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Science & Medicine Historical Markers

 
In Touch with the World Marker image, Touch for more information
By Richard E. Miller, December 23, 2010
In Touch with the World Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 7 — In Touch with the World — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
“Tenley Tower,” behind you, dates from the mid-1940s. Western Union Telegraph Co. built it as part of an experimental system using microwaves to transmit telegrams in the mid-Atlantic region. This new technology helped erase . . . — Map (db m130925) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 10 — Crossing Lines — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Across the street is the former 11th Precinct Police Station. In 1993 it became the Max Robinson Center for Health and Living, providing services for people with HIV/AIDS. Whether by design or by accident, in 1910 the city built . . . — Map (db m100763) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acanthus mollis — Artist's Acanthus
According to Dioscorides, the root was good for treating ruptures and convulsions. It was also used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144670) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Achillea millefolium — Yarrow
Yarrow was one of the first herbs brought to America by the colonists. Its leaves were used to stop the flow of blood on cuts and bruises and to deaden the pain. — Map (db m144642) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Acorus calamus — Sweet Flag
The Penobscot tribe of Maine believed this plant to have protective powers; they chewed a piece of the aromatic root to ward off disease when traveling or used steam from the root to prevent illness. — Map (db m144624) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Anethum graveolens — Dill
Although used to flavor food, dill was also eaten to help calm upset stomachs and indigestion, especially in children. Seeds were used in pickling and to flavor vinegar. — Map (db m144643) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia abrotanum — Southernwood
Artemisia abrotanum hung in courtrooms was thought to stop the spread of disease. It was also used in kitchens to keep bad odors away. Pennsylvania Germans used southernwood in their pantries to repel ants. Range: Asia and southern . . . — Map (db m145047) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Artemisia absinthium — Wormwood
This plant was spread across floors and put in between clothes in dressers to repel insects and moths. The plant was thought to prevent disease, as well as expel worms. — Map (db m144556) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Arum maculatum — Lords-and-Ladies
The juice, mixed with oil, stopped earaches and destroyed nasal polyps. It was also used to treat certain cancers and abortion. Drunk with wine, it was an aphrodisiac. The plant is injurious. — Map (db m144661) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asarum canadense — Wild Ginger
The Chippewa used this herb to season food and chewed the root to relieve indigestion. The Iroquois used the roots to preserve meats. — Map (db m144574) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Asclepias tuberosa — Butterfly Weed
This plant was one of the most important medicines of the Menomini. The pulverized root was used for cuts and wounds, and was mixed with other roots for additional cures. This herb is potentially toxic if taken internally. — Map (db m144617) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ballota nigra — Black Horehound
Dioscorides reported that the leaves were applied with salt to dog bites, with honey to clean ulcers, and that the ashes of the leaves repressed venereal warts. — Map (db m144666) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Baptistia tinctoria — Wild Indigo
The Cherokee used the leaves and woody stem to make a blue die. The Mohegan bathed their cuts and wounds with an infusion of the plant. This entire herb is toxic. — Map (db m144568) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Calycanthus floridus — Carolina Allspice
The Cherokee used the root of this herb to make a strong diuretic for urinary and bladder complaints. The seeds of this plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144619) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Camptotheca acuminata — Camptotheca, Chinese Happy Tree
Known as the "cancer tree", Camptotheca contains the alkaloid camptothecin that is used to treat ovarian, colorectal, and small-cell lung cancers. It has been used in China for hundreds of years to treat psoriasis and diseases of various internal . . . — Map (db m144682) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ceanothus americanus — New Jersey Tea
The Menomini believed the tea made from the roots to be a cure-all for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144607) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cephalanthus occidentalis — Buttonbush
The Louisiana Choctaws chewed the bitter bark of this shrub to relieve toothaches. They also drank a strong decoction (extract) of it to treat diarrhea. The leaves have poisoned grazing animals. — Map (db m144625) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Comptonia peregrina — Sweet Fern
The leaves of this herb were thrown on fires by the Potawatomi of Michigan to create a smudge to deter mosquitos. The Ojibwe used the leaves for a tea to cure stomach cramps. — Map (db m144611) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Corylus americana — Hazelnut
This shrub produces a sweet, edible nut. The Cherokee drank a tea made from the bark for hives. — Map (db m144570) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Cunila origanoides — American Dittany
Native peoples of eastern North America drank a tea of this plant to produce sweating when treating fever and colds. — Map (db m144616) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Daucus carota spp. carota — Queen Anne’s Lace
Dioscorides noted that a drink of the seeds was a diuretic, a colic neutralizer, and brought on menses and abortion. The seeds or roots, prepared in wine, were effective in treating wounds from poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144674) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 82218-H — Dioscorea villosa — wild yam
Wild yam contains diosgenin, a chemical compound that can be converted in a lab (but not in the human body) to progesterone. This discovery paved the way for the invention of the modern oral contraceptive pill. Today, wild yam is used to calm . . . — Map (db m144627) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echinacea purpurea — Purple Coneflower
The Plains Indians considered this herb to be one of the most important medicinal plants. Its root was the universal antidote for snakebites and all kinds of venomous bites and stings. — Map (db m144605) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Echium vulgare — Viper's Bugloss
The leaves, root, and seeds were drunk in wine for the prevention or cure of snakebite. The entire plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144673) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eryngium planum — Eryngo
In Dioscordes' time the young leaves of this prickly plant were pickled in brine and eaten as a pot herb. A drink of 'Eryngum' root diluted in honey liquor was said to cure epilepsy. — Map (db m144654) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Joe-Pye Weed
