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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

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Wilderness Battlefield - Federal Rear virtual tour by markers.
 
Two Markers at Germanna Ford image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
Two Markers at Germanna Ford
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — J–35 — Germanna Ford
One of the principal crossings of the Rapidan River from colonial times. Here a part of the Army of the Potomac crossed the river, April 30, 1863, preceding the Battle of Chancellorsville. Here a part of Meade’s army crossed on the way to Mine Run, . . . — Map (db m116528) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Flat Run — Germanna FordGrant Takes Command — Lee Vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign —
In March 1864, President Abraham Lincoln placed Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in charge of the Union’s overall military effort. Grant’s strategy was simple: attack the Confederates simultaneously on all fronts, overwhelming them by sheer force of numbers. . . . — Map (db m3587) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Flat Run — Germanna FordInto the Wilderness — Lee Vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign —
When the 1864 Overland Campaign started, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia held the upper fords of the Rapidan River, blocking the Union army's route to Richmond. Rather than attack Lee head on, Grant chose to cross here at Germanna . . . — Map (db m3588) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Grant Comes to VirginiaThe Battle of Fredericksburg
This short trail leads to "Grant's Knoll." For three days Gen. Ulysses S. Grant made his headquarters here, issuing orders that would determine the fate of armies and men. President Abraham Lincoln had recently appointed Grant general-in-chief over . . . — Map (db m7403) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Grant’s HeadquartersThe Battle of the Wilderness
On May 5, 1864, this knoll was bordered by a second growth of scraggly pines and scrub oak. From here Grant and Meade could see little of the battle. Instead, they relied on subordinates to keep them apprised of the situation at the front. In the . . . — Map (db m6024) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — An Uneasy PartnershipThe Battle of the Wilderness
At the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House, Grant would not only struggle against Lee’s army, but also against the conservative, sometimes timid, methods of the Union Army of the Potomac. George G. Meade, commander of that army, . . . — Map (db m6026) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Old Wilderness Tavern
Known for many years as "Old Wilderness Tavern," the frame building at your left of this view, was a dependency of a by-gone complex. The site of the main structure is located by the brick ruins to the right of the picture, taken about 1865. In the . . . — Map (db m7500) HM
Virginia (Spotsylvania County), Spotsylvania — Landmark in the Wilderness
The building complex known collectively as Wilderness Tavern appeared in the early 19th century to serve the needs of travellers. Located on either side of the Fredericksburg-Orange Turnpike, the original roadbed of which survives today as the . . . — Map (db m7499) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Union HeadquartersThe Battle of the Wilderness
Ellwood stood in the midst of the Wilderness, a dark, forbidding forest characterized by stunted trees and densely tangled undergrowth. When the Confederates challenged General Ulysses S. Grant’s advance through the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, the . . . — Map (db m6123) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — EllwoodThe Battle of the Wilderness
“The house stands on Wilderness Run, in a lonely place about half a mile south of the Culpeper plank road; it is a good-sized farmhouse, built of wood, square, with two porticos and painted a dove color. From the apex of the roof a hospital . . . — Map (db m6121) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — A Military Scene — The Battle of the Wilderness —
As one of the few large open areas in the Wilderness, the broad fields north and east of Ellwood assumed instant importance during the battle here. While fighting raged a miles to the west, the fields around Ellwood filled with artillery and wagon . . . — Map (db m12947) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Locust Grove — Archeology at Ellwood — The Battle of the Wilderness —
The National Park Service acquired Ellwood in 1977. Since then, archeologists have conducted three studies of the site: test excavations around the base of the house (1978) and in the cellar (1979), and a geophysical survey of the grounds (1984). . . . — Map (db m12948) HM

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