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Looking for Lincoln Historical Markers

A series of over 200 markers in Illinois highlight incidents in Lincoln's life.
 
A Quincy "Copperhead" Marker image, Touch for more information
By Jason Voigt, May 12, 2020
A Quincy "Copperhead" Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — A Quincy "Copperhead"Looking for Lincoln
Singleton had succumbed "Hook and Line" to the Democrats, stated Lincoln in 1854. He and Quincyan James W. Singleton had been fellow Whigs and disciples of Henry Clay. They had campaigned together in 1848 during Whig Zachary Taylor's . . . Map (db m150599) HM
2Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — A Victorian CemeteryLooking for Lincoln
Woodland Cemetery—The necropolis that in life (Cornelius Volk) did so much to beaut(ify) and make attractive" (Quincy Daily-Herald, 1898). Among significant historical Woodland memorials are the gravestones of Orville and . . . Map (db m150258) HM
3Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Douglas' DiscipleLooking for Lincoln
"I regard (Richardson) as one of the truest men that ever lived; he 'sticks to judge Douglas through thick and thin" (A. Lincoln, 1860). Douglas composed the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act. William A. Richardson, another Quincyan and Douglas' . . . Map (db m58760) HM
4Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Downtown Quincy in 1858Looking for Lincoln
Sixteen days of rain had laid a coat of mud over the macadam streets that wrapped the city's square. Called the "Model City" because of its beautiful setting on the bluffs, Quincy in 1858 occupied about five square miles within . . . Map (db m58759) HM
5Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — His Friends Rest HereLooking for Lincoln
"Here, too, the father of the town, with other men of large renown, are gathered by that reaper stern, who cuts down each and all in turn" (Henry Asbury, Reminiscences of Quincy, Illinois". Referring to the leaders from an earlier . . . Map (db m150257) HM
6Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln CorrespondentLooking for Lincoln
"The points you propose to press upon Douglas, he will be very hard to get up to" ):Lincoln letter to Henry Asbury, 1858). Originally a Kentucky Whig, Henry Asbury was one of the founders of the Republican Party in Illinois along with . . . Map (db m58753) HM
7Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln PromoterLooking for Lincoln
"You are one of my most valued friends" (Lincoln letter to Abraham Jonas, 1860). Their friendship began in 1843 in Springfield when Lincoln and Jonas served together in the Illinois House of Representatives. Jonas became an early and . . . Map (db m58764) HM
8Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln Recuperates
Lincoln Was Exhausted after the debate with Douglas. "I tell you, I'm mighty nigh petered out; I reckon I'll have to quit and give up the race." That was Lincoln's comment on October 13, 1858; he was in a "state of . . . Map (db m156849) HM
9Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln-Douglas DebateLooking for Lincoln
On October 13 1858, two candidates for U.S. Senate met in this public square for a sixth debate. Quincy, in the west-central portion of the state, was a true battleground area where both candidates saw reasonable prospects of victory. . . . Map (db m58781) HM
10Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's 1854 VisitLooking for Lincoln
On November 1, 1854 an incensed Lincoln attacked the immorality of slavery in a speech at Kendall Hall. Lincoln was awakened from a five-bear political slumber by Douglas's Kansas-Nebraska Act, attacking it in a series of speeches in . . . Map (db m149831) HM
11Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's ConfidanteLooking for Lincoln
Quincy's Eliza Caldwell Browning and Abraham Lincoln first met in 1836. She was a new bride, and he had just received his law license. When Eliza discovered Lincoln's "great merits," the two established an easy rapport. Their . . . Map (db m58739) HM
12Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Friend JohnstonLooking for Lincoln
Quincy lawyer and newspaper editor Andrew Johnston became acquainted with Abraham Lincoln in the Illinois Legislature when Lincoln served as representative and Johnson as assistant clerk. Like Lincoln, a Whig, Johnston was a law partner . . . Map (db m58795) HM
13Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Honored FriendLooking for Lincoln
"Archie Williams was one of the strongest-minded and clearest-minded men in Illinois" (A. Lincoln). Lincoln and his friend Archibald Williams had much in common. Both were born in Kentucky and moved to Illinois. Williams coming to Quincy . . . Map (db m58790) HM
14Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's QuincyLooking for Lincoln
With a population of nearly 13,000 in 1858, Quincy was the Adams County seat and the third largest city in Illinois. Quincy boasted a strong, growing economy based on its transportation, milling, pork packing, and light industry. In 1853 . . . Map (db m58755) HM
15Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Political AlliesLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln and John Wood shared similar political views, Both were members of the Whig Party and were strongly allied against slavery. Lincoln and Wood worked to establish the Republican Party, and each campaigned for the other's . . . Map (db m58737) HM
16Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Political Campaigning in 1858Looking for Lincoln
Quincy was in a festive mood for the all-day event with bands, banners, and thousands of people in attendance. Historian E.B. Long said, "It was a carnival time in Illinois. Mobs of thousands journeyed by wagon, horseback, boat and . . . Map (db m150023) HM
17Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Quincy's Early Environment1848
Timbered hills, tall prairie grasses, ravines, creeks, and springs were prominent features of Quincy in Lincoln's time. Originally called "Bluffs," the town grew along the Mississippi's east bank and on the heights . . . Map (db m156922) HM
18Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Quincy's Judge DouglasLooking for Lincoln
"His name fills the nation; and is not unknown, even in foreign lands" (A. Lincoln, 1856). Stephen A. Douglas, a Jacksonian Democrat, arrived in Quincy in 1841, at twenty-seven the youngest Supreme Court Judge in Illinois history. In . . . Map (db m150024) HM
19Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Search for EqualityLooking for Lincoln
"Who shall say, I am the superior, and you are the inferior?" asked Lincoln in July 1858. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates focused on slavery. During the October 13th Quincy debate Lincoln affirmed: "...in the right to eat the bread . . . Map (db m58798) HM
20Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Steamboats and RailroadsLooking for Lincoln
Lincoln traveled to Quincy by stagecoach in 1854 after crossing the Illinois River at Naples. Lincoln's first documented visit was to support the Congressional candidacy of Archibald Williams and to attack the Kansas- Nebraska Act and . . . Map (db m57881) HM
21Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Tri-State Business CenterLooking for Lincoln
Quincy's brewers and brick makers, contractors and coopers, foundry and factory workers, and diverse other tradesmen made this Mississippi River community an important center of commerce in Lincoln's day. Quincy's businessmen, whose . . . Map (db m57883) HM
22Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Warm, Sincere FriendshipLooking for Lincoln
Quincy's Orville Hickman Browning was Lincoln's friend, advisor, and confidant. According to historian David Donald, Lincoln considered Browning an old friend "whom he could absolutely trust. He knew the Illinois senator would never . . . Map (db m58742) HM
23Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Captain Abraham LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Rejecting a treaty, Black Hawk, a leader of the Sauk and Fox, led his hungry people back into Illinois from Iowa in early 1832, intending to plant corn. Black Hawk also hoped to form an alliance with the Winnebago and Pottawatomie. . . . Map (db m57691) HM
24Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln and BlackhawkLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln and his men were among the 1,500 or so volunteers who had poured into Beardstown for basic military drills. These men had answered Gen. John Reynolds' call to drive Black Hawk and his people out of Illinois. The military . . . Map (db m57689) HM
25Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln and the RiverLooking for Lincoln
When Abraham Lincoln sought election to the Illinois legislature in 1832, his platform focused on his belief that improvements should be made to the Sangamon River, which he said would be "vastly important and highly desirable to the . . . Map (db m57856) HM
26Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln in BeardstownLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln first saw Beardstown in the Spring of 1831 as he, two friends, and Denton Offutt steered Offutt's flatboat laden with merchandise on their way to New Orleans. He returned in 1832, first in March to help get the steamer . . . Map (db m57693) HM
27Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln PhotographLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln had just won an acquittal for his client William Duff Armstrong in what is now known as the celebrated Almanac Trial of May 7, 1858. At the conclusion of the trial, held on the second floor of the Cass County Courthouse . . . Map (db m57858) HM
28Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln the CandidateLooking for Lincoln
People in Cass County knew Abraham Lincoln not only as a lawyer but also as a candidate for the Illinois legislature and U.S. Congress. Those earlier campaigns allowed Lincoln to hone his political skills for the 1858 senatorial content . . . Map (db m57861) HM
29Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln the LawyerLooking for Lincoln