The Menomini used a decoction, or extract, of the root to treat the genitourinary tract. The Potowatomi made a poultice of fresh leaves to treat burns, and the Ojibwe bathed babies in a solution of the root to strengthen them. — Map (db m144569) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Eupatorium purpureum — Boneset
The northern Iroquois used the leave to make a tea that was considered a tonic and cure for colds and fevers This herb may damage the liver. — Map (db m144612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Genista tinctoria — Dyer's Greenwood
The colonists used this plant to obtain a yellow-green dye from its flowers. The leaves, seeds and flowering plant were also used medically as a diuretic and purgative. — Map (db m144557) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Geranium maculatum — Wild Geranium
The Meskwaki of Minnesota pounded the astringent root of this geranium in an animal bladder to make a poultice for hemorrhoids. — Map (db m144596) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Gillenia trifoliata — Indian Physic
The root furnished an effective purge of the bowels and an emetic to induce vomiting. — Map (db m144626) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hedera helix — English Ivy
An infusion of the flowers in wine was drunk for dysentery, and the leaves mixed with fat were used as a burn ointment. Dioscorides believed that drinking the juice caused sterility. The leaves and berries are poisonous. — Map (db m144669) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helenium flexuosum — Sneezeweed
According to Cherokee belief, the roots of sneezeweed and Veronica noveboracensis steeped in warm water acted as a contraceptive by preventing menstruation for two years. — Map (db m144614) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Helleborus niger — Christmas Rose
Helleborus was once used to stimulate the heart, expel worms, and promote menstrual flow. It contains cardioglycosides, which help the heart to beat regularly and strongly. Currently regarded as too strong to use safely. — Map (db m144683) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Heuchera americana — Rock Geranium
The root, a powerful astringent, was used by Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek of the Southeast when conditions required an astringent or "puckering" medicine. — Map (db m144613) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Native American medicinal uses of the root included treatment of the eyes and skin and for cancers and venereal diseases. The yellow root provided dye. This plant should be avoided during pregnancy. — Map (db m144572) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Hydrastis canadensis — Goldenseal
Historic use for stomach ailments and inflamed eyes has been confirmed. Its antibiotic property makes it useful for vaginal infections. Its antibacterial property may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis. — Map (db m144681) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ilex vomitoria — Yaupon
Yaupon was a common drink of the Southeastern tribes, taken mainly for its emeting (vomit-inducing) action, which was a means of purification. The fruit is poisonous. — Map (db m144604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Iris Χ germanica 'Florentina' — Iris
Dioscorides said that the root was fit for use against chill, chest congestion, and coughs. A poultice made with orris and roses in vinegar was said to be good for headaches. The rootstock is toxic. — Map (db m144656) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lobelia inflata — Indian Tobacco
The common name for this plant comes from its purported use as a Native American smoke. It was used by the Seneca as an emetic (vomit-inducer) and for coughs. The whole plant is poisonous. — Map (db m144621) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Lychnis coronaria — Rose Campion
According to Dioscorides, the seeds drunk with wine helped those who had been bitten by a scorpion. — Map (db m144672) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — 53002-H — Magnolia virginiana — sweetbay magnolia
American Indians used the leaves of this small tree to make a medicinal tea for the treatment of chills, colds, and other ailments. Early American physicians used it as a quinine substitute as well as to treat gout, rheumatism, and respiratory . . . — Map (db m144692) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mentha spicata — Spearmint
Although most commonly used by the colonists to flavor food and drink, mint was also used to whiten teeth, prevent milk from curdling and to strew on floors to repel bad smells and insects. — Map (db m144639) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mertensia virginica — Virginia Bluebells
The Cherokee used this plant for whooping cough and consumption. — Map (db m144608) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Mitchella repens — Partridge-berry
The St. Lawrence Montagnai considered the cooked berries a fever medicine. The dried leaves were added to Chippewa smoking mixtures. — Map (db m144622) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare — Oregano
This versatile herb was used by colonists to alleviate toothaches, flavor food and strew on floors, as well as flavor ale. The flowering tops were used to produce a reddish brown dye. — Map (db m144633) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum — Greek Oregano
Dioscorides reported that above-ground parts, taken with wine, were good for those who had drunk the juice of the poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) or the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). — Map (db m144663) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Osmorhiza calytonii — Sweet Cicely
Sweet Cicely roots taste and smell like anise. Oil from the roots contains sugar, fats, resins and tannin. Chippewa Indians women drank the tea of the roots to aid in childbirth. — Map (db m144601) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phlomis fruticosa — Jerusalem Sage
The leaves soaked in water were laid upon swollen, inflamed eyes. Dioscorides also noted that just a knucklebone's length of the root, given with wine, could bind excessive intestinal discharges. — Map (db m144668) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Phytolacca americana — Poke
The Pamunkey of Virginia treated rheumatism with boiled poke berries. Several tribes used berry pigments as a dye. All parts of the plant are poisonous. — Map (db m144571) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polemonium reptans — Jacob's Ladder
The roots were used by the Meskwaki Indians of Wisconsin to induce vomiting. They called the plant 'fine hair woman medicine'. — Map (db m144623) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Polygonatum biflorum — Small Solomon's Seal
This plant was called the "reviver" by the Menomini and Fox because inhaling the smoke of the heated root revived unconscious patients. — Map (db m144578) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosa virginiana — Pasture Rose
North-central Native Americans made a medicine with the rose hip skin for stomach troubles. — Map (db m144603) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Rosmarinus officinalis — rosemary
Rosemary contains several volatile oils, tannins, bittering compounds, and resins, which are thought to contribute to the increased potency and extended preservation of beers brewed with it. It has been used medicinally for centuries to improve . . . — Map (db m144695) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Ruscus aculeatus — Butcher's Broom
