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Historical Markers in New Mexico

621 markers matched your search criteria. Markers 401 through 601 are listed. Previous 200 Next 21
 
YMCA Building Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Kirchner, July 24, 2011
YMCA Building Marker
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — YMCA Building1905
Built by M.M. Sundt Architects: Issac H. & William M. Rapp The YMCA was organized in Las Vegas in 1900 with Attorney A.T. Rogers as president. The "Y" flourished for two decades before closing in 1924. The building then served as the Las Vegas . . . — Map (db m45891) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post
Built in 1810 — Map (db m65857) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — Pecos Pueblo Mission
The largest of the mission churches at Pecos Pueblo, ca. 1625 La Iglesia mas grande de la mission de Pecos, ca. 1625 — Map (db m60272) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — San Antonio de Padua Catholic Church
This is one of the finest surviving examples of Bishop Lamy's French-inspired gothic architecture in New Mexico. Completed in 1906, it is constructed of locally quarried stone instead of traditional adobe. Among its adornments is a painting of . . . — Map (db m66172) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — St. Anthony's Catholic Church War Memorial
For the Glory of God and Country These died in World War II Martin Quintana Jr. Ernesto Ortiz Pablo V. Roybal "They died that we may live in peace" — Map (db m66205) WM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Sapello — Hermit’s PeakElevation– 10,212
From 1863 to 1867, this mountain was the home of Juan Maria Agostini, an Italian penitent who lived there as a hermit, carving crucifixes and religious emblems which he traded for food. Leaving this area, he moved to the Organ Mountains, in southern . . . — Map (db m73309) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Sapello — Strike Valleys
Between Sapello and Mora, State Road 3 follows a narrow strike valley eroded into soft shale between ridges of resistant sandstone called hogbacks, both the result of uplift of the Rocky Mountains. To the east stretch the Great Plains, and to the . . . — Map (db m73283) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Trujillo — Canadian Escarpment
Prominent landform of north-eastern New Mexico that extends for almost 100 miles between Las Vegas and Clayton. From this point, the grass-lands of the High Plains reach northwestward to the foot of the . . . — Map (db m25591) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Algodones — Kewa Women's Co-opSanto Domingo Pueblo
(side one) According to oral and recorded history, the Santo Domingo people have always made and traded jewelry. From prehistoric times heishi, drilled and ground shell beads, have been strung into necklaces. Generations of Santo . . . — Map (db m45475) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Algodones — La Angostura
Near here the Rio Grande Valley closes into a narrow pass (angostura). Control of this pass was critical to the safety of the trade along the Camino Real, so this area has been the focus of fortifications since the early 17th century. The 18th . . . — Map (db m32800) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — BernalilloOn the Camino Real — Population 2,763 - Elevation 5,050
The Pueblo Indian province of Tiguex, in the area of Bernalillo, served as winter headquarters for Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1540-42 during his explorations of the Southwest. Bernalillo was founded after the Spanish reconquest of New Mexico . . . — Map (db m45440) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — Bernalillo
Archaeological research indicates that this fertile valley has been the focus of human occupation for at least 10,000 years. Soon after the Spanish colonized New Mexico in 1598, a series of estancias, or farming and ranching communities, flanked the . . . — Map (db m45441) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — Pueblo of Santa Ana
The Keres-speaking pueblo of Santa Ana was established on its present site in 1693, as part of Diego de Vargas' reconquest of New Mexico. The spot, exposed to flooding, was poorly suited for farming, and today the residents live on their farms along . . . — Map (db m32843) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Cochiti Pueblo — La Bajada
This black volcanic escarpment is one of New Mexico's most important landmarks. The descent (bajada) of this escarpment marked the traditional division between New Mexico's upper (Rio Arriba) and lower (Rio Abajo) districts. Over the centuries, . . . — Map (db m60563) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Cochiti Pueblo — Women of CochitiCochiti Pueblo — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
Women of Cochiti are known for reviving the historic figurative tradition now referred to as Storytellers, adult clay figurines surrounded by children. The efforts of these women have bloomed into a vibrant cottage industry, inspiring many potters . . . — Map (db m73262) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Corrales — CorralesPopulation 2,791 - Elevation 5,097
(front of marker) Spanish colonization of this region, once the location of many Tiwa Indian pueblos, began in the 17th century. Corrales is named for the extensive corrals built here by Juan González, founder of Alameda. In the 18th . . . — Map (db m45436) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Corrales — Iglesia de San Ysidro
This church was constructed in 1868 following a flood which demolished an earlier building. Dedicated to San Ysidro, patron of farmers, the church incorporates materials salvaged from the original structure. The building is one of the finest . . . — Map (db m45437) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Cuba — Continental DivideElevation - 7,379 feet
Rainfall divides at this point. To the west it drains into the Pacific Ocean, to the east, into the Atlantic — Map (db m73666) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Cuba — Cuba
