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Lenoir County North Carolina Historical Markers

 
Battle of Kinston December 13 -14, 1862 image, Touch for more information
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
Battle of Kinston December 13 -14, 1862
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Battle of KinstonFoster's Position on Southwest Creek — Foster's Raid
The yellow sidebar in the upper left provides a brief background: Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster’s garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New . . . — Map (db m23655) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Battle of KinstonConfederates Retreat Across Jones Bridge — Foster's Raid
(Preface): Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster's garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m30526) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Battle of KinstonFederals Turn the Confederate Flank — Foster's Raid
(Preface): Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster's garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge . . . — Map (db m30529) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Battle of Wyse ForkLast Mass Capture of Union Troops — Carolinas Campaign
The yellow sidebar in the upper left of the marker provides a brief synopsis of the Carolinas Campaign. It states: The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, . . . — Map (db m23802) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Battle of Wyse ForkHoke's Attacks — Carolinas Campaign
The yellow sidebar in the upper left of the marker provides a brief synopsis of the Carolinas Campaign. It states: The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, . . . — Map (db m23811) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Caring for the WoundedHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
As the fighting surged past the church and the battle moves into Kinston, surgeons of both armies began the task of caring for the wounded. Harriet’s Chapel became a refuge and men from both sides found care at the church. The fighting around . . . — Map (db m70424) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Caswell
(West face) The people of N.C. have erected this monument in remembrance of the eminent services of Richard Caswell The first Governor under a free constitution (South face) He was called to the Head of . . . — Map (db m68942) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Cat HoleFinishing CSS Neuse
The Confederate ironclad ram Neuse was constructed at Whitehall (present-day Seven Springs) beginning in October 1862. In March 1863, having survived Union Gen. John G. Foster's raid and the engagement at Whitehall the pervious December, . . . — Map (db m30533) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Confederate HeadquartersBragg's Command Post
At this location was the site of the Howard House, used as Confederate Headquarters during the Battle of Wyse Fork, March 8-10, 1865. General Braxton Bragg commanded the Confederate Army that was composed of the forces of Major General D.H. Hill and . . . — Map (db m23745) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — CSS NeuseThe Story of CSS Neuse
The Confederate ironclad ram Neuse was constructed at Whitehall (present-day Seven Springs) beginning in October 1862. The unfinished hull survived the fighting there during Union Gen. John G. Foster's raid in December of 1863. It was docked . . . — Map (db m30489) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 15 — CSS Neuse
Confederate ironclad, built at Whitehall and floated down the Neuse. Grounded and burned by Confederates in 1865. Remains one block N. — Map (db m70451) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — CSS Neuse Confederate Ironclad Gunboat
(Front): Moored near the King Street Bridge, the Confederate States Ship Neuse, and ironclad gunboat, was outfitted in Kinston in late 1863 and early 1864. (Left): An April 1864 attempt to take her downriver in a concerted . . . — Map (db m30538) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Fighting at Harriet's ChapelHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
On December 14, Union troops overwhelmed the Confederate line at Harriet’s Chapel. After making a determined stand, the outnumbered Confederates withdrew, fighting as they pulled back toward Jones Bridge. Union Gen. Henry Wessells spent hours . . . — Map (db m70416) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — First Battle of KinstonHarriet's Chapel — Foster's Raid
The yellow sidebar in the upper left provides a brief background: Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster’s garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New . . . — Map (db m23656) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 20 — Foster's Raid
On a raid from New Bern to Goldsboro, the Union troops led by Gen. J.G. Foster passed through Kinston, Dec. 14, 1862. — Map (db m30522) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Grave of Richard Caswell
South of this tablet, 166 yards, is the grave of Richard Caswell, the first Governor of North Carolina, as an independent state. "I will most cheerfully join any of my countrymen, even as a rank and file man, and whilst I have blood in my veins . . . — Map (db m30488) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F-49 — Harmony Hall
Office of Secretary of State during Revolution. Later owned by Richard Caswell & sons. Altered in nineteenth century. — Map (db m66406) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — John Taylor Wood, CSNAnd the Sinking of the USS Underwriter
In January 1864, General Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate President Jefferson Davis that "a bold party" could descend the Neuse River to New Bern at night, capture Federal gunboats and use them to assist an assault on Union-held New Bern by a . . . — Map (db m30537) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Kinston Battlefield ParkHarriet's Chapel and Starr's Battery Site
This site was the center of the Confederate’s final line of defense during the Dec. 13-14, 1862 Battle of Kinston. It occurred as Union General John G. Foster’s Division was enroute from New Bern to Goldsboro to destroy the Wilmington-Weldon . . . — Map (db m70408) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Kinston Hangings
In February 1864, in this vicinity, 22 white soldiers from the Kinston area were hanged in three groups by Confederate authorities. The executed men had been captured while serving in the Union army by troops under the command of Maj. General E. . . . — Map (db m37426) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Lenoir County Confederate Memorial1861 - 1865
. . . — Map (db m30520) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Lenoir County WW I and WW II Memorial
