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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Looking for Lincoln Historical Markers

A series of over 200 markers in Illinois highlight incidents in Lincoln's life.
 
James W. Singleton image, Touch for more information
By Bill Pfingsten, June 11, 2012
James W. Singleton
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — A Quincy "Copperhead"
Singleton had succumbed "Hook and Line" to the Democrats, stated Lincoln in 1854. He and Quincyan James W. Singleton had been fellow Whigs and disciples of Henry Clay. They had campaigned together in 1848 during Whig Zachary Taylor's . . . — Map (db m58787) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — A Victorian Cemetery
Woodland Cemetery---The necropolis that in life (Cornelius Volk) did so much to beaut(ify) and make attractive" (Quincy Daily-Herald, 1898). Among significant historical Woodland memorials are the gravestones of Orville and Eliza . . . — Map (db m58803) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Douglas' Disciple
"I regard (Richardson) as one of the truest men that ever lived; he 'sticks to judge Douglas through thick and thin" (A. Lincoln, 1860). Douglas composed the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act. William A. Richardson, another Quincyan and Douglas' . . . — Map (db m58760) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Downtown Quincy in 1858
Sixteen days of rain had laid a coat of mud over the macadam streets that wrapped the city's square. Called the "Model City" because of its beautiful setting on the bluffs, Quincy in 1858 occupied about five square miles within . . . — Map (db m58759) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — His Friends Rest Here
"Here, too, the father of the town, with other men of large renown, are gathered by that reaper stern, who cuts down each and all in turn" (Henry Asbury, Reminiscences of Quincy, Illinois". Referring to the leaders from an earlier . . . — Map (db m58800) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln Correspondent
"The points you propose to press upon Douglas, he will be very hard to get up to" ):Lincoln letter to Henry Asbury, 1858). Originally a Kentucky Whig, Henry Asbury was one of the founders of the Republican Party in Illinois along with . . . — Map (db m58753) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln Promoter
"You are one of my most valued friends" (Lincoln letter to Abraham Jonas, 1860). Their friendship began in 1843 in Springfield when Lincoln and Jonas served together in the Illinois House of Representatives. Jonas became an early and . . . — Map (db m58764) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln-Douglas Debate
On October 13 1858, two candidates for U.S. Senate met in this public square for a sixth debate. Quincy, in the west-central portion of the state, was a true battleground area where both candidates saw reasonable prospects of victory. . . . — Map (db m58781) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's 1854 Visit
On November 1, 1854 an incensed Lincoln attached the immorality of slavery in a speech at Kendall Hall. Lincoln was awakened from a five-bear political slumber by Douglas's Kansas-Nebraska Act, attacking it in a series of speeches in . . . — Map (db m58788) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Confidante
Quincy's Eliza Caldwell Browning and Abraham Lincoln first met in 1836. She was a new bride, and he had just received his law license. When Eliza discovered Lincoln's "great merits," the two established an easy rapport. Their . . . — Map (db m58739) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Friend Johnston
Quincy lawyer and newspaper editor Andrew Johnston became acquainted with Abraham Lincoln in the Illinois Legislature when Lincoln served as representative and Johnson as assistant clerk. Like Lincoln, a Whig, Johnston was a law partner . . . — Map (db m58795) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Honored Friend
"Archie Williams was one of the strongest-minded and clearest-minded men in Illinois" (A. Lincoln). Lincoln and his friend Archibald Williams had much in common. Both were born in Kentucky and moved to Illinois. Williams coming to Quincy . . . — Map (db m58790) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's Quincy
With a population of nearly 13,000 in 1858, Quincy was the Adams County seat and the third largest city in Illinois. Quincy boasted a strong, growing economy based on its transportation, milling, pork packing, and light industry. In 1853 . . . — Map (db m58755) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Political Allies
Abraham Lincoln and John Wood shared similar political views, Both were members of the Whig Party and were strongly allied against slavery. Lincoln and Wood worked to establish the Republican Party, and each campaigned for the other's . . . — Map (db m58737) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Political Campaigning in 1858
Quincy was in a festive mood for the all-day event with bands, banners, and thousands of people in attendance. Historian E.B. Long said, "It was a carnival time in Illinois. Mobs of thousands journeyed by wagon, horseback, boat and . . . — Map (db m58780) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Quincy's Judge Douglas
"His name fills the nation; and is not unknown, even in foreign lands" (A. Lincoln, 1856). Stephen A. Douglas, a Jacksonian Democrat, arrived in Quincy in 1841, at twenty-seven the youngest Supreme Court Judge in Illinois history. In . . . — Map (db m58761) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Search for Equality
"Who shall say, I am the superior, and you are the inferior?" asked Lincoln in July 1858. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates focused on slavery. During the October 13th Quincy debate Lincoln affirmed: "...in the right to eat the bread . . . — Map (db m58798) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Steamboats and Railroads
Lincoln traveled to Quincy by stagecoach in 1854 after crossing the Illinois River at Naples. Lincoln's first documented visit was to support the Congressional candidacy of Archibald Williams and to attack the Kansas- Nebraska Act and . . . — Map (db m57881) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Tri-State Business Center
Quincy's brewers and brick makers, contractors and coopers, foundry and factory workers, and diverse other tradesmen made this Mississippi River community an important center of commerce in Lincoln's day. Quincy's businessmen, whose . . . — Map (db m57883) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Warm, Sincere Friendship
Quincy's Orville Hickman Browning was Lincoln's friend, advisor, and confidant. According to historian David Donald, Lincoln considered Browning an old friend "whom he could absolutely trust. He knew the Illinois senator would never . . . — Map (db m58742) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Captain Abraham Lincoln
Rejecting a treaty, Black Hawk, a leader of the Sauk and Fox, led his hungry people back into Illinois from Iowa in early 1832, intending to plant corn. Black Hawk also hoped to form an alliance with the Winnebago and Pottawatomie. . . . — Map (db m57691) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln and Blackhawk