In 1769, Spanish Governor Pedro Fermin de Mendinueta made the San Joaquin del Nacimiento land grant to 35 pioneering families who had settled the headwaters of the Rio Puerco in 1766. The community was later abandoned owing to raids by frontier . . . — Map (db m73665) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Jemez Pueblo — Evelyn M. Vigil, Phan-Un-Pha-Kee (Young Doe) 1921–1995Juanita T. Toledo, Pha-Wa-Luh-Luh (Ring-Cloud Around the Moon) 1914–1999 — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
Jemez Pueblo. Evelyn M. Vigil, a descendant of the last remaining Pecos residents that moved to Jemez Pueblo in 1838, led a revival of Pecos Pueblo style pottery. She spent time at Pecos National Historic Park studying materials and techniques . . . — Map (db m73244) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Jemez Pueblo — Pueblo of Jémez
Jémez is the sole surviving pueblo of the seven in the “provencia de los Hemes” noted by Spaniards in 1541, and the last at which the Towa language is still spoken. In 1838, the remaining inhabitants of Pecos Pueblo moved here. The . . . — Map (db m73254) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Jemez Springs — Jémez State Monument
The village of Giusewa was occupied by ancestors of the Jémez Indians before the arrival of the Spanish in 1541. Its ruins lie close to those of the great stone mission church of San José de los Jémez, which was built by the Franciscans around 1622. — Map (db m73238) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Jemez Springs — Valle Grande
About one million years ago, the magnificent valley before you was formed by collapse, after a series of tremendous volcanic eruptions ejected a volume of material more than 500 times greater than the May 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. This event . . . — Map (db m73235) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Placitas — Las Placitas
English: The Sandia Mountains have been occupied by human beings for thousands of years. This area was settled by 1767, when Governor Pedro Fermin de Mendinueta made the land grant known as La Merced de San Antonio de las Huertas. The . . . — Map (db m45460) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Placitas — Women Veterans of New Mexico
(side one) New Mexico has a proud history of military service. We are a state of culturally diverse citizens who are willing to defend our freedom and rights. Over 15,000 women in New Mexico have volunteered to serve in our military. These . . . — Map (db m45458) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Rio Rancho — Dulcelina Salce Curtis (1904-1995)
(front) Teacher, agriculturalist, farmer and conservationist, Dulcelina Curtis led efforts to control flooding of arroyos in Corrales where a flood-control channel is named in her honor. The first woman appointed to a board of the U.S. . . . — Map (db m45438) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Rio Rancho — Spanish Entrada Site
Among the many prehistoric and historic sites located nearby is a camp where Francisco Vasquez de Coronado’s troops may have spent the winter of 1540-41. Coronado also visited the ancient pueblo of Kuaua located to the north. Kuaua’s ruins are . . . — Map (db m45439) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Rio Rancho — Tiguex Province
More the one hundred prehistoric and historic pueblos and other archeological sites and over 15,000 petroglyphs or rock art sites give ample evidence of the occupation of this valley for at least 12,000 years. Spanish explorers who came into the . . . — Map (db m73508) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), San Ysidro — Colorado Plateau
From this point, the Colorado Plateau extends across northwestern New Mexico into northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and southwestern Colorado. A colorful landscape of mesas and canyons, it is underlain by natural mineral, oil and gas . . . — Map (db m45463) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), San Ysidro — Trinidad Gachupin Medina (ca. 1883-1964)Zia Pueblo
Trinidad Gachupin Medina was the most widely known Zia potter of her time. She was recognized for her large polychrome storage jars. Sponsored by trader Wick Miller, she toured the United States from 1930 to 1946, demonstrating pottery making at . . . — Map (db m32859) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Santo Domingo Pueblo — Pueblo of Santo Domingo Kiua
The Keresan people of Santo Domingo have occupied the area of the Rio Grande Valley since prehistoric times despite several floods that have forced relocation and reconstruction of the original pueblo. Strategically located along the roads that have . . . — Map (db m45476) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Santo Domingo Pueblo — The Mormon Battalion
The Mormon Battalion Council Bluffs, July 16, 1846 Fort Leavenworth, Aug. 2, 1846 Santa Fe, Oct. 9, 1846 San Diego, Jan 29, 1847 Erected June 16, 1940 [ Map of Mormon Battalion Route ] The Mormon Battalion, composed . . . — Map (db m32984) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Zia Pueblo — Pueblo of Zía
In 1583 Antonio de Espejo recorded this pueblo as one of five in the Province of Punamé. Following the sacking of Zia by Spanish troops in 1689, the pueblo was reestablished, but never attained its former size. The Zia ancient sun symbol is . . . — Map (db m32858) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Zia Pueblo — Vasquez de Coronado's Route
In 1541 an expedition from the army of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, New Mexico's first explorer, marched south 80 leagues to investigate the pueblos along the lower Rio Grande. The group reached that part of the infamous Jornada del Muerto, now . . . — Map (db m32826) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Agua Fria Village — Agua Fria
Caravans entering and leaving Santa Fe on the Camino Real wound their way through scattered agricultural settlements south of the capital. Although this section of the Santa Fe River Valley was initially utilized as pasture for livestock, in the . . . — Map (db m40451) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Agua Fria Village — San Isidro Catholic Church
This 19th century adobe church is dedicated to San Isidro, ploughman, patron saint of farmers and protector of crops. Christian tradition maintains that in order to allow San Isidro time for his daily prayers an angel plowed his fields. Agua Fria . . . — Map (db m40452) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Cerrillos — CerrillosElevation 5,688 ft.