It is the celebrated "Almanac Trial" of May 7, 1858 that has forever linked Abraham Lincoln with Beardstown. On that day, Lincoln defended William Duff Armstrong, the son of Lincoln's closest New Salem friends Jack and Hannah Armstrong. . . . Map (db m57859) HM
30Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Traveling to BeardstownLooking for Lincoln
Travel in Abraham Lincoln's time was time-consuming, dirty, and usually downright uncomfortable. On many of his trips, Lincoln traveled by train to Meredosia. From there he had the choice of a steamboat or a bone-jarring ride in a . . . Map (db m57863) HM
31Illinois (Champaign County), Champaign — Champaign's LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Until the Illinois Central Railroad rolled into town, geese flocked to a pond in this vicinity. The IC cleared the pond and donated the land to the Congregationalist (today the Community United Church of Christ). Their sanctuary, completed near the . . . Map (db m31113) HM
32Illinois (Champaign County), Homer — On The Bloomington Road / The Clark NeighborhoodLooking for Lincoln
On the Bloomington Road The Fort Clark Road, later known as the Bloomington or State Road, was an important artery for commerce between Danville and Urbana. The road was first approved in 1826 by the Illinois Assembly. It was the first . . . Map (db m23850) HM
33Illinois (Champaign County), Mahomet — Champaign County's LincolnLooking for Lincoln
(Top Section) Champaign County was always on Lincoln’s circuit. Abraham Lincoln spent nearly 20 years of his life practicing law on the 8th Judicial Circuit, traveling from one county seat to another. Even as the circuit shrank while . . . Map (db m24340) HM
34Illinois (Champaign County), Mahomet — Lincoln's Mahomet / Mahomet's LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Lincoln’s Mahomet Upper Section The village of Middletown-Mahomet was platted by Daniel Porter in 1832 on the west bank of the Sangamon River near its headwaters. The main street of the village was actually a new road, made necessary by . . . Map (db m24374) HM
35Illinois (Champaign County), St. Joseph — Lincoln at Kelley's TavernLooking for Lincoln
Kelley’s Tavern was originally called Strong’s Inn after Cyrus Strong, who built a mud-mortar log cabin here in the 1830's. The inn at Strong’s Ford was a stop on the Bloomington or State Road from Danville west to Urbana. Kelley’s Inn was a stop . . . Map (db m23803) HM
36Illinois (Champaign County), Tolono — Lincoln in TolonoLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln traveled through Tolono by locomotive at least eighteen times. He whiled the time away for his train connections by playing horseshoes and visiting with the Tolono residents. While campaigning in Illinois, Lincoln would frequently . . . Map (db m23816) HM
37Illinois (Champaign County), Urbana — Lincoln & PhotographyLooking for Lincoln
Top Section During the Spring term of the Circuit Court in 1858, Abraham Lincoln sat for a portrait with photographer Samuel Alschuler. Alschuler’s studio was on the second floor of the Lowenstern Building, at the southwest corner of . . . Map (db m31120) HM
38Illinois (Champaign County), Urbana — Urbana's LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Top Section Murder, larceny, and even rape- - -the young circuit lawyer Abraham Lincoln, practicing in Urbana, handled cases involving all of these in the courthouse which stood on this city block. Lincoln unsuccessfully defended . . . Map (db m31119) HM
39Illinois (Christian County), Taylorville — The Last StopLooking for Lincoln
“I had pleasant accommodations at Taylorville in company with Mr. Lincoln & Mr. Thorton,” Circuit Judge David Davis once wrote from here. He found this town–the last county seat on his circuit route–to be . . . Map (db m12208) HM
40Illinois (Coles County), Charleston — Rally After the Debate / Lincoln in Coles CountyLooking for Lincoln
Side One Top Section Nineteenth-century Illinois political campaigns and rallies were raucous affairs, part entertainment and part serious politics. The candidates were often accompanied or preceded by marchers, fireworks, flag . . . Map (db m30866) HM
41Illinois (Coles County), Lerna — Lincoln's Care for His FamilyLooking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln was a frequent visitor to Cole County in the 1840's, traveling on the judicial circuit. In Charleston, according to Amanda Hanks Poorman (the daughter of Dennis Hanks), Lincoln would use the Hanks’s horse . . . Map (db m30847) HM
42Illinois (Coles County), Mattoon — Lincoln's Last Visit / The Debaters in MattoonLooking for Lincoln
Side One Top Section Abraham Lincoln’s last visit to Cole County was indeed of a personal nature. Lincoln was described as he left Springfield by Henry C. Whitney, who accompanied him part of the way on the train: “. . . . . Map (db m30840) HM
43Illinois (Coles County), Oakland — The Matson Slave TrialLooking for Lincoln
Top Section Dr. Hiram Rutherford was a key person involved in Abraham Lincoln’s famous slave case, the only instance in his career where Lincoln represented the rights of a slave owner. Robert Matson brought slaves from Kentucky to work his . . . Map (db m30867) HM
44Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Friends To The EndLooking for Lincoln
During the twenty years Abraham Lincoln attended the DeWitt County Court on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, he and Clifton H. Moore, Clinton’s first resident attorney, developed a deep friendship as well as a mutual law practice. The two men . . . Map (db m24298) HM
45Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Humorous MomentsLooking for Lincoln
Barnett Tavern, owned and operated by Alvin and Rebecca Barnett, stood at 200 South Center Street. The two-story home was a stopping-place for weary travelers, circuit lawyers, and judges journeying across the Illinois prairie. When in Clinton, . . . Map (db m24236) HM
46Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Lincoln and The LawLooking for Lincoln
During his twenty years on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Abraham Lincoln tried numerous cases in the DeWitt County courthouses, including a slander case involving William Dungey. Dungey, “a dark skinned man of Portuguese descent,” . . . Map (db m24237) HM
47Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Lincoln at Work and PlayYou Can't Fool the People — Looking for Lincoln —
Top Section DeWitt County was part of the Eighth Judicial Circuit from its beginning, and so was Abraham Lincoln, who attended the first session of DeWitt Circuit Court in Clinton on October 24, 1839. Court sessions were held each . . . Map (db m24321) HM
48Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Lincoln's Friends and FoesLooking for Lincoln
Top Section This satirical February 1863 editorial illustration, titled “The Copperhead Party, “ depicts three Copperheads advancing on Columbia. Copperheads were Southern sympathizers who saw themselves as “Peace Democrats,” opposed to . . . Map (db m24235) HM
49Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Lincoln's HatLooking for Lincoln
A proper Presbyterian Church was under construction in the summer of 1859. A floor was laid, walls, roof, and belfry nearly completed, when “a halt due to lack of funds” occurred. In October 1859, money was urgently needed to . . . Map (db m24247) HM
50Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — On The Campaign TrailLooking for Lincoln
Top Section Clifton H. Moore, DeWitt County’s first resident attorney, built this stately brick home in 1857-58 on an eighty-acre tract of land purchased from Judge David Davis. The original house suffered damage from a windstorm and now lacks . . . Map (db m24301) HM
51Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — War on the HorizonLooking for Lincoln
Left Section When Lincoln called for troops to defend the Union, the men and boys of DeWitt County heeded his urgent request. Some who volunteered were from families who had know and befriended Lincoln during his days as a prairie lawyer . . . Map (db m24253) HM
52Illinois (DeWitt County), Clinton — Warner's Memories / Lawyers and Book LoversLooking for Lincoln
Warner's Memories Top Section Lincoln traveled the Eighth Judicial Circuit six months a year, becoming close friends with his fellow lawyers, with whom he shared, not only courtroom, but also meals, an easy camaraderie, and often a . . . Map (db m24325) HM
53Illinois (DeWitt County), DeWitt — The Law and Lodging / Whiskey MayhemLooking for Lincoln
The Law and Lodging Top Section During his years traveling the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Abraham Lincoln was the overnight guest of many DeWitt County residents. As a frontier lawyer, he spent several months per year . . . Map (db m24371) HM
54Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Ebenezer Capps' Store1837 — Looking for Lincoln —
The store of Ebenezer Capps was located just north of this site at the northeast corner of Main and Fourth streets. The location of Main street is not the same today as when Lincoln was here. Vandalia existed long before the coming of . . . Map (db m42486) HM
55Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — First Elective Office1834
On December 1, 1834 Abraham Lincoln entered the State Capitol that stood on this site. This was his first term as a state representative and the first time he held elective office. The Abraham Lincoln that began his political career on that . . . Map (db m42510) HM
56Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — First Protest Against Slavery1837
At the beginning of Lincoln's second term as a state representative, several southern legislatures were concerned that the Federal Government would abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. Most of the members of the Illinois Legislature . . . Map (db m42490) HM
57Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Internal Improvements1837
In Lincoln’s first campaign speech on March 9, 1832, he expressed support for internal improvements. “Time and experience have verified to a demonstration, the public utility of internal improvements. That the poorest and most . . . Map (db m42512) HM
58Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln and the "Long Nine"1836
The delegation from Sangamon County for the 1836-1837 Session of the legislature quickly became known as the "Long Nine." The seven representatives and two senators were all six feet or taller. Five were lawyers, three were farmers, and one . . . Map (db m42485) HM
59Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln As A Polished Politician1836 — Looking for Lincoln —
On December 5, 1836 Abraham Lincoln attended the opening session of the Tenth Gereral Assembly in Vandalia. This session was held in a new building just recently completed by the citizens of Vandalia to serve as the State Capitol. It was . . . Map (db m42517) HM
60Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln Attends Funerals1835 — Looking for Lincoln —
On June 12, 1823, the Third General Assembly, meeting in the newly formed city of Vandalia, conveyed one and one-half acres of land to the city of Vandalia, with the proviso that the land be used as a burial ground. This is the location of that . . . Map (db m42428) HM
61Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln Travels To The Capital1834 — Looking for Lincoln —
Abraham Lincoln traveled past this spot while he served as a state representative in Vandalia. This location marks the route of a road that ran from Vandalia to Springfield, Illinois. Traces of the roadway are still visible today. The roadway . . . Map (db m42527) HM
62Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Unorthodox Romance1834 — Looking for Lincoln —
Not all of Lincoln’s time was dedicated to noble causes like opposing slavery and championing internal improvements. In 1833, Mrs. Bennett Abell, a New Salem neighbor of Lincoln, brought her sister Mary Owens to New Salem for an extended visit. . . . Map (db m42521) HM
63Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Where Did Lincoln Stay?1834 — Looking for Lincoln —
As the Illinois State Capital, Vandalia provided many hotels to serve the needs of legislators and visitors. Vandalia had at least eleven hotels that served the needs of travelers. Whenever a session of the legislature was in progress, these . . . Map (db m144134) HM
64Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Hamilton HouseLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln probably stayed at the Hamilton House when he came to Carthage in 1839 to serve as the defendant's counsel in the Fraim murder trial. There are no other known Lincoln court cases in Hancock County. But he did handle . . . Map (db m57867) HM
65Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Historic Carthage JailLooking for Lincoln
Alexander Sympson knew Lincoln when they were small boys in Kentucky. Like Lincoln, he moved to Illinois in the 1830's, and arrived in Carthage in early 1844, just as contention with the Mormons was peaking. In 1858 Sympson was the most . . . Map (db m57869) HM
66Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln and AgricultureLooking for Lincoln
Agricultural life has defined the very essence of Hancock County from the earliest days of its Anglo-American settlement. Lincoln, however, seemed indifferent to agriculture. Once he left his father's home, Lincoln never farmed again. . . . Map (db m57876) HM
67Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln in Hancock CountyLooking for Lincoln
Hancock County was off the beaten track for Abraham Lincoln. County residents were more familiar with his senatorial opponent, Stephen A. Douglas. In October 1858, Lincoln addressed an enthusiastic audience on the Carthage square. . . . Map (db m57871) HM
68Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln's Carthage SpeechLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln defended himself against political attacks during much of the speech he delivered here on the courthouse grounds on October 22, 1858. Stephen A. Douglas, who had spoken here eleven days earlier, had accused Lincoln of . . . Map (db m57878) HM
69Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln's Failed Murder CaseLooking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln lost a murder case here in April, 1839 A drunken Irish deckhand, William Fraim, killed a shipmate while their steamboat was docked at Frederick on the Illinois River in Schuyler County. When the shipmate blew cigar smoke . . . Map (db m57865) HM
70Illinois (Knox County), Galesburg — The Fifth DebateLooking for Lincoln
[Left panel] Lincoln and Douglas debated here on October 7, 1858. Their joint meeting was one of seven across Illinois as they contested Stephen A. Douglas's seat in the Senate that summer and fall. Here in . . . Map (db m150565) HM
71Illinois (LaSalle County), Ottawa — First Lincoln-Douglas DebateLooking for Lincoln
First Lincoln-Douglas Debate Abraham Lincoln's first heated exchanged with Stephen A. Douglas on Aug 21, 1858 in Ottawa was received coolly by his advisors. They insisted Lincoln had treated Douglas entirely too "tenderly." . . . Map (db m65302) HM
72Illinois (LaSalle County), Ottawa — Lincoln the LitigatorLooking for Lincoln
