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Historical Markers in New Mexico

621 markers matched your search criteria. Markers 201 through 401 are listed. Previous 200 Next 221
 
Smugglers’ Trail Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Kirchner, November 3, 2010
Smugglers’ Trail Marker
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Animas — Smugglers’ Trail
On State Road 338 at milepost 24.4 at State Road 9, on the right when traveling south on State Road 338.
Smugglers once crossed this area with mule trains of contraband from Mexico, to be traded for merchandise in Arizona. In the summer of 1881, a group of Mexican smugglers was killed in Skeleton Canyon by members of the Clanton gang, including Old Man . . . — Map (db m37770) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Animas — The Clanton Hideout
On State Road 338 at milepost 24.4 at State Road 9, on the left when traveling north on State Road 338.
The infamous Clanton Gang had two crude dugouts here in the 1880s that served as hideouts and a base for wide-ranging outlaw activities, particularly in connection with the Curly Bill Gang’s depredations along the Smugglers’ Trail that passed by . . . — Map (db m37771) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — Camp Lordsburg
On Frontage Road at POW Road, on the left when traveling south on Frontage Road.
Near this site the US Army operated a camp during World War II. It opened as an internment camp for the Japanese and Japanese-American civilians from 1942-43. It later reopened as the Lordsburg Prisoner of War Camp for Germans and Italians from . . . — Map (db m60678) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 20.
Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument was established in 1907 by Theodore Roosevelt to protect the prehistoric material culture of the Mogollon people and others who inhabited this area. The first scientific description of a pueblo ruin on the . . . — Map (db m38242) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgPopulation 3,195 — Elevation 4,245
On U.S. 70 at milepost 28, on the right when traveling south.
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. It eventually absorbed most of the population of Shakespeare, a now-deserted mining town three miles south. — Map (db m38233) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgElevation 4,245
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 20.
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. The town was named for Delbert Lord, an engineer with the railroad. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his . . . — Map (db m38244) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgElevation 4,245
On West Motel Drive 0.4 miles east of Interstate 10, on the right when traveling east.
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. The town was named for Delbert Lord, an engineer with the railroad. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his . . . — Map (db m73727) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — Lordsburg-Hidalgo Library
On West Motel Drive 0.4 miles east of Interstate 10, on the right when traveling east.
The Lordsburg-Hidalgo Library was founded in 1928 under the leadership of Bethel Vernon Fuller (1888-1976). Mrs. Fuller, president of the Library Board of Trustees from 1928-1969, raised funds to build the WPA Pueblo Revival style building, which . . . — Map (db m73726) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — Shakespeare
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 20.
Located at the north end of the Pyramid Mountains, near the old stage stop at Mexican Springs, Shakespeare was first known as Pyramid Station. Later named Ralston, a diamond swindle caused its collapse in 1874. The town was revived as Shakespeare in . . . — Map (db m38243) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — The Women of Shakespeare
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 20.
(Front): Emma Marble Muir (1873–1959) Rita Wells Hill (1901–1985) Janaloo Hill Hough (1939–2005) Emma Marble Muir arrived at the mining town of Shakespeare in 1882. She and her daughter, Rita Wells Muir, learned . . . — Map (db m38246) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — Yucca Plains / Yucca/ New Mexico's State Flower
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 53.
Marker Front: Wide alluvial plains of Southwest New Mexico are feature of basin and range province with isolated fault block mountains scattered like islands from a sandy sea. Volcanic rocks form most of Cedar Mountains to south and Pyramid . . . — Map (db m42271) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Playas — Playas Siding
On State Road 9 at milepost 25.5 east of Baker Ranch Road, on the right when traveling east.
In 1902, Phelps, Dodge and Company built the El Paso and Southwestern Railroad to link El Paso, Texas with the copper mines of Bisbee, Arizona, and eventually, with several other mining towns throughout the region. Highway 9, New Mexico’s . . . — Map (db m37772) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Rodeo — Rodeo Intermediate Field Civil Aeronautics Authority # 57A
On State Road 80 at State Road 9, on the right when traveling south on State Road 80.
The intermediate field system, developed by the U.S. Department of Commerce, greatly increased safety in early commercial aviation. Rodeo Intermediate Field 57A was established in 1930 to enhance navigation for Standard Airlines -later TWA- from . . . — Map (db m62752) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Rodeo — Rodeo Station
On 1st Street (State Road 80) at Hickory Street, on the right when traveling south on 1st Street.
The El Paso and Southwestern railroad was constructed in 1902 by Phelps, Dodge and Company, to link El Paso, Texas with the copper mines of Bisbee, Arizona. New Mexico Highway 9, the "Border Route", between Columbus and Rodeo, parallels the rail . . . — Map (db m34856) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Caprock — Llano Estacado
On U.S. 380 at milepost 200.7, on the right when traveling west.
Nomadic Indians and countless buffalo herds dominated this vast plain when the Vásquez de Coronado expedition explored it in 1541. Later it was the focus of Comanchero activity, and in the 19th century it became a center for cattle ranching. The . . . — Map (db m73464) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Hobbs — HobbsPopulation 28,794 – Elevation 3615 ft.
On U.S. 62 0.6 miles west of NW County Raod, on the right when traveling east.
Named for the family of James Hobbs which homesteaded here in 1907, Hobbs became first a trading village for ranchers and then a major oil town after the discovery of oil by the Midwest Oil Company in 1928. — Map (db m61441) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Hobbs — Llano Estacado
On U.S. 62 0.3 miles west of NW County Road, on the right when traveling west.
Nomadic Indians and countless buffalo herds dominated the vast plain when the Vasquez de Coronado expedition explored it in 1541. Later it was the focus of Comanchero activity, and in the 19th century it became a center for cattle ranching. The name . . . — Map (db m61440) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Hobbs — Oil and Gas
On U.S. 62 1.2 miles west of State Line Road, on the right when traveling west.
A completion of the Discovery Well of the Hobbs Pool six miles south, April 12, 1929 focuses attention upon the potential of New Mexico as a major source of oil and natural gas. Steady development under the state conservation program, gradually . . . — Map (db m61424) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Monument — Monument
On State Road 8 0.1 miles south of Monument Highway, on the right when traveling south.
Settled in 1885 and named for a marker at the springs a few miles west, Monument remained a ranching community until oil was discovered in 1928. The Indian statue, called Geronimo by residents, was erected in 1928 by land developers. Monument has . . . — Map (db m61442) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Tatum — Dallas Cash Grocery
On Avenue A at 1st Street, on the left when traveling south on Avenue A.
Clarence E. (CE) & Mae Dallas opened the Dallas Cash Grocery in 1926 on their ranch (founded in 1910) at Caprock, NM. To keep the store stocked CE & sons often traveled 5 days in a wagon drawn by a team of horses – 2 days to Roswell, one . . . — Map (db m73465) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Tatum — Lea County CowgirlsDessie Sawyer (1897-1990) — Fern Sawyer (1917-1993)
On U.S. 380 at milepost 231, on the right when traveling west.
This is a two sided marker Front of Marker Dessie Sawyer was a rancher, philanthropist and political activist. Her work with community and charitable organizations advanced her into politics. She became the National Committee Woman . . . — Map (db m73466) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
On Smokey Bear Boulevard (U.S. 380 at milepost 85.5), on the right when traveling west.
Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitan. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the El Paso & Northeastern Railroad from Carrizozo in order to . . . — Map (db m45949) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
On U.S. 380 at milepost 83.5, on the right when traveling east.
[This is a two-sided marker] Side A: Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitán. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the . . . — Map (db m45950) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
On State Road 48 at milepost 21.1, 1 mile south of U.S. 380, on the right when traveling south.
Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitán. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the El Paso & Northeastern Railroad from Carrizozo in order to . . . — Map (db m45951) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — Eve Ball (1890-1984)Author and Preservationist
On U.S. 380 at milepost 91.2, 1.5 miles west of State Road 220, on the left when traveling east.
Side A: A pioneer in the preservation of the history of people in Southeastern New Mexico, Eve wrote over 150 articles and numerous books chronicling Mescalero and Chiricahua Apaches, Anglo and Hispanic settlers. Her honesty, patience . . . — Map (db m45957) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — Fort Stanton1855-1896
On State Road 220 at milepost 13.5, on the left when traveling south.