Abraham Lincoln and his men were among the 1,500 or so volunteers who had poured into Beardstown for basic military drills. These men had answered Gen. John Reynolds' call to drive Black Hawk and his people out of Illinois. The military . . . — Map (db m57689) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln and the River
When Abraham Lincoln sought election to the Illinois legislature in 1832, his platform focused on his belief that improvements should be made to the Sangamon River, which he said would be "vastly important and highly desirable to the . . . — Map (db m57856) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln in Beardstown
Abraham Lincoln first saw Beardstown in the Spring of 1831 as he, two friends, and Denton Offutt steered Offutt's flatboat laden with merchandise on their way to New Orleans. He returned in 1832, first in March to help get the steamer . . . — Map (db m57693) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln Photograph
Abraham Lincoln had just won an acquittal for his client William Duff Armstrong in what is now known as the celebrated Almanac Trial of May 7, 1858. At the conclusion of the trial, held on the second floor of the Cass County Courthouse . . . — Map (db m57858) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln the Candidate
People in Cass County knew Abraham Lincoln not only as a lawyer but also as a candidate for the Illinois legislature and U.S. Congress. Those earlier campaigns allowed Lincoln to hone his political skills for the 1858 senatorial content . . . — Map (db m57861) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Lincoln the Lawyer
It is the celebrated "Almanac Trial" of May 7, 1858 that has forever linked Abraham Lincoln with Beardstown. On that day, Lincoln defended William Duff Armstrong, the son of Lincoln's closest New Salem friends Jack and Hannah Armstrong. . . . — Map (db m57859) HM
Illinois (Cass County), Beardstown — Traveling to Beardstown
Travel in Abraham Lincoln's time was time-consuming, dirty, and usually downright uncomfortable. On many of his trips, Lincoln traveled by train to Meredosia. From there he had the choice of a steamboat or a bone-jarring ride in a . . . — Map (db m57863) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Champaign — Champaign's Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Until the Illinois Central Railroad rolled into town, geese flocked to a pond in this vicinity. The IC cleared the pond and donated the land to the Congregationalist (today the Community United Church of Christ). Their . . . — Map (db m31113) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Homer — On The Bloomington Road / The Clark Neighborhood — Looking for Lincoln
On the Bloomington Road The Fort Clark Road, later known as the Bloomington or State Road, was an important artery for commerce between Danville and Urbana. The road was first approved in 1826 by the Illinois Assembly. It was the first . . . — Map (db m23850) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Mahomet — Champaign County's Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
(Top Section) Champaign County was always on Lincoln’s circuit. Abraham Lincoln spent nearly 20 years of his life practicing law on the 8th Judicial Circuit, traveling from one county seat to another. Even as the circuit shrank while . . . — Map (db m24340) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Mahomet — Lincoln's Mahomet / Mahomet's Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
Lincoln’s Mahomet Upper Section The village of Middletown-Mahomet was platted by Daniel Porter in 1832 on the west bank of the Sangamon River near its headwaters. The main street of the village was actually a new road, made necessary by . . . — Map (db m24374) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), St. Joseph — Lincoln at Kelley's Tavern — Looking for Lincoln
Kelley’s Tavern was originally called Strong’s Inn after Cyrus Strong, who built a mud-mortar log cabin here in the 1830's. The inn at Strong’s Ford was a stop on the Bloomington or State Road from Danville west to Urbana. Kelley’s Inn was a stop . . . — Map (db m23803) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Tolono — Lincoln in Tolono — Looking for Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln traveled through Tolono by locomotive at least eighteen times. He whiled the time away for his train connections by playing horseshoes and visiting with the Tolono residents. While campaigning in Illinois, Lincoln would frequently . . . — Map (db m23816) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Urbana — Lincoln & Photography — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section During the Spring term of the Circuit Court in 1858, Abraham Lincoln sat for a portrait with photographer Samuel Alschuler. Alschuler’s studio was on the second floor of the Lowenstern Building, at the southwest corner of . . . — Map (db m31120) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Urbana — Urbana's Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Murder, larceny, and even rape- - -the young circuit lawyer Abraham Lincoln, practicing in Urbana, handled cases involving all of these in the courthouse which stood on this city block. Lincoln unsuccessfully defended . . . — Map (db m31119) HM
Illinois (Christian County), Taylorville — The Last Stop — "Looking for Lincoln"
“I had pleasant accommodations at Taylorville in company with Mr. Lincoln & Mr. Thorton,” Circuit Judge David Davis once wrote from here. He found this town–the last county seat on his circuit route–to be . . . — Map (db m12208) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Charleston — Rally After the Debate / Lincoln in Coles County — Looking for Lincoln
Side One Top Section Nineteenth-century Illinois political campaigns and rallies were raucous affairs, part entertainment and part serious politics. The candidates were often accompanied or preceded by marchers, fireworks, flag . . . — Map (db m30866) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Lerna — Lincoln's Care for His Family — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln was a frequent visitor to Cole County in the 1840's, traveling on the judicial circuit. In Charleston, according to Amanda Hanks Poorman (the daughter of Dennis Hanks), Lincoln would use the Hanks’s horse . . . — Map (db m30847) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Mattoon — Lincoln's Last Visit / The Debaters in Mattoon — Looking for Lincoln