On this site stood the Third LaSalle County Courthouse. Actually the second courthouse to be erected at this location, the Third LaSalle County Courthouse was completed in the latter part of 1841. It was a two-story brick structure, with imposing . . . Map (db m65303) HM
73Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Citizenry Mourn LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Left Section When word of President Lincoln’s assassination came, most of Pontiac’s male population had not yet returned from the Civil War. But their wives and children remained, and when word was received that the special train . . . Map (db m29731) HM
74Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — County Seat Almost MovedLooking for Lincoln
Left Section Riding the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Lincoln pleaded cases in Livingston County’s first courthouse located on this site. But these events almost did not come to pass. The town proprietors had promised a courthouse, which two . . . Map (db m29675) HM
75Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Fell Leads The WayLooking for Lincoln
Top Section Photo Lincoln’s good friend Jesse Fell had more to do with shaping early events in Livingston County and Pontiac than any other man. He named the county and, in 1837, was instrumental in having the county seat located here. . . . Map (db m29727) HM
76Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Slept HereLooking for Lincoln
Upper Section When Abraham Lincoln rode into Pontiac that rainy day, he found few cabins, and those were so scattered and hidden among the clumps of bushes that they were rendered almost invisible. Lincoln stayed overnight in a log . . . Map (db m29683) HM
77Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Speaks at ChurchLooking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln spoke in the little Presbyterian Church on the northwest corner of Livingston and Mill streets on Jan. 27, 1860, shortly before being nominated for the presidency at the Republican . . . Map (db m29719) HM
78Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Stranded HereLooking For Lincoln
Left Section In February 1855,Abraham Lincoln was with a group of sixty passengers stranded in Pontiac after a train, bound for Springfield from Chicago, became mired in a snowdrift just this side of where the village of Cayuga was . . . Map (db m29717) HM
79Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Visits StrevellLooking for Lincoln
Left Section While sitting up late the night of January 27, 1860, in the Pontiac home of Jason Strevell, Abraham Lincoln predicted he would be nominated for the vice presidency of the young Republican party. In a letter to . . . Map (db m29725) HM
80Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Wins His CaseLooking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas were opposing attorneys during Livingston County’s first regular term of circuit court, which was held on this site May 18 and 19, 1840, in Henry Weed’s log cabin. In the first . . . Map (db m29676) HM
81Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Riverbank DebateLooking for Lincoln
Photo Text - Upper Section Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, young attorneys who had faced each other earlier in Livingston County’s first court case, later the same day debated political issues at this very site. At the Old . . . Map (db m29689) HM
82Illinois (Logan County), Atlanta — "Wide Awakes" March in AtlantaLooking for Lincoln — 1860 —
Political parties in 1860 often served as social clubs, as well as electoral organizations. One such group established to support Abraham Lincoln was the "Wide Awakes" - a chapter of which was formed in Atlanta, Illinois on June 22, 1860, with . . . Map (db m160708) HM
83Illinois (Logan County), Elkhart — Lincoln's Elkhart ConnectionLooking for Lincoln
(left:) Elkhart's central location, superb soil and timberland attracted the first settlers in 1818. James Latham and his son, Richard, chose the hill's western slope to settle. Robert Latham, the youngest son, would later play a . . . Map (db m156859) HM
84Illinois (Logan County), Lincoln — Lincoln's LincolnTown Christening Site — "Looking for Lincoln" —
Town Christening Site On August 27, 1853 the first sale of lots in the new town of Lincoln took place near this spot. In attendance was Abraham Lincoln, in whose honor the town had been named. “Nothing with the name of Lincoln has . . . Map (db m12305) HM
85Illinois (Logan County), Middletown — Middletown's LincolnLooking for Lincoln
Middletown was founded in 1832 by Hiram S. Allen. Middletown was an excellent business location because stagecoaches already ran through the area, going from Springfield to Galena, carrying both passengers and mail. The first lot to be sold in . . . Map (db m41279) HM
86Illinois (Logan County), Mt. Pulaski — Circuit Court StopLooking for Lincoln
Mid-19th Century Lawyers riding the eighth judicial circuit sometimes found that local accommodations left much to be desired. If they were lucky, a prosperous local resident would invite them into their home. If not, they were at the mercy of . . . Map (db m41239) HM