According to Dioscorides, leaves and berries were drunk in wine to encourage menstruation, to break up bladder stones, and to cure jaundice and headache. This mixture could also be used as a diuretic. — Map (db m144657) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia lyrata — Lyre-leaved Sage
The roots of this sage were used by Native Americans to make a salve for sores. — Map (db m144620) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Salvia sclarea — Clary Sage
Clary wine was considered an aphrodisiac in the sixteenth century. The bitter aromatic leaves flavor wine, ale, beer and liqueurs. — Map (db m144693) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja douglasii — Yerba Buena
The Cahuilla of southern California believed a tea made from this plant to be an effective remedy for reducing fevers and curing colds. — Map (db m144618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Satureja montana — Winter Savory
Colonists brought winter savory over to the new world to flavor dishes, stuffings to meat, fish and sausages. Leaves were taken to stimulate the appetite and to aid in digestion. — Map (db m144634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Smilacina racemosa — Plumelily
Smoke from the burning root was used by the Meskwaki to revive unconscious patients, to hush a crying child, and to cast spells. — Map (db m144573) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Solidago canadensis — Canada Goldenrod
The Potowami called it "yellow top" and made a tea of the flowers to treat fevers. — Map (db m144615) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
A lotion or mixture of the fresh or dried leaves or roots was used for bruises, wounds and sores. — Map (db m144676) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Symphytum officinale — Comfrey
Used for thousands of years to treat bruises and sprains, the plant contains compounds, such as allantoin, that promote healing and other substances that are anti-inflammatory. There is controversy concerning its safety, especially for internal use, . . . — Map (db m144680) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Tanacetum vulgare — Tansy
Tansy tea was taken to calm cramps, but colonists also used tansy leaves as an insect repellant in their homes. Leaves were also rubbed on fresh meats to keep flies off. — Map (db m144559) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Teucrium chamaedrys — Wall Germander
Dioscorides reported that a beverage of the fruiting plant was drunk for convulsions and coughs. It was taken with wine by those who were bitten by poisonous beasts. — Map (db m144675) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Trillium grandiflorum — Large Flowered Trillium
A decoction of the root was used for female diseases and to bring on childbirth by some tribes; others used it to treat headaches and rheumatism. — Map (db m144606) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vaccinium corymbosum — Highbush Bluberry
The Chippewa made pemmican (high-energy food) by adding dried blueberries to moose fat and deer tallow. Native Americans also made a tea of blueberry roots to treat diarrhea and to ease childbirth. — Map (db m144610) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Veronicastrum virginicum — Culver's Root
The black roots contain a substance with powerful emetic (vomit-inducing) and cathartic (bowel-purging) properties which was used by the Senecas and Menomini. This root is potentially toxic. — Map (db m144602) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Periwinkle was used by the colonists to make soothing ointments for the skin. Fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding, externally and internally. — Map (db m144555) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vinca minor — Periwinkle
Dioscorides suggested that the leaves be chewed for toothache and applied as a poultice for snakebite. He prescribed a drink of the leaves and stalks in wine for dysentery. — Map (db m144678) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Vitex agnus-castus — Chaste Tree
Dioscorides noted that chaste maidens used the plant for bedding. He recommended burning leaves to fumigate venomous beasts. A poultice of the leaves relieved stings. — Map (db m144677) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Zingiber officinale — Ginger
Used as early as 3000 B.C. in China where it was prescribed for colds, fever, and leprosy, among other ailments. It was also used medicinally in ancient Greece and India. Research has identified constituents that have anti-inflammatory qualities, . . . — Map (db m144685) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dawn Redwood from China — (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)
This small grove of Dawn Redwood is somewhat reminiscent of the few stands that occur in its native homeland, China. Known only through paleobotanical records prior to 1945, living specimens of this almost extinct plant were discovered in that year . . . — Map (db m144582) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Dioscorides Garden
These herbs planted here are a representative selection from plants listed about 60 A.D by the Greek physician, Dioscorides. The modern science of pharmacology is traced back to his efforts to list systematically the plants that were used for . . . — Map (db m144439) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Arboretum — Medicinal Garden
This garden illustrates the historic and current use of herbs as medicine. Plants have played an integral part in illness and disease treatment for thousands of years. By observation, trial, and error, people learned which plants had healing . . . — Map (db m144438) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Atlas District — 5 — Community Caretakers — Hub, Home, Heart — Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —
The elegant Romanesque portion of the Senate Square condominium complex started life in 1874 as the Little Sisters of the Poor House for the Aged. St. Aloysius Church member Ellen Sherman, wife of Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman, . . . — Map (db m71682) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Barry Farm — 5 — The Curative Powers of Nature — An East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
The fence and wall ahead of you, on either side of Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, enclose historic St. Elizabeths Hospital. The pioneering facility opened in 1855 to treat mentally ill members of the armed forces and DC residents. At a time when . . . — Map (db m100694) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 14 — Great Expectations — Worthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Bloomingdale of the 1940s and '50s was a village of high expectations. Within a block of this sign lived four young women who grew up to be judges. Anna Diggs Taylor rose to chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Michigan. The daughter . . . — Map (db m130843) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Bloomingdale — 13 — Home to Headliners — Worthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Edward Brooke, who represented Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate from 1967 to 1979, was the first African American elected to the Senate in the 20th century. Brooke was born at 1938 Third Street and later lived with his family at 1730 First . . . — Map (db m130842) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Army Medical Museum