Fort Stanton, named for Captain Henry Stanton, was established to control the Mescalero Apaches. It was burned and evacuated by Union troops in 1861, held briefly by the Confederates, and then reoccupied by Colonel Kit Carson for the Union in 1862. . . . — Map (db m45954) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — Fort Stanton
On State Road 220 at milepost 13.5, on the right when traveling south.
Established Apr., 1855 by Brig. Gnl. Garland. Named for Capt. Stanton, killed near here in fighting Apaches. One of several forts controlling Indians and aiding westward migration. Partly destroyed, 1861, before a Confederate approach, reoccupied . . . — Map (db m45955) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — Smokey Bear
Near Smokey Bear Boulevard (U.S. 380) at Stanton Avenue (County Road 206).
This is the resting place of the first living Smokey Bear. In 1950 when Smokey was a tiny cub, wildfire burned his forest home in the nearby Capitan Mountains of the Lincoln National Forest. Firefighters found the badly burned cub clinging to a . . . — Map (db m25111) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — Smokey Bear Historical Park
On U.S. 380 at milepost 85, on the left when traveling east.
This park commemorates Smokey Bear and describes the history and development of this national symbol of forest fire protection. The original Smokey is buried here within sight of the mountain where he was found orphaned by a fire raging in the . . . — Map (db m45953) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 – Elevation 5,438
On Central Avenue (U.S. 54 at milepost 125.3), 0.5 miles north of U.S. 380, on the right when traveling south.
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45909) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 - Elevation 5,438 Ft
On U.S. 380 at milepost 64.5, 0.2 miles west of B Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45910) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 - Elevation 5,438 Ft
On U.S. 380 at milepost 65.5, 0.5 miles east of U.S. 54, on the right when traveling west.
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45912) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 – Elevation 5,438
On Central Avenue (U.S. 54 at milepost 122.5), 0.1 miles south of A Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45914) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — MalpaisValley of Fires
On U.S. 380 at milepost 64, 1.5 miles west of U.S. 54, on the right when traveling west.
Spanish explorers called this extensive lava flow malpais, or badlands. The river of lava that flowed down this "Valley of Fires" erupted from a volcano some 7 miles north of here about 1000 years ago. Extending through the valley for 44 miles, the . . . — Map (db m45911) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Corona — Corona, New MexicoPopulation: 210 (1990 Census) Elevation: 6666 feet Founded in 1903 Incorporated in 1947
On Main Street (U.S. 54 at milepost 170) north of Duboise Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
The earliest settlers in the area were the Spanish ranchers who raised sheep and cattle on the open rangelands surrounding Corona. In the 1850's, a stage line was established from Las Vegas to White Oaks and Fort Stanton, transporting passengers, . . . — Map (db m45907) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Corona — Greathouse Station and Tavern
On Main Street (U.S. 54 at milepost 168.5) at Mayeux Road, on the right when traveling south on Main Street.
In late November, 1880, William “Billy the Kid” Bonney, David Rudabaugh and William Wilson were hiding out near here at a store and tavern operated by James Greathouse and a partner named Kuch. The night of November 27, they were . . . — Map (db m45908) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — American Merchant Marine Monuments
On Billy the Kid Trail (State Road 200) 0.1 miles south of Black Jack Pershing Road, on the left when traveling south.
In Memory Of The Men And Women Of The American Merchant Marine ----------------------- American Merchant Marine Veterans This ancient anchor is a tribute to Merchant Mariners the world over. Donated by Betty Wattam in memory of Joseph . . . — Map (db m102809) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Barracks / Dining HallBuilding 6
On Parade Ground near State Road 220.
Photo etching caption: Soldiers of the 10th Infantry Co. E in front of the barracks in 1892 This building, like most, has been modified numerous times to suit the needs of the entities that managed it. Originally built in 1855 as a . . . — Map (db m86182) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Buildings 17 - 20
On Just north of Kit Carson Road north of State Road 220, on the right when traveling north.
Originally built by the Army in 1876 as four separate buildings, these adobe structures replaced older laundress quarters attached to the barracks. In 1928, they were joined together to create seven apartments for hospital staff. ‘Four women . . . — Map (db m85351) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — CCC Camp/German Internment Camp
On Black Jack Pershing Road near State Road 220, on the right when traveling west.
As part of the ‘New Deal’ envisioned by President Roosevelt, a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp was built in 1934 across the Rio Bravo from the fort. The Fort Stanton CCC employed civilians in soil conservation, forestry and women’s programs . . . — Map (db m85347) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Chapel
On Black Jack Pershing Road near State Road 220, on the right when traveling west.
The Catholic chapel was originally built in 1913 on a wing of building 11 across the parade ground. In 1938, buildings 10, 11 and 12 were demolished, but the chapel was left free standing. A new stone façade was added to the old chapel consisting . . . — Map (db m85868) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Commanding Officer's QuartersBuilding 1
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
During the Army era, the fort’s commander and his family lived in this beautiful stone structure. During the Hospital’s tenure, it was the residence of the Medical Officer in Charge. Over the years, it is the only building that has remained . . . — Map (db m86089) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Commissary WarehouseBuilding 12
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
Photo etchings caption: Building 12, torn down in 1930, was actually attached to Building 13. When it was taken down, a chunk of the roof fell into a lady’s bedroom. Originally built in 1855 of adobe, the building that occupied this . . . — Map (db m86189) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Community House
On Kit Carson Road near State Road 220, on the right when traveling west.
This beautiful building was constructed in 1931 for use by civilian employees of the hospital (and their families) for social activities. Patients utilized the ‘Seaman’s Social Club’ located just to the west of this building. In most aspects of life . . . — Map (db m85772) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Fort Administration BuildingBuilding 9
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
This building, like most others on the parade ground, was first constructed in 1855 as a single story, stone structure. It included an Adjutant’s office, library, and guard house. Later remodels added a second floor and arched porch. It was known as . . . — Map (db m85802) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Fort Stanton Cave
Fort Stanton Cave Has been designated a Registered Natural Landmark The site possesses exceptional value as an illustration of the nation's natural heritage and contributes to a better understanding of man's environment . . . — Map (db m108359)
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — GuardhouseBuilding 8
On Parade Ground near State Road 220.
James Dolan, Emil Fritz, W.W. Martin and Lawrence Murphy established a business that would become the focus of the Lincoln County War. Fritz and Murphy (and possibly Dolan) served at Fort Stanton as soldiers. Originally built of adobe in 1879, . . . — Map (db m85804) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Hospital AdministrationBuilding 7
On Parade Ground near State Road 220.
T.B. Patients in front of the hospital administration building. This building was constructed of local stone by troops of the 1st Dragoons and 8th Infantry as a barracks in 1855. It was utilized in that capacity until the fort was closed by the . . . — Map (db m85808) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — L.G. Murphy Sutler Store
On the site located 100 yards west of this sign resided the L.G. Murphy Sutler Store (the post trader). Begun in 1866 by Lawrence G. Murphy and Emil Fritz (both former Dragoons stationed at Fort Stanton), it was a large, rambling, adobe structure of . . . — Map (db m86093) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — New Hospital(Site of Building 5)
On Parade Ground near State Road 220.
This new hospital building replaced the old tubercular hospital (buildings 10 and 11) in 1936. It was state of the art when constructed and boasted a bed capacity of 85 patients and the first elevator in the state of New Mexico. Doctors that . . . — Map (db m85869) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Nurse's QuartersSite of Building 11
Near Parade Ground north of Kit Carson Road.
This building was constructed in 1940 on the site of building 11 (formerly barracks and then the original tubercular hospital). While it does not match the style or construction of most of the original fort buildings, it does reflect the Territorial . . . — Map (db m85923) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Officer’s QuartersBuilding 4
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
Constructed in 1855, this building was originally a single story complex of four quarters for officers and their families. It has evolved over time to be more spacious and comfortable with a second story, bay windows and covered porches. Seen in the . . . — Map (db m86307) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Officer's QuartersBuilding 3
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
This building was constructed in 1883 of adobe. It was designed to house two officers and their families. During the hospital years, it was used as doctor’s housing, boasting two finely appointed apartments. What a privilege it was to be . . . — Map (db m85928) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Officer's QuartersBuilding 13
Near Parade Ground near State Road 220.
