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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Civil War to Civil Rights Historical Markers

A set of three walking tours in Washington, DC featuring Civil War and Civil Rights related sites.
 
Chinatown Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. Makali Bruton, September 24, 2016
Chinatown Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), Chinatown — e.10 — Chinatown — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
dragons to bring rain, prosperity and friendship More than 280 dragons, crowned by 700 glazed tiles, look down from the Chinatown Friendship Archway before you. Symbols of the spirits that bring rain and prosperity in China, these . . . — Map (db m26935) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Chinatown — e.9 — Mary Surratt's Boarding House — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
"The nest in which the egg was hatched."President Andrew Johnson, April 1865. The building at 604 H Street, today Golo’s Chinese Restaurant, is intimately connected with the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at . . . — Map (db m16585) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.3 — Asbury United Methodist Church — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
Stories of slavery and freedom, of struggle and achievement are woven through the history of this African American congregation. Founded in 1836, by the time of the Civil War Asbury United Methodist Church was the preeminent Black church in the . . . — Map (db m70316) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .3 — Clara Barton, Angel of the Battlefield at Home — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“I have paid the rent of a room in Washington ... retaining it merely as a shelter to which I might return when my strength should fail me under exposure and labor at the field.” Clara Barton, December 1863. In November . . . — Map (db m36174) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.2 — Franklin Square - "Going into the country" — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
This urban oasis exists because President Andrew Jackson needed water. The site of excellent springs (a rare commodity in the early city when everyone was dependent on private wells), this square was purchased by the federal government in 1832 so . . . — Map (db m29594) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.7 — Freedom Plaza — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“I have a dream.”                             Martin Luther King, Jr. August 1963 The block-long plaza at 13th and Pennsylvania Avenue just ahead to your left honors civil rights leader Martin Luther King . . . — Map (db m28528) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .6 — John Wilkes Booth's Escape — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“My brother saw Booth as he came down the alley and turned into F Street.” Henry Davis, 1901. Twelve-year-old Henry Davis and his brother often looked out the back window of their Ninth Street home before they went to bed. They . . . — Map (db m28492) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .1 — Market Space: Yesterday’s Town Square — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Hay for the horses, produce for the table, live chickens for the pot, and a hat for your head.” All this and more could be had right here during the Civil War. The triangular area just ahead to your left was called Major Space. . . . — Map (db m27529) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.4 — New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“The churches are needed as never before for divine services,” President Abraham Lincoln So said President Lincoln from his pew in New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. While other churches were occupied by the federal government . . . — Map (db m32926) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .8 — Pennsylvania Avenue — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Main Street” for the city and the nation. Just a few steps ahead is Pennsylvania Avenue the inaugural parade route for every president since Thomas Jefferson and “Main Street” for local Washington since the city’s . . . — Map (db m29651) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.1 — The Church of the Epiphany — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Carpets, cushions, and hymnbooks were packed away ... ambulances began to stop ... lastly come the surgeons....” Margaret Leech, Reveille in Washington. Church spires dominated the skyline of the city of Washington at the . . . — Map (db m29618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.5 — The United States Treasury — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
Billions for the war, and a bunker for the president The grand, pillared United States Treasury building that stands before you, its first section designed by Robert Mills in 1836, was the financial command center for the Union. It was here . . . — Map (db m29578) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.6 — Willard Inter-Continental Hotel — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
"This hotel, in fact, may be much more justly called the center of Washington and the Union than either the Capitol, the White House or the State Department. . ." Nathaniel Hawthorne, Civil War reporter for the Atlantic Monthly At 6:30 a.m. . . . — Map (db m10905) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .7 — Woodies Comes to F Street — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
"Alvin, Washington, D.C. is the place for us." So wrote Samuel Walter Woodward to his business partner, Alvin Lothrop, in 1879. The young entrepreneurs were looking for a new location for their innovative dry goods store near Boston, . . . — Map (db m37223) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.6 — A Courthouse Reborn — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
(Front): The old City Hall/Courthouse endured hard use, was abandoned, and then was transformed. In 2009 it re-opened as the DC Court of Appeals, redesigned by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, which modernized the interior while . . . — Map (db m58612) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.5 — Building Out the Square — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
(Front): The great depression (1929-1941) meant economic catastrophe for millions of Americans, but in Washington it meant a building boom as the Federal Government staffed up to the end the economic crisis. In 1931 alone Congress approved . . . — Map (db m61823) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.1 — Chief Justice John Marshall — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
A bronze likeness of Chief Justice John Marshall, visible on your way to the next Heritage Trail sign, keeps watch over John Marshall Park to your right. Marshall is remembered for molding the U.S. Supreme Court into today's authoritative body. . . . — Map (db m56495) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.8 — Lillian and Albert Small Jewish Museum — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington “The neighborhood was our whole life.” Albert Small, born in the neighborhood in 1902. This is the oldest surviving synagogue building in Washington. Constructed in 1875 by . . . — Map (db m29761) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.2 — Old City Hall — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
"--witness to the end of slavery in the nation’s capital." This imposing Greek Revival building was Washington’s first city hall, designed by George Hadfield and built between 1820 and 1850. It house the city court and an elected mayor and . . . — Map (db m29655) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.3 — Senator Daniel Webster — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable,” Senator Daniel Webster, January 1830. Senator Daniel Webster, eloquent advocate for the preservation of the Union and a political giant in pre-Civil War America, . . . — Map (db m29708) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.4 — Sitting in Judgment — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
(Front): This imposing, Greek Revival style structure was designed by George Hadfield as Washington's first City Hall/Courthouse. Throughout its history, the building has housed the local and federal courts for DC, presided over by judges . . . — Map (db m58366) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.7 — The National Building Museum — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“It’s too bad the damn thing is fire proof,” General William Tecumseh Sherman, 1887. The nation’s only museum dedicated to American achievements in architecture, urban planning, construction, engineering, and design is . . . — Map (db m48661) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — .5 — Abraham Lincoln Walked Here — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Tonight, beautiful women, perfume, and the violins’ sweetness ... [yet during the war] the amputation, the blue face, the groan, the glassy eye of the dying.” Walt Whitman At 10:30 p.m. on March 4, 1865, a tired and gaunt . . . — Map (db m28665) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — .2 — Ceremony at the Crossroads — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Imagine a great avenue [with] solid ranks of soldiers, just marching steady all day long, for two days. ...” Walt Whitman. It took two days for the grand parade of 200,000 victorious Union soldiers described by the great American poet . . . — Map (db m14875) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — e.2 — Ending Slavery in Washington — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
To your right at the end of Indiana Avenue is Washington's first City Hall/Courthouse. Across Sixth Street is the H. Carl Moultrie I Courthouse, a successor to the original courthouse. The Old City Hall/Courthouse opened in 1822, with offices for . . . — Map (db m56124) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — .4 — The Roots of Freedom and Equality — Civil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“It is known to you that events have transpired within the last few days, deeply affecting the peace and character of our community.” With these words, city officials tried to calm the angry mobs gathering on this corner in April . . . — Map (db m25271) HM

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