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Churches & Religion Historical Markers

 
First Methodist Meeting Place In New Hampshire Marker image, Touch for more information
By Guylaine Beaudoin, July 19, 2015
First Methodist Meeting Place In New Hampshire Marker
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Chesterfield — 060 — First Methodist Meeting Place In New Hampshire
In 1772 "the people called Methodist" held their first religious meeting in this state on the James Robertson farm, 1.2 miles north of here, on Christian Street, with Philip Embury as the preacher. On June 20, 1803, Francis Asbury spoke here using . . . — Map (db m85918) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Keene — 226 — Jonathan Myrick Daniels1939 - 1965
Civil Rights activist Daniels worshiped at St. James Episcopal Church during his high school years. Born in Keene, he graduated from Virginia Military Institute before entering the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, MA. While studying for . . . — Map (db m85872) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Westmoreland — 074 — Park Hill Meeting House
This church, built on the northeast corner of Cole Cemetery in 1762, was moved in sections by ox cart in 1779 to this location, then known as Federal Hill. A steeple with a bell cast by the Paul Revere Foundry was added in 1826. This edifice is . . . — Map (db m90195) HM
New Hampshire (Coos County), Lancaster — 084 — Wilder-Holton House
This Structure, erected by Major Jonas Wilder, from boards planed and nails wrought on the site, originally possessing a four-fireplace chimney and Indian shutters, is Coos County's first two-storey dwelling. Construction was initiated on the noted . . . — Map (db m77609) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Bethlehem — Jodo Karate
Built as a Congregational Church in 1877 by the founding group of eight members, the building became the Maplewood Lodge I.O.O.F. in 1940. It has also served as the Rebekah Lodge. A beautiful three faced clock kept village residents apprised of . . . — Map (db m116524) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Littleton — First Congregational Church
On July 4, 1833, Main Street’s first house of “publick worship” was dedicated here on Meetinghouse Hill. Several denominations shared the English Gothic church, and it was a famed forum for abolition and temperance causes. The . . . — Map (db m116307) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Littleton — Methodist Church
This building was graced with the first church bell and spire in town. Built in 1850 on the site of the Old Red Store, a pioneer tavern, the church was dedicated on January 8, 1851. A Greek Revival portico with two fluted Doric columns was . . . — Map (db m116306) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Chichester — On This Spot Stood the First Congregational Church
On This Spot Stood The First Congregational Church Erected - 1793 — Map (db m129661) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — A Gift from Mary Baker G. Eddy
The discoverer and founder of Christian Science to First Church of Christ Scientist Concord, New Hampshire — Map (db m76438) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — 105 — Mary Baker Eddy1821 - 1910
While living at her "Pleasant View" home (1892 - 1908) once on this site, Mrs. Eddy founded The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, Mass., headquarters of the Christian Science movement. From "Pleasant View" some six miles from her . . . — Map (db m77803) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Mary Baker Eddy House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m105382) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — On The Interval Below This Spot
On the interval below this spot a committee of the General Court of Massachusetts Bay, their surveyors and attendants there present to locate and survey the Plantation of Penny Cook, conducted the first religious service ever held in the central . . . — Map (db m129757) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of First Block House
Site of First Block House Erected 1726-7. Used As Meeting House Town House And School House. — Map (db m130508) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Hopkinton — Rev Jacob Cram
Rev Jacob Cram Ordained February 25, 1789 Reception of Gen Lafayette June 22, 1825 — Map (db m141440) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Loudon — Shaker Village

Take opposite road 2.6 miles to the attractive buildings of this Utopian community organized in 1792 in the township of Canterbury. The Shakers established high standards of agricultural efficiency, craftsmanship and domestic skill for their . . . — Map (db m117623) HM