Built in 1855, as a single story, gabled roof structure of simple design and construction, this building housed officers and their families. It was here that 2nd Lieutenant John J. Pershing was quartered in 1887 and where he met his future wife. On . . . — Map (db m86734) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Stables and Corrals
On State Road 220 near Kit Carson Road, on the right when traveling north.
Corrals have stood on this site since 1855. The current rock corrals were built in 1877 to replace older ones that burned. These structures housed horses and mules necessary for Cavalry and freighting operations. When the hospital took over Fort . . . — Map (db m85775) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — TB Tent Cottages
On Kit Carson Road near State Road 220, on the left when traveling west.
On these terraces were located 40 – 70 tent cottages that housed ambulatory tuberculosis patients between 1900 and 1963. These two man cottages had roll up canvas sides that were kept open for the fresh air regarded as essential to curing . . . — Map (db m85768) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Glencoe — John H. TunstallMurder Site
On U.S. 70 at milepost 273.5, on the right when traveling east.
In one of the Lincoln County War’s earliest violent encounters, John H. Tunstall was shot and killed at a nearby site on February 18, 1878. Tunstall’s death set off a series of violent reprisals between his friends, among whom was William . . . — Map (db m46009) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Glencoe — John H. Tunstall Murder Site (Actual)
Near Forest Road FS9019D.
John H Tunstall Age 24 Killed Here February 18, 1878 Triggering Lincoln County War Erected By L. C. Hist. Society Feb. 18, 1978 — Map (db m87061) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Hondo — Historic Lincoln, New Mexico
On U.S. 380 at U.S. 70, on the left when traveling west on U.S. 380.
Just 10 miles west on US Highway 380 you will discover one of New Mexico’s hidden treasures, the town of Lincoln. Tucked away in the beautiful Bonito River Valley, Lincoln has barely changed since the Lincoln County War (1878-1881). Lincoln is . . . — Map (db m79141) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Hondo — San Patricio
On U.S. 70 at milepost 281.2, on the right when traveling east.
This farming and ranching community was the scene of many events associated with the Lincoln County War. In July 1878, a posse ransacked the village while looking for William "Billy the Kid" Bonney and others of the faction known as the "Regulators" . . . — Map (db m46005) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Col. Dudley's Camping Place
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.9, on the right when traveling west.
Encamped a few yards away on July 19, 1878 were U.S. troops from Fort Stanton. Allegedly brought to protect lives and property, their presence quickened Murphy party into firing McSween's residence and pillaging the Tunstall store. — Map (db m45989) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Earliest Courthouse
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.8, on the right when traveling east.
Three room adobe, seat of law and justice when Lincoln County was established, 1869. Routine issuing of warrants and records, trials for crimes large and small, all issued from it. Now called Priest's House, belongs with neighboring church. — Map (db m45971) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Lincoln
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.4, on the right when traveling east.
This is a two-sided marker Side A: Spanish-speaking settlers established a town here in the 1850s, after the U.S. Army began to control the Mescalero Apaches. First known as Las Placitas del Río Bonito, the name of the community . . . — Map (db m45958) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Lincoln
On U.S. 380 at milepost 98.5, on the right when traveling west.
Side A: Spanish-speaking settlers established a town here in the 1850's, after the U. S. Army began to control the Mescalero Apaches. First known as Las Placitas del Rio Bonito, the name of the community was changed to Lincoln when . . . — Map (db m46007) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Montano Store
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.9, on the right when traveling east.
Owned by Montano family, one of first in Lincoln. Operated as a general store by Jose Montano, neutral in Lincoln County War. Its 25 man garrison of McSween men, led by Martin Chaves, were driven out by Col. Dudley and troops in July fight. — Map (db m45972) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Murphy-Dolan Store
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.5, on the right when traveling east.
Built in 1874, as place of business and residence of L.G. Murphy & Co., a dominant factor in area in 1870's, and headquarters of the Murphy faction during Lincoln County War. Firm failed, and store became county gov't and judicial center for 33 . . . — Map (db m45959) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Old Dolan Home
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.7, on the right when traveling east.
Built in 1888 by J.J. Dolan, who took part in the L.C. War on the Murphy side, and afterwards was conspicuous in county affairs. In later times the building served as a hotel, the most familiar name being Bonito Inn. — Map (db m45961) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — 12 — San Juan Church
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.8, on the right when traveling east.
La Iglesia de San Juan Bautista was dedicated in 1887 and was restored by the New Mexico State Monuments in 1984. — Map (db m45970) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Site of Old Wortley Hotel
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.6, on the right when traveling west.
In this frontier hostelry lodged judges during court terms, court's retainers. Here Robt. M. Ollinger, at table, noon, April 28, 1881, heard shooting from Courthouse, rushed to his death at hands of William H. Bonney. — Map (db m45960) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Site of Squire Wilson's Home
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.8, on the right when traveling east.
South some 75 yds. was the lone adobe house of J.B. Wilson, noted J.P. in Lincoln Co. War. At night, Mar 17, 1879 he helped Gov. Lew Wallace meet with Bill Bonney, leader of remaining McSween men, and arranged a surrender under promise of protection. — Map (db m45969) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Site of the McSween Home
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.7, on the right when traveling west.
Opening a law office in Lincoln, 1875, Alex A. McSween rebuilt an old adobe into a ten room house. On July 19, 1878, Peppin's posse fired it to oust inmates. Leading victim of this strategm was McSween himself. The burned-down house was never . . . — Map (db m45992) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Torreon
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.8, on the right when traveling west.
One of Lincoln's earliest structures. Built in the 1850's, its thick walls protected Spanish-Americans against the Apaches. In Lincoln Co. War Murphy's sharpshooters were here stationed. In 1937 Chaves County Historical Society undertook restoration . . . — Map (db m45990) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Tunstall-McSween Store
On U.S. 380 at milepost 97.7, on the right when traveling west.
J.H. Tunstall and A. A. McSween erected-1877. A focal point in Lincoln County War in which both partners were slain. Despite looting by Seven Rivers group, building continued as a store under pioneer merchants, notably John M. Penfield. — Map (db m45991) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Ruidoso — Old Dowlin Mill
On Sudderth Drive 1.4 miles west of U.S. 70, on the left when traveling west.
Part original structure. Famous landmark for 100 years. Originally grist and sawmill. Used as rendezvous by William H. Bonney (Billy, the Kid), Pat Garrett, Johnny Riley, J.J. Pershing (then Lt. at Ft. Stanton) and other historic figures. — Map (db m46014) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Ruidoso Downs — Old Dowlin Mill
On U.S. 70 at milepost 264, on the right when traveling west.
Famous New Mexico landmark for over 100 years. Original building still stands and water turns massive water wheel during the summer. Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett and General Pershing visited here. Turn on NM 48, 2.7 miles to west, then proceed 1.4 . . . — Map (db m46011) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), White Oaks — Susan McSween Barber “Cattle Queen of New Mexico” 1845-1931
On State Road 349, on the right when traveling east.
Her second husband was George Barber. Under the Desert Land Act, they patented 400 acres in 1883. The act required irrigating the land and in 1881 Susan built a dam across Three Rivers stream and a half-mile ditch to convey water to her property. By . . . — Map (db m103652) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), White Oaks — White Oaks
On State Road 349, on the right when traveling east.
White Oaks grew rapidly after the discovery of gold in 1869. From tent city to bustling mining town, it was the largest town in Lincoln County with cultural events and an occasional bandit. Gold depletion and failure to grant railroad right-of-way . . . — Map (db m105813) HM
New Mexico (Los Alamos County), Los Alamos — Peggy Pond Church — (1903–1986)
On Trinity Drive (State Road 502) at 20th Street on Trinity Drive.
Peggy Pond Church, author of the Southwest classic The House at Otowi Bridge and daughter of Los Alamos Ranch School founder Ashley Pond, will forever be “The First Lady of New Mexican Poetry.” As she rode the Pajarito Plateau and . . . — Map (db m64820) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Columbus
On State Road 11 at milepost 5.3, on the right when traveling south.