Before the arrival of the Spanish, the mineral rich area around Cerrillos produced turquoise, which was broadly traded across the American Southwest and into México. An early settlement of Los Cerrillos harbored Spanish refugees from the 1680 . . . — Map (db m54706) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Cerrillos — Welcome to the Cerrillos Hills State Park
… where you will experience the tri-cultural story of New Mexico, a history of the Indians, the Spanish, and the Anglos each altering this landscape in their efforts to obtain turquoise, lead, silver, and more. Indians mined nearby . . . — Map (db m70565) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Cuyamungue — Pueblo of Tesuque
The name Tesuque is a Spanish variation of the Tewa name Tetsugeh, meaninig "narrow place of cotton wood trees." The small Tewa speaking pueblo of Tesuque was established before 1200, and was first visited by Europeans in 1591. It is one of the most . . . — Map (db m32852) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Galisteo — Galisteo Pueblo
Spanish explorers found several Tano-speaking pueblos in the Galisteo Basin in 1540. They were among the leaders of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680. 150 Tano families were eventually resettled in Galisteo Pueblo in 1706. Droughts, famine, Comanche raids, . . . — Map (db m64819) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Glorieta — Colorado Volunteers at the Battles of Glorieta PassMarch 26-28, 1862
On this site and several miles to the west along the Santa Fe Trail, Colorado Volunteers and Regular U.S. Troops fought a Confederate force from Texas in the Battle of Glorieta Pass. Although no clear victory emerged after two days of fierce and . . . — Map (db m55177) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Glorieta — Glorieta Pass BattlefieldNational Historic Landmark, 1961
The Civil War battle fought in this pass is often referred to as the "Gettysburg of the West." Union forces dashed Confederate strategy to seize the southwest's major supply base at Fort Union; Colorado and California were to be next. The Texas . . . — Map (db m55176) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Glorietta — Glorieta Battlefield
The decisive battle of the Civil War in New Mexico was fought at the summit of Glorieta Pass on March 28, 1862. Union troops won the battle when a party of Colorado Volunteers burned the Confederate supply wagons, thus destroying Southern . . . — Map (db m6676) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), La Cienega — Golondrinas Old Cienega Village Museum
Established in the 1700, Rancho de Las Golondrinas was a paraje, or stopping place, which provided a welcome respite to weary travelers along the Camino Real well into the 19th century. The site is now a living historical museum which features a . . . — Map (db m64956) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Lamy — Galisteo Basin / Southern Rockies
Galisteo Basin. The extensive lowland south of here is called Galisteo basin, a sag in the earth’s crust where rock layers are depressed and thickened. It is one of the northernmost basins in the Basin and Range province in New Mexico and is . . . — Map (db m55295) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Nambe Pueblo — The St. Francis Women's ClubNambe Pueblo
The St. Francis Women's Club was instrumental in raising funds to rebuild San Francisco de Asís Church, which had been condemned and demolished in about 1960. Their main fundraiser was the annual Fourth of July Ceremonial, featuring dances of . . . — Map (db m32833) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Pojoaque — Feliciana Tapia Viarrial (1904-1988)Pojoaque Pueblo
Feliciana Tapia Viarrial helped establish today's Pueblo of Pojoaque. Pojoaque, or Posuwageh, water drinking place, is a Tewa village founded circa A.D. 900. By 1919, the Pojoaque homelands were severely diminished. Most members left . . . — Map (db m32835) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), San Ildefonso Pueblo — Maria Montoya Martinez, (Povika, Pond Lily)(ca. 1886-1980) — San Ildefonso Pueblo
Maria Martinez was a self-taught potter who helped elevate Pueblo pottery to a respected art form. She and her husband Julian were successful polychrome potters and together revived black pottery. Their work improved the economic conditions of the . . . — Map (db m45657) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), San Ildefonso Pueblo — Pueblo of San Ildefonso
In the 1500’s, migrants from the Pajarito Plateau joined their Tewa-speaking relatives at San Ildefonso. The pueblo is famous as the home of the late María Martínez and other makers of polished black pottery. The modern church, a replica of that of . . . — Map (db m45659) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Cruz — Santa Cruz de la Cañada / Santa Cruz Plaza on the Camino Real
(side one) Santa Cruz de la Cañada In 1695, Governor Diego de Vargas founded his first town, Santa Cruz de la Cañada, designed to protect the Spanish frontier north of Santa Fe. The church, which still stands, was constructed in . . . — Map (db m45673) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — CIP 2003.1 — “Homage to the Burro”by Charles Southard — City of Santa Fe 1% for Art in Public Places
Wood peddlers, farmers and merchants went through Burro Alley. Burros economically served the many cultures of New Mexico. For many years the people of Santa Fe relied on the burro for their welfare. — Map (db m54958) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 2 — 1540 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Seeking to expand the domain of the King of Spain in 1540, Francisco Vásquez de Coronado led an expedition of over 1,000 men and women north from Mexico into what is now Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. The Spanish explorers, in . . . — Map (db m76166) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 3 — 1598 — Commemorative Walkway Park
The viceroy of New Spain appointed Juan de Oñate as New Mexico’s first governor and directed him to settle the area along the upper Rio Grande. Accompanied by 200 settlers and over 7,000 head of livestock, Oñate arrived in New Mexico and established . . . — Map (db m76183) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 4 — 1610 — Commemorative Walkway Park
New Mexico’s third governor, Pedro de Peralta was instructed to relocate the capital to a more central location. He founded the Villa de Santa Fe, or Town of Holy Faith. The villa was named for a city of Spain built by King Ferdinand and Queen . . . — Map (db m76198) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 5 — 1680 — Commemorative Walkway Park
In the seventeenth century New Mexico was plagued by drought, conflicts between civil and church authorities, and extreme demands placed by the Spanish settlers on the native population. The latter situation caused a deterioration so severe that by . . . — Map (db m76202) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 6 — 1692 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Under the direction of Don Diego de Vargas, the Spanish returned to recapture New Mexico after twelve years of exile in El Paso. In an attempt to encourage settlement of the land in the Rio Grande Valley, Don Diego de Vargas issued land grants for . . . — Map (db m76222) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 7 — 1712 — Commemorative Walkway Park
In order to fulfill a promise that Don Diego de Vargas made, the government leaders of Santa Fe issued a proclamation calling for an annual fiesta to commemorate the peaceful reentry of the Spanish into Santa Fe in 1692. This annual celebration held . . . — Map (db m76236) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 8 — 1776 — Commemorative Walkway Park