Army Medical Museum has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provision of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the . . . — Map (db m17095) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 5 — Army Nurse Corps Training — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
Until the early 20th century, the Army largely relied on untrained civilian women for temporary medical care for the sick and wounded. Shortages in medical staff set the stage for greater involvement of women in Army medical care and made a . . . — Map (db m143701) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 1 — Battle of Fort Stevens — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
Although nothing remains of the original landscape, this area was a battleground of the only Civil War battle fought in Washington. On July 11, 1864, Confederate troops attempted to capture the Union's capitol by first taking a meagerly defended . . . — Map (db m105292) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 2 — Borden's Dream — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
WRAMC was named for Major Walter Reed, but it was the persistence and vision of another Army doctor, Major William Cline Borden, that led to the construction of the first prominent structures for a U.S. Army general hospital on this site. Borden . . . — Map (db m143695) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 4 — Borden's Dream Realized — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
While the hospital continued to emphasize clinical microscopy and bacteriology, achievements in other fields set the standards for military and civilian care in fields such as dentistry and X-ray use. The circumstances of World War I and the high . . . — Map (db m143699) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Site of a Tulip Tree
Used as a signal station · by · Confederate soldiers under Gen. Jubal A. Early during the attack on · Washington · July 11 and 12, 1864 Also used by Confederate Sharpshooters The lower plaque reads: Two cannon balls . . . — Map (db m42698) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 15 — The Rock on Brightwood Avenue — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
Across Quackenbos Street is Emory United Methodist Church. Named to honor Bishop John Emory of Maryland (1789-1835), the congregation dates from 1832. From the beginning, Emory welcomed all races but, like most Washington churches then, . . . — Map (db m147739) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Named in honor of Major Walter Reed — Pioneer in Military Medicine —
Although first envisioned during the Civil War, it was not until 1909 that an army general hospital was built in Washington. Named in honor of Major Walter Reed, famed for conquering yellow fever, the original hospital resulted from determined . . . — Map (db m14164) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Walter Reed Army Medical Center — 1 May 1909 - 15 September 2011
Walter Reed Army Medical Center Named in honor of Major Walter Reed, pioneer in military medicine Dedicated September 26, 1977 A.D. Dedicated to Major Walter Reed, who proved the mosquito transmission of . . . — Map (db m143697) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 3 — Walter Reed General Hospital — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
As conceived by Major Borden, the Walter Reed General Hospital campus was to focus around a large hospital and administrative building, with separate and symmetrically arranged outbuildings. In 1905, congressional funding provided for construction . . . — Map (db m143696) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Walter Reed Memorial
Walter Reed 1851 - 1902 Bacteriologist - Research Scientist In honor of his great work in the fight for the eradication of yellow fever Reverse: Insignia of the Army Medical Corps In recognition of the high public service of . . . — Map (db m68990) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 7 — WRAMC - Modern Era — Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center — Walking Tour —
To keep pace with the advances in medical technology and consolidate patient care in one facility, congressional funds were procured for a new modern hospital facility on the WRAMC campus in 1967. Construction of the New Hospital commenced in 1972, . . . — Map (db m143704) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Charles Richard Drew Memorial Bridge
. . . — Map (db m6262) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 4 — Healing the Wounded — Tour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail —
In 1866 the Navy completed the hospital you see across the street to treat injured and ailing seamen. With beds for 50, it included the carriage house/stable and cast-iron fence and (around the corner) the gazebo. Its front door originally was . . . — Map (db m130732) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Original Site Of Providence Hospital
Providence Hospital was located on this site during the years 1861 through 1956. Founded in 1861 by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul from Emmitsburg, Maryland. The Hospital was chartered by an Act of Congress in 1864. During . . . — Map (db m116116) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — The Old Naval Hospital
The Neighborhood This site has been associated with Navy medicine since 1800 when an apothecary shop located here provided medical services to sailors and marines from the nearby Navy Yard and Marine Barracks. Naval Hospital, . . . — Map (db m127966) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — An American Meridian — Meridian Hill Park, National Historic Landmark — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Thomas Jefferson Believed the surveyor's of the nation's capital city should set a new American Meridian, a north-south line running through both poles and the American continent. This reference line, longitude 0° 0°, would aid navigation, . . . — Map (db m63770) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew — African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC — 3324 Sherman Avenue, NW, Apartment 1 —
Dr. Charles R. Drew (1904-1950), renowned for his blood plasma research, was associated with Howard University College of Medicine during most of his career. In 1941 Drew joined a national effort to set up a blood banking process but left because . . . — Map (db m65523) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Congress Heights — Welcome to St. Elizabeths East
Organized by Congress in 1855 as the Government Hospital for the Insane, the institution that would become a nationally recognized symbol of healthcare and medical breakthroughs became known as St. Elizabeths during the Civil War. Following its . . . — Map (db m129253) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Alexander Graham Bell
From the top floor of this building was sent on June 3, 1880 over a beam of light to 1325 L Street, the first wireless telephone message in the history of the world. The apparatus used in sending the message was the photophone invented by Alexander . . . — Map (db m17569) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.2 — Franklin Square — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail —
"going into the country" This urban oasis exists because President Andrew Jackson needed water. The site of excellent springs (a rare commodity in the early city when everyone was dependent on private wells), this square was purchased . . . — Map (db m29594) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — 2 — HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulier) (based Oakland, CA) — Golden Spike 2015 — powder-coated steel, LED lighting, and wood; Courtesy of the artists —
In their work, Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu, the artist duo behind the art and design studio HYBYCOZO, investigate the influences of geometry on human evolution. Their works explore the connections between contemporary physics and ancient . . . — Map (db m115904) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — Administration Building, Carnegie Institution of Washington
Administration Building Carnegie Institution of Washington has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 This site possesses exceptional . . . — Map (db m129560) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — 2007.001 — Excerpt from Walt Whitman's "The Dresser" (1865 version) and "We Embrace" by E. Ethelbert Miller
The Dresser Walt Whitman (surrounding station entrance) We Embrace E. Ethelbert Miller, 2005 (surrounding bench) This excerpt from Walt Whitman's "The Dresser" (1865 version) and "We Embrace" by E. Ethelbert Miller are . . . — Map (db m112634) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — In Memory of Henry Martyn Robert — 1837–1923 — Brigadier General, U. S. Army —
One of this country’s most distinguished river, harbor and shoreline engineers, he was led by civic concerns to become the noted original author of the familiar parliamentary manual, Robert's Rules of Order. Robert served in the . . . — Map (db m31140) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Dupont Circle — The Elliott Coues House
The Elliott Coues House has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m136874) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Albert Einstein - The Einstein Memorial
[Panel 1:] Albert Einstein, March 14, 1879 - April 18, 1955. "As long as I have any choice in the matter, I shall live only in a country where civil liberty, tolerance, and equality of all citizens before the law prevail," Albert . . . — Map (db m68433) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Announcement of the Atomic Age
On this campus, January 26, 1939, Nobel Laureate Niels Bohr reported the splitting of the uranium nucleus with the release of two hundred million electron volts of energy, thus heralding the beginning of the atomic age. This announcement took place . . . — Map (db m47330) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — At GW, Being Bright Comes Naturally
Did you know that the George Washington University gets 50% of its electricity from solar energy? The Capital Partners Solar Project allows GW, GW University Hospital, and American University to source renewable energy from a solar farm . . . — Map (db m115019) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Benjamin Rush
[South:] Benjamin•Rush Physician and Philanthropist MDCCXLV MDCCCXIII [East:] Signer of the Declaration of Independence [North:] The first American Alienist [West:] Studium . . . — Map (db m128014) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Building 2 — Old Naval Observatory (1844)
This building once housed the U.S. Naval Observatory (1844-1893), the workplace of Navy scientists whose skill and perseverance made this institution one of the finest astronomical laboratories in the world. Here its superintendent, LT Matthew . . . — Map (db m128094) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Building 5 — "Sick Officer's Quarters" (erected 1903-1908)
Segregated by rank, the Washington Naval Hospital's patients occupied either wards, if enlisted, or this building, if officers. The first floor of the Sick Officer's Quarters featured an office, reception room, medical library, a nurses' dressing . . . — Map (db m129348) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Edward Teller — Professor of Physics, 1935 to 1945
This plaque commemorates the seminal research of the renowned Dr. Edward Teller during his tenure at The George Washington University. By agreement with GW Professor George Gamow, President Cloyd Heck Marvin invited the Hungarian-born Teller to . . . — Map (db m47326) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — George Gamow — Professor Of Physics at The George Washington University — from 1934 to 1956 —
Gamow (1904-1968) is renowned for developing the “Big Bang Theory” of the universe (1948); explaining nuclear alpha decay by quantum tunneling (1928); describing, with Edward Teller, spin-induced nuclear beta decay (1936); pioneering the . . . — Map (db m47320) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Jane Delano
To Jane Delano and 296 nurses who died in the war 1914 — 1918 (Inscription on statue sides:) Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night nor for the arrow that flieth by day Nor for the pestilence that walketh . . . — Map (db m131072) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — National Academy of Sciences
Marker Panel 1: on the lawn, off the sidewalk, north side of Constitution Avenue, NW: National Academy of Sciences Incorporated 1863 National Academy of Engineering Institute of Medicine National Research Council. . . . — Map (db m65095) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — National Academy of Sciences — More Than a Century of Public Service as Advisors to the nation
"... the Academy shall, whenever called upon by any department of the Government, investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art ..." from the Charter of the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President . . . — Map (db m115900) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Pharmacists' War Memorial — American Pharmacists Association —
[Inscription on wall at north end of the memorial:] Dedicated to all Pharmacists who served in the Wars of our Country "1950, 1961, 1991" [Inscriptions on flagpole base and platform:] Revolutionary War: 1776-1781 Civil . . . — Map (db m68521) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Philip S. Amsterdam Hall
This residence hall is named in honor of Philip S. Amsterdam, BA '62, Hon LLD '07 "It has given me tremendous pleasure to serve the University and watch it grow and develop over the years. My time as a GW undergraduate was a unique experience . . . — Map (db m115893) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Sheen Hok Gate — "Learning and Using in the Proper Way"
Dedicated in honor of the Philanthropic efforts of Louis S.C. and Alice T.H.W. Chiu, J.P. Of Hong Kong, China Recipients of The President's Medal, 2001 Founders, The Sheen Hok Charitable Foundation Serving the Elderly, Disabled, Sick, and . . . — Map (db m114966) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The American Meridian
To your left is the hemisphere of the Atlantic, the hemisphere of Europe and Africa, of Roman numerals and Indian script, of the Silk Road and the rising sun. To your right is the hemisphere of the Pacific and the American West, the hemisphere . . . — Map (db m46880) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The American Red Cross
Generations of Americans have given themselves to help others at home and around the world through the American Red Cross, generously donating time, money and blood. They have helped feed, shelter, and clothe those in need—from thousands of . . . — Map (db m131073) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The American Red Cross - Harvard Field Hospital Unit — (September 1939 - July 1942)