Side One Top Section Abraham Lincoln’s last visit to Cole County was indeed of a personal nature. Lincoln was described as he left Springfield by Henry C. Whitney, who accompanied him part of the way on the train: “. . . . . — Map (db m30840) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Oakland — The Matson Slave Trial — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Dr. Hiram Rutherford was a key person involved in Abraham Lincoln’s famous slave case, the only instance in his career where Lincoln represented the rights of a slave owner. Robert Matson brought slaves from Kentucky to work his . . . — Map (db m30867) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Friends To The End — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section During the twenty years Abraham Lincoln attended the DeWitt County Court on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, he and Clifton H. Moore, Clinton’s first resident attorney, developed a deep friendship as well as a mutual law . . . — Map (db m24298) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Humorous Moments — Looking for Lincoln
Barnett Tavern, owned and operated by Alvin and Rebecca Barnett, stood at 200 South Center Street. The two-story home was a stopping-place for weary travelers, circuit lawyers, and judges journeying across the Illinois prairie. When in Clinton, . . . — Map (db m24236) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Lincoln and The Law — Looking for Lincoln
During his twenty years on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Abraham Lincoln tried numerous cases in the DeWitt County courthouses, including a slander case involving William Dungey. Dungey, “a dark skinned man of Portuguese descent,” . . . — Map (db m24237) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Lincoln at Work and PlayYou Can't Fool the People — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section DeWitt County was part of the Eighth Judicial Circuit from its beginning, and so was Abraham Lincoln, who attended the first session of DeWitt Circuit Court in Clinton on October 24, 1839. Court sessions were held each . . . — Map (db m24321) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Lincoln's Friends and Foes — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section This satirical February 1863 editorial illustration, titled “The Copperhead Party, “ depicts three Copperheads advancing on Columbia. Copperheads were Southern sympathizers who saw themselves as “Peace . . . — Map (db m24235) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Lincoln's Hat — Looking for Lincoln
A proper Presbyterian Church was under construction in the summer of 1859. A floor was laid, walls, roof, and belfry nearly completed, when “a halt due to lack of funds” occurred. In October 1859, money was urgently needed to . . . — Map (db m24247) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — On The Campaign Trail — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Clifton H. Moore, DeWitt County’s first resident attorney, built this stately brick home in 1857-58 on an eighty-acre tract of land purchased from Judge David Davis. The original house suffered damage from a windstorm and now lacks . . . — Map (db m24301) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — War on the Horizon — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section When Lincoln called for troops to defend the Union, the men and boys of DeWitt County heeded his urgent request. Some who volunteered were from families who had know and befriended Lincoln during his days as a prairie lawyer . . . — Map (db m24253) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), Clinton — Warner's Memories / Lawyers and Book Lovers — Looking for Lincoln
Warner's Memories Top Section Lincoln traveled the Eighth Judicial Circuit six months a year, becoming close friends with his fellow lawyers, with whom he shared, not only courtroom, but also meals, an easy camaraderie, and often a . . . — Map (db m24325) HM
Illinois (Dewitt County), DeWitt — The Law and Lodging / Whiskey Mayhem — Looking for Lincoln
The Law and Lodging Top Section During his years traveling the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Abraham Lincoln was the overnight guest of many DeWitt County residents. As a frontier lawyer, he spent several months per year . . . — Map (db m24371) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Ebenezer Capps' Store1837
The store of Ebenezer Capps was located just north of this site at the northeast corner of Main and Fourth streets. The location of Main street is not the same today as when Lincoln was here. Vandalia existed long before the coming of . . . — Map (db m42486) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — First Elective Office1834
On December 1, 1834 Abraham Lincoln entered the State Capitol that stood on this site. This was his first term as a state representative and the first time he held elective office. The Abraham Lincoln that began his political career on that . . . — Map (db m42510) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — First Protest Against Slavery1837
At the beginning of Lincoln's second term as a state representative, several southern legislatures were concerned that the Federal Government would abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. Most of the members of the Illinois Legislature . . . — Map (db m42490) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Internal Improvements1837
In Lincoln’s first campaign speech on March 9, 1832, he expressed support for internal improvements. “Time and experience have verified to a demonstration, the public utility of internal improvements. That the poorest and most . . . — Map (db m42512) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln and the "Long Nine"1836
The delegation from Sangamon County for the 1836-1837 Session of the legislature quickly became known as the "Long Nine." The seven representatives and two senators were all six feet or taller. Five were lawyers, three were farmers, and one . . . — Map (db m42485) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln As A Polished Politician1836
On December 5, 1836 Abraham Lincoln attended the opening session of the Tenth Gereral Assembly in Vandalia. This session was held in a new building just recently completed by the citizens of Vandalia to serve as the State Capitol. It was . . . — Map (db m42517) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln Attends Funerals1835
On June 12, 1823, the Third General Assembly, meeting in the newly formed city of Vandalia, conveyed one and one-half acres of land to the city of Vandalia, with the proviso that the land be used as a burial ground. This is the location of that . . . — Map (db m42428) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Lincoln Travels To The Capital1834
Abraham Lincoln traveled past this spot while he served as a state representative in Vandalia. This location marks the route of a road that ran from Vandalia to Springfield, Illinois. Traces of the roadway are still visible today. The roadway . . . — Map (db m42527) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Unorthodox Romance1834
Not all of Lincoln’s time was dedicated to noble causes like opposing slavery and championing internal improvements. In 1833, Mrs. Bennett Abell, a New Salem neighbor of Lincoln, brought her sister Mary Owens to New Salem for an extended visit. . . . — Map (db m42521) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Where Did Lincoln Stay?1834
As the Illinois State Capital, Vandalia provided many hotels to serve the needs of legislators and visitors. Vandalia had at least eleven hotels that served the needs of travelers. Whenever a session of the legislature was in progress, these . . . — Map (db m42525) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Hamilton House