When the Declaration of Independence was signed, Santa Fe was already 166 years old. English and American explorers and traders replaced the French as a source of concern to Spanish officials in New Mexico. The successful American War of . . . — Map (db m76238) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 9 — 1821 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Map (db m76239) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 10 — 1848 — Commemorative Walkway Park
In May of 1846, U.S. President James K. Polk ordered the invasion of Mexico by U.S. troops, thus beginning the Mexican War. Three months later, General Stephen Watts Kearney led a victorious U.S. Army unopposed across northern New Mexico and into . . . — Map (db m76263) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 11 — 1862 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Shortly after the Civil War began, the Confederacy turned its attention to the Southwest, and in February, 1862, three thousand three hundred troops under the command of Confederate General Sibley, defeated the Union troops at Valverde, raised the . . . — Map (db m76264) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 12 — 1876 — Commemorative Walkway Park
While the nation was celebrating the Centennial, Santa Fe was into its 266th year. Although the Treaty of Guadalupe Hildago guaranteed the property of Hispanics and Indians, problems in the interpretation of Spanish and Mexican land laws worked to . . . — Map (db m76269) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 13 — 1912 — Commemorative Walkway Park
In 1906, Congress passed an act that would enable New Mexico and Arizona to become one large state. The residents in Arizona voted against the act, while the New Mexicans voted for it. It was not until 1912 that the opposing forces were reconciled . . . — Map (db m76270) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 14 — 1926 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Every year since 1926, when Will Shuster and Jacques Cartier created the image, Santa Fe and friends have been able to release their ties to depression, gloom and uncertainty by burning a symbol of these misfortunes . . . Zozobra! The burning of the . . . — Map (db m76273) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 15 — 1945 — Commemorative Walkway Park
During World War II, the federal government set up a secret facility in Los Alamos to coordinate the Manhattan Project, resulting in the development of the first atomic bomb. On July 16, 1945, the atomic bomb was exploded at “Trinity . . . — Map (db m76309) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 16 — 1960 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Santa Fe celebrated its 350th anniversary. During that year, special guests Maria Teresa Perez-Balsera and Maria Luisa Perez-Balsera arrived from Spain. The two ladies are direct descendants of Captain-General Don Diego de Vargas, the central figure . . . — Map (db m76311) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 17 — 1976 — Commemorative Walkway Park
Santa Fe, now 366 years old, joined the rest of the United States in celebrating the nation’s 200th birthday. New Mexico and the entire Southwest continued to see tremendous expansion and population growth with the influx of migration from the east. . . . — Map (db m76316) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 18 — 1982 — Commemorative Walkway Park
While responding to a request to give the Last Rites to a dying man, Franciscan Father Reynaldo Rivera, rector at St. Francis Cathedral, was kidnapped and brutally murdered, sending Santa Fe and the entire state into shock. Ironically, Father Rivera . . . — Map (db m76317) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 19 — 1985 — Commemorative Walkway Park
By proclamation of the City Council, Santa Fe celebrated its 375th anniversary. During the year, this property was donated to the city by Archbishop Robert Sanchez and the Santa Fe Fiesta Council. These gifts, together with appropriations by the . . . — Map (db m76319) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 375th Anniversary of Santa FeA Gift to Visitors — Commemorative Walkway Park
Santa Fe is the oldest capital city in the United States, a successful blend of three cultures and yet a modern city of over 50,000 residents. The Commemorative Walkway Park, constructed in 1986, provides a historical walk through Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m76131) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 1 — 500 A.D. — Commemorative Walkway Park
From 500 A.D. onward, New Mexico underwent a number of comparatively rapid changes. The people throughout the western two-thirds of the state became increasingly restricted to smaller and smaller areas resulting in the development of many regional . . . — Map (db m76136) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — A Building Stood Here Before 1680
A building stood here before 1680. It was wrecked in the Great Indian Uprising. This house incorporates what remains. — Map (db m55708) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — A Two Way StreetAmelia White Park — Santa Fe National Historic Trail
The Santa Fe Trail passed through what is now Amelia White Park. The paved road to the right, Old Santa Fe Trail, follows the path and ruts of the original trail route, whose travelers came from a variety of backgrounds. From the start, Hispanic . . . — Map (db m76487) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Amelia Elizabeth White / Mary Cabot Wheelwright(1878-1972) / (1878-1958)
(side one) Amelia Elizabeth White (1878-1972) Amelia Elizabeth White worked tirelessly to promote Indian art and to preserve Santa Fe's heritage. A philanthropist and community activist, she donated land for the Laboratory of . . . — Map (db m45484) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Annexation of New Mexico
In this plaza Gen. S. W. Kearney, U.S.A. proclaimed the peaceable annexation of New Mexico. Aug. 19, 1846. — Map (db m45577) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Bicentennial Celebration / La Bajada
This is a two sided marker Side A: Bicentennial Celebration This facility was built by the New Mexico State Highway Department to commemorate the bicentennial birthday of the United States. Located 15 miles south of the . . . — Map (db m55150) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Billy The Kid
The notorious New Mexico outlaw, also known as William Bonney, was captured and sucessfully imprisoned for the last time in the downstairs jail housed in this, the Cornell Building, at 208 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, from December 27, 1880 to . . . — Map (db m73714) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Cañoncito at Apache Canyon
Strategically located where the Santa Fe Trail emerges from Glorieta Pass, Cañoncito is where the New Mexico Governor Manuel Armijo weakly defended New Mexico against the American Army in 1846. In 1862, Union forces destroyed a Confederate supply . . . — Map (db m24315) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Captain Diego Arias de Quiros
In 1697 this property was granted to Captain Diego Arias de Quiros by Spanish royal decree for his part in the reconquest of New Mexico with De Vargas. In 1879 bought by L. Bradford Prince, later Territorial Governor. In 1942 bought by Field estate . . . — Map (db m55706) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Cross of the MartyrsCruz de los Mártires