This plaque acknowledges the public spirit of Harvard University and the dedication of the staff of the American Red Cross - Harvard Field Hospital Unit, who provided and staffed a pre-fabricated hospital sent to Salisbury, England, in the summer . . . — Map (db m14997) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The Celestial Map
...Joy and amazement at the beauty and grandeur of this world of which man can just form a faint notion... -Albert Einstein We live on a planet that orbits a star, our Sun. The Sun is one of two hundred billion stars that make up our . . . — Map (db m115898) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — U.S. Naval Observatory / The Prime Meridian
[Top plaque:] U.S. Naval Observatory Designed by LT James M. Gilliss in 1842, the U.S. Naval Observatory occupied this site from 1844 to 1893. In 1894 the domed structure became home to the Naval Museum of Hygiene. Eight years later the . . . — Map (db m128012) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — "Music of the Spheres"
[Top plaque:] "Music of the Spheres" Artist: Martha Jackson Jarvis Commissioned by Fannie Mae Dedicated July 10, 2003 [Center plaque:] Fannie Mae: Van Ness Sculpture Project Martha Jackson-Jarvis The . . . — Map (db m114358) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — Cultural Institutions — Forest Hills Neighborhood Art on Call
Forest Hills has two major cultural institutions in the neighborhood, the Hillwood Estate Museum & Gardens, and the Levine School of Music. Built in 1926, the Hillwood Museum houses the remarkable collections of Marjorie Merriweather Post in . . . — Map (db m114360) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — First Atomic Clock, 1948 — IEEE Milestone
The first atomic clock, developed near this site by Harold Lyons at the National Bureau of Standards, revolutionized timekeeping by using transitions of the ammonia molecule as its source of frequency. Far more accurate than previous clocks, atomic . . . — Map (db m111606) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — Science Has Its Traditions As Well As Its Frontiers — The Newton Apple Tree
A descendant of the original tree whose fruit gave inspirational impetus to Isaac Newton's theory of gravitational forces was nurtured by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and transplanted here on the grounds of the National Bureau of Standards on . . . — Map (db m124922) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Forest Hills — Site of the National Bureau of Standards — Forest Hills Neighborhood Art on Call
In 1901, the National Bureau of Standards began developing a large complex of 89 buildings on 70 acres west of Connecticut Avenue near this site. The NBS was devoted to testing new materials and establishing industry standards. The NBS physicists . . . — Map (db m114354) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Gallaudet — Cogswell and Krug Halls
[Top left plaque] Cogswell Hall dedicated to Alice Cogswell 1805-1830 First deaf pupil of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet [Top right plaque] Krug Hall dedicated to Walter J. Krug, '27 1905 . . . — Map (db m130936) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Healing in War and Peace
Georgetown University Hospital, set atop a row of hills along Reservoir Road, promotes good health through patient care, research and education. Founded in 1898 and shaped by Georgetown's Catholic Jesuit heritage, the hospital consistently has . . . — Map (db m113906) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — How High is the River?
The structure to the right contains a streamgage that records water levels (stage) in the Potomac River. Water levels at this site are measured by sensing the air pressure required to force air bubbles into the river. The water in the river at this . . . — Map (db m113413) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — St. Mary's — Built 1956
This building is named in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary and was dedicated to Our Lady of Victory. Originally built as a combined Nursing School and Nurses Dormitory. The building is home to the School of Nursing and Health Studies although it no . . . — Map (db m110854) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — The Freddy and Diana Prince Labyrinth — Be mindful. Be moving. Be well.
In October of 2014, the artists of the Georgetown Lombard ARts and Humanities Program painted a navy blue labyrinth on the round outside of the 2CCC Surgery Center Waiting Room. The labyrinth is based on a 13th century design from the Cathedral of . . . — Map (db m146575) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — The History of Canal Square
Canal Square has seen more than century and a half of change in Georgetown. It is a typical brick and fieldstone industrial structure built to facilitate barge traffic on the Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Canal. Necessary for westward expansion, canals . . . — Map (db m113418) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Volta Place: A Place in History
The first house of worship in Georgetown — a town dominated by Presbyterian Scots — was a log church built in 1769 by a Lutheran congregation where the present Lutheran church now stands (opposite). The Presbyterian Burial Ground, once . . . — Map (db m120508) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Glover Park — "Herbert R. Morgan"
For years Hall Place was home to many astronomers who worked nearby at the United States Naval Observatory. One of the most celebrated was Herbert R. Morgan (1875-1957), a longtime resident of Glover Park. He bought one of the first homes on Hall . . . — Map (db m113378) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Kenilworth Park — Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation — Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Anacostia River tidal marshes were far more extensive a hundred years ago than today. Marshes support amphibians, small fish and insects. This abundant aquatic life attracts herons, egrets, rails and other birds to feed. Over-hunting and draining of . . . — Map (db m141727) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — Freedmen's Hospital — African American Heritage Trail, Washington DC — 520 W Street, NW —
Freedmen's Hospital was established by the federal government in 1862 to address the needs of thousands of African Americans who poured into the city seeking freedom during the Civil War. The hospital's first administrator was Major Alexander T. . . . — Map (db m84805) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 16 — The Doctor Is In — Worthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
When I was at Dunbar, I thought I wanted to be a doctor. In our community, doctors were the men who made the most money, earned the most respect and had the prettiest wives." Sen. Edward W. Brooke, Bridging the Divide: My . . . — Map (db m130846) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), LeDroit Park — 15 — The Prettiest Place — Worthy Ambition — LeDroit Park/Bloomingdale Heritage Trail —
Before there was a LeDroit Park, map engraver David McClelland owned a mansion on the property across Rhode Island Avenue. When the Civil War broke out in April 1861, McClelland possessed a detailed map of Washington that suddenly had great . . . — Map (db m130844) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Logan Circle — Bishop's Gate Condominium — 1715 15th Street, N.W.
