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Reeves County Texas Historical Markers

 
Red Bluff Dam Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Kirchner, July 10, 2015
Red Bluff Dam Marker
Texas (Reeves County), Orla — 4216 — Red Bluff Dam(Three miles northeast)
Constructed for irrigation and electrical power purposes during 1934-36, dam is located on Pecos River 8 miles south of Texas-New Mexico state line. It impounds an 11,700-acre lake occupying parts of Reeves and Loving Counties, Tex., and Eddy . . . — Map (db m85523) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 1473 — Emigrants' Crossing(20 mi. SE)
One of the few spots where pioneer travelers could cross the Pecos River by fording. At Emigrants' Crossing, the deep, treacherous river flows over exposed rock. It is one of only three fords in a 60-mile segment of the stream, and was the one . . . — Map (db m61266) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 1662 — First Baptist Church of Pecos City
The Rev. Sumner Battle Callaway (1852-1916) led the organization of this Baptist Church in 1885 and served as its first pastor. Callaway had come to Texas from Georgia and had been Gov. Richard Hubbard's private secretary and a lawyer before . . . — Map (db m85524) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 1701 — First Christian Church
This congregation grew out of a community Sunday school begun by Mrs. Peyton Parker in the Parker Hotel in 1881. One participant, pharmacist B.P. Van Horn (1852-1932), arranged a revival in 1891 that resulted in formation of the First Christian . . . — Map (db m61217) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 2158 — George R. Reeves
(Front): County Named for Texas Confederate George R. Reeves 1826-1887 Organized, captained company in 11th Texas Cavalry at start Civil War. Served in Arkansas, Indian Territory, Kentucky invasion of 1862. Assigned to Wheeler's Cavalry in . . . — Map (db m61218) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 3512 — Mrs. Lillie W. Cole(Aug. 31, 1884 – July 26, 1939)
Outstanding and dedicated teacher; public benefactor. Born in Lavernia, Texas. Came to Pecos, 1906, with husband Wylie Moffitt Cole. They had two daughters. Widowed in 1912, started teaching career which lasted for 27 years. — Map (db m61267) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 3699 — Old Camp Hospital
First permanent hospital in the Trans-Pecos area. Erected 1929 by pioneer physician and surgeon, Jim Camp, M.D. -- "Texas Doctor of the year" for 1950. "Dr. Jim" came to Pecos in 1900. In early days, he performed many operations using kitchen tables . . . — Map (db m61236) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 3868 — Orient Hotel
"Finest from Ft. Worth to El Paso." Saloon built 1896 of Pecos Valley red sandstone. Hotel opened 1907 by R.S. Johnson, owner. Headquarters for land promoters, salesmen, families of settlers in early years of Pecos Valley development. Restored . . . — Map (db m61271) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 4029 — Pioneer Graveyard
Earliest Pecos landmark. Started with burial of men in hazardous work of building Texas & Pacific Railroad, 1881. Used over 30 years by settlers in the Pecos Valley. First markers, of native red stone or wood, have now been lost or effaced in . . . — Map (db m61272) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 4071 — Pope's Crossing
Used by emigrants and the Southern (Butterfield) Overland Mail which linked St. Louis and San Francisco with semi-weekly mail, 1858-1861. Headquarters in 1855 of Captain John Pope, supervisor of the drilling of the first deep well west of the 98th . . . — Map (db m80284) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 4227 — Reeves County-Pecos, Texas
Flat, arid, grassy land with a moderate water supply from the Pecos River and springs in Toyah Valley. Yuma Indians are thought to have done irrigated farming here in 16th century. Mexicans later raised vegetables, grain. Cattlemen moved in . . . — Map (db m61269) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 4998 — Spanish Explorers
Antonio de Espejo in 1583, after exploring among pueblos in New Mexico, reached the Pecos River southeast of Santa Fe. He named it Rio de Las Vacas (River of Cows), for the abundance of buffalo. On his return route to Mexico he went down the river . . . — Map (db m73303) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 5397 — The Pecos Cantaloupe
Nationally famed melon, originated in this city. Residents from 1880s grew melons in gardens, noting sun and soil imparted a distinctive flavor. Madison L. Todd (March 22, 1875-Sept. 10, 1967) and wife Julia (Jan. 30, 1880-Feb. 5, 1969) came here . . . — Map (db m61270) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Pecos — 5909 — World's First Rodeo
Held a block south of Pecos Courthouse, July 4, 1883. Started with claims of cattle outfits--NA, Lazy Y, and W Ranches--that each had fastest steer ropers. Settlers in town for Fourth of July picnic were spectators. The prizes were blue ribbons . . . — Map (db m61235) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Toyah — 5548 — Toyah
Began as division point, 1881, on T. & P. Railway, with shops, roundhouse, hotel, cafe. Water was hauled from Monahans and sold by the barrel. Stage took passengers and mail to Brogado. 1882. Cattle shipping brought . . . — Map (db m86980) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Toyahvale — 16611 — Mission Mary
From 1895 to 1935, Father Nicholas Brocardus Eiken served several mission stations in this region, including Mission Mary, established by 1902 in the Calera Community. The original adobe and rubble sanctuary was built in 1925 and featured pillars, . . . — Map (db m73261) HM
Texas (Reeves County), Toyahvale — 4557 — San Solomon Spring
Called "Mescalero Spring" in 1849, when watering corn and peaches of the Mescalero Apaches. To Ft. Davis soldiers, 1856, was "Head Spring". Present name given by first permanent settlers, Mexican farmers. Miller, Lyles and Murphy in 1871 began . . . — Map (db m59706) HM

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