Columbus was founded in 1891 as a U.S./Mexico border station but eventually coalesced around the railroad station three miles to the north in 1903. The area’s history is tied to a March 9, 1916, raid on Columbus by Mexican revolutionary leader . . . — Map (db m37778) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Columbus
On State Road 11 at milepost 2.5, on the right when traveling north.
Columbus was founded in 1891 as a U.S./Mexico border station but eventually coalesced around the railroad station three miles to the north in 1903. The area’s history is tied to a March 9, 1916, raid on Columbus by Mexican revolutionary leader . . . — Map (db m37780) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — In Memory of Citizens Killed / In Memory of Thirteenth CavalryPancho Villa Raid of 1916
On State Road 11 at milepost 3, on the right when traveling north.
[Side A:] In Memory Citizens Killed – March 9, 1916 W. A. Davidson • Harry Davis • James T. Dean • Dr. H. M. Hart • Bessie James • C.C. Miller • C.D. Miller • J. J. Moore • Wm. T. Ritchie • J. W. Walker [Side . . . — Map (db m37791) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Last Hostile Action by Foreign Troops
Site of the Last Hostile Action by Foreign Troops in the Continental United States. Led by General Francisco (Pancho) Villa, insurgent Mexican forces on the night of March 9, 1916 raided camp Furlong a United States army cantonment, and the nearby . . . — Map (db m37901) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Pancho Villa State Park
Pancho Villa State Park commemorates the historic Columbus Raid of 1916. Ruins of Camp Furlong, headquarters for General John Pershing's expeditionary force, still exist at the park. The old Columbus Customs Service building has been restored to . . . — Map (db m37777) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Pancho Villa State Park
Pancho Villa State Park commemorates the historic Columbus Raid of 1916. Ruins of Camp Furlong, headquarters for General John Pershing's expeditionary force, still exist at the park. The old Columbus Customs Service building has been restored to . . . — Map (db m81737) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Pancho Villa’s Raid
On March 9, 1916, Francisco “Pancho” Villa, a major figure in the Mexican Revolution, crossed the international border with a large force, attacking and looting Columbus, New Mexico. Eighteen U.S. soldiers and civilians, and . . . — Map (db m37776) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — 390-B — Southern Pacific Railroad Depot
On State Road 9 at State Road 11, on the right when traveling east on State Road 9.
Now the site of the Columbus Historical Society Museum the depot was built c. 1902 by the El Paso & Southwestern Railroad which was merged with the Southern Pacific in 1924. Site No. 390-B A Registered Cultural Property State of New . . . — Map (db m37782) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Cathay Williams(c1850 – Death Date Unknown)
On State Road 26 at milepost 10.2, on the right when traveling east.
Born into slavery, Cathay was liberated in 1861 and worked as a cook for the Union army during the Civil War. In 1866 she enlisted in the U.S. Army as Private William Cathey serving with the Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Cummings and Fort Bayard until . . . — Map (db m38211) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Cooke’s Wagon RoadBasin and Range Country
Near Interstate 10 at milepost 61.
In 1846, while leading the Mormon Battalion to California during the Mexican War, Lt. Col. Philip St. George Cooke blazed a wagon road from New Mexico to the West Coast. The potential use of the route for the railroad construction was one of the . . . — Map (db m38236) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — DemingElevation – 4,331 ft
On U.S. 180 at milepost 164, on the right when traveling south.
In 1780, Governor Juan Bautista de Anza passed here while searching for a trade route between Santa Fe and the mines of Sonora, Mexico. Deming, named for Mary Anne Deming, was founded in 1881 when the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railroads were . . . — Map (db m38212) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Deming Armory
On South Silver Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Built in 1916 in reaction to border conflicts arising out of the Mexican Revolution Site No. 584 A Register Cultural Property State of New Mexico — Map (db m38299) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — First Road to Southern California
On U.S. 180 at milepost 145 at Butterfield Trail, on the right when traveling north on U.S. 180.
Here crossed the first road to Southern California opened for wagons by Capt. Cooke, who passed here in command of the Mormon Battalion, Nov. 1846 – later it became the California Emigrant Road – from 1858-1861, the route of the . . . — Map (db m38302) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Lest We Forget
On South Silver Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Jan. 1941 – The New Mexico National Guard was inducted into federal service. They were trained at Ft. Bliss and became the 200th Coast Artillery (AA). Sept. 1941 – The 200th Coast Artillery (AA) was sent to the Philippines. . . . — Map (db m38300) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Pearl Harbor Memorial
On South Silver Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
. . . — Map (db m38301) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Rockhound State Park
On Stirrup Road SE, on the right when traveling east.
Located on the rugged slopes of the Florida Mountains, this is one of the most unusual parks in the nation. Here "rockhounds" are encouraged to take home samples (up to 15 pounds) of rocks and minerals. The park also offers camping and picnicking . . . — Map (db m72718) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Seamon Field House
On South Silver Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
This Property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior. Built 1898. Also known as the Untied States Custom House. Site No. 1499 A Registered Cultural Property State . . . — Map (db m38298) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — GallupPopulation 18,161 - Elevation 6600 ft
On Interstate 40 Frontage Road (State Road 118), on the right when traveling west.
Long a major trading center for the Navajo and Zuni Indians living in communities north and south of the town. Gallup emerged in 1881 from a railroad construction camp. It is named for David Gallup, who in 1880 was paymaster for the Atlantic & . . . — Map (db m36541) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — In Memory of All Vietnam Veterans
Near 11th Street 0.1 miles south of West Aztec Avenue.
This memorial was erected in memory of the young individuals who went to war as kids and lost their youthful dreams, and some their lives, for a cause – freedom and honor – and came back as men with the horrors of war instilled in every . . . — Map (db m36559) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Gallup — Navajo Code TalkersDeparture — May 4, 1942
On East Historic Route 66 (State Road 118), on the right when traveling west.
29 Marines prepare to depart during World War II — Map (db m36558) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Red Rock — Fort Wingate
On State Road 400 at milepost 3 at Main Street, on the left when traveling south on State Road 400.
The first Fort Wingate was established near San Rafael in 1862, to serve as the base of Col. Kit Carson's campaigns against the Navajos. In 1868 the garrison was transferred to the second Fort Wingate near Gallup. In that same year, the Navajos . . . — Map (db m36538) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Pueblo of Zuni
On Road 53 at milepost 14, on the right when traveling west.
The six original Zuni pueblos were the legendary "Seven Cities of Cibola" sought by Vasquez de Coronado in 1540. They were abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt, and the present pueblo was settled in 1699 after the Spanish reconquest. In 1970 Zuni . . . — Map (db m36582) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Pueblo of Zuni
On State Road 53 at milepost 11, on the right when traveling east.
The six original Zuni pueblos were the legendary "Seven Cities of Cibola" sought by Vasquez de Coronado in 1540. They were abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt, and the present pueblo was settled in 1699 after the Spanish reconquest. In 1970 Zuni . . . — Map (db m36584) HM
New Mexico (McKinley County), Zuni — Zuni Olla Maidens - Zuni Pueblo
On State Road 53 at milepost 17, on the right when traveling east.
The Zuni Olla Maidens are an all-women's group renowned for their skill and ability to balance fragile water jars or ollas on their heads. Historically, Zuni women collected water in ollas from nearby springs for everyday use. Today, they perform in . . . — Map (db m36580) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), La Cueva — La Cueva Mill — La Cueva National Historic District
On State Road 442 just east of State Road 518, on the right when traveling east.
This mill was built in the 1870s by Vicente Romero. In 1851 he established the La Cueva Ranch by purchasing land from several grantees of the Mora Land Grant which had been conceded by Governor Albino Pérez in 1835. According to legend Vicente . . . — Map (db m73281) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), La Cueva — La Cueva National Historic District
On State Road 518 at State Road 442 on State Road 518.
This ranching community was established by Vicente Romero in the early 1850s. The grist mill was built in the 1870s. Its proximity to Fort Union and the Santa Fe Trail helped the ranch develop into one of the region’s most important commercial . . . — Map (db m73280) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Mora — Curanderas — Women Who Heal — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
On State Road 518 just north of State Road 434, on the right when traveling north.
