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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Related Historical Markers

To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
John Wilkes Booth Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Fuchs, March 31, 2007
John Wilkes Booth Marker
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m922) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1104) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — John Wilkes Booth
The assassin of Lincoln stopped here at the house of Mrs. Surratt to secure ammunition on the night of April 14, 1865. He rode on to "T.B." and then to Dr. Mudd's who set his broken leg. — Map (db m3612) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Home of Dr. Samuel Mudd(1833–1883)
John Wilkes Booth rested here for several hours on April 15, 1865, after receiving treatment for his broken leg. — Map (db m920) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Dr. Samuel A. MuddTreating an Assassin — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
This house was the home of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd and his wife, Sarah Frances Dyer. Early on the morning of April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth arrived here with a companion, David E. Herold, and asked Mudd to set Booth’s broken leg. Afterward, as . . . — Map (db m921) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — Village of BryantownCommercial Center — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
This building in the Bryantown Tavern, constructed about 1815. On April 15, 1865, the morning after President Lincoln’s assassination, Lt. David D. Dana made it his headquarters while pursuing John Wilkes Booth, the assassin, with a detachment of . . . — Map (db m4500) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — John Wilkes Booth and David Herold
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold remained hidden from April 16 to 21, 1865 in a nearby pine thicket, while Union troops searched for them. Thomas A. Jones brought them food and the newspapers. — Map (db m39524) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Pine Thicket“the instrument of his punishment” — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. After leaving the home of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd near . . . — Map (db m39528) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill
Mid-18th century farm house (with alterations after 1800) was home of Col. Samuel Cox. This southern sympathizer fed and sheltered fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David E. Herold before dawn on Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865 following Booth's . . . — Map (db m4458) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich HillThe Fugitives Seek Shelter — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryantown. Unsure of their . . . — Map (db m129036) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — "Huckleberry"
Home of Confederate Mail Agent, Thomas A. Jones, who helped to shelter, and aided the escape of John Wilkes Booth and David Herold in their flight, April 16th to 21st 1865. — Map (db m129119) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Crossing the PotomacOff into the Darkness — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two . . . — Map (db m128807) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m24540) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Dents MeadowOne mile →
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold set out from here for the Virginia shore during the night of April 21, 1865, in a boat supplied by Thomas A. Jones. — Map (db m128809) HM
Virginia (King George County), King George — EP-9 — Cleydael
This T-shaped house was built in 1859 by Dr. Richard Stuart as a summer residence for his family. On Sunday afternoon, April 23, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and three companions came to this house seeking medical assistance from Dr. Stuart. Suspicious . . . — Map (db m2925) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — John Wilkes Booth
This is the Garrett place, where John Wilkes Booth, assassin of Lincoln, was cornered by Union soldiers and killed, April 26, 1865. The house stood a short distance from this spot. — Map (db m1584) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Port RoyalBooth Turned Away — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
In front of you is the Brockenbrough-Peyton House where fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David Herold accompanied by three former Confederate soldiers arrived about 2:30 pm April 24, 1865, 10 days after Booth shot Lincoln. The owner, Randolph . . . — Map (db m4525) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — John Wilkes Booth
This is the Garrett place, where John Wilkes Booth, assassin of Lincoln, was cornered by Union soldiers and killed, April 26, 1865. The house stood a short distance from this spot. — Map (db m1584) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Star HotelConspirator's Lair
Built approximately 1820, the Star Hotel was one of two taverns serving Bowling Green. During the Civil War, it was operated by the Henry Gouldman family, and became a notorious Confederate spy headquarters and safe haven to those who aided Lincoln . . . — Map (db m116127) HM

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