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Charlottesville Virginia Historical Markers

 
Albemarle UDC Monument image, Touch for more information
By Bernard Fisher, December 24, 2009
Albemarle UDC Monument
Virginia, Charlottesville — Albemarle Confederate Monument
. . . — Map (db m25955) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Barry and Bill Battle
The Battle Building at UVA Children's Hospital is named for Barry W. and William C. "Bill" Battle, longtime supporters of children's healthcare research and clinical care in central Virginia. Barry Webb Battle was inaugural chair of the UVA . . . — Map (db m101182) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-28 — Buck v. Bell
In 1924, Virginia, like a majority of states then, enacted eugenic sterilization laws. Virginia’s law allowed state institutions to operate on individuals to prevent the conception of what were believed to be “genetically inferior” . . . — Map (db m10128) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — 'Burying' Ground

The Foster family kept their ancestors close. Sheltered on a portion of their 2 1/8-acre plot purchased in 1833 by free black Catherine Foster, this burial ground still contains several dozen graves.

Rediscovered in 1993, the Foster . . . — Map (db m81599) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-28a — C. B. Holt Rock House
African American Charles B. Holt owned a carpentry business in Charlottesville’s Vinegar Hill neighborhood. The son of former slaves, Holt built this Arts and Crafts-style house in 1925-1926, during the era of segregation when blacks were . . . — Map (db m30541) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — CharlottesvilleConfederate Heroes Remembered
Lee and Jackson Parks contain two of Charlottesville's fine examples of public sculpture, gifts of benefactor Paul Goodloe McIntire (1860-1952). The Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson statue was dedicated in 1921,the Robert E. Lee statue in 1924. . . . — Map (db m497) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1d — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m8643) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1b — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19843) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1a — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19844) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-23 — Charlottesville General Hospital
During the Civil War, the Rotunda at the University of Virginia, the Charlottesville town hall and the courthouse, as well as nearby homes and hotels were converted into a makeshift hospital complex called the Charlottesville General Hospital. It . . . — Map (db m8664) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-24 — Charlottesville Woolen Mills
As early as 1795, several types of mills operated here. In 1847, Farish, Jones, and Co., opened a cotton and woolen factory. John A. Marchant gained control of it by 1852 and renamed it the Charlottesville Manufacturing Company. His son, Henry Clay . . . — Map (db m86175) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Claude Moore, M.D.1892–1991
A native of Radford, Virginia, Dr. Moore was a 1916 graduate of the School of Medicine and a gifted player on the University’s football team. He served in the Army Medical Corps in France during World War I. Dr. Moore began his career in radiology . . . — Map (db m8823) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land
This reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of Virginia by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder Secretary of the Treasury As the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds Independence Drive from May . . . — Map (db m73013) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-29 — Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)—writer, poet, and critic—was born in Boston, Mass. Orphaned at a young age, Poe was raised by John and Frances Allan of Richmond. He attended schools in England and Richmond before enrolling at the . . . — Map (db m8765) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Fernando Símon Bolívar1810–1898
Fernando Bolívar, a native of Venezuela, attended the University of Virginia in 1827. He was the nephew and adopted son of Símon Bolívar, The Liberator, who sent him to study in the “Republic of Washington and Jefferson.” A friend of . . . — Map (db m8820) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-16 — First Baptist Church, West Main Street
The Charlottesville African Church congregation was organized in 1864. Four years later it bought the Delevan building, built in 1828 by Gen. John H. Cocke, and at one time used as a temperance hotel for University of Virginia students. It became . . . — Map (db m8824) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-25 — Gen. Alexander Archer Vandegrift
Gen. Alexander Archer Vandegrift was born in Charlottesville on 13 Mar. 1887. He entered the U.S. Marine Corps in 1909 and served on posts in the Caribbean, Central America, China, and the United States. General Vandegrift led American forces in . . . — Map (db m18547) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-26 — Georgia O’Keeffe
Georgia O’Keeffe was born in Wisconsin in 1887. Her mother moved to Charlottesville in 1909 and rented the house here. Beginning in 1912, O’Keeffe intermittently lived with her mother and sisters. She took a summer drawing class taught by Mon . . . — Map (db m19092) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Historic Courthouse Square
This building, in continuous use as a courthouse for over 200 years, is one of America’s most historic. No other courthouse has been used by three early American Presidents at the same time, The original wood frame courthouse was erected on a . . . — Map (db m19723) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — History Underfoot