New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Newbury — Center Meeting House, Newbury NH
New marker text Built in 1832, the Center Meeting House appears to be inspired by Asher Benjamin’s designs for Federal period religious buildings. Construction was financed by the First Toleration Society who wanted a place where all . . . — Map (db m104567) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Pembroke — 0144 — First Meeting House
This is the site of the first meeting house in Suncook, incorporated as Pembroke in 1759. Granted to soldiers in Lovewell's Indian War (1722-25) or their survivors, the land was largely settled by Congregationalists from Massachusetts Bay. . . . — Map (db m131384) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Deerfield — Site of the First Congregational Church1772
1772 To Commemorate the site of The First Congregational Church Doorstep in in gateway, location identical. Ministers and term of service 1772 – Rev. Timothy Upham – 1811 1812 – Rev. Nathaniel Wells – . . . — Map (db m115950) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Fremont — 167 — Meeting House and Hearse House
Built in 1800, this steepleless structure, originally unheated, was used for both town and church meetings. This and a similar building in Rockingham, Vt., are the only two survivors of some 70 meeting houses with twin end "porches" . . . — Map (db m115798) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Hampton — Bell of 5th Congregational Church Building
Bell of 5th Congregational Church Building 1797-1844 "Townsfolk to the Church I called." Bell Inscription Maneely's West Troy NY 1861 — Map (db m105146) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), New Castle — New Castle Congregational Church
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m105370) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Joseph & Nancy (Cotton) and their children, Eleazor & JamesPortsmouth Black Heritage Trail
In 1717 Portsmouth's first identified black family was baptised by South Church. Baptisms of enslaved people became more frequent in local churches; black marriages, however, were not included in town records until the Revolutionary Era, when . . . — Map (db m115979) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Negro PewsPortsmouth Black Heritage Trail
Until the mid 1800's, most New England churches assigned pews to parishioners by their social rank. Black people, enslaved or free, usually were seated as far as possible from the pulpit. Negro pews in the North Meetinghouse, which stood here from . . . — Map (db m115983) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — New Hampshire's First Black ChurchPortsmouth NH Black Heritage Trail
In 1915 the congregation of the People's Baptist Church which had been meeting in the South Ward Hall for more than twenty-five years, brought this 1857 building for $1200. Though officially Baptist, its membership was multidenominational. For . . . — Map (db m115984) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Temple Israel1910
First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in New Hampshire Star of David New Hampshire's Jewish community dates back to the pre colonial ear. Temple Israel, established as a formally organized community in 1910, affirmed the American principles . . . — Map (db m76462) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — The South Church
This Greek Revival-style church was dedicated on February 15, 1826. Its architect and construction supervisor was Jonathon Folsom, a master builder. The exterior granite was quarried in Rockport, Massachusetts, transported to Portsmouth by water, . . . — Map (db m96778) HM
New Hampshire (Strafford County), New Durham — New Durham Meeting House
The New Durham Meetinghouse was built by settlers from Durham and nearby towns in 1770 as their house of worship and seat of government until 1819 when the town's first church was built. This area was the town center until the 1850's when the . . . — Map (db m96748) HM
New Hampshire (Sullivan County), Claremont — 041 — First Roman Catholic Church
Southerly on Old Church Road is located the first Roman Catholic edifice in New Hampshire. It was erected in 1823 under the direction of the Reverend Virgil Horace Barber, S.J. The building serves St. Mary's parish and contained the first Roman . . . — Map (db m109414) HM
New Hampshire (Sullivan County), Claremont — 057 — Union Church
Located easterly on Old Church Road, this wood-frame structure, built 1771–1773, is the oldest standing Episcopal church in the State, serving the second oldest parish. The parish began in 1768 as a mission of the Society for the Propagation . . . — Map (db m109370) HM
New Hampshire (Sullivan County), Washington — 94 — Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church
In April 1842, a group of citizens in this town banded together to form "the first Christian Society." In the Adventist movement of 1842-43, they espoused the Advent hope. In January 1842, these Washington Sabbathkeepers, after meeting for many . . . — Map (db m73224) HM

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