In New Mexico, women blessed with special knowledge of herbs, household remedies, human health and strong faith are trusted to cure real or imaged maladies. Known as Curanderas, these women have been an integral part of the Hispanic fabric in . . . — Map (db m73273) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Wagon Mound — Wagon Mound
On State Road 120 at Interstate 25, on the right when traveling east on State Road 120.
This last great landmark on the Santa Fe Trail was named for its resemblance to the top of a covered wagon. At Wagon Mound, travelers could cross from the Cimarron Cutoff to Fort Union, which is located on the Mountain Branch of the Trail. The two . . . — Map (db m45824) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Fort Union National Monument / Santa Fe Trail1851-1891
Near Interstate 25 at milepost 375.5, 8.6 miles north of State Road 161.
Side A: Fort Union National Monument 1851-1891 Once the largest post in the Southwest, Fort Union was established to control the Jicarilla Apaches and Utes, to protect the Santa Fe Trail, and to serve as a supply depot for . . . — Map (db m45829) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Santa Fe Trail
On Interstate 25 at milepost 374, on the right when traveling north.
Opened by William Becknell in 1821, the Santa Fe Trail became the major trade route to Santa Fe from Missouri River towns. The two main branches, the Cimarron Cutoff and the Mountain Branch, joined at Watrous. Travel over the Trail ceased with the . . . — Map (db m55199) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Watrous
On State Road 161 at Interstate 25, on the left when traveling east on State Road 161.
The Mountain Branch and the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail meet at Watrous. This important spot on the Trail was first known at La Junta, "junction" in Spanish. In 1879, with the coming of the railroad, it was named for Samuel B. Watrous, a . . . — Map (db m55198) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Alamagordo — Commission for the Blind Orientation Center
On North Whitesands Boulevard, on the right when traveling north.
The Orientation Center teaches persons who are blind or visually impaired the skills to live independently and work competitively. Originally part of the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the “Training Center” opened . . . — Map (db m46076) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Alamagordo — Disappearance of Albert J. Fountain and his son Henry
On U.S. 70 at milepost 178, on the right when traveling east.
Albert Jennings Fountain was a Civil War veteran, New Mexico legislator and prominent lawyer. On February 1, 1896, Fountain and his eight-year-old son, Henry, were traveling home to Mesilla from Lincoln. They carried grand jury indictments against . . . — Map (db m46077) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Alamagordo — New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
On North Whitesands Boulevard, on the right when traveling north.
The New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired was founded on granted land in 1903 by the new territorial governor. The teacher and later regent was the blind daughter of lawman Pat Garrett, Elizabeth Garrett, who solicited the support of . . . — Map (db m46075) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Alamogordo — Dog Canyon(Cañon Del Perro)
On State Road 54 at Dog Canyon Road, on the right when traveling south on State Road 54.
For the Mescalero Apache, Dog Canyon was a favorite camping area and trail through the Sacramento Mountains. It was the scene of several battles in the 19th century. In 1863 a group of Mescaleros was attacked by soldiers, and the survivors were sent . . . — Map (db m72719) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Bent — Blazer’s Mill
On U.S. 70 at milepost 241.5, on the right when traveling east.
An early fight in the Lincoln County War occurred near this sawmill on April 5, 1878, when several men of the McSween faction, including Dick Brewer and Billy the Kid, attempted to arrest Buckshot Roberts. Roberts and Brewer were killed, and two . . . — Map (db m46038) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Bent — Round Mountain
On U.S. 70 at milepost 237.5, on the right when traveling west.
This cone--shaped mountain is a landmark in southern New Mexico that has historic significance for many area families. In April 1868 a skirmish occurred between the Apache and Tularosa settlers when six U.S. soldiers left supply wagons between Fort . . . — Map (db m73725) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Cloudcroft — Cloud-Climbing Railroad
On U.S. 82, on the right when traveling east.
In order to provide timber for the construction of his El Paso & Northeastern Railroad north of Alamagordo, Charles B. Eddy in 1898 built a spur into the Sacramento Mountains. The line operated as far as Cloudcroft until 1947. The Cloudcroft Trestle . . . — Map (db m59164) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Cloudcroft — Restoring a Local Treasure
On U.S. 82, on the right when traveling east.
The Mexican Canyon Trestle was restored in 2009-2010. Over 420 timbers were replaced and large sections of the trestle were rebuilt. The US Forest Service, New Mexico Rails-to-Trails and local efforts continue to preserve this treasure. The . . . — Map (db m59346) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), La Luz — La Luz
On State Road 545 at U.S. 54, on the left when traveling east on State Road 545.
In 1719, Spanish Franciscan missionaries built a chapel here dedicated to Nuestra Señora de la Luz, Our Lady of the Light. The naming of the village is also attributed to the will o’wisp light in the canyon, a perpetually burning lamp in an . . . — Map (db m46073) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Mayhill — Apache Battleground
On Road 82 at milepost 35, on the right when traveling east.
In this immediate vicinity, Captain Henry W. Stanton of the U.S. Army, for whom Fort Stanton was named, lost his life in 1855 in a skirmish with the Mescalero Apaches. For several weeks, soldiers commanded by Stanton and Capt. Richard S. Ewell, were . . . — Map (db m73434) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Mescalero — Lozen, Little Sister“A Shield to Her People” — (ca. 1840-1889)
On U.S. 70 at milepost 256.2, on the right when traveling east.
Lozen, a warrior and sister of the famous Warm Springs Apache chief Victorio, fought alongside her brother until his death in 1880 and later with his successors, Nana and Geronimo. Lozen also was a medicine woman and healer and, it was said, . . . — Map (db m46033) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Mescalero — Sierra Blanca
On U.S. 70 at milepost 253.5, on the right when traveling north.
Sierra Blanca, a complex ancient volcano, rises more than 7,300 feet above Tularosa Basin to peak at 12,003 feet. Vertical geologic movement between ranges and basin is about 2 miles. San Andrés Mountains on the west side of Tularosa Basin are . . . — Map (db m46036) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers
On U.S. 54 at milepost 96.6 at County Road B030, on the right when traveling north on U.S. 54. Reported missing.
Located in the Tularosa Basin east of the great lava flows known as the malpais, Three Rivers was once prominent in the cattle empires of Albert Bacon Fall, John S. Chisum, and Susie McSween Barber, “the cattle queen of New Mexico.” . . . — Map (db m46039) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers
On U.S. 54 at milepost 96.6, on the right when traveling north.
Located in the Tularosa Basin at the turn-off for Three Rivers Petroglyphs, this ranching village settled in the early 1870's took its name for a nearby convergence of three creeks. The cattle empires of Albert Bacon Fall, John Chisum, and Susan . . . — Map (db m91006) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers Petroglyph Site
Near County Road B030 4.5 miles east of U.S. 54.
Inhabitants of a nearby village made the Three Rivers Petroglyphs (rock carvings) over 600 years ago. Over 20,000 petroglyphs have been identified in the area. The people were of the Jornada Mogollon (hor-NAH-da muggy-OWN) prehistoric Indian . . . — Map (db m46042) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers Petroglyph Site
On U.S. 54 at milepost 96.6, on the right when traveling north.
Three miles east of here is one of the most concentrated arrays of petroglyphs in the Southwest. Along a mile-long volcanic ridge are some 21,000 images depicting animals, humans, plants and geometric shapes making it one of very few sites with . . . — Map (db m91007) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers Petroglyphs
On U.S. 54 at milepost 96.6 at County Road B030, on the right when traveling north on U.S. 54. Reported missing.
Three miles to the east is a mile-long array of pictures pecked into the solid rock walls of a volcanic ridge. They include both geometric and animal forms. They were likely made by prehistoric Mogollón Indians between ca. A.D. 1000 and 1400. — Map (db m46040) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Tularosa
On U.S. 54 at milepost 78, on the right when traveling north.
The Tularosa Basin has been occupied by Indian groups for thousands of years. The first Hispanic settlers moved here from the Rio Grande Valley in 1862. Anglo settlers and cattlemen began moving into the region in the 1870s. The original 1862 . . . — Map (db m46072) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Nara Visa — Nara VisaFounded 1902    Elevation 4200 ft.
On U.S. 54 at milepost 351, on the left when traveling west.