Traces of those who came before are all around us. This spot, for example, holds clues to the life of Catherine Foster, a free black seamstress and laundress, who purchased 2 1/8-acres here, in 1833, for herself and her family.

As this . . . — Map (db m81593) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-17 — Jack Jouett’s Ride
On 4 June 1781, John “Jack” Jouett Jr. arrived at the Albemarle County Courthouse to warn the Virginia legislature of approaching British troops. The state government under Governor Thomas Jefferson had retreated from Richmond to . . . — Map (db m18549) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — G-23 — James Monroe’s First FarmSite of the University of Virginia
In 1788 James Monroe purchased an 800-acre farm here to be close to his friend Thomas Jefferson and to establish a law office. In 1799 the Monroes moved to their new Highland plantation adjacent to Monticello and sold the first farm. In 1817 the . . . — Map (db m8762) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-30 — Jefferson School
The name Jefferson School has a long association with African American education in Charlottesville. It was first used in the 1860s in a Freedmen's Bureau school and then for a public grade school by 1894. Jefferson High School opened here . . . — Map (db m19834) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Meriwether Lewis and William Clark1774–1809, 1770–1838
Bold and farseeing pathfinders who carried the flag of the young republic to the western ocean and revealed an unknown empire to the uses of mankind. A territory of 385000 square miles was added to the country by the efforts of these men, an . . . — Map (db m8353) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — W-200 — Monticello
Three miles to the southeast, Thomas Jefferson began the house in 1770 and finished it in 1802. He brought his bride to it in 1772. Lafayette visited it in 1825. Jefferson spent his last years there and died there, July 4, 1826. His tomb is there. . . . — Map (db m65069) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-31 — Monticello Wine Company
The Monticello Wine Company’s four-story brick building was located on the middle of Perry Drive on the north side. Founded in 1873 using grapes from local vineyards, it operated until about the time Prohibition began in Virginia in Nov. 1916. . . . — Map (db m17993) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Paul Goodloe McIntire1860–1952 — Justice Park
Paul Goodloe McIntire (1860–1952) commissioned in 1921 the statue of General Thomas Jonathan (“Stonewall“) Jackson from Charles Keck. He gave the statue and this park to Charlottesville, the city of his birth, for the pleasure of . . . — Map (db m19753) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — President Monroe’s Local Homes
In 1789 James Monroe moved to Charlottesville and for one year his home was located in the first block west of this site. Then he lived for nine years in the home he built on what is now called “Monroe Hill” at the University of . . . — Map (db m19808) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Robert Edward Lee1807 - 1870
Robert Edward Lee 1807 - 1870 — Map (db m85955) WM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Roosevelt “Rosey” Brown, Jr.
Roosevelt Brown, Jr. (1932-2004) was born In Charlottesville and played football at Jefferson High School, the City’s only African-American High School. Following a stellar career he attended Morgan State University where he was named to the . . . — Map (db m30546) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Sacajawea
This plaque is dedicated to Sacajawea, whose contribution of traditional and cultural knowledge, with courage and bravery, earned her recognition in the chronicles of American History. Sacajawea was a Lemhi Shoshone (Agaidika) born in Salmon, . . . — Map (db m21757) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Shadow Catcher