87Illinois (Logan County), Mt. Pulaski — Lincoln's Law PracticeLooking for Lincoln
Lincoln illustrator Lloyd Ostendorf imagined this scene in connection with Mt. Pulaski's "cast iron tombstone" case that Lincoln handled on appeal in the Illinois Supreme Court in Springfield (1859). Two local residents separately sued Reuben Miller . . . Map (db m41242) HM
88Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — A "Favorite" Lies HereLooking for Lincoln
John Hanks was born in 1802 in Kentucky, he was a second cousin of Abraham Lincoln through Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln. John Hanks stated that he first knew Lincoln when he was a boy of twelve in Spencer County, Indiana. However, it . . . Map (db m41240) HM
89Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Choosing a PresidentLooking for Lincoln
In February 1860 the Illinois State Republican Central Committee met in Springfield, Illinois. There the Committee selected Decatur as the site for the upcoming State Republican Convention. The site selected for the Convention was . . . Map (db m56911) HM
90Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Getting There from HereLooking for Lincoln
The road beside this wayside exhibit is West Main Street. It was one of the main routes into and out of the City of Decatur all during the time of Lincoln's travels as a lawyer on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, the main system of justice . . . Map (db m56875) HM
91Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Let Us All Be UnitedLooking for Lincoln
By 1856 Abraham Lincoln had realized that his former political party, the Whigs, was in ruins. The political landscape had changed to the point that Lincoln accepted an invitation to attend an Anti-Nebraska Editors Convention held at the . . . Map (db m56884) HM
92Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Lincoln's Decatur AllyLooking for Lincoln
Richard J. Oglesby was born in Kentucky, journeyed to Decatur as a young orphan, and later became one of Decatur's most prominentand best-loved citizens. Oglesby made a small fortune in the California Gold Rush and fought in both the . . . Map (db m56877) HM
93Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Lincoln's LegacyLooking for Lincoln
During his presidency, Abraham Lincoln had promised to care for the men in the armed services-and for their widows and orphans. Lincoln was unable, however, to keep that promise. In response, the Grand Army of the Republic or G.A.R. . . . Map (db m56908) HM
94Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Music Please, MaestroLooking for Lincoln
In December 1849, an unusual event occurred for the lawyers who traveled on the Eighth Circuit. Mrs. Jane Martin Johns had recently moved to Decatur with her husband. She had set up temporary residence in the Macon House when her piano . . . Map (db m56906) HM
95Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — The Railsplitter CandidateLooking for Lincoln
The City of Decatur was chosen as the site for the 1860 Republican State Convention with Abraham Lincoln as the most prominent Republican present. As the convention delegates were beginning to take their first, formal balloting, Richard . . . Map (db m56912) HM
96Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Discover History All Around AltonLooking for Lincoln
Rich in heritage and haunted by history, many threads of our nation's past can be discovered here in Alton. Located at the confluence of the Mississippi, Illinois, and Missouri rivers, Alton is one of America's great river towns. It was the . . . Map (db m133286) HM
97Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Freedom's MartyrElijah P. Lovejoy — Looking for Lincoln —
Considered by many to be the first casualty of the Civil War, abolitionist editor and Presbyterian minister Rev. Elijah P. Lovejoy was killed defending the freedom of the press. Editor of the St. Louis Observer, Lovejoy wrote . . . Map (db m133295) HM
98Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Lincoln-Douglas Debates!Lincoln's Rise to Prominence
The two life-like statues represent a monumental event in our nation's history—the Lincoln-Douglas debates. For a decade, the Illinois U.S. Senate seat was held by Stephen A. Douglas, one of the most famous politicians of his time. . . . Map (db m133288) HM
99Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Lyman Trumbull HouseNew Birth of Freedom — Looking for Lincoln —
The stately house down the block once housed the co-author of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in the United States. In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free—honorable alike in what we give and what we . . . Map (db m133291) HM
100Illinois (Madison County), Alton — Ryder BuildingLincoln Practiced Here — Life Before Presidency —
Lincoln made frequent legal and political trips to Alton putting him in the heart of Alton history. For nearly twenty-five years before becoming president, Lincoln was a general practice attorney, representing clients in a variety of civil . . . Map (db m133290) HM

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Jun. 23, 2021