The area is rich in prehistoric evidence, and home of the buffalo and Plains Indians. Explored by the early Spanish, the area was settled when the Rock Island Railroad was built thru in 1901. The brick building, built in 1921, was home for a fine . . . — Map (db m78866) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Nara Visa — Townsite of Obar
On U.S. 54 at milepost 343, on the left when traveling west.
Founded in 1906 and at one time had a couple dozen buildings with all types of business found in early western towns including a newspaper called Obar Progress. A partial list of the several hundred pioneer families who homesteaded in the Obar . . . — Map (db m78867) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), San Jon — Llano Estacado
On State Road 469 0.4 miles south of Interstate 40, on the right when traveling south.
Sediments shed from the rising mountains to the west formed the Llano Estacado, later to be bypassed by streams such as the Pecos and Canadian Rivers and left standing in bold relief with a relatively level, uneroded caprock surface. Croplands on . . . — Map (db m91040) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Black Jack Ketchum
On State Road 209 at milepost 71.5, on the right when traveling north.
The last of the train robbers, Black Jack Ketchum, who terrorized the railroads in the 1880's killed two men near this spot and hid out in a cave near Saddleback Mesa to the Southwest. The swarthy bandit was wounded in his last robbery and hanged in . . . — Map (db m93199) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Fort Bascom1863 - 1870
On Main Street, on the right when traveling east.
Built under Brigadier General James H. Carleton. First Post Commander Captain Peter W.L. Plympton with Company F, 7th U.S. Infantry and Company 1st New Mexico Volunteer Cavalry. Named after Captain George N. Bascom, 16th U.S. Infantry. Officers . . . — Map (db m63510)
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Fort Bascom1863-1870
On State Road 104 at milepost 100.3, on the right when traveling north.
Fort Bascom was built to protect this area from Comanches. In 1864, Kit Carson led a campaign against the Comanches, as did General Philip Sheridan in 1868. The fort was also established to control the Comancheros, New Mexicans involved in illegal . . . — Map (db m93198) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — TucumcariPopulation 6,765 – Elevation 4,096
On U.S. 54 at milepost 305.5, on the right when traveling west.
This area was troubled by both Comanches and Comancheros, New Mexicans who traded illegally with the Indians, until the military campaigns of 1874. With the coming of the railroad in 1898, the small community of Liberty, eight miles to the north, . . . — Map (db m78868) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — TucumcariPopulation 6,765 - Elevation 4,096
On East Tucumcari Boulevard 0.5 miles west of Quay Road Am, on the right when traveling west.
This area was troubled by both Comanches and Comancheros, New Mexicans who traded illegally with the Indians, until the military campaigns of 1874. With the coming of the railroad in 1898, the small community of Liberty, eight miles to the north, . . . — Map (db m78888) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
On East Main St (U.S. 54), on the right when traveling east.
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. Randolph . . . — Map (db m4378) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
On East Tucumcari Boulevard 0.5 miles west of Quay Raod Am, on the right when traveling west.
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pathfinder Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. . . . — Map (db m78889) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
On State Road 209 0.5 miles south of Interstate 40, on the left when traveling south.
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pathfinder Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. . . . — Map (db m78890) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Yetta Kohn (1843 – 1917)Matriarch, Cattle Rancher and Business Woman
On West Tucumcari Boulevard west of West Hines Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Born in Bavaria and widowed in Las Vegas, New Mexico, Yetta ran the family store and raised four children alone. She later moved to La Cinta on the Canadian River where she opened another store, became postmistress, started a bank and operated a . . . — Map (db m78891) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Abiquiú
On Highway 84 (U.S. 84 at milepost 211.5) near Local Road 187, on the left when traveling south.
Established on the site of an abandoned Indian pueblo, Abiquiú in the mid-18th century became a settlement of Spaniards and genizaros (Hispanicized Indians). In 1776, explorers Fray Francisco Atanacio Dominguez and Fray Silvestre Vélez de Escalante . . . — Map (db m73192) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Coelophysis Quarry — Ghost Ranch
Near U.S. 84 at milepost 225 near Local Road 1708.
In 1881 David Baldwin discovered small fossilized bones on what is now Ghost Ranch. He mailed the bones to paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope in Philadelphia. Cope had been through the area in the late 1870s and had urged Baldwin to explore and . . . — Map (db m75212) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Georgia O’Keeffe(1887–1986) — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
On Highway 84 (U.S. 84 at milepost 215.5) north of Abiquiu, on the right when traveling north.
One of America’s great and most celebrated painters of the twentieth century, Georgia O’Keeffe is known for her unique depictions of natural and architectural forms. She began spending summers painting in Northern New Mexico in 1929 and moved from . . . — Map (db m73124) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Abiquiu — Red Rocks
On Highway 84 (U.S. 84 at milepost 215.5) north of Abiquiu, on the right when traveling north.
The colorful formations exposed here are the slope forming Chinle Shale of Triassic age, deposited in streams, lakes, and floodplains some 250 million years ago and the cliff-forming Entrada Sandstone of Jurassic age deposited as windblown sand some . . . — Map (db m73158) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Alcalde — Historic Los Luceros
On State Road 68 at milepost 8.7 at Los Luceros (County Road 48), on the right when traveling north on State Road 68.
Historic Los Luceros includes a Pueblo Indian ruin and an 18th century rancho/hacienda on Sebastián Martin Serrano's 1703 land grant. Evolving out of family inheritance, local artistry and preservation efforts, the complex contains five adobe . . . — Map (db m45711) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chama — ChamaPopulation 1,199 - Elevation 7,850 ft.
On Terrace Avenue (State Road 17), on the right when traveling north.
From a small crossroads town, Chama became an important site on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad after 1880. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is a remnant of the San Juan Extension, a narrow-gauge line which once served the mining areas . . . — Map (db m74253) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chama — ChamaPopulation 1,090 - Elevation 7,860 ft.
On Highway 84/64 (State Road 84).
From a small crossroads town, Chama became an important site on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad after 1880. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is a remnant of the San Juan Extension a narrow-gauge line which once served the mining areas . . . — Map (db m74254) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Chimayo
On Juan Medina Road (County Road 98) 0.1 miles east of High Road to Taos (State Road 76), on the left when traveling south.
Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 . . . — Map (db m32819) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Cordova
On State Road 76 at milepost 10.2, 0.4 miles east of Cundiyo Road (State Road 503), on the right when traveling west. Reported missing.
Cordova, originally named Pueblo Quemado after a nearby burned-out Indian Pueblo, was permanently re-settled in 1750 after Indian attacks. It was renamed Cordova in 1900 after a prominent local family. The village chapel, San Antonio de Padua, is an . . . — Map (db m45675) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Santuario de Chimayó
On Sanctuario Drive - County 94C 0.2 miles west of Juan Medina Road (County Road 98), on the right.
In 1816, Bernardo Abeyta and the other residents of El Potrero, then a separate community, finished this massive adobe chapel honoring Nuestro Señor de Esquípulas. It is noted for its 6-foot crucifix and its tradition of healing the sick. The . . . — Map (db m32817) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Dulce — Jicarilla Apache (Tribe)Official Scenic Historic Marker
On U.S. 64.
The Jicarilla Apaches, primarily a hunting and gathering group, once occupied vast portions of northeastern New Mexico and southern Colorado. Pressure from Comanche Indians and European settlers eventually pushed them from their homeland. In 1887, . . . — Map (db m104757) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — El Rito
On State Road 554 at milepost 11, on the right when traveling north.
Tewa people lived in this area before the village of El Rito Colorado was settled in the 1830s by residents from the Abiquiú area. The Territorial Legislature of 1909 established the Spanish-American Normal School here to train teachers . . . — Map (db m73394) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — El RitoElevation 6,870 ft.
On State Road 554 at milepost 11.5 north of State Road 571.
This village was settled in the 1830s by residents from the Abiquiú area. The Territorial Legislature of 1909 established the Spanish-American Normal School here to train teachers for northern New Mexico schools. After several changes in name and . . . — Map (db m73395) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — Welcome to the Church of San Juan Nepomuceno
On State Road 554 near Placitas Road (State Road 215).
