Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Oglethorpe in Catoosa County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Texas State Monument

 
 
Texas State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2016
1. Texas State Monument Marker
Front side, close-up view of the monument.
Inscription.  
Text from the front side of the monument:

Texas
Remembers the valor and devotion of
her sons who served at Chickamauga
September 19-20, 1863.

Here in the Great Confederate Break-
Through Texans vied with each other
to prove themselves worthy of the fame
won by their brothers on other fields.

Texas troops at Chickamauga were:

6th & 10th Texas Infantry & 15th Texas Cavalry,
dismounted, Colonel Roger O. Mills & Lieutenant Colonel
T. Scott Anderson; 17th, 18th, 24th &
25th Texas Cavalry, dismounted, Colonel F.C.
Wilkes, Lieutenant Colonel John T. Coit & Major William
A. Taylor; Douglas Texas Artillery, Captain
James P. Douglas.
(General James Deshler's Brigade,
Cleburne's Division)

9th Texas Infantry, Colonel William H. Young;
10th Texas Cavalry, Lieutenant Colonel C. R. Earp; 14th
Texas Cavalry, Colonel J. L. Camp; 32nd Texas Cavalry,
Colonel Julius A. Andrews (all units serving
as infantry.)
(General Matthew D. Ector's Brigade,
Walker's Division)

(see
Texas State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2016
2. Texas State Monument Marker
Back side, close-up view of the monument.
Click or scan to see
this page online
other side)

Text from the back side of the monument:

7th Texas Infantry, Colonel R. B. Granbury & Major
K. M. Vanzandt.
(General John Gregg's Brigade,
Johnson's Division)

1st Texas Infantry, Captain R. J. Harding; 4th
Texas Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel John P. Bane & Captain
R. H. Bassett; 5th Texas Infantry, Major J. G.
Rogers, Captain J. S. Cleveland & Captain T. T.
Clay.
(General Jerome B. Robertson's Brigade,
Hood's Division)

8th Texas Cavalry, Lieutenant Colonel Gustave Cook;
11th Texas Cavalry, Colonel G. R. Reeves.
(Colonel Thomas Harrison's Brigade,
Wharton's Division)

Texas Troops at Missionary Ridge were

7th Texas Infantry, Colonel Hiram Granbury; 6th
10th Texas Infantry & 15th Texas Cavalry,
dismounted, Colonel Roger O. Mills; 17th, 18th,
24th & 25th Texas Cavalry, dismounted, Major
William A. Taylor; Douglas' Texas Battery,
Captain James P. Douglas.
(General James A. Smith's Brigade,
Cleburne's Division)

A Memorial to Texans
Who Served the Confederacy

Erected by the State of Texas 1964

 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number MT-1415A.)
 
Topics. This memorial monument is listed
Texas State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2016
3. Texas State Monument Marker
View of the monument looking north along the Battleline Road.
in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is September 20, 1863.
 
Location. 34° 55.616′ N, 85° 15.385′ W. Marker is near Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in Catoosa County. Memorial is on Battleline Road south of Alexanders Bridge Road, on the left when traveling south. This monument is located in the national park that preserves the site of the Chickamauga Battlefield, The monument is located about two thirds of the way through the long line of mostly Union monuments, markers, and tablets that are situated along the length of the park's Battleline Road. However, it should be noted that, this monument is a Confederate marker and is on the opposite side of the street from the majority of the markers on Battleline Road. If you follow the path that start near the Texas Monument in a south easterly direction, you find a shell Monument to James Deshler and a plaque about the part Deshler’s Brigade took in the battle on Sept. 20, 1863. Most of the regiments in Deshler’s Brigade were from Texas. Brig. Gen. Deshler was killed about noon near the spot where the shell monument is located. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Oglethorpe GA 30742, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery F, 1st Ohio, Light Artillery (a few steps from this marker); 9th Indiana Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Battery F, 1st Ohio Light Artillery
Texas State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2016
4. Texas State Monument Marker
View of the monument looking east, from across the Battleline Road, in the direction of the Confederate assault.
(a few steps from this marker); 41st Ohio Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 6th Kentucky Infantry Regiment (US Volunteers) (within shouting distance of this marker); Hazen's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 10th Indiana Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 6th Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Oglethorpe.
 
More about this monument. I used the "Chickamauga Battlefield" map, that I purchased at the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Visitor Center, to determine both the marker number for this monument and the monument's location in relation to the rest of the park's monuments, markers, and tablets. According to the map it provides the, "numerical listing of all monuments, markers, and tablets on the Chickamauga Battlefield (using the Chick-Chatt NMP Monument Numbering System).”
 
Regarding Texas State Monument. Although the primary purpose of this monument was to serve as a memorial for the Texans who served the Confederacy and fought in the Battle of Chickamauga, on the bottom half of the back side, it also serves as a memorial for the Texans who served the Confederacy and fought in the nearby Battle of Missionary Ridge.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Texas Civil War Monuments
This marker is one of 19 monuments placed by the State of Texas on battlefields across the nation, preserving the memories of the contributions made by the state’s military units during the Civil War.

In 1961 the Texas Civil War Centennial Commission and the Texas State Historical Survey Committee
Texas State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2016
5. Texas State Monument Marker
View of the monument looking south along the Battleline Road.
initiated this commemorative series of granite monuments by dedicating the first and largest of the original Centennial monuments at Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi. Over the next three years monuments were also placed in the towns of Pea Ridge, Arkansas and Anthony, Texas (for the Arizona-New Mexico campaign) and at the following battlefields: Chickamauga, Georgia; Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia; Mansfield, Louisiana; Antietam, Maryland; Bentonville, North Carolina; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Fort Donelson, Tennessee; Shiloh, Tennessee; and The Wilderness, Virginia.

Starting in 1998, the Texas Historical Commission continued the work begun in 1961 by the Centennial Commission and the Historical Survey Committee by placing granite monuments
Texas State Monument image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 11, 2019
6. Texas State Monument
Distant view of the marker, looking west along the park hiking trail, situated along the Battleline road.
at other Civil War battlefields. As of 2017, monuments have been placed at the battlefields of Galveston, Texas (1998); Raymond, Mississippi (2002); Rowlett’s Station, Kentucky (2008); Richmond, Kentucky (2009); Corinth, Mississippi (2010); Gaines Mill, Virginia(2012); and Second Manassas, Virginia (2012).

The Texas Historical Commission plans to place a monument at the battlefield of Glorieta Pass, New Mexico.

(Source: Texas Historical Commission, 2015)

NOTE: The links above will take you the HMdb record for the Texas Monument of that battle or campaign.
    — Submitted August 12, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 12, 2016, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 703 times since then and 47 times this year. Last updated on May 24, 2017, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 12, 2016, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6. submitted on September 1, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=103663

Paid Advertisement
Nov. 30, 2021