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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Harlan County Kentucky Historical Markers

 
View to East Along State Highway 6 image, Touch for more information
By Duane Hall, August 3, 2016
View to East Along State Highway 6
Kentucky (Harlan County), Benham — 1995 — Joseph Alexander Matthews(1902 - 1970)
Principal of the East Benham High School, 1934-60. Matthews taught math and coached ball teams. The students were children of employees of Wisconsin Steel Company. Joseph Matthews and his wife Ruth were leaders in black community and bought food, . . . — Map (db m97118) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — City Water Plant
In 1933, the wells which supplied the town of Lynch and company mines were not producing enough water. Land was acquired on Lewis Creek in Letcher County for a filtration plant and 20,000 feet of 8 inch pipe was ordered. During the drought of . . . — Map (db m121695) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Coal Tipple
The original structure, which consisted of the concrete bin seen here and an additional 60 foot high steel super structure atop the concrete, was the largest coal tipple in the world when completed in 1930. The upper steel structure was used to . . . — Map (db m121694) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — History of Lynch
To build the town and mine support facilities Bog Looney Creek was rerouted and over one mile was walled with local quarried native sandstone. Among the structures chronicled here, the coal company constructed six miles of concrete paved . . . — Map (db m121691) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Lamp House No. 2
This lamp house was built about the same time as No. 31 Mine Portal. Shortly after it was built, and again during World War II, more than 2000 electric cap lamps were issued to miners each day, flame safety lamps were also issued to each foremen and . . . — Map (db m121791) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — 1803 — Lynch
Built by U.S. Steel Corp., 1917-25, this was largest company-owned town in Kentucky through World War II. Crucial need for steel during WWI led to founding of town, site of millions of tons of high-quality coal. With largest coal tipple then in . . . — Map (db m97159) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — 2109 — Lynch Colored High School - West Main High School
(Side One) This brick facility was built in 1923 by the United States Coal and Coke Co., then leased to Lynch Colored Common Graded School District. Students from Benham and Lynch enrolled in the high school. The first four graduates . . . — Map (db m97161) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Lynch Firehouse
This building, constructed of native sandstone, as were most of the mine structures, was completed about 1920. Machine shop personnel served as firemen. The second story of the firehouse quartered mining company personnel; usually ten to . . . — Map (db m121789) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Mine Ventilating Fan
This fan moved 50,000 cubic feet of air per minute to ventilate borehole conveyor entries. It replaced a 300,000 CFM Aerodyne fan in 1968, which, in turn, replaced a 150,000 CFM centrifugal fan to ventilate No. 31 Mine when it was in operation. — Map (db m121792) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — No. 31 Mine Portals
(panel 1) These portals were finished in 1920 while coal was being removed from temporary portals to the west. The main haulage goes straight through the mountain to Lewis Creek in Letcher Co., while an offset continues to Colliers . . . — Map (db m121687) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — No. 31 Mine Shop
On this concrete slab, a mining equipment repair shop was erected in an area that earlier was used as a mine car marshalling yard. The building was moved to No. 32 Mine in 1963, where it became the 5 South Main Bathhouse and Warehouse building. — Map (db m121692) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Power House
This building once housed boiler operated generators which furnished electric power to operate No.'s 30 & 31 mines and support facilities. In addition, it supplied electric power to all homes in Lynch. Originally four 150 KW D.C. generators were . . . — Map (db m121693) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Railroad Station
This railroad depot was finished in 1925. One of the few brick structures in Lynch because the stone quarries were closed by this date. This was a busy station, serving two passenger trains daily through the forties and then one train a day . . . — Map (db m121699) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Restaurant Building
This structure was completed in the early twenties. Because of its location astride Big Looney Creek, it was built of brick instead of native sandstone to reduce the weight. The restaurant was famous in the region for its foot long hotdogs and . . . — Map (db m121790) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — To Honor the Black Coal Miners
To Honor the Black Coal Miners and Keep Their Legacy Alive The Black Coal Miner was recruited by International Harvester and U.S. Steel to work and live in the coal camps of Benham and Lynch. They came in search of a better life, better . . . — Map (db m97160) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Lynch — Winifrede Mine Conveyor
This conveyor, installed in 1968, transported coal at a rate of 500 tons per hour from the Winifrede mine borehole (1800 feet underground in No. 31 mine) to the 2300 ton silo at the tipple. Three entries in No. 31 mine were rehabilitated in 1968 . . . — Map (db m121689) HM
Kentucky (Harlan County), Partridge — Highest Point in KentuckyElevation 4,139 Feet
This plaque is in memory of William Risden (1914-1994) WW II Veteran An innovator and devotee of electronic technology, Risden was a pioneer in the cable TV industry credited with building the first cable system in Kentucky. Taking advantage . . . — Map (db m121223) HM WM

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