Abraham Lincoln probably stayed at the Hamilton House when he came to Carthage in 1839 to serve as the defendant's counsel in the Fraim murder trial. There are no other known Lincoln court cases in Hancock County. But he did handle . . . — Map (db m57867) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Historic Carthage Jail
Alexander Sympson knew Lincoln when they were small boys in Kentucky. Like Lincoln, he moved to Illinois in the 1830's, and arrived in Carthage in early 1844, just as contention with the Mormons was peaking. In 1858 Sympson was the most . . . — Map (db m57869) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln and Agriculture
Agricultural life has defined the very essence of Hancock County from the earliest days of its Anglo-American settlement. Lincoln, however, seemed indifferent to agriculture. Once he left his father's home, Lincoln never farmed again. . . . — Map (db m57876) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln in Hancock County
Hancock County was off the beaten track for Abraham Lincoln. County residents were more familiar with his senatorial opponent, Stephen A. Douglas. In October 1858, Lincoln addressed an enthusiastic audience on the Carthage square. . . . — Map (db m57871) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln's Carthage Speech
Abraham Lincoln defended himself against political attacks during much of the speech he delivered here on the courthouse grounds on October 22, 1858. Stephen A. Douglas, who had spoken here eleven days earlier, had accused Lincoln of . . . — Map (db m57878) HM
Illinois (Hancock County), Carthage — Lincoln's Failed Murder Case
Abraham Lincoln lost a murder case here in April, 1839 A drunken Irish deckhand, William Fraim, killed a shipmate while their steamboat was docked at Frederick on the Illinois River in Schuyler County. When the shipmate blew cigar smoke . . . — Map (db m57865) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — First Lincoln-Douglas DebateLooking for Lincoln
First Lincoln-Douglas Debate Abraham Lincoln's first heated exchanged with Stephen A. Douglas on Aug 21, 1858 in Ottawa was received coolly by his advisors. They insisted Lincoln had treated Douglas entirely too "tenderly." . . . — Map (db m65302) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — Lincoln the LitigatorLooking for Lincoln
On this site stood the Third LaSalle County Courthouse. Actually the second courthouse to be erected at this location, the Third LaSalle County Courthouse was completed in the latter part of 1841. It was a two-story brick structure, with imposing . . . — Map (db m65303) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Citizenry Mourn Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section When word of President Lincoln’s assassination came, most of Pontiac’s male population had not yet returned from the Civil War. But their wives and children remained, and when word was received that the special train . . . — Map (db m29731) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — County Seat Almost Moved — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Riding the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Lincoln pleaded cases in Livingston County’s first courthouse located on this site. But these events almost did not come to pass. The town proprietors had promised a courthouse, which two . . . — Map (db m29675) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Fell Leads The Way — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Photo Lincoln’s good friend Jesse Fell had more to do with shaping early events in Livingston County and Pontiac than any other man. He named the county and, in 1837, was instrumental in having the county seat located . . . — Map (db m29727) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Slept Here — Looking for Lincoln
Upper Section When Abraham Lincoln rode into Pontiac that rainy day, he found few cabins, and those were so scattered and hidden among the clumps of bushes that they were rendered almost invisible. Lincoln stayed overnight in a log . . . — Map (db m29683) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Speaks at Church — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln spoke in the little Presbyterian Church on the northwest corner of Livingston and Mill streets on Jan. 27, 1860, shortly before being nominated for the presidency at the Republican . . . — Map (db m29719) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Stranded HereLooking For Lincoln
Left Section In February 1855,Abraham Lincoln was with a group of sixty passengers stranded in Pontiac after a train, bound for Springfield from Chicago, became mired in a snowdrift just this side of where the village of Cayuga was . . . — Map (db m29717) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Visits Strevell — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section While sitting up late the night of January 27, 1860, in the Pontiac home of Jason Strevell, Abraham Lincoln predicted he would be nominated for the vice presidency of the young Republican party. In a letter to . . . — Map (db m29725) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Lincoln Wins His Case — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas were opposing attorneys during Livingston County’s first regular term of circuit court, which was held on this site May 18 and 19, 1840, in Henry Weed’s log cabin. In the first . . . — Map (db m29676) HM
Illinois (Livingston County), Pontiac — Riverbank Debate — Looking for Lincoln
Photo Text - Upper Section Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, young attorneys who had faced each other earlier in Livingston County’s first court case, later the same day debated political issues at this very site. At the Old . . . — Map (db m29689) HM
Illinois (Logan County), Lincoln — Lincoln's LincolnTown Christening Site — "Looking for Lincoln"
Town Christening Site On August 27, 1853 the first sale of lots in the new town of Lincoln took place near this spot. In attendance was Abraham Lincoln, in whose honor the town had been named. “Nothing with the name of Lincoln has . . . — Map (db m12305) HM
Illinois (Logan County), Middletown — Middletown's Lincoln
Middletown was founded in 1832 by Hiram S. Allen. Middletown was an excellent business location because stagecoaches already ran through the area, going from Springfield to Galena, carrying both passengers and mail. The first lot to be sold in . . . — Map (db m41279) HM
Illinois (Logan County), Mt. Pulaski — Circuit Court Stop
Mid-19th Century Lawyers riding the eighth judicial circuit sometimes found that local accommodations left much to be desired. If they were lucky, a prosperous local resident would invite them into their home. If not, they were at the mercy of . . . — Map (db m41239) HM
Illinois (Logan County), Mt. Pulaski — Lincoln's Law Practice
Lincoln illustrator Lloyd Ostendorf imagined this scene in connection with Mt. Pulaski's "cast iron tombstone" case that Lincoln handled on appeal in the Illinois Supreme Court in Springfield (1859). Two local residents separately sued Reuben Miller . . . — Map (db m41242) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — A "Favorite" Lies Here
