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After filtering for Hawaii, 16 entries match your criteria.
 
 

Natural Features Topic

 
Mauna Ulu Marker image, Touch for more information
By Barry Swackhamer, September 4, 2017
Mauna Ulu Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Hawaii (Hawaii County), Pāhoa — Mauna Ulu
On May 24, 1969, a series of lava fountains erupted from a fissure which extended roughly from Aloi to Alae craters. The fountains soon concentrated between the two craters. Mauna Ulu, a new lava shield, was forming. By mid-summer of 1970, lava . . . — Map (db m111017) HM
2Hawaii (Hawaii County), Pāhoa — Mokumanamana is a place of spiritual and geologic transition
As these massive volcanoes move away from the hot spot, they cease to erupt, and slowly erode to become atolls, lagoons, and expansive sholes of coral reef. The island of Mokumanamana rises from the sea about halfway along the island chain and . . . — Map (db m111014) HM
3Hawaii (Hawaii County), Pāhoa — Nature's Untamed Forces Unite to Sculpt Sea Arches
Examine natures's creative handiwork, from the lava forged cliffs ma uka (uphill) of you, to the wave-battered Hōlei Sea Arch standing sentinel against the coastline. Sea arches, characterized as erosional remnants of a once-continuous sea . . . — Map (db m111010) HM
4Hawaii (Hawaii County), Pāhoa — The islands of Hawai'i begin here
'O ka lipolipo, 'o ka lipolipo In the unfathomable darkness, dark blue, and bottomless... Kumulipo, a Hawaiian creating chant, tells of the fiery beginnings of the earth that began in the primordial darkness of Pō. Just . . . — Map (db m111011) HM
5Hawaii (Hawaii County), Pāhoa — Vast coral reefs create a world of abundance
It takes 10 million years for a new Hawaiian island to subside and erode to sea level, yet its foundation continues to support life far beyond that. Upon the back of the eroded mountain range, tiny corals build extensive reefs. Due to their age . . . — Map (db m111016) HM
6Hawaii (Hawaii County), Volcano — Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano
Oli (chants) and mo'olelo (stories of this region recount the celebrated battle between Pelehonuamea (Pele, the volcano deity) and her sister, Hi'iakaikapoliopele (Hi'iaka), that erupted here at the summit of Kīlauea. After a series of . . . — Map (db m111041) HM
7Hawaii (Hawaii County), Volcano — KilaueaRising Smoke Cloud — Hawaii Volcanoes National Park —
A caldera has likely existed at Kilauea’s summit for as long as has the volcano. Collapse occurred repeatedly as magma swelled the summit area and then drained rapidly through the flanking rift zones. Large fault blocks have formed here and at . . . — Map (db m104768) HM
8Hawaii (Hawaii County), Volcano — Mauna Loa
In front of you looms the world's largest active volcano The summit of Mauna Loa stands 20 miles ahead of you, reaching an elevation of 13,677 feet above sea level and more that 31,000 feet above the ocean floor. With a volume of 10,000 . . . — Map (db m111040) HM
9Hawaii (Hawaii County), Volcano — The "Firepit" of Halema'uma'u
Halema'uma'u Crater is the site of the most eruptions at the summit of Kilauea Volcano. Between 1905 and 1924, a period of about 20 years, a dazzling lake of molten lava circulated within its walls. Then, in 1924, the lake drained away, allowing . . . — Map (db m26233) HM
10Hawaii (Kauai County), Poipu — 8 — Makawehi & Pā‘ā DunesKōloa Heritage Trail — Ka Ala Hele Waiwai Ho‘olina o Kōloa — Preserving the Heritage of Po‘ipū & Kōloa —
The eastern sand dunes of Makawehi, calm face, and Pā‘ā, hard rock, yield fossilized plant roots, bird bones, crab claws and other treasures. Prior to extensive wave erosion, this prominent limestone ridge extended across Keoneloa Bay. . . . — Map (db m12859) HM
11Hawaii (Kauai County), Poipu — 9 — Pu‘uwanawana Volcanic ConeKōloa Heritage Trail — Ka Ala Hele Waiwai Ho‘olina o Kōloa — Preserving the Heritage of Po‘ipū & Kōloa —
More than 5 million years ago, a hotspot in the earth spewed lava upward to form the volcanic mountain island of Kaua‘i. Nearby Hā‘upu Ridge and Mountain contain some of the oldest geologic formations. Look for the youngest volcanic cones, such . . . — Map (db m12864) HM
12Hawaii (Kauai County), Poipu — 1 — Spouting Horn ParkKōloa Heritage Trail — Ka Ala Hele Waiwai Ho‘olina o Kōloa — Preserving the Heritage of Po‘ipū & Kōloa —
Spouting Horn Park was called puhi, or blowhole, by early Hawaiians. Legends tell of a huge mo‘o, or lizard, caught in this puhi, which was formed when waves eroded softer, underlying rocks and wore through the harder top rock. Water rushing into . . . — Map (db m12764) HM
13Hawaii (Kauai County), Waimea — Pu'uhuluhuluDaniel K. Inouye Highway
What is a kīpuka? Pu'uhuluhulu, a 500-year old patter cone, is a kīpuka ( an older oasis within a newer lava flow). It preserves native plants and acts as a seed bank to revegetate the more recent lava flows that surround it. . . . — Map (db m110790) HM
14Hawaii (Maui County), Hana — Haleakala National ParkKipahulu: Costal District
The landscape of Haleakala National Park rises from a lush valley beneath a waterfall at sea level to a red desert of cinder cones here at the volcanic summit of Haleakala. An astounding array of climates and life zones lies in between. Yet the . . . — Map (db m62199) HM
15Hawaii (Maui County), Kula — Haleakalā National ParkSummit District
The landscape of Haleakalā National Park rises from a lush valley beneath a waterfall at sea level to a red desert of cinder cones here at the volcanic summit of Haleakala. An astounding array of climates and life zones lies in between. Yet the . . . — Map (db m71753) HM
16Hawaii (Maui County), Wailuku — Kūka‘emoku — [ʻĪao Valley] —
Commonly called ʻĪao Needle, the traditional Hawaiian name for this 2,250 foot high peak is Kūka‘emoku. This peak is known as the phallic stone of Kanaloa, Hawaiian god of the ocean. During periods of warfare, the peak was . . . — Map (db m31540) HM
 
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Feb. 26, 2021