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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Morris County Texas Historical Markers

 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker is on the right. image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, June 25, 2018
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker is on the right.
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7846 — Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Congregation traces its history to 1849, when area Presbyterians formally organized and began holding worship services in private homes. From 1852 to 1880, services were held in the Chapel Hill College building at this site. The congregation has . . . — Map (db m120017) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7847 — Daingerfield, C. S. A.
Civil War center for manufacturing, supply and travel. Place of enrollment of several Confederate army units. Local industries supporting the war effort included 3 tanyards--sidelines of the beef slaughtering trade that helped feed troops and . . . — Map (db m119459) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7851 — Morris County
Created and organized in 1875, with Daingerfield as county seat. Named for William W. Morris (1805-1883), who came to Texas in 1849, when the Civil War began in 1861, was in 8th Legislature that armed the state, enacted soldiers' families' relief . . . — Map (db m119468) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7849 — Rev. Nathan S. Johnson
Born in Virginia in 1802, Nathan Johnson spent his boyhood years near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. In 1824 he was licensed to preach and served as a Methodist missionary to the Cherokee Indians and others in the Tennessee Conference. Johnson brought his . . . — Map (db m119476) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7843 — Site of Chapel Hill College
Chartered 1850. Opened 1852 in brick building on land donated by Allen Urquhart, Republic of Texas surveyor. Founded by Marshall Presbytery of Cumberland Presbyterian Church, to educate ministers. Also offered courses in medicine, law and liberal . . . — Map (db m120016) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7848 — Site of Hussey & Logan's Mill and Gin Factory(1855-1897)
Made machinery to process most important crops in Texas: gin saws to take seeds from cotton, for cloth-making; grist mills to grind corn into meal for bread. During Civil War, when mills or parts could not be imported, gave vital aid to Texas . . . — Map (db m119475) HM
Texas (Morris County), Daingerfield — 7859 — Veteran of the American Revolution James Thompson(1759-1841)
Ancestors of James Thompson lived in Virginia in the 17th century. Thompson served in Capt. Bynum's Company of North Carolina Militia in 1781, helping win victory in the American Revolution. In pioneer spirit, he and his family later moved to . . . — Map (db m119477) HM
Texas (Morris County), Lone Star — 13788 — Iron Bluff Cemetery
Livingston Skinner (1795-1874) came to this part of Texas from Georgia in the early 1840s with his wife, Hedidah "Jodie" (Hughes) (1806-1881), and their children. The Iron Bluff Cemetery began as a family cemetery at the northwest corner of their . . . — Map (db m119844) HM
Texas (Morris County), Lone Star — 7857 — Site of Old Spearman's Ferry(1 mile west)
Operated along with a mill by E. B. Smith during the Republic of Texas. Bought by John Spearman in 1850. At this site in 1870 the state authorized a toll bridge. Fees ranged from 2˘ for a sheep to $1 for an 8-horse team and loaded wagon. This was at . . . — Map (db m119346) HM
Texas (Morris County), Snow Hill — 7856 — Snow Hill Baptist Church
Settlers began moving to this area, which they called Snow Hill, by the early 1840s. In 1852, local residents organized this congregation under the direction of the Rev. Samuel Morris. The first sanctuary, which also served as a community . . . — Map (db m120020) HM
Texas (Morris County), Snow Hill — 14248 — Snow Hill Cemetery
Snow Hill Cemetery Established 1870 Historic Texas CemeteryMap (db m120021) HM

11 markers matched your search criteria.
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