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Booth's Escape Historical Markers

Markers related to John Wilkes Booth, the Booth family, the Conspirators, and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
 
Booth's Escape Marker [Reverse] image, Touch for more information
By Devry Becker Jones, March 21, 2020
Booth's Escape Marker [Reverse]
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — 14 — Booth's EscapeAn East-of-the-River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail —
Late On The Night Of April 14, 1865, a guard at the other end of the Navy Yard Bridge allowed a young man on horseback to cross, despite a wartime curfew. Unbeknownst to the guard, the rider, John Wilkes Booth, had just shot President Abraham . . . — Map (db m100715) HM
2District of Columbia (Washington), Chinatown — Discover DC / Gallery Place - Chinatown
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. Ford's Theatre Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, . . . — Map (db m113106) HM
3District of Columbia (Washington), Chinatown — e.9 — Mary Surratt's Boarding HouseCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail —
"The nest in which the egg was hatched." President Andrew Johnson, April 1865. The building at 604 H Street is intimately connected to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theater, just five . . . — Map (db m16585) HM
4District of Columbia (Washington), Fort McNair — Lincoln Assassination Trial
On April 14, 1865 John Wilkes Booth (of Maryland) assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Fords Theater in downtown Washington. Booth's conspirators were arrested and tried by a Military Court here in Building 20 from May 9 to June 30, 1865. One . . . — Map (db m29740) HM
5District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — Discover DC / Judiciary Square
Welcome to downtown Washington DC - an area rich in history, culture and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. Clockwise from top: "Lone Sailor" at the US Navy . . . — Map (db m110214) HM
6District of Columbia (Washington), Navy Yard — Serving as a Temporary Federal PrisonSafety — Behind These Walls —
The body of John Wilkes Booth, assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, was brought to the Navy Yard for examination and identification aboard the USS Montauk. With the exception of Mary Surratt, the Lincoln conspirators (including Lewis Payne, . . . — Map (db m126460) HM
7District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln died in this house April 15, 1865 at 7:22 a.m. Purchased by the United States in 1896. — Map (db m28502) HM
8District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Discover DC / Gallery Place
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. Sites described clockwise from top left Old Post . . . — Map (db m113218) HM
9District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Discover DC / Gallery Place / Arena
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. Chinatown Arch Chinatown, centered on Seventh and H . . . — Map (db m113226) HM
10District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Discover DC / Metro Center
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites in the vicinity of this sign. [Clockwise from top left:] Old Post Office Pavilion The . . . — Map (db m114658) HM
11District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — .6 — John Wilkes Booth’s EscapeCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail —
“My brother saw Booth as he came down the alley and turned into F Street.” —Henry Davis, 1901. Twelve-year-old Henry Davis and his brother often looked out the back window of their Ninth . . . — Map (db m148286) HM
12District of Columbia (Washington), Petworth — 19 — Mr. Lincoln’s RideLift Every Voice Georgia Avenue — Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail —
It’s the summer of 1862. Early morning, but already hot and dusty. You’re standing at this spot, when you see a tall man on horseback. It’s President Abraham Lincoln. You’re pleased to see him, but not surprised. After all, he rides by here . . . — Map (db m130757) HM
13Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Skidmore — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander's hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m72089) HM
14Maryland, Baltimore — Green Mount Cemetery
Green Mount Cemetery was dedicated in 1839 on the site of the former country estate of Robert Oliver. This was the beginning of the “rural cemetery movement”; Green Mount was Baltimore’s first such rural cemetery and one of the first in . . . — Map (db m62629) HM
15Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m3390) HM
16Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — John Wilkes Booth
John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice Harold hid in a thick woods on Samuel Cox's farm. (One mile north →) for several days before escaping to Virginia after Lincoln's assassination April 14, 1865. — Map (db m129023) HM
17Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — John Wilkes Booth and David Herold
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold remained hidden from April 16 to 21, 1865 in a nearby pine thicket, while Union troops searched for them. Thomas A. Jones brought them food and the newspapers. — Map (db m39524) HM
18Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Pine Thicket“the instrument of his punishment” — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. After leaving the home of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd near . . . — Map (db m39528) HM
19Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill
Mid-18th century farm house (with alterations after 1800) was home of Col. Samuel Cox. This southern sympathizer fed and sheltered fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David E. Herold before dawn on Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865 following Booth's . . . — Map (db m4458) HM
20Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich HillThe Fugitives Seek Shelter — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryantown. Unsure of their . . . — Map (db m129036) HM
21Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill Historic SiteHistoric Preservation/Public Archaeology
(Right Banner) After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryanstown. . . . — Map (db m129045) HM
22Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill Through the Years
) 1666 Hugh Thomas receives a 600 acre patent to "Rich Hill." ) 1666—1714 Beginnings ) 1714—1807 Brown Family Era ) (Image of Dr. Gustavus Brown) ) Scottish immigrant Dr. Gustavus Brown builds the house. 1729 . . . — Map (db m129049) HM
23Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
24Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — "Huckleberry"
Home of Confederate Mail Agent, Thomas A. Jones, who helped to shelter, and aided the escape of John Wilkes Booth and David Herold in their flight, April 16th to 21st 1865. — Map (db m129119) HM
25Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Crossing the PotomacOff into the Darkness — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two . . . — Map (db m128807) HM
26Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Dents MeadowOne mile →
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold set out from here for the Virginia shore during the night of April 21, 1865, in a boat supplied by Thomas A. Jones. — Map (db m128809) HM
27Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m24540) HM
28Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1104) HM
29Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco
In this center of Confederate activity, at the Brawner Hotel, Detective Captain William Williams unsuccessfully offered Thomas Jones $100,000 reward for information that would lead to the capture of John Wilkes Booth. — Map (db m128825) HM
30Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco: Conspiracy & the Plot to Assassinate President Lincoln
Port Tobacco was the home and place of business of George Atzerodt. Although he failed to murder Vice President Andrew Johnson, he was convicted and executed for his role in the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. Part of . . . — Map (db m128954) HM
31Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Dr. Samuel A. MuddTreating an Assassin — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
This house was the home of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd and his wife, Sarah Frances Dyer. Early on the morning of April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth arrived here with a companion, David E. Herold, and asked Mudd to set Booth’s broken leg. Afterward, as . . . — Map (db m921) HM
32Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Home of Dr. Samuel Mudd(1833–1883)
John Wilkes Booth rested here for several hours on April 15, 1865, after receiving treatment for his broken leg. — Map (db m920) HM
33Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m922) HM
34Maryland (Charles County), Waldorf — Dr. Mudd's House
Dr. Mudd set the broken leg of Wilkes Booth who escaped from Washington after Lincoln's assassination on April 14, 1865. Dr. Mudd was tried and imprisoned on Dry Tortugas Island. — Map (db m8932) HM
35Maryland (Charles County), Waldorf — Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House
Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House circa 1830 placed on the National Register of Historic Places — Map (db m92707) HM
36Maryland (Prince George's County), Brandywine — John Wilkes Booth and his companion David Herold
John Wilkes Booth and his companion David Herold entered Charles County near this spot after assassinating President Abraham Lincoln in Washington on April 14, 1865. — Map (db m24211) HM
37Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — John Wilkes Booth
The assassin of Lincoln stopped here at the house of Mrs. Surratt to secure ammunition on the night of April 14, 1865. He rode on to "T.B." and then to Dr. Mudd's who set his broken leg. — Map (db m3612) HM
38Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m60164) HM
39Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Surratt TavernConfederate Safe House — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
Owned and operated by the ardently pro-Southern Surratt family, this building was used by Confederate agents as a safe house during the Civil War. Built in 1852, the structure was a tavern, hostelry and post office. Surratt's son, John, Jr., a . . . — Map (db m4188) HM
40Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Surratt TavernConfederate Safe House — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
Owned and operated by the ardently pro-Southern Surratt family, this building was used by Confederate agents as a safe house during the Civil War. Built in 1852, the structure was a tavern, hostelry, and post office. Surratt's son, John, . . . — Map (db m154461) HM
41Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — The Mary Surratt House
Built in 1852 for the family of John and Mary Surratt. Restored in 1975 in recognition of the buildings national historical significance relating to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. — Map (db m141912) HM
42Maryland (Prince George's County), Oxon Hill — Clinton
After assassinating Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth fled on horseback to Prince George's County. He was aided by Mary Surratt and stopped at her tavern in Surrattsville (now known as Clinton). Though many today believe she was innocent, Mary . . . — Map (db m127709) HM
43Maryland (Prince George's County), Oxon Hill — Discover Gorgeous Southern Prince George's
1. Oxon Cove Farm & Oxon Hill Farm Explore farm life and how it's changed over time by visiting the outbuildings and animal pens of a working farm, taking a wagon ride, and by participating in hands-on activities and living history programs. A . . . — Map (db m127703) HM
44Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1000) HM
45Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — Visiting Old Town
Welcome to Old Town Alexandria! Experience historical charm with contemporary flair from the river to the rails Plan Alexandria Visitors Center at Ramsay House Knowledgeable staff help you create a perfect plan for your . . . — Map (db m115778) HM
46Virginia (Alexandria), Old Town — Visiting Old Town
(obverse side) King Street Trolley Free Proceed directly ahead to trolley stop Welcome to Old Town Alexandria! Experience historical charm with contemporary flair from the river to the rails Plan Alexandria Visitors . . . — Map (db m115143) HM
47Virginia (Alexandria), Southwest Quadrant — "Pursuers of Booth the Assassin"Alexandria National Cemetery
. . . — Map (db m73446) HM
48Virginia (Caroline County), Bowling Green — Star HotelConspirator's Lair
Built approximately 1820, the Star Hotel was one of two taverns serving Bowling Green. During the Civil War, it was operated by the Henry Gouldman family, and became a notorious Confederate spy headquarters and safe haven to those who aided Lincoln . . . — Map (db m116127) HM
49Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — Assassin's End
This is the site of Locust Hill, Richard Henry Garrett's farm. Early on the morning of 26 April 1865, a 16th New York Cavalry detachment cornered John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his co-conspirator, David E. Herold, . . . — Map (db m151255) HM
50Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — EP-20 — John Wilkes Booth
This is the Garrett place, where John Wilkes Booth, assassin of Lincoln, was cornered by Union soldiers and killed, April 26, 1865. The house stood a short distance from this spot. — Map (db m1584) HM
51Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — Port RoyalBooth Turned Away — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
In front of you is the Brockenbrough-Peyton House where fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David Herold accompanied by three former Confederate soldiers arrived about 2:30 pm April 24, 1865, 10 days after Booth shot Lincoln. The owner, Randolph . . . — Map (db m4525) HM
52Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — N-16 — Where Booth Died
On this road two miles south is the Garrett place. There John Wilkes Booth, Lincoln's assassin, was found by Union cavalry and killed while resisting arrest, April 26, 1865. — Map (db m22246) HM
53Virginia (King George County), King George — EP-9 — Cleydael
This T-shaped house was built in 1859 by Dr. Richard Stuart as a summer residence for his family. On Sunday afternoon, April 23, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and three companions came to this house seeking medical assistance from Dr. Stuart. Suspicious . . . — Map (db m2925) HM
54Virginia (King George County), King George — EP 9 — Cleydael
Dr. Richard H. Stuart built a T-shaped house just southeast of here in 1859 as a summer residence for his family. John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice David Herold, guided by a local farmer, arrived here on 23 April 1865 while attempting to escape . . . — Map (db m138070) HM
55Virginia (King George County), Office Hall — J-66 — Historic Port Conway
The site of Port Conway is located five miles south on the Rappahannock River. Francis Conway laid out the town in 1783, and the next year the Virginia General Assembly passed an act establishing it. James Madison, Father of the Constitution and . . . — Map (db m7290) HM
56Virginia (Page County), Luray — Thornton GapTactical Mountain Pass
During the Civil War, this gap in the Blue Ridge was of significant tactical importance for the movement of troops, artillery, and supply wagons. The Thornton’s Gap Turnpike, a macadamized (hard-surfaced) road, passed through the gap and linked . . . — Map (db m100651) HM
 
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Oct. 24, 2020