This historical church was begun by the first Spanish settlers of the El Rito Valley in 1827 and completed in 1832. Originally flat roofed and with small window openings in the 5 ft. thick walls, it not only served as an imposing temple, but also as . . . — Map (db m64977) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — 1543 — Chimayo Trading Post / Trujillo House
On Sandia Drive (U.S. 285) at State Road 68, on the left when traveling east on Sandia Drive.
Restored 1939 on site of original 1926 trading post. A Registered Cultural Property State of New Mexico — Map (db m34205) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — Española Valley
On North Paseo De Onate (U.S. 84 at milepost 191), 0.5 miles north of Fairview Drive, on the right when traveling south.
When it was described by Gaspar Castano de Sosa in 1591, the Española Valley contained about ten Tewa-speaking pueblos, several of which are still occupied today. Juan de Oñate established New Mexico’s first colony here in 1598. Long on the northern . . . — Map (db m45671) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Española — Dominguez Escalante Trail
On Chama Highway (U.S. 84 at milepost 191.1), just from Española, on the right when traveling north.
On July 29, 1776, two Franciscans, Fray Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Fray Silvestre Velez de Escalante set out on horseback on an expedition from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to Monterey, California. The purpose of the expedition was two-fold: to open . . . — Map (db m73389) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Española — The Bond House
On Bond Street, on the left when traveling west.
Frank Bond (1863-1945), prominent Española merchant, came from Canada in 1882. In 1887 Bond married May Anna Caffal of Pueblo, Colorado and built the home. The house grew from a two-room adobe to this large structure. Acquired by the city in 1957, . . . — Map (db m45665) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Medanales — Agueda S. Martinez (1898–2000)“You Will Find Me Dancing On the Loom”
On Highway 84 (U.S. 84) at State Road 233 on Highway 84.
Agueda is the matriarch of Hispanic weaving in New Mexico. From a very young age, she was known for her complex designs and natural dyes. She was the subject of the Academy Award-nominated documentary film, “Agueda Martinez: Our People, Our . . . — Map (db m73393) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Ohkay Owingeh — Esther Martinez - P’oe Tsáwäˀ (1912-2006)Ohkay Owingeh
On State Road 68 0.3 miles south of State Road 74, on the right when traveling north.
Esther Martinez served her community as an educator, linguist and storyteller. Her foremost contributions to our state are documenting and preserving the Tewa language and the art of storytelling. Esther was named a National Heritage Fellow in 2006 . . . — Map (db m32856) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Ohkay Owingeh — Shrine of Our Lady of LourdesConstructed 1889-1890
On State Road 291 0.1 miles south of State Road 74, on the left when traveling south.
[ Panel 1: ] San Juan Parish's Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes was conceived as place of pilgrimage for those faithful wishing to honor Our Lady and to be given a glimpse of her place of apparition to St. Bernadette Soubirou in the . . . — Map (db m32794) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh) — San GabrielOn the Camino Real
On State Road 68, on the right when traveling north.
Governor Juan de Oñate set up his headquarters in San Juan Pueblo in 1598, but by 1601 he had moved the Spanish capital across the Rio Grande to Yuque-Yunque Pueblo. Named San Gabriel, it served as the seat of government until 1610, when Oñate's . . . — Map (db m32877) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pablita Velarde, Tse Tsan, Golden Dawn(1918-2006) — Santa Clara Pueblo
On Los Alamos Highway (State Road 30 at milepost 7.1) at Roller Road, on the left when traveling north on Los Alamos Highway.
Pablita Velarde was an internationally acclaimed artist whose paintings largely depicted Pueblo life. She was commissioned by the WPA art's program to paint murals at Bandelier National Monument. Selected as one of New Mexico's "Living Treasures", . . . — Map (db m45663) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pueblo of Santa Clara
On Los Alamos Highway (State Road 30 at milepost 7.1) at Roller Road, on the left when traveling north on Los Alamos Highway.
Founded around the fourteenth century, Santa Clara traces its ancestry to Puye, an abandoned site of cave dwellings on the Pajarito Plateau. Increasing tensions with the Spanish led to its participation in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The mission . . . — Map (db m45664) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Fort Lowell
On Highway 84/64 (U.S. 84), on the right when traveling south.
Fort Lowell was established in 1866 to protect the Tierra Amarilla area settlements from the Southern Utes. Originally named Camp Plummer this post was garrisoned by a detachment of New Mexico Volunteers, some of whose descendants live in the area. . . . — Map (db m74255) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
On Highway 84/64 (State Road 84) at Highway 162 (State Road 162) on Highway 84/64.
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74256) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
On Highway 84/64 (State Road 84) at Highway 162 (State Road 162) on Highway 84/64.
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74257) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Truchas — Truchas
On State Road 76 near County Road 77A, on the right when traveling east.
In 1754, Governor Tomás Vélez Cachupín granted land on the Rio Truchas to families from Santa Cruz and Chimayó. Because Nuestra Señora de Rosario de Truchas was on the northern frontier, and subject to attack by Plains Indians, the governor . . . — Map (db m64915) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Truchas — Truchas Peaks
On State Road 76 north of Truchas Crossroads, on the right when traveling east.
Ice age glaciers carved these beautiful alpine peaks, among the highest in the New Mexico Rockies, rising to 13,101 feet. Precambrian quartzite, some of the oldest rock in New Mexico, forms the core of the Truchas (“trout”) Peaks, part . . . — Map (db m64916) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Velarde — VelardeOn the Camino Real
On State Road 68 at County Road 60, on the left when traveling north on State Road 68.
Founded in 1875, this small farming community was named La Jolla. It was once famous for finely woven blankets. Here the Camino Real left the Rio Grande and followed a canyon northeast to Embudo Creek where it began a climb over the mountains to . . . — Map (db m43810) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — Blackwater Draw
On U.S. 70 1.7 miles east of State Road 202, on the right when traveling east.
Blackwater Draw consists of several important archaeological sites that have yielded much information about the big-game hunting way of life. Some of the animals that were hunted, like the mammoth, are long extinct. Eastern New Mexico University's . . . — Map (db m56114) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — Eastern New Mexico University
On U.S. 70 0.1 miles west of North Avenue K, on the right when traveling west.
This university was established at Portales in 1927 by the State Legislature as the Eastern New Mexico Normal School. It opened for the 1934-35 School year with 274 students. Originally established to train teachers for rural schools, Eastern now . . . — Map (db m56118) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — PortalesPopulation 9940 - Elevation 4004 ft.
On U.S. 70 0.1 miles east of State Road 467, on the right when traveling west.
Portales derives its name from the porch-like appearance of a cave entrance at nearby Portales Springs. It developed as a major peanut producing region in the early twentieth century, after the Pecos Valley Railroad opened the area for commercial . . . — Map (db m56117) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — PortalesElevation 4004 ft.
On U.S. 70 at University Place, on the right when traveling east on U.S. 70.
Portales derives its name from the porch-like appearance of a cave entrance at nearby Portales Springs. It developed as a major peanut producing region in the early twentieth century, after the Pecos Valley Railroad opened the area for commercial . . . — Map (db m56120) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — Rose Powers White(1894-1969) — Guardian of History
On U.S. 70 1.7 miles east of State Road 202, on the right when traveling east.
This is a two sided marker Side A: Rose Powers White worked tirelessly to compile histories of early pioneers of southeastern New Mexico. She published numerous articles and was frequently asked to lecture to organizations and . . . — Map (db m56113) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Aztec — "For the Enlightenment of the Nation"Aztec Ruins National Monument
On Ruins Road.
Working from his house and publishing through the American Natural History Museum, Earl Morris intrigued the nation with his findings at Aztec Ruins. In 1923 the site Morris had known since boyhood was preserved as a national monument . . . — Map (db m71078) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Aztec — AztecPopulation 5512 - Elevation 5460 ft.
On U.S. 550 at milepost 158.5, on the right when traveling north.
Aztec, named for the nearby National Monument, was founded in 1876 when portions of the Jicarilla Apache Reservation were opened for non Indian settlement. It is the seat of San Juan County, which was created in 1887 partially as a response to the . . . — Map (db m36464) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Aztec — Aztec Ruins National Monument
On West Aztec Boulevard (State Road 516 at milepost 12.7), 1 mile west of U.S. 550, on the right when traveling east.