(center) 1917 - 1918 1941 - 1945 In grateful tribute toward the living and the dead, who through their valiant efforts and bitter sacrifice have made America great, is this shrine so nobly dedicated. . . . — Map (db m68282) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F-28 — Lewis School
A coeducational private school, conducted by Dr. and Mrs. Richard Henry Lewis, opened in 1877 and closed in 1902, was in this house. — Map (db m67138) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Moving the CSS NeuseA Question of Wood and Time
When asked by superiors about the completion of the Confederate ironclad being built on the Neuse River upstream from New Bern, Gen. John Peck of the Union army stated, "Hitherto it has been a question of iron and time." Paraphrasing the general, . . . — Map (db m33849) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina's Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids, and the . . . — Map (db m30518) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 15 — Ram Neuse
Confederate Ironclad, built at Whitehall and floated down the Neuse. Grounded and burned by Confederates in 1865. Remains are 250 yds. S. — Map (db m30420) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 2 — Richard Caswell
First Governor of the state, 1776. Revolutionary statesman and soldier. Grave 166 yards south. — Map (db m30486) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Starr's BatteryHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
In front of you is the position held by Capt. Joseph B. Starr’s Battery. Starr’s Battery defended this position against the Union advance on December 14. Finally, his ammunition exhausted, Starr withdrew across the Neuse River. Capt. Starr had . . . — Map (db m70441) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Action in the SwampHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
A large swamp separated the advancing Union army and the Confederate defenders one-half mile north. Described by one Union soldier as, “difficult to cross, and densely covered with a growth of small trees and pine,” the swamp . . . — Map (db m70438) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Center of the Confederate LineHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
Harriet’s Chapel stood in the center of the Confederate line. A heavily wooded wetland stood in front of the line. Behind it was the Neuse River. Three regiments of infantry and two batteries of artillery held this portion of the Confederate line. . . . — Map (db m70436) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Confederate Defenses of KinstonHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
Confederate engineers built fortifications around Kinston and along the approaches from New Bern. You can see a portion of these earthworks from the boardwalk. This line of earthworks originally straddled the road to Jones Bridge, which was near the . . . — Map (db m70426) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Night of December 13, 1862Harriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
After the fighting near Southwest Creek, the Confederates withdrew toward Kinston. Marching north, they crossed a creek and waded through the frigid swamp. Many cold, wet soldiers spent a miserable night at Harriet’s Chapel. The Confederate . . . — Map (db m70410) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Site of Harriet's ChapelHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
Harriet’s Chapel saw some of the most intense fighting of the Battle of Kinston. In 2010, Historical Preservation Group moved this building, once New Beaverdam Primitive Baptist Church, to this site to interpret Harriet’s Chapel’s role in the . . . — Map (db m70418) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Town Of Kingston
To Commemorate The Establishment Of The Town Of Kingston In 1762 And To Honor Its First Trustees Francis McLewean - Richard Casewell Simon Bright, Jr, - John Shine David Gordon —— This tablet is placed by the . . . — Map (db m68738) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Union ArtilleryHarriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
Twenty-four guns of the 3rd New York Artillery supported Gen. Wessells’ infantry as they advanced through the swamp toward the Confederate line. The overwhelming firepower of Union infantry and artillery eventually forced the Confederates to abandon . . . — Map (db m70439) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — Wessells' Advance—December 14, 1862Harriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park
Gen. John Gray Foster’s long blue line slowly marched north from Southwest Creek toward the Confederate line. The Confederates, behind a formidable line of earthworks protected by a swamp in their front, braced for the Union assault. Gen. Henry . . . — Map (db m70434) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 40 — Wheat Swamp Church
Disciples of Christ since 1843. Organized about 1760 as Free Will Baptist. Part of present church built in 1858. One mile northwest. — Map (db m31205) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), La Grange — F-41 — James Y. Joyner1862-1954
Superintendent of Public Instruction, 1902-1919. Educator and agriculturist. Home is 3 blks. N.W. — Map (db m66963) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), La Grange — F-42 — William Dunn Moseley
Member of N.C. Senate, 1829-1836; Speaker, 1833- 1835. First governor of State of Florida, 1845- 1849. Home was 1 mi. N. — Map (db m66443) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), near Kinston — F-13 — Tower Hill
Plantation of Gov. Dobbs, selected as the colonial capital & named George City by act of assembly, 1758. Act was never executed. 1 1/2 mi. S. — Map (db m65500) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Walnut Creek — F-25 — Dobbs County
Formed 1758 & named for Gov. Arthur Dobbs. From it were formed Wayne, 1779, Lenoir and Glasgow (now Greene), 1791. Courthouse was 3 miles S. — Map (db m64801) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Walnut Creek — Dobbs County Court House
On this spot stood Dobbs County Court House 1758-1791 The following counties were formed from Dobbs. Greene (formerly Glascow) 1779 Wayne 1779 Lenoir 1791 Erected by the Wayne County Committee North Carolina Society Colonial . . . — Map (db m64803) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Wyse Fork — Battle of Wyse ForkMarch 8-10, 1865
In the late stages of the Civil War Union forces were intent on moving up the rail line from New Bern through Kinston to Goldsboro. Their objective was to unite with Sherman and open a supply route through eastern North Carolina. Confederate troops . . . — Map (db m23554) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Wyse Fork — General Robert Hoke Monument
Near this spot, March 8, 1865, about 9 a.m., Hoke's Division, C.S.A. under the immediate command of Major-General Robert E. Hoke, broke the advanced columns of Cox's First Division, 23rd Corps, U.S.A. and captured principally from Upham's brigade . . . — Map (db m23556) HM

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