John Hanks was born in 1802 in Kentucky, he was a second cousin of Abraham Lincoln through Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln. John Hanks stated that he first knew Lincoln when he was a boy of twelve in Spencer County, Indiana. However, it . . . — Map (db m41240) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Choosing a President
In February 1860 the Illinois State Republican Central Committee met in Springfield, Illinois. There the Committee selected Decatur as the site for the upcoming State Republican Convention. The site selected for the Convention was . . . — Map (db m56911) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Getting There from Here
The road beside this wayside exhibit is west main street. It was one of the main routes into and out of the City of Decatur all during the time of Lincoln's travels as a lawyer on the Eighth Judicial Circuit, the main system of justice . . . — Map (db m56875) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Let Us All Be United
By 1856 Abraham Lincoln had realized that his former political party, the Whigs, was in ruins. The political landscape had changed to the point that Lincoln accepted an invitation to attend an Anti-Nebraska Editors Convention held at the . . . — Map (db m56884) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Lincoln's Decatur Ally
Richard J. Oglesby was born in Kentucky, journeyed to Decatur as a young orphan, and later became one of Decatur's most prominentand best-loved citizens. Oglesby made a small fortune in the California Gold Rush and fought in both the . . . — Map (db m56877) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Lincoln's Legacy
During his presidency, Abraham Lincoln had promised to care for the men in the armed services-and for their widows and orphans. Lincoln was unable, however, to keep that promise. In response, the Grand Army of the Republic or G.A.R. . . . — Map (db m56908) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Music Please, Maestro
In December 1849, an unusual event occurred for the lawyers who traveled on the Eighth Circuit. Mrs. Jane Martin Johns had recently moved to Decatur with her husband. She had set up temporary residence in the Macon House when her piano . . . — Map (db m56906) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — The Railsplitter Candidate
The City of Decatur was chosen as the site for the 1860 Republican State Convention with Abraham Lincoln as the most prominent Republican present. As the convention delegates were beginning to take their first, formal balloting, Richard . . . — Map (db m56912) HM
Illinois (McDonough County), Macomb — Lincoln Photograph / McDonough CourthouseLooking for Lincoln
Lincoln Photograph. Abraham Lincoln visited the city of Macomb twice in 1858. His first visit lasted from August 25th to August 26th, and it was unexpected. The Randolph House was the place that attracted Abraham Lincoln to Macomb. Lincoln . . . — Map (db m59987) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — Asahel Gridley's Bank
"My line of defense is going to be that your tongue is no slanderer...that the people generally know you to be, impulsive and say things that you do not mean, and they do not consider what you say as slander," was Lincoln's defense of . . . — Map (db m57379) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — Illinois Central R. R.
"I am now free to make an engagement for the road; and if you think fit you may 'count me in,'" wrote Lincoln to Illinois Central Railroad attorney Mason Brayman in October 1853. In 1851, the Illinois Central Railroad charter had . . . — Map (db m57561) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — Lincoln The Lawyer" A Rustic on his First Visit " — Looking for Lincoln
“A rustic on his first visit to the circus” is how John W. Baddeley, an English immigrant farmer described Abraham Lincoln on his first visit to the McLean County Courthouse as a young attorney in the summer of 1837. Lincoln was wearing . . . — Map (db m12362) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — Lincoln's Real Estate
"His love of wealth was very weak....he said he had no capacity whatever for speculation and never attempted it." So said attorney friend Joseph Gillespie who once asked Lincoln how much land he owned and why he had never speculated in . . . — Map (db m57559) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — Miller-Davis Buildings
"...If they believe...Vandeventer pointed the gun at Swartz and advanced upon him, merely to intimidate Swartz.... so that he could get to kill the dog, and with no intention of him, or otherwise hurting him with the gun, that was no assault . . . — Map (db m57454) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — My Good FriendJudge David Davis - Mansion — Looking for Lincoln
The frame house (left) that once stood on the site of this Victorian mansion was the home of Abraham Lincoln’s trusted friend, legal associate, and political manager, David Davis (1815-1886). The two-story structure closely resembled Lincoln’s . . . — Map (db m12263) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — The Lost Speech
"I look upon that enactment not as a 'law,' but as 'violence' from the beginning. It was conceived in violence, passed in violence, is maintained in violence, and is being executed in violence. I say it was 'conceived' in violence, because . . . — Map (db m57456) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — The National Hotel
"Why if that one is named Democrat, I will name this one Whig," Lincoln said to John Ewing the proprietor. Such was Lincoln's affection for the family of John Ewing, who ran the hotel in the 1840's. John had nicknamed one of his sons . . . — Map (db m57550) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — The Phoenix Block
"Herewith is a little sketch...there is not much of it...I suppose, that there is not much of me." Lincoln thus fulfilled Jesse Fell's 1858 request for an autobiography. Catching Lincoln as he emerged from the courthouse, Fell invited . . . — Map (db m57553) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — The Pike House
"While I am writing speakers are addressing the people from the portico of the Pike House." Thus wrote the correspondent of the Chicago Democrat Press on the morning of May 29, 1856. The Anti-Nebraska Convention was scheduled to . . . — Map (db m57556) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — William Florville
"I am in a little trouble here---I am trying to get a decree for our 'Billy the Barber' for the conveyance of certain town lots sold to him by Allin Gridley and Prickett...." Lincoln explained that "Billy will blame me, if I do not . . . — Map (db m57558) HM
Illinois (Menard County), Petersburg — Lincoln in Petersburg
After moving to Springfield, Abraham Lincoln would visit the Petersburg area and stay overnight at the Menard House. When Lincoln was on the Judicial Circuit, he traveled from court to court, often sleeping at the local hotel or tavern. . . . — Map (db m57373) HM