At this place, on the site of Catherine Foster's home, this "shadow catcher" links the visible with the unseen even as it pulls the eyes upward to the sky. It creates a shadowy, gridlike outline of the house that once stood at this . . . — Map (db m81598) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Site of Old Swan Tavern
Site of old Swan Tavern where lived and died Jack Jouett, whose heroic ride saved Mr. Jefferson, the Governor, and the Virginia Assembly from capture by Tarleton June 1781. — Map (db m18552) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-20 — Stone Tavern and Central Hotel
George Nicholas, Albemarle County’s Virginia General Assembly delegate in 1783, built a stone house here in 1784. James Monroe occupied it 1789-1790, while improving the dwelling at his nearby farm, later the site of the University of Virginia. Here . . . — Map (db m19830) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — G-27 — Technical Sergeant Frank D. Peregory
Born at Esmont on 10 April 1915, Frank D. Peregory enlisted in May 1931 in Charlottesville’s Co. K (Monticello Guard), 116th Inf. Regt., 29th Inf. Div. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, T. Sgt. Peregory landed in the assault on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France. . . . — Map (db m18584) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-27 — The Farm
The Farm stands on a 1020-acre tract acquired by Nicholas Meriwether in 1735 and later owned by Col. Nicholas Lewis, uncle of Meriwether Lewis. A building on the property likely served as headquarters for British Col. Banastre Tarleton briefly in . . . — Map (db m19582) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-21 — The Three Notch’d Road
Also called Three Chopt Road, this colonial route ran from Richmond to the Shenandoah Valley. It likely took its name from three notches cut into trees to blaze the trail. A major east-west route across central Virginia from the 1730s, it was . . . — Map (db m5576) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — The University “Corner”A Student Rendezvous Since the Mid-1800s
In the early 1900s “The Corner,” so named by the University crowd, was but a sparse collection of businesses at the entrance to the University Grounds—literally just a corner. In the intervening years “The Corner” has . . . — Map (db m86177) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Thomas Jefferson Monument
Proclaim Liberty throughtout the land unto the inhabitants thereof —Leviticus XXIV. This monument to Thomas Jefferson was presented to the people to perpetuate the teachings and examples of the Founders of the . . . — Map (db m8805) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Thomas Jonathan Jackson1824 - 1863
Thomas Jonathan Jackson 1824 1863
Chancellorsville • Manassas • The Valley Campaign 1919 — Map (db m85954) WM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Triumph of “The Charlottesville Twelve”
Lane High School. French Jackson, Donald Martin, John Martin. Venable Elementary School. Charles E. Alexander, Raymond Dixon, Regina Dixon, Maurice Henry, Marvin Townsend, William Townsend, Sandra Wicks, Roland T. Woodfolk, Ronald E. . . . — Map (db m64024) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Triumph of “The Charlottesville Twelve”
Venable Elementary School. Charles E. Alexander, Raymond Dixon, Regina Dixon, Maurice Henry, Marvin Townsend, William Townsend, Sandra Wicks, Roland T. Woodfolk, Ronald E. Woodfolk. Lane High School. French Jackson, Donald Martin, John . . . — Map (db m65187) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — I-3 — University of Virginia
Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. The cornerstone of its first building was laid on October 6, 1817, in the presence of three presidents of the United States—Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. In 1825, the . . . — Map (db m61101) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Walter “Rock” Greene Albert “AP” Moore Gymnasium — Architects of Success
Washington, DC native, Walter “Rock” Greene, began his coaching career in 1957 as an assistant football and basketball coach under legendary Coach “Bob” Smith. Coach Greene became head coach to the Burley Bears basketball . . . — Map (db m65229) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Watering Fountains
During the late 1800’s, the City of Charlottesville installed four watering fountains in the downtown area. The fountains were designed to provide water to the citizens, their horses and other domesticated animals. Water was provided by the City . . . — Map (db m19739) HM
Virginia (Charlottesville), University of Virginia — Henry Martin1826 - 1915
Born in slavery at Monticello on July 4, 1826, the day of Thomas Jefferson's death, Henry Martin worked at the University in various capacities from about 1847 until his retirement in 1910. In late 1868 or early 1869, he was employed as head . . . — Map (db m75526) HM

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