shed flank the rear. Joshua was an avid horticulturist, and . . . — Map (db m70684) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Orchards, Fields, Gardens, Pastures — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Even in the mill's heyday, the Peirce family ran a diversified farm. They grew vegetables, tended bees, raised livestock for meat and dairy and cultivated fields of wheat, corn, rye, and oats. On this hillside they maintained a substantial orchard. . . . — Map (db m99415) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Tupelo Tree — (Nyssa Sylvatica)
This & neighboring trees were From all parts of the country Planted by Camp Fire Girls At a National Conservation Rally April 12, 1936 in memory of Dr. Luther H. Gulick First President — Map (db m65020) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — Earth Day Park
Welcome to Earth Day Park Earth Day Park is a living example of the United States Government’s commitment to environmentally conscious landscape design and use of renewable resources. As part of the celebration of Earth Day 1994, President . . . — Map (db m99344) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — Memorial Tree Planting — April 21, 1995 — Yoshino Cherry Redbud —
In memory of the children of Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building America's Day Care Center Oklahoma City, OK — Map (db m113225) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — Native Plants — United States Botanic Garden
Bartholdi Park features selections of American native plants suitable for the urban landscape and your own home garden. Growing plants adapted to local environmental conditions reduces water and fertilizer use, and helps reduce the need to treat . . . — Map (db m110439)
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — Sarah P. Duke Gardens — Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
Sarah P. Duke Gardens creates and nurtures an environment in the heart of Duke University for learning, inspiration, and enjoyment through excellence in horticulture and community engagement. The 55-acre garden was first planted in 1934 as a garden . . . — Map (db m134245) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — "Nature is my religion." -- Enid A. Haupt
"Nature is my religion." -- Enid A. Haupt Philanthropist and publishing heiress Enid Annenberg Haupt (1906-2005) donated millions of dollars to support public gardens, horticultural institutions, and other green spaces in . . . — Map (db m110723) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — An Apple is a Rose — Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden
In the early 1900s, botanists reclassified the Spirea, Plum, and Apple families as subfamilies within the Rose family. This new categorization was embodied in Robert Frost's poem from 1927: The Rose Family by Robert Frost The . . . — Map (db m110772) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Andrew Jackson Downing
[Inscription on urn pedestal, 1856]: This vase was erected by his friends in memory of Andrew Jackson Downing who died July 28, 1852, aged 37 years. He was born, and lived, and died upon the Hudson River. His life was devoted . . . — Map (db m46600) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Bald Cypress — [Native American Agriculture] — [U.S. Department of Agriculture] —
This tree commemorates the many contributions Native Americans have made to American agriculture, plants domesticated and harvested by Native Americans in the New World still make up a significant proportion of all vegetables produced worldwide. . . . — Map (db m47743) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Bald Cypress • Αrtu (ar-too)
In the middle of the wetlands, you can see the entire life cycle of the unusual bald cypress tree. A fallen cypress was placed in the wetlands to evoke an authentic wetlands environment--and a young cypress has begun to grow out of the stump of the . . . — Map (db m110077) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Bradford Pear Tree — (Pyrus calleryana Bradford)
. . . — Map (db m70457) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Cedar of Lebanon — Cedrus libani — National Museum/National Museum of Natural History —
This tree commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 1904 groundbreaking of the new National Museum. A wooded park, with a variety of trees including these cedars, previously stood here. Dedicated on June 15, 2004 Photo caption: . . . — Map (db m70231) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Enid A. Haupt Garden
Panel 1: Enid A. Haupt Garden. A popular urban oasis since its completion in 1987, the 4.2-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden comprises three distinct gardens. The design of each reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the . . . — Map (db m110710) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Enid A. Haupt Garden
A popular urban oasis since its completion in 1987, the 4.2-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden comprises three distinct gardens. The design of each reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the Smithsonian Castle and the surrounding . . . — Map (db m110713) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Enid A. Haupt Garden
A popular urban oasis since its completion in 1987, the 4.2-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden comprises three distinct gardens. The design of each reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the Smithsonian Castle and the surrounding . . . — Map (db m111541) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Enid A. Haupt Garden
A popular urban oasis since its completion in 1987, the 4.2-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden comprises three distinct gardens. The design of each reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the Smithsonian Castle and the surrounding . . . — Map (db m111542) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Live Oaks: Specimens of Global, Scholarly and Public Research
Early Conservation Efforts In the past, live oaks were so valuable to shipbuilding and U.S. national security that in the early 1800s Congress passed laws to prevent them from being harvested illegally. The U.S. government also purchased and . . . — Map (db m143310) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Petrified Wood — Araucarioxylon Arizonicum Knowlton — Triassic Period —
About 200 million years old Found near Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona Contributors: Mr. and Mrs. James M. Gray Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Zuhl City of Holbrook, Arizona — Map (db m54063) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Smokey Bear Blue Spruce — Picea pungens
. . . — Map (db m70456) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Swamp Milkweed • Wihsakαn (wee-sah-quam)
Distinguished by its scarlet hourglass-shaped flowers and white sap, the swamp milkweed is a beautiful wetlands plant. The Menominee harvested the plant "heads" when in full bloom and added them to soup, or stored them for winter use. The Sac and . . . — Map (db m114146)
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — The American Elm that Grew Along with America
This American elm (Ulmus Americana) is one of the oldest and most majestic trees on the Smithsonian grounds. It was planted around 1850, well before the opening of the National Museum of Natural History in 1910. Known as the Smithsonian . . . — Map (db m113994) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — What is this?
Known as a snag, this tree's rotting trunk and branches serve as a space for nests, nurseries, storage, foraging, roosting, and perching for birds, small mammals, and other urban wildlife. Why did this tree die? This lacebark pine . . . — Map (db m113989) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — A Symbol of International Friendship — National Mall and Memorial Parks — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On March 27, 1912, First Lady Helen Herron Taft, Viscountess Iwa Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador to the United States, and a small group of people assembled at the Tidal Basin. There they planted the first two of more than 3,000 flowering . . . — Map (db m93423) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — Japanese Pagoda — National Mall & Memorial Parks — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Admired by thousands each year, the Japanese Pagoda arrived in Washington, not as a gift from one nation to another, but as a gift from one man to another. In 1957, Ryozo Hiranuma, the Mayor of Yokohama and a visitor to Washington, DC four years . . . — Map (db m309) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — Keeping the Cherry Trees Healthy — National Mall and Memorial Parks — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Flowering cherry trees need constant care to keep them growing and blooming well. They are pruned once a year to remove damaged or diseased limbs. A second annual pruning shapes the trees. Soil that has been compacted – one of the great . . . — Map (db m100155) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — The 1912 Cherry Tree Plantings — National Mall and Memorial Parks, Washington, D.C. — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Historic Trees. You are standing near two of the most important cherry trees in Washington, D.C. These Yoshino Cherries (Prunus x yedoensis) are among the 3,700 trees of various species that grow in East and West Potomac Park and on the . . . — Map (db m215) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — The First Japanese Cherry Trees
The first Japanese Cherry Trees, presented to the City of Washington as a gesture of friendship and good will by the City of Tokyo, were planted on this site, March 27, 1912. — Map (db m54912) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The Tidal Basin — The Gift of Trees — National Mall and Memorial Parks — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Flowering cherry trees – which bloom profusely but do not bear edible fruit – were not common in the United States in 1900. American visitors to Japan found their beauty remarkable and journalist Eliza Scidmore was inspired to have these . . . — Map (db m61837) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020