Illinois (Menard County), Petersburg — Lincoln the Surveyor
Abraham Lincoln surveyed the town of Petersburg certifying his plat on February 17,1836, five days after his 27th birthday. At the time he was still living in New Salem. He later surveyed several additions to the Petersburg plat. Though . . . — Map (db m57371) HM
Illinois (Menard County), Petersburg — The Survey of Petersburg
Abraham Lincoln laid out the original sixty blocks of Petersburg, Illinois between November 1835 and February 1836. In 1832, Peter Lukins and George Warburton had laid out a few lots for a new town. Lukins and Warburton played a card . . . — Map (db m57348) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — 1858 Senate Race Here
Abraham Lincoln and incumbent Stephen A. Douglas spent ten weeks in 1858, contesting for the U.S. Senate. During the grueling campaign, Lincoln made sixty-three speeches across the state; Douglas made 130. Both men spoke separately in . . . — Map (db m57637) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — I. C. Honors Mr. Lincoln
Since 1856, Beecher Hall has been the headquarters of two of Illinois College men's societies. Sigma Pi Society and Phi Alpha Society. Both societies elected Abraham Lincoln into honorary membership in their fraternal-literary . . . — Map (db m57657) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln & Governor Duncan
Abraham Lincoln won his elected office, a seat in the Illinois House of Representatives in 1834. That same year Joseph Duncan of Jacksonville was elected Governor of Illinois. Before you stands the home of Joseph Duncan, which became the . . . — Map (db m57650) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Grierson
Abraham Lincoln met Benjamin H. Grierson when the two campaigned for the Republican Party. Grierson, a merchant, music teacher, and musician, even wrote a song for Lincoln's presidential campaign in 1860, with the chorus: "So clear . . . — Map (db m57635) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Jaquess
Abraham Lincoln met the Reverend James F. Jaquess when Lincoln was a lawyer on the Eighth Judicial Circuit and Jaquess rode the Petersburg Circuit for the Methodist Church. They became better acquainted in Jacksonville when Jaquess was . . . — Map (db m57630) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Slavery
Pictured in the crowd listening to Abraham Lincoln's speech is Joseph O. King, a prominent merchant who later became mayor of Jacksonville. He helped found a political group that agitated for the exclusion of slavery from the free . . . — Map (db m57653) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln's Religion
Abraham Lincoln was often accused by his detractors---and even by some of his friends---of not being a Christian. Just before becoming President, Lincoln shared the following with his friend Dr. Newton Bateman: "I know there is a God, . . . — Map (db m57648) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — The Civil War Governor
Richard Yates moved from Kentucky to Jacksonville in 1831. Four years later he became the first graduate of Illinois College. Abraham Lincoln and Yates admired Henry Clay and actively supported the Whig Party. Both strongly opposed . . . — Map (db m57633) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Whig Rivals and Friends
A native of Kentucky, John J. Hardin moved to Jacksonville in 1831 when he was twenty-one. Like other young men of their generation. Hardin and Abraham Lincoln served in the Black Hawk War. Both men were lawyers and Whig politicians who . . . — Map (db m57634) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Bement — Bement Goes to War — Looking for Lincoln
Edgar Camp came to Bement in 1855 along with two brothers. As one of the early settlers, he assisted in building the first houses. The Camp boys were joined by another brother in 1858. When Civil War broke out, Edgar, James and William . . . — Map (db m23897) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Bement — Douglas - Lincoln Debates — Looking for Lincoln
Lincoln wrote Douglas on July 24, 1858, challenging him “to divide time and address the same audiences” during the campaign. The Senator suggested seven locations, adding, “I will confer with you at the earliest . . . — Map (db m23858) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Bement — The Bement Connection — Looking for Lincoln
A pocket watch is meant to be used with a chain. Three styles were popular: T-bar, which slips through a vest buttonhole; spring ring, which attaches to a belt loop; and fob. Lincoln’s pocket watch shown here has a shorter style chain, featuring . . . — Map (db m23889) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Monticello — Lincoln in Monticello — Looking for Lincoln
The Tenbrook Hotel, the building shown on the right-hand side of the photo (which was taken at the end of the Civil War), was the site where Lincoln and other members of the bar lodged when traversing the Eighth Judicial Circuit. Lincoln traveled . . . — Map (db m23855) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Monticello — Monticello Journeys — Looking for Lincoln
Lincoln’s journeys to Monticello were sometimes difficult because of the weather and his lack of popularity on some issues. Lincoln, Judge David Davis, and other members of the Bar were trying to reach Monticello in the spring of 1852, having . . . — Map (db m23813) HM
Illinois (Piatt County), Monticello — Railroads Bring Change — Looking for Lincoln
The I.C.R.R. Co. Steam locomotive was popular in the mid 1850's, when Lincoln worked for the Illinois Central. It was named “American Standard,” and latter ran from Decatur to Champaign. Locomotives were originally wood burning, and the . . . — Map (db m23808) HM
Illinois (Pike County), Pittsfield — Lincoln's Pike CountyLooking for Lincoln
Pike County, Illinois was organized January 31, 1821, named for Zebulon Pike, early explorer of the Louisiana Purchase and general in the War of 1812. The first settlement in 1820 was founded by Ebenezer Franklin, followed by Daniel . . . — Map (db m68919) HM
Illinois (Pike County), Pittsfield — Pike County's Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln was a frequent visitor to Pike County. He left his judicial circuit and crossed the Illinois River to practice law with many of Pike County's leading attorneys, forming close associations with prominent Whig and . . . — Map (db m68918) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Animal Problems
Cultural differences made it hard for citizens to agree on animal control policies. Well into the 1850's hogs freely roamed the streets, contesting the walkways with pedestrians, rooting up sidewalk planks, and creating smelly "how . . . — Map (db m57077) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Brunwick's Billiard Hall
In 1860 Emanuel Brunswick opened a billiard hall in the second floor of the building just east of the Chenery House here on Washington Street. It contained elegant Brunswick tables and was touted as the largest and best hall in Illinois . . . — Map (db m57057) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — C. M. & S. Smith Store