In 1598 a group of Spanish colonists, led by Juan de Oñate of Zacatecas, Mexico, established a settlement along the banks of the Rio Grande north of present-day Española. In 1610 Governor Pedro de Peralta relocated the capital of the province to . . . — Map (db m73092) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Don Diego de Vargas Zapata Luján Ponce de León, El Marques de la Nava de Barcinas1643–1704 — Resettled New Mexico Twelve Years after Pueblo Revolt of 1680
Don Diego de Vargas Zapata Luján Ponce de León, born 1643 in Madrid, Spain, served the crown as Governor of New Mexico from 1691–1697 and 1703–1704. Vargas was a devout Christian with a strong devotion to Nuestra Señora La Conquistadora, . . . — Map (db m76234) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Don Juan Bautista de Anza
Don Juan Bautista de Anza, outstanding Spanish governor of New Mexico (1776–1787), explored a new road from Santa Fe to Arispe, Sonora, in 1780. This plaque is placed in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of that historic journey. Don . . . — Map (db m76950) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — El Palacio Real
Fortress and Castle built by order of the Spanish crown 1610-1612 Seat of Government under three flags–Spanish, Mexican & American- From 1610 to 1910 the residence of over a hundred Governors & Captains General The . . . — Map (db m45588) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — End of Santa Fe Trail
This stone marks the end of the Santa Fe Trail 1822 – 1879 — Map (db m45576) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Fray Angélico Chávez(1910 – 1996)
Priest – Poet – Historian – Archivist Artist – Author – Biographer – Genealogist And native-born New Mexican Major, U.S. Army – W.W. II & Korean Conflict “THE LOVE I Love is one, . . . — Map (db m72746) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Gold and Turquoise
(side one) First gold placer mining west of the Mississippi began with the discovery of the precious metal in the rugged Ortiz Mountains south of here in 1828, 21 years before the California gold rush. Since then, the district has . . . — Map (db m45477) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Hitching Post at the End of the Trail1776 – 1976
Roadrunner Cowbelles dedicate this hitching post at the end of the trail to American cattlemen and their horses for their glorious role in winning the West. — Map (db m72745) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Hyde Memorial State Park
This park is named after Benjamin Talbot Hyde, devoted educator of America’s youth. His family donated the 350 acres which constitutes the park to the State of New Mexico in 1934. Situated at an elevation of 8,500 feet in the scenic Sangre de Cristo . . . — Map (db m73259) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Jémez Mountains
(side one) On the skyline to the west are the Jémez Mountains where tremendous volcanic eruptions a million years ago created a huge caldera some 15 miles in diameter that now forms beautiful Valle Grande set amid a ring of volcanic peaks. . . . — Map (db m45655) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Kateri Tekakwitha1656–1680
First Indian of North America to be Promoted a Saint — Map (db m54967) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — La Castrense† 1760–1859
On this site stood the memorable Chapel of The Lady of Light, often called the “Castrense” which marked the northernmost limit of Mexican Baroque style. Here in Santa Fe flourished the Hispano-American civilization which this Chapel . . . — Map (db m64841) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Lamy Building
Built in 1878, the Lamy Building was originally part of St. Michael's College. The lower two floors, which remain today, were constructed of adobe. The third floor, with its mansard roof and domed cupola, was framed in wood, probably to reduce the . . . — Map (db m45594) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Laura Gilpin (1891-1979)
(side one) An outstanding photographer of the twentieth century, Laura Gilpin is best known for capturing southwestern cultures and landscapes on film. When her car ran out of gas on the Navajo reservation in 1930, she began . . . — Map (db m45483) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Maralyn Budke1936 - 2010 — New Mexico Historic Women Marker Initiative
Maralyn Budke, Inez Gill’s first intern, joined the Legislative Finance Committee in 1959 and was its first woman director from 1968-1982. A brilliant strategist and trusted advisor, Maralyn was a confidant to legislative leaders and chief of . . . — Map (db m72744) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Maria Gertrudis BarcelóDoña Tules — (c. 1800-1852)
(side one) Maria Gertrudis Barceló or Doña Tules, a notorious gambler and courtesan, operated a gambling house and saloon on Burro Alley in Santa Fe. She traveled up El Camino Real from Sonora, Mexico in 1815. Bishop Jean-Baptiste Lamy . . . — Map (db m45479) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Mother Magdalen and the Sisters of Loretto (1852-1968)
(side one) Four Sisters of Loretto, Mother Magdalen Hayden and Sisters Roberta Brown, Rosana Dant and Catherine Mahoney, arrived in Santa Fe from Kentucky on September 26, 1852. In January 1853 they established Our Lady of Light Academy, . . . — Map (db m45597) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa FeOn the Camino Real — Population 58,000 - Elevation 7,045
Santa Fe, the oldest capital city in the United States, was established in 1610 as the seat of the Spanish colonial government for the Province of New Mexico. The Palace of the Governors, used by the Spanish, Mexican, and Territorial governors, has . . . — Map (db m45575) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Korean War Memorial
Remember those Santa Feans who went to fight in the mud, the snow, and the choking dust of a strange land: Korea 1950–1953. — Map (db m80479) WM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe OperaEntrance One Mile Ahead
The Santa Fe Opera, founded in 1957, has won worldwide acclaim for the high standards of its presentations and the success of its apprentice program. World and American premieres as well as standard operatic favorites are presented here. Most operas . . . — Map (db m64870) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Plaza
Has been designated a National Historic Landmark The heart of Santa Fe since its founding by Spanish colonial Governor Don Pedro De Peralta in 1609-1610, this public space was a terminus of El Camino Real and the Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m71579) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Trail
This marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail, Kansas City to Santa Fe. 1822–1880. — Map (db m61884) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Sena Plaza
When Don Juan Sena bought this land in 1796, Santa Fe belonged to Spain. When Major José D. Sena built this house for his bride Doña Isabel Cabeza de Baca in 1831, Santa Fe belonged to Mexico. In 1846 Santa Fe became part of the United States. — Map (db m55709) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Seton Village
Ernest Thompson Seton (1860-1946), naturalist, artist, writer, authority on Indian lore, and first Chief Scout of the Boy Scouts of America, lived here during the last part of his life. The village includes his home, art collection, library, and . . . — Map (db m55151) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Sisters of Charity
(side one) The first Sisters of Charity arrived in New Mexico Territory in 1865 from Cincinnati at the request of Bishop Lamy with the mission of serving all people regardless of race, religion or ability to pay. Hundreds of sisters . . . — Map (db m45482) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Site of Santa Fe’s First ChapelDemolished 1714