Despite its name, this magnificent site reflects 11th century influence from nearby Chaco Canyon rather than from the later Aztecs of Mexico. The striking masonry pueblos illustrate the classic Chaco architectural style with later Mesa Verde . . . — Map (db m36466) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Aztec — Aztec Ruins National Monument
On North Aztec Boulevard 0.2 miles west of U.S. 550, on the right when traveling west.
Despite its name, this magnificent site reflects 11th century influence from nearby Chaco Canyon rather than from the later Aztecs of Mexico. The striking masonry pueblos illustrate the classic Chaco architectural style with later Mesa Verde . . . — Map (db m36467) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Aztec — Aztec Ruins National Monument
On Ruins Road.
Through the collective recognition of the community of nations, expressed within the principles of the convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage Aztec Ruins National Monument has been designated an outlier . . . — Map (db m71077) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Bloomfield — City of Bloomfield
On West Broadway Avenue (U.S. 64 at milepost 62), on the right when traveling east.
Prehistoric farmers established major communities along the rivers of this region in the eleventh century. Eight hundred years later, historic settlement was also made possible by abundant water. Bloomfield was established in 1879 near a site which . . . — Map (db m36460) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Bloomfield — Salmon Ruin
Near U.S. 64 at milepost 61.
In the late 11th century, influence from Chaco Canyon, 45 miles south of here, began to be felt at this site and at nearby Aztec Ruins National Monument. The Chacoans abandoned this large and well-built masonry pueblo by 1150, and shortly . . . — Map (db m36457) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — Bisti Wilderness
On State Road 371 at milepost 77, at County Road 7250, on the right when traveling south on State Road 371.
The highly scenic badlands of the Bisti were created by the erosion and weathering of interbedded shale, sandstone and coal formations into unusual forms. The area is also rich in fossil flora and fauna. 3,946 acres of the Badlands were designated a . . . — Map (db m52706) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — FarmingtonPopulation 30,792 Elevation 5395 ft
On West Main Street (U.S. 64 at milepost 46.1), on the right when traveling east.
Until 1876 this area comprised part of the Jicarilla Apache Reservation. Anglo settlement quickly began at the confluence of the San Juan, Animas, and La Plata Rivers. Farmington became a ranching and farming area and, later, an important producer . . . — Map (db m36469) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — 177 — Farmington, New Mexico
On Locke Avenue 0 miles north of Apache Street, on the left when traveling north.
First settled 1876 to 1878 by families of William and Marion B. Hendrickson, Charles and Milton Virden, Orville Pyle, A.F. Miller and William Lock. The first school-house was built in 1879; the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1886. William Lock . . . — Map (db m22805) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — Footloose in Farmington:A Historic Perspective of Downtown
On Main Street at Orchard Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Main Street.
Farmington, New Mexico, the heart of the Four Corners, boasts a thriving downtown, where character, history and culture fuse in a mixture of places and events. Originally the land in what is now Northwest New Mexico was known as Tóta’ . . . — Map (db m22861) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — Harriet Belle Amsden Sammons (1876-1954)Bank President
On Browning Parkway at Burnham Road, on the right when traveling south on Browning Parkway.
Harriet was an astute financial manager and the first female bank president in New Mexico, operating the First National Bank in Farmington from 1922 until 1951. During the Depression she bought out San Juan National Bank, keeping it solvent and . . . — Map (db m59629) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — Hogback
On U.S. 64 at milepost 32.5 at Road 6950, on the right when traveling west on U.S. 64.
Steeply dipping strata define the western edge of the San Juan basin. To the west older geologic formations are exposed toward the Defiance uplift whereas basinward they are downwarped thousands of feet beneath younger rock units. Vast coal, . . . — Map (db m36456) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Shiprock — Beclabito Dome
On State Route 504 (U.S. 64 at milepost 3.5), on the right when traveling west.
Colorful red rocks of Entrada Sandstone are domed up by deep seated igneous intrusions to be exposed by erosion. The same igneous activity created the Carrizo Mountains to the west. Uranium deposits in the Morrison Formation just above the Entrada . . . — Map (db m36455) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Shiprock — Four Corners – A Common Bond
Near State Road 597 at milepost 0.4, 0.5 miles west of U.S. 160.
This is the only place in the United States marking the common corner of four states – Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. Who established this corner? The four corners monument was established and perpetuated by U.S. Government . . . — Map (db m36522) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Shiprock — New Mexico(Four Corners)
Near 4 Corners Road 0.5 miles west of U.S. 160.
In 1868, U.S. Surveyor Ehud N. Darling surveyed the 37 parallel of latitude to establish the territorial boundary of Colorado and New Mexico. He placed specially marked stones at intervals along the surveyed line that started at the northeast corner . . . — Map (db m36529) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Shiprock — Shiprock
On U.S. 64, on the left when traveling west. Reported missing.
This huge volcanic neck was formed in Pliocene times, over 3,000,000 years ago. It rises 1700 feet above the surrounding plain and is famed in legends of the Navajo as "Sa-bit-tai-e" (the rock with the wings). They hold that it was the . . . — Map (db m30013) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — City Hall1892
On 6th Street at University Avenue (State Road 65), on the right when traveling north on 6th Street.
John Hill was the "supervising architect" using a Kirchner & Kirchner design. Built during a surge of civic improvements in New Town which included sidewalks, parks, and schools. Said to be the first municipal building in New Mexico. The structure . . . — Map (db m45890) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Dr. Meta L.Christy
On Grand Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
Side A: Meta L. Christy, DO, is recognized by the American Osteopathic Association as the first black osteopath. Dr. Christy graduated in 1921 from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine as its first black graduate. The College . . . — Map (db m45889) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — E. Romero Hose & Fire Co.1909
On Bridge Street east of the Plaza, on the right when traveling east.
Design by E.W. Hart • Built by M. M. Sundt Named for Las Vegas’s first mayor, merchant, and benefactor, Don Eugenio Romero. The Fire Company was formed in 1882 and continued in service as a volunteer organization until 2003. Throughout that . . . — Map (db m64894) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Engine No. 1129
On North Grand Avenue (U.S. 85) at Mills Avenue (Alternate U.S. 85), on the right when traveling south on North Grand Avenue.
The Engine was built for the Santa Fe Railroad Co. by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, in 1902 & used in regular service on various divisions of the Santa Fe Railroad in New Mexico, for 51 years. It's last trip in railroad service ended in Belen, . . . — Map (db m45888) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Fort Union National Monument1851-1891 — 18 Miles
On Interstate 25 at milepost 360, on the right when traveling north.
Once the largest post in the Southwest, Fort Union was established to control the Jicarilla Apaches and Utes, to protect the Santa Fe Trail, and to serve as a supply depot for other New Mexico forts. The arrival of the railroad and the pacification . . . — Map (db m55197) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Hogbacks
On Interstate 25 at milepost 339 at U.S. 84, on the right when traveling north on Interstate 25.
Interstate 25 cuts through dipping strata that form hogback ridges between the Great Plains and the south end of the Rocky Mountains. The Santa Fe Trail from here to Santa Fe, followed a natural valley eroded in less resistant strata between the . . . — Map (db m55196) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Isidor Stern’s “Famous” Dry Good Store1881
On Bridge Street near the Plaza, on the right when traveling east.
“Don Luis” Stern’s trademark slogan was “La Tienda Barata”—or the inexpensive shop. Later the site of the West Las Vegas Town Hall and jail. The cells still exist in the rear of the building. — Map (db m64897) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Las VegasPopulation 16,507 - Elevation 6,470
On North Grand Avenue (U.S. 85) at Legion Drive, on the right when traveling north on North Grand Avenue.
Las Vegas served as an important stop on the Santa Fe Trail and later as a major railroad center. Here General Kearny announced the annexation of New Mexico by the U.S. in 1846. In 1862, during the Confederate occupation of Santa Fe, Las Vegas . . . — Map (db m45887) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Plaza Hotel1882
On Plaza Park, on the right.
Architect: Charles Wheelock • Contractor: John Bennett Wooten Built by a consortium led by Benigno Romero and Jean Pendaries to replace the two-story Territorial Style adobe Las Vegas Hotel. — Map (db m64925) HM

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