Shoppers at Clark M. Smith's All-Purpose Store on the South Side of the public square seldom paid cash. Money was scarce; credit accounts were common. Smith's in-laws---the Lincolns---had an account. After her husband lost the Senate race to . . . — Map (db m48620) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Campaign Poles
(Left) Campaign poles sported flags and banners, such as this one from 1844 supporting Lincoln's hero, Henry clay. Lashed to Lincoln's 120-foot presidential Ash Pole in 1860 was a broom--- signifying Lincoln's intent to sweep corrupt Democrats . . . — Map (db m48902) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Cook's Hall
When it opened in 1858, Cook's Hall became the largest of Springfield's public halls. Its gas-lighted auditorium and gallery were the grandest in the region. A wealthy soap and candle manufacturer, John Cook, built the hall following a . . . — Map (db m48557) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Corneau & Diller Drug Store
Apothecaries in the mid-19th century carried a surprising variety of drugs and remedies---potassium iodide for rheumatism and syphilis, sulphate of quinine for tooth powder, opium elixir for toothache, and camphor . . . — Map (db m48560) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Curran's Jewelry Shop
The Gregarious General Isaac B. Curran was a prominent citizen in Lincoln's Springfield. His store here on the south side of the square was a popular gathering place for Lincoln's political opponents. Curran arrived as a young silversmith from . . . — Map (db m48740) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Florville's Barber Shop
William Florville was Lincoln's barber for twenty-four years. Florville, or de Fleurville ("Billy the Barber" to his white customers), was born in Haiti of French ancestry. He came to America at age fifteen and was a barber's apprentice in . . . — Map (db m57193) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Globe Tavern
The Globe Tavern as it appeared in May 1865 at the time of Lincoln's funeral. the Lincolns lived here from November 1842 until the winter or early spring of 1844. At that time the tavern consisted of two buildings joined as a "T," with the older . . . — Map (db m48903) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Great Western Depot
Throngs give big sendoff to Lincoln Monday morning February 11, 1861 dawned dismal and gray. A chilling drizzle soakedthe dirt roads of the capital. At 7:30 A.M., a carriage pulled up here in front of the depot, and President-elect . . . — Map (db m48554) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Illinois State Register
November 1858 Register notices published on Election Day and the day after---documenting the end of the heated and hectic Lincoln-Douglas Senatorial contest.

When the seat of government left Vandalia in 1839, the former . . . — Map (db m48901) HM

Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — In Their Springfield Prime
1854 marked Lincoln's public return to politics following a five-year hiatus. That year Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois pushed the "Kansas-Nebraska Act" through the U.S. Congress, overturning the 1820 Missouri Compromise line. Fearing . . . — Map (db m48577) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Joshua Speed's Store
There was a housing shortage in Springfield when 28 year old Abraham Lincoln---riding a borrowed horse---moved here from New Salem in April 1837. Builders couldn't keep up with the newly designated state capital. One of Lincoln's first stops . . . — Map (db m48899) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Leaping Lincoln
In November 1840 legislators convened in the cramped quarters of the Methodist Church while workers were completing the statehouse a block away. "The House of Representatives was crammed in a room barely large enough for the members . . . — Map (db m57068) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln the Leader
During four years as President, Abraham Lincoln spent much of his time among the troops. They were important because they were the people who would get the job done. He frequented the War Department's telegraph office to stay abreast of . . . — Map (db m57340) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln-Era Fire Companies
Lincoln's Springfield was vulnerable to fire, Crowded wood-frame buildings, open flames in stoves, fireplaces, candles, and primitive gas lighting ineffective alarms, muddy streets, and inadequate water supplies---all combined to make . . . — Map (db m57167) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Carriage Maker
Lincoln brought his buggy to Obed Lewis for servicing at his shop on the north side of Monroe Street between Sixth and Seventh Streets. When Lincoln first arrived in Springfield riding a borrowed horse he wondered at the "great deal of . . . — Map (db m57164) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Dentist
Americans had poor oral hygiene in Lincoln's era. Rotten teeth and foul breath were common (halitosis was not yet a social evil). Calomel frequently prescribed by doctors for fevers caused many people to have loose teeth. Dentistry was plagued . . . — Map (db m48621) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Hat
Lincoln reportedly has a "very defective taste" in hats. At various times he was known to have worn fur caps, straw or palm hats, and broad, low-brimmed wool or felt hats. He is best known for the "plug" or stovepipe hats he wore as a lawyer . . . — Map (db m48875) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Horse
When Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865,joyous citizens decorated Lincoln's horse, Old Bob, with flags and led him triumphantly through the streets of . . . — Map (db m48553) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Last Law Office
Lincoln and Herndon rented law offices at several locations over the years. Their last was a rear room on the second floor in a building that stood here. Leslie's Weekly published this drawing of the office interior during the 1860 presidential . . . — Map (db m48896) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Lincoln's Springfield
Twenty-eight-year-old Abraham Lincoln settled here in 1837. He was unmarried, unlearned, unrefined, with "no wealthy or popular relations to recommend me." On the day before his fifty-second birthday, Lincoln left here a profoundly changed man; . . . — Map (db m48571) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Mary Lincoln's Family
These four Todd sisters each married a Springfield man and established households within a few blocks of each other, Elizabeth was the oldest and became Mary's surrogate mother." Frances lived closest to Mary (across the street where the Grace . . . — Map (db m48550) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Mary Lincoln's Ring
"Love is Eternal" were the words engraved in the plain gold band that Abraham Lincoln slipped on Mary's finger at their wedding in Springfield on November 4, 1842. The inscription reflected the ideal of "romantic love" that swept America in the . . . — Map (db m48874) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Republican Wigwams