Also used as two-story defensive tower for Palace of the Governors during the 1600’s. Gen. Don Diego de Vargas was probably buried beneath the floor of this chapel in 1704. — Map (db m64842) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — The "Oldest" House
The Historic Santa Fe Foundation Finds this building worthy of preservation The "Oldest" House (West Portion) — Map (db m45591) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — The Founding of Santa FeDon Pedro De Peralta — 1610
(right tablet) On March 30, 1609, the Viceroy of New Spain appointed Don Pedro de Peralta Governor and Captain-General of New Mexico, instructing him to proceed to New Mexico with the greatest dispatch accompanied by twelve soldiers and . . . — Map (db m76340) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — The Old Spanish Trail
The Old Spanish Trail from Santa Fe to Los Angeles. In the years 1829 to 1848 pack mule trains regularly left the Santa Fe Plaza and northern New Mexico carrying woolen goods produced in New Mexico bound for California. Horses and mules were . . . — Map (db m64852) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — The Spitz Clock
The Spitz Jewelry Store was established on the Plaza in 1881, and a clock, without works, was placed in front of the store to advertise the wares offered. Near the turn of the century, this “clock” was replaced by a functioning sidewalk . . . — Map (db m64966) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Three Wise WomenEva Scott Fenyes, 1849-1930 Leonora Scott Muse Curtin, 1879-1972
(side one) Three generations of one family worked more than 100 years to preserve the cultural heritage of New Mexico. Eva Fenyes created an artistic and photographic record of missions and adobe buildings, and preserved Spanish . . . — Map (db m45481) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 20 — To the Future — Commemorative Walkway Park
T O   T H E   F U T U R E — Map (db m76321) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — To the Heroes
(South face): To the Heroes of the Federal Army, who fell at the Battle of Valverde. Fought with the Rebels February 21, 1862 (West face): To the Heroes of the Federal Army, who fell at the Battles of Cañon . . . — Map (db m45586) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — U.S.S. Santa Fe CL-60
The officers and crew of the light cruiser, U.S.S. Santa Fe, dedicate this plaque to the memory of the gallant men who fought and served aboard her from 1942 to 1946. — Map (db m54960) WM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Sante Fe — San Miguel Church
Oldest church structure in U.S.A. The adobe walls and altar were built by Tlaxcalan Indians from Mexico under the direction of Franciscan Padres. ca. 1610 — Map (db m69872) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Tesuque — Tesuque Rain GodsTesuque Pueblo
Seated clay figurines known as rain gods or "rain catchers" spring from Tesuque Pueblos's deep-rooted figurative pottery tradition. Popularized in the 1880's, Tesuque women made and sold the figurines in a variety of colors and designs, and earned . . . — Map (db m32853) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Caballo — Caballo Mountains
To the east beyond Caballo Reservoir are the rugged Caballo Mountains, uplifted about 3 miles above the downdropped Río Grande trough, along the fault scarp at the edge of the mountains. Lowest slopes are ancient granites. Black ironstone beds are . . . — Map (db m45107) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — Ebin (Eben) Stanley14 February 1844-19 November 1904 — Indian Wars Campaign Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient
Near this spot lie the unidentified remains of an American Hero, Ebin Stanley, born Decatur County, Iowa. Ebin served with the 3rd and 5th U.S. Cavalry from 1861 to 1873. Variously described as a rancher, miner, hotel operator, Indian Scout, and . . . — Map (db m62894) HM WM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — HillsboroHistoric District
Hillsboro was founded in the 1870’s after gold and silver was discovered in the surrounding Black Range. The town developed into an important mining and ranching center, and served as the Sierra County seat from 1884 to 1939. It was the site of . . . — Map (db m38207) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — James McNally1839 - 1904
Near this spot lie the unidentified remains of a true American hero. Born in Ireland in 1839, James McNally served in the 3rd and 8th US Cavalry from 1858 to 1883. He was wounded during the Civil War Battle of Valverde, NM. 21 February 1862. After . . . — Map (db m38209) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — Miller Drug Store
Built in 1879, this building has been a mercantile, pharmacy, grocery, post office and telephone exchange. Site No. 1304 A Registered Cultural Property State of New Mexico — Map (db m38296) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — Mormon Battalion Historical Marker
"History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry" Lt. Col. Cooke The Mormon Battalion, of some 500 men marched through this area during November of 1846. The march covered over 2000 miles from Council Bluffs, Iowa to San . . . — Map (db m38297) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — Percha Creek
Built in 1927, this historic Warren deck truss bridge spans Percha Creek, cutting through an impassable but beautiful gorge below. The bridge was constructed during a difficult project to build the Black Range Highway, now NM 152. This structure has . . . — Map (db m38208) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — Sadie Orchard(1860 - 1943)
Arriving in the silver mining boomtown of Kingston in 1886, Sadie Jane Creech Orchard is arguably the most colorful woman in New Mexico history. Sadie opened brothels, worked as a prostitute, built and operated hotels, restaurants, and co-owned and . . . — Map (db m97441) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Lake Valley — Lake ValleyNational Back Country Byway — From Riches to Ruins
Why is it called Lake Valley? The town was originally located north of here, and during the 1870's derived its name from nearby relic lake beds. At that time it was just a small stage stop. That location was flooded, and the small settlement was . . . — Map (db m97440) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Elephant Butte Dam
Pueblo Indians irrigated and farmed the Rio Grande Valley for several hundred years before the Spaniards arrived and continued the tradition. Built between 1910-1916, Elephant Butte Dam when completed was the world's largest irrigation reservoir. It . . . — Map (db m45125) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Elephant Butte Lake State Park
Situated beside the huge, 36,000-acre Elephant Butte Reservoir, this is one of the largest and most popular parks in New Mexico. It combines boating, waterskiing, fishing and other water-based sports with land activities such as camping, picnicking, . . . — Map (db m45110) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Magnolia Ellis, “Magnificent Magnolia”(1893-1974)
(front) Magnolia Ellis was a healer with a special gift. She opened a clinic in Hot Springs, today's Truth or Consequences. Patients claimed to have a feeling of electricity when she touched them. Recognized by most notable doctors of the . . . — Map (db m45109) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesPopulation 7,289 – Elevation 4,576
In 1581, Capitán Francisco Sánchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain, naming it the Province of San Felipe. Significant European settlement of the area, however, did not occur until the mid-1800s. Once called Hot . . . — Map (db m45108) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesElevation 4,576 ft.