1885-1929 Site of the Washington Hospital for Foundlings 1929-1966 St. Augustine Catholic Church constructed a complex consisting of a school, convent and chapel. Early in the 1980's the property was converted to condominiums. . . . — Map (db m140139) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Mount Pleasant — 3 — Casualties Arriving at Mount Pleasant General Hospital, May 1864
In May 1864, a year before the Civil War ended, Union and Rebel troops clashed in a series of bloody battles in Virginia. Steamships loaded with the wounded traveled up the Potomac River to Washington where stretchers piled ashore for days and . . . — Map (db m111885) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — 1911 — Charles Kettering
Kettering perfects a workable electric starter at his lab in Dayton. First installed in 1912 Cadillacs, it means the end of difficult and dangerous hand cranking; and enables more women to drive. Charles Kettering (detail), 1916. . . . — Map (db m112768) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — 1926 — Robert Goddard
Among his many firsts, pioneer of space flight Robert Goddard constructs and launches the first liquid fuel rocket. Robert Goddard, 1946. National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution (SI A-267-B). Robert Goddard and his . . . — Map (db m112774) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Cantilever Bridge — Transportation Walk
Cantilever bridges carry heavy loads. The structure is built out symmetrically from each pier. The landward side is anchored and the other side may support an intermediate truss or be joined to the next cantilever. Snake River Bridge, . . . — Map (db m112781) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Functioning as the Nation's First Proving Ground — Firepower — Behind These Walls —
During the Civil War, the Navy established its first "Experimental Battery" here, testing cannons by firing down the Anacostia River. Ballistic test pits also were created here to determine how best to defeat Confederate ironclads. The Navy's . . . — Map (db m126459) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Functioning as the Navy's First Research and Development Center — Innovation — Behind These Walls —
The Navy has a treasured aeronautical history. Important early activities included the first shipboard catapult test in 1912, the establishment of the world's largest wind tunnel by the Navy's Aerodynamics Laboratory, and the large wooden scale . . . — Map (db m126458) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Marine Railway - Experimental Model Basin
Marine Railway In 1822 Commodore John Rogers designed and built the first marine railway in the United States. The purpose of the railway was to haul ships out of the water for repair or preservation of their hull. Before this time, ships . . . — Map (db m10799) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Protecting Undersea Rescue and Salvage Techniques — Diving — Behind These Walls —
In 1927, the U.S. Navy established an experimental dive school at the Navy Yard. The school centralized training, allowing the consolidation of dive-related and submarine-escape research efforts—including the development of the Momsen Lung . . . — Map (db m130977) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Ship's Propeller / Airplane Propeller / Truck Wheel — Transportation Walk
Ship's Propeller The helical blades of the ship's propeller force water backward. The reaction drives the ship forward. Additional drive is provided by the suction created on the forward face of the screw blades. Propeler and . . . — Map (db m112922) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Palisades — Georgetown Incline Plane — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Here, in 1876, an engineering marvel was built. The largest incline plane in the world and the first built in the United States, carried canal boats to and from the Potomac River. The incline plane was used to help clear heavy boat traffic in . . . — Map (db m129838) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Park View — 17 — The Next Wave — Lift Every Voice — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
Caribbean immigrants discovered this stretch of Georgia Avenue in the 1940s, bringing island culture along with jerk chicken, curry, and coco bread. Many, like Eric Williams, who later led Trinidad and Tobago to independence in 1962, came to . . . — Map (db m130769) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Children's Hospital
Here stood the first Children's Hospital of Washington, DC. Opened as a rented rowhouse in 1871, the hospital had a capacity of 12 beds and had only four doctors on staff. Now internationally recognized, Children's National Medical Center is proud . . . — Map (db m59703) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Clara Barton 1821 - 1912 — The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway —
Clara Barton lived a lifetime of tireless service to others. During the American Civil War, she became known as the “Angel of the Battlefield,” delivering supplies and caring for the sick and wounded. After the war, Barton organized a . . . — Map (db m92177) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Clifford W. Beers 1876 - 1943 — The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway —
Founded the National Mental Health Association in 1909 to improve mental health care and fight discrimination against people with mental illness. To instigate this reform, Beers courageously shared his own experience with mental illness in his . . . — Map (db m92194) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Dorothea Dix 1802 - 1887 — The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway —
Inspired by her social conscience, Dorothea Dix launched a self-financed career aimed at improving the lives of the mentally ill. Her mission to document squalid institutional living conditions and inhumane treatment built public awareness and . . . — Map (db m91874) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Rachel Carson 1907 - 1964 — The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway —
Blending meticulous research on the indiscriminate use of pesticides with her eloquent literary style, Rachel Carson laid the groundwork for the modern environmental movement when she wrote Silent Spring, one of the most influential books of . . . — Map (db m91939) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Samuel F. B. Morse
Artist and inventor opened and operated on this site under the direction of the Post Office Department the first public telegraph office in the United States April 1st 1845 "What Hath God Wrought" — Map (db m66518) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — The Daguerre Monument
[Inscription on Monument's front, 1890]: DAGUERRE [Inscription on 1890 monument's south side]: To commemorate the half century in photography 1839 - 1889. Erected by the photographers association of America Aug. 1890. . . . — Map (db m28545) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — The Daguerre Monument
This monument pays tribute to French Artist and inventor Louis-Jacques-Mandι Daguerre (1787–1851), who revolutionized picture-making in 1839 by introducing the first practical form of photography to the world. Known as the daguerreotype, . . . — Map (db m80876) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Petworth — 19 — Mr. Lincoln’s Ride — Lift Every Voice Georgia Avenue — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
It’s the summer of 1862. Early morning, but already hot and dusty. You’re standing at this spot, when you see a tall man on horseback. It’s President Abraham Lincoln. You’re pleased to see him, but not surprised. After all, he rides by here . . . — Map (db m130757) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — 6 — Medical Care for All — "Lift Every Voice" — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
During the Civil War (1861-1865), thousands of formerly enslaved people came to Washington in search of new lives. They needed work, education, shelter – and health care. In 1862 the U.S. government responded with Freedmen’s Hospital, . . . — Map (db m130764) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Pleasant Plains — Tau Beta Pi
Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society D.C. Alpha Chapter Chartered in 1956 "Dedicated to excellence" — Map (db m110807) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Sheridan-Kalorama — Dr. Philip Jaisohn, 1864-1951 — The First Korean American
Dr. Philip Jaisohn was a pioneer of independence, democracy and public awakening for the Korean people. After the failed 1884 reformation movement, he was exiled to the United States, where he became the first Korean-born to become an American . . . — Map (db m39925) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Sheridan-Kalorama — 14 — Women of Influence — Sheridan Kalorama — Call Box Restoration Project —
Sheridan-Kalorama has been home to many influential women. While she lobbied our political leaders to support Nationalist China, Madame Chiang Kai-Shek lived nearby at 2443 Kalorama Rd. Others include presidential wives Eleanor Roosevelt, a wise . . . — Map (db m112604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Smithsonian National Zoo — Saving Species Through Science — Smithsonian's National Zoo — 125 Years —
Our science came of age in the 1960s with the establishment of a Zoological Research Department to study animals in the field as well as in the Zoo. Our growth in knowledge has been exponential. Today our science-based husbandry paired with . . . — Map (db m111612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — The 3 kW photovoltaic (PV) system
The 3 kW photovoltaic (PV) system, attached to the railing running alongside the large wall to your left, converts the sun's energy directly into electricity. The array will produce up to 4,500 kilowatt-hours of electricity each year, enough to run . . . — Map (db m111485) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Waterfront — Benjamin Banneker Park — National Mall and Memorial Parks, Washington, D.C. — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
“… it is the indispensable duty of those, who maintain for themselves the rights of human nature, ... to extend their power and influence to the relief of every part of the human race...” Benjamin Banneker, . . . — Map (db m130604) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Waterfront — 12 — The Law House In Peace and War — River Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail —
To your left across Water Street is the Thomas Law House, now a community center for the Tiber Island cooperative. The Federal style house was designed by William Lovering in 1794 for businessman Thomas Law and his bride Eliza Parke Custis, . . . — Map (db m130911) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Waterfront — Walter Reed
Walter Reed who gave man control over Yellow Fever Died in a hospital on this site November 23, 1902 — Map (db m80491) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Waterfront — Walter Reed 1851 - 1902 — Major, Medical Corps — United States Army Soldier, Physician, Teacher, Scientiest —
Major Reed died in this building on November 3, 1902. In 1900 Walter Reed led the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Board that documented the mosquito transmission of Yellow Fever, proved the existence of the first viral disease in man, and was the first . . . — Map (db m80493) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Spring Valley — Birthplace of the Army Chemical Corps
Soon after the United States entered the First World War in 1917, the American University’s offer of its campus and buildings for war work was accepted. The permanent buildings and part of campus were turned over to the Bureau of Mines on July 6, . . . — Map (db m34014) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), St. Elizabeths — History of St. Elizabeths Hospital — St. Elizabeths — Preserving the Legacy. Realizing Potential. —
Evolution of St. Elizabeths Campus At the urging of mental health care reformer Dorothea Dix, the United States Congress provided $100,000 to establish the first Federal mental health hospital to care for members of the Army and Navy as . . . — Map (db m131526) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), St. Elizabeths — Redevelopment of St. Elizabeths — St. Elizabeths — Preserving the Legacy. Realizing Potential. —
Bringing a Landmark Back to Life St. Elizabeths overs approximately 350 acres. The West Campus, on the other side of the historic wall in front of you, is comprised of 176 acres and is the oldest part of the historic campus. It is . . . — Map (db m131529) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), St. Elizabeths — St. Elizabeths Hospital
St. Elizabeths Hospital has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America. — Map (db m58305) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), St. Elizabeths — St. Elizabeths Hospital Civil War Cemetery
Founded during the Civil War for wounded soldiers that died on the St. Elizabeths Campus during and after the Civil War. This small cemetery houses the remains of some 300 Civil War dead, both Confederate and Union, Black and White. When the foliage . . . — Map (db m131712) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — A Common Language — Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden
Plant nomenclature is the naming of plants using the binomial (meaning "two names") system. The Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus introduced this method in 1753. Binomial nomenclature uses Latin to communicate scientific information on a global . . . — Map (db m110761) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — An Apple is a Rose — Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden
In the early 1900s, botanists reclassified the Spirea, Plum, and Apple families as subfamilies within the Rose family. This new categorization was embodied in Robert Frost's poem from 1927: The Rose Family by Robert Frost The . . . — Map (db m110772) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Lunar Calendars
The circles and moon phases marked on the pavement refer to a phenomenon known as lunar standstills. Lunar standstills occur every 18.6 years when the moon reaches a northern extreme at summer solstice and a southern extreme at winter solstice. This . . . — Map (db m110068) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Meadow
This museum's meadow environment consists of abundant grasses, wildflowers, and shrubs. The plants are perennials, growing or lying dormant with the seasons. Plant Medicine Meadows are important sources of medicinal plants used by . . . — Map (db m113955) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Solomon G. Brown
Solomon G. Brown (1829-1906), the Smithsonian’s first African-American employee, retired in 1906 after 54 years of service. Brown, well-known for his lectures on natural history, was also an avid poet and Anacostia community leader. . . . — Map (db m70118) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Spencer Fullerton Baird — 1823 - 1887
Second Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Pioneer in American Natural History [on reverse of statue:] ("Opus, Baskin, 1976") — Map (db m46418) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — The Modern Rose — Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden
"How cunningly nature hides every wrinkle of her inconceivable antiquity under roses and violets and morning dew." —Ralph Waldo Emerson Fossil evidence found in Colorado in the U.S. suggests that plants in the rose family have . . . — Map (db m110773) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Upland Hardwood Forest
You are standing next to an upland hardwood forest—a group of shrubs and more than 30 species of trees—that reflects the dense forests of the Blue Ridge Mountains and other local sites. The Forests' Bounty The Nanticoke and . . . — Map (db m113971) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), The National Mall — Uranus
This is the planet Uranus and its 4 largest moons at one 10-billionth actual size. If Uranus were this big, how far away would Earth and other planets be? look at the map on the lower panel to find your position in the solar system? . . . — Map (db m110095) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020