During the 1860 election Illinois Republicans held conventions in temporary wood and canvas structures dubbed "Wigwams." "Wigwams" were reminiscent of the "Log Cabins" from the 1840 presidential campaign. They quickly became symbols of . . . — Map (db m57073) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Streetscape 1859East Side of the Public Square
This is the how the east side of the public square looked from this vantage point (circa 1859), looking north along Sixth Street. The picture shows how buildings were refurbished following the great east-side fire of February 1858. but the . . . — Map (db m48572) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Streetscape 1859
West side of the public square This is the how west side of the public square looked from this vantage point (circa 1859), looking north along Fifth Street. In September 1859 "daguerrean" (photographer) Preston Butler advertised his four . . . — Map (db m48741) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Streetscape 1859
North side of the public square This is the how the north side of the public square looked from this vantage point (circa 1859), looking east along Washington Street. The rickety wood structures of "Chicken Row" that had been familiar to . . . — Map (db m48742) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Streetscape 1859
This is how the south side of the public square looked from this vantage point (circa 1859), looking east along Adams Street. Businesses at the time included (starting at right); J.W. Bunn Groceries; T.S. Little clothier, with a dental office and . . . — Map (db m57063) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Stuart and Lincoln Law Office
Before he moved to Springfield Abraham Lincoln came to the law office of John Todd Stuart to barrow law books. Henry E. Dummer---Stuart;s partner at the time---recalled that the "uncouth looking" Lincoln said little and seemed timid. Yet . . . — Map (db m57194) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — Surveyor Presidents
Many people look at Mount Rushmore, carved in the Black Hills of South Dakota, as a monument to four Presidents, but land surveyors see it as "three surveyors and one other guy." Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln all were land . . . — Map (db m48744) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The 1858 Senate Campaign
Abraham Lincoln accepted the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate on June 16, 1858. To open his campaign, Lincoln delivered the famous House Divided speech from Springfield that evening. Upon hearing the speech, Senator Stephen A. . . . — Map (db m57052) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The American House
Social galas and political functions were common at the American House. Stephen A.Douglas sometimes used the hotel as headquarters for the Democrats. (Below Left) A newspaper published Springfield's newest hotel under the direction of J. . . . — Map (db m48569) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The Bath & Barber Shop
"The bathing rooms now kept by Rev. S. S. Ball in the rear of his Barber's Shop are in elegant trim for the accommodation of his Friends and the public," advertised Elder Samuel S. Ball.His shop was on the south side of the public square . . . — Map (db m48619) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The Children's Lincoln
Neighbor girl Josie Remann (left)was a favorite of Lincoln's. Once, on finding her in tears in front of her house, Lincoln ran all the way to the train station with her trunk on his shoulders because a carriage driver failed to come for it on . . . — Map (db m48548) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The Lincoln Boys in 1854
The Springfield "urban" environment that shaped the childhood of the Lincoln boys was a far cry from the "backwoods wilderness" their father knew as a child. "Pay schools" and academies, railroad trains and fancy carriages, circuses and Sunday . . . — Map (db m48575) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The Lyceum
Lyceums were community associations that sponsored lectures, debates, and discussions. Eastern Protestant missionaries and educators brought the concept to frontier Illinois. Promoters hoped their Lyceums would disseminate knowledge and . . . — Map (db m57166) HM
Illinois (Shelby County), Moweaqua — Lincoln's Cavalry Guard — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section In 1863, Ohio Governor David Tod believed that Lincoln needed a cavalry body-guard. Governor Tod requested one volunteer from each county in Ohio to serve on special duty. Guernsey County, in east-central Ohio supplied Ephraim . . . — Map (db m30751) HM
Illinois (Shelby County), Shelbyville — Anthony Thornton — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Anthony Thornton and Abraham Lincoln led fairly similar lives. Both were born in Kentucky, were tall, and were Whigs. Both began practicing law in Illinois in 1836, even though Thornton was college-educated and read . . . — Map (db m30755) HM
Illinois (Shelby County), Shelbyville — Lincoln - Thornton Debate — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section In the summer of 1856, Abraham Lincoln traveled across much of Illinois, giving speeches supporting the new Republican Party and its national and state candidates. On August 9, 1856, Lincoln arrived in Shelbyville to . . . — Map (db m30801) HM
Illinois (Shelby County), Shelbyville — Traveling the Circuit — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Taverns - - or Inns - - were the primary accommodation for the circuit traveler. Before arriving in Shelbyville, the judge and lawyers had a two-day journey from Paris, usually with an overnight stay in Charleston. Abraham . . . — Map (db m30784) HM
Illinois (Shelby County), Strasburg — Lincoln and Divorce — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Abraham Lincoln handled at least 147 divorce cases during his twenty-five years as a lawyer. One in Shelby County also concerned the ownership of land. William Stewardson and Mary Jane Dawson, both English immigrants, . . . — Map (db m30805) HM
Illinois (Vermilion County), Danville — A Friend Forever — " Looking For Lincoln "
Left Panel A FRIEND FOREVER “I appeal to you because I can to no other with so much confidence,” Lincoln said to Doctor William H. Fithian, August 15, 1860. He was asking for Fithian’s assistance in a . . . — Map (db m29721) HM
Illinois (Vermilion County), Danville — Danville's Lincoln — Looking for Lincoln
Left Section Danville was a destination for Abraham Lincoln for nearly twenty years. He first came to the village of a few hundred residents when he was a thirty-two-year-old attorney in 1841. Elizabeth Harmon described the early . . . — Map (db m29481) HM
Illinois (Vermilion County), Danville — Lincoln's Danville Friends — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section The center of town, during the time of Lincoln’s years in Danville, was located in a range from Franklin Street in the West, to Washington Street in the East, bordered by Harrison Street in the North and Water Street to . . . — Map (db m29571) HM

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