In 1581, Capitan Franciso Sanchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain naming it Ojo de Zoquete (mud spring) in the province of San Felipe. Native Americans first used these springs for healing; in early 20th century, . . . — Map (db m45122) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — Acomilla
The Camino Real wound its way below the black basaltic buttes of San Acacia, seen to the southeast. Named Acomilla, or Acomita (little Acoma) by the Spanish, these buttes form the walls of a narrow passage for the Rio Grande, along which hostile . . . — Map (db m45215) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — La Joya de Sevilleta
Present-day La Joya is located near the site of an ancient Piro Indian Pueblo that the Spanish named Nueva Sevilla, or Sevilleta. During the eighteenth century, this was the southernmost settlement along the Camino Real before the travelers ended . . . — Map (db m67105) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — Rio Salado Sand Dunes
Dunes along this part of the Rio Grande Valley are formed by sand blown northeastward from the normally dry bed of the Rio Salado (salty river). The Rio Grande is in a deep trench between the uplifted Los Pinos Mountains to the east and the Ladrones . . . — Map (db m45219) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Lemitar — Sabino y Lemitar
The Camino Real passed near here below the bluffs on the east bank of the Rio Grande. Apache raids prevented permanent Spanish settlement of this area until the early 1800s, when the village of Sabino was established on the east bank of the river . . . — Map (db m45178) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Espejo's Expedition(On the Camino Real)
In 1582 and 1583, Antonio de Espejo and his party followed the Rio Grande north to the Bernalillo area. Espejo was trying to learn the fate of two Franciscan friars who stayed with the Pueblo Indians after the Rodriquez – Sanchez/Chamuscado . . . — Map (db m68057) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Fort Craig Rest Area
Fort Craig is on alluvial gravelly sands, derived from the mountains to the west, sloping toward Rio Grande to east. Magdalena Mountains to northwest and San Mateo Mountains to west are mainly thick piles of volcanic rocks. San Andres Mountains on . . . — Map (db m68055) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Kelly
Silver was discovered in Kelly around 1866 and the town site was laid out in circa 1879. Kelly boomed with silver mining and eventually zinc mining, becoming one of central New Mexico's most prosperous mining towns. At one time it boasted a . . . — Map (db m38862) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Magdalena
Magdalena is located in a mineral-rich area which became a center of silver mining in the 1860's. In 1885, a railroad was built to the smelter in Socorro, and Magdalena became an important railhead for cattle, sheep, and ore. — Map (db m38860) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Magdalena Fault
Magdalena Mountains to the west are topped by South Baldy at 10,783 feet; Magdalena Peak at 8,152 feet. La Jencia plain to the east is bisected by Water Canyon three miles below this marker. The bench along the edge of the mountains is Magdalena . . . — Map (db m38471) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Magdalena Fault
The Magdalena Mountains to the west are topped by South Baldy at 10,783 feet; Magdalena Peak at 8,152 feet. La Jencia plain to the east is bisected by Water Canyon three miles below this marker. The bench along the edge of the mountains is Magdalena . . . — Map (db m38885) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Magdalena Livestock Driveway
South across the road lies one of the west's historic "hoof highways" which was used annually from 1885 until 1971. Sheep and cattle were driven to and from the railroad at Magdalena, NM or to Springerville, AZ. The driveway was 5 to 10 miles wide . . . — Map (db m60565) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Paraje De Fra Cristobal
The mountain range seen along the east bank of the Rio Grande is named after Father Cristobal de Salazar of the 1598 Juan de Onate expedition. The northern edge of the twenty-one mile range is said to resemble the profile of the good friar. This . . . — Map (db m68056) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Acacia — Doña Eufemia"La Valerosa" — The Spanish Entrada of 1598
Traveling with the colonizing expedition of Juan de Oñate, Doña Eufemia rallied Spanish soldiers to persevere when morale broke down during their long journey on the Camino Real. Settling in present-day New Mexico, she rallied 22 women to defend the . . . — Map (db m100056) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Acacia — Rio Salado Sand DunesElevation 4,850 ft.
Winds blowing across the usually dry, sandy riverbed of Rio Salado formed dunes along this part of the Rio Grande Valley. The Rio Grande, just southwest here, follows a massive geological trench shaped millions of years ago when huge blocks of land . . . — Map (db m67211) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — Carthage-Tokay-Farley
In the 1860s, a coal field east of San Antonio was occasionally mined by soldiers for heating fuel and to fire their blacksmith ovens. In 1883, the Santa Fe railroad built a bridge across the Rio Grande at San Antonio and laid track to the new coal . . . — Map (db m45175) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San AntonioOn the Camino Real
Established in the mid 1600s, the mission of San Antonio de Senecú was the last outpost on the Camino Real before the Mesilla Valley to the south. Around 1820 Hispano settlers from the north re-occupied the area after the Pueblo Revolt. Conrad . . . — Map (db m45172) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San Pedro
Established in the 1840s on the east bank of the Rio Grande, San Pedro became an important trading center along the Camino Real. The sister village of San Antonio, it was once known for its extensive vineyards and other agricultural produce. The . . . — Map (db m45174) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Marcial — Fort Craig
Fort Craig, which replaced Fort Conrad located about nine miles north, was established to control Indian raids along the Jornada del Muerto. Troops from Fort Craig were defeated by Confederate forces at the Battle of Valverde, 7 miles distant, in . . . — Map (db m24312) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — For Southern Independence
(front): Victory Awaits You. (back): This monument honors and perpetuates the memory of the brave Texas citizen volunteers who offered their lives and fortunes in the defense of the Confederate states of America during the war for . . . — Map (db m64055) HM WM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Fort Craig
Fort Craig was established in 1853 and garrisoned in 1854 with troops from Fort Conrad located about nine miles north. Named after Capt. Louis S. Craig, it was used to control Indian raids along the Jornada del Muerto. Troops from Fort Craig were . . . — Map (db m45130) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Jumbo
This is a fragment from Jumbo, a huge steel vessel designed to contain the explosion of the first nuclear device at the Trinity Site some 35 miles southeast of here on July 16, 1945. Jumbo was 25 feet long, 12 feet in diameter, and weighed 214 tons. . . . — Map (db m35908) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources Museum
Based on personal collection willed to the New Mexico School of Mines by C.T. Brown in 1928, this museum displays thousands of mineral specimens from around the world with special emphasis on minerals found in New Mexico. Highlights include . . . — Map (db m38753) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — New Mexico Tech
Founded in 1889 as New Mexico's School of Mines, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology offers degrees through the doctorate in a number of science and engineering disciplines. In addition to its academic functions, the institute also . . . — Map (db m38461) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Paraje De Fra Cristobal
The mountain range seen along the east bank of the Rio Grande is named after Father Cristobal de Salazar of the 1598 Juan de Oñate expedition. The northern edge of the twenty-one mile range is said to resemble the profile of the good friar. This . . . — Map (db m45132) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
The Piro Indian pueblo Teypana was visited by Juan de Oñate in 1598. The people of the village reportedly supplied corn to Oñate who bestowed the name Socorro ("aid" in Spanish) on the pueblo. In 1626, the mission of Nuestra Señora de Socorro was . . . — Map (db m38462) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
In 1598, Juan de Oñate's Spanish colonization expedition arrived here at the Piro Indian Pueblo of Pilabo, They renamed it Socorro owning to the food and shelter provided by Pilabo's inhabitants. The pueblo and its Spanish mission were destroyed . . . — Map (db m45177) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — The Garcia Opera House
Using the gold he had left her, the widow of Juan Nepomuceno Garcia began construction of the Garcia Opera House is 1884. It was completed three years later in 1887. It served as the main center for cultural and community events including theatrical . . . — Map (db m45176) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Vásquez de Coronado’s Route
In 1541 an expedition from the army of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, New Mexico’s first explorer, marched south 80 leagues to investigate the pueblos along the lower Río Grande. The group reached that part of the infamous Jornada del Muerto, now . . . — Map (db m45129) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Very Large Array
Commemorating 20 Years of Frontier Science At the VLA Pete V. Domenici United States Senator Dr. Rita R. Colwell Director National Science Foundation Dr. Paul C. Martin Chairman of the Board Associated Universities, Inc. . . . — Map (db m102671) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Women of the Camino Real
Front of Marker In 1598 the first Spanish settlers in New Mexico traveled up the Camino Real from north-central Mexico. Of the 560 people so far identified on that expedition, at least 20 percent were women. They came on foot, on wagons or . . . — Map (db m45131) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Veguita — Las Nutrias
During the late 17th century, this area had become well known to the Spanish. Called La Vega de Las Nutrias, or meadow of the beavers, it was a welcome paraje, or stopping place, for caravans on the Camino Real. Eighteenth century attempts at . . . — Map (db m67080) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), White Sands Proving Grounds — McDonald Ranch House Trinity SiteNational Historic Landmark — 1972
Restored by US Army White Sands Missile Range US Department of Energy National Park Service 1984 In the front room of this humble ranch house the world's first nuclear device was assembled on 13 July 1945. The device was then taken to Trinity . . . — Map (db m15072) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), White Sands Proving Grounds — Trinity Site
where the world's first Nuclear Device was exploded on July 16, 1945 Erected 1965 White Sands Missile Range J. Frederick Thorlin Major General U.S. Army Commanding (The lower marker reads): Trinity Site . . . — Map (db m4314) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), White Sands Proving Grounds — Trinity Site
The world's first atomic explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, at the Trinity Site near the north end of the historic Jornada del Muerto. It marked the beginning of the nuclear age, and the culmination of the Manhattan Project. The site, now part of . . . — Map (db m15073) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Dixon — Rio Grande Gaging StationU.S. Geological Survey — Established 1889
First Gaging Station established by U.S. Geological Survey — Map (db m45113) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Ojo Caliente — Santa Cruz† † †
The Santa Cruz Catholic Church was built after 1793 and was licensed on January 13, 1811, and blessed on January 3, 1812. The restoration of the historic Santa Cruz Catholic Church of Ojo Caliente, New Mexico, began in April, 1991, by the . . . — Map (db m64962) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Picuris Pueblo — Maria Ramita Simbola Martinez "Summer Harvest" (1884-1969)Cora Durand (1904-1981),Virginia Duran (1904-1998) — Picuris Pueblo
Maria Ramita Simbola Martinez, Cora Durand, and Virginia Duran helped to preserve the distinctive micaceous pottery tradition that is important in Picuris and other nearby pueblos. Made with locally mined mica-rich clay, these unusual pots have a . . . — Map (db m43808) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Pilar — Pilar
In 1795, twenty-five families were granted land along the Río Grande at Pilar, then known as Cieneguilla. The Battle of Cieneguilla was fought at Embudo Mountain near here in March 1854. A large force of Utes and Apaches inflicted heavy losses on . . . — Map (db m69869) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Rancho de Taos — Captive Women and Children of Taos County / María Rosa Villapando, (ca. 1725-1830)
(side one) Captive Women and Children of Taos County In August 1760, around sixty women and children were taken captive in a Comanche raid on Ranchos de Taos. That raid is an example of the danger of living on New Mexico's . . . — Map (db m45719) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Rancho de Taos — William J. KlauerFebruary 15, 1909 – February 21, 2001 — In Honor and Memory of
The Klauer family of Dubuque, Iowa, stewards of the Taba Valley Overlook since 1920, transferred ownership of this property to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management on March 31, 2001, with the help of the Trust for Public Land and the Taos Land Trust. . . . — Map (db m64879) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Ranchos de Taos — San Francisco de Asis ChurchRanchos de Taos, New Mexico
This Mission Church is one of the oldest churches in America dedicated to San Francisco de Asis. It was constructed between 1813 and 1815 under the direction of the Franciscan Fray José Benito Pereyro. It is an outstanding example of adobe, mission . . . — Map (db m45725) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Rio Lucio — Pueblo of Picuris
The Pueblo of Picuris, first visited by Spaniards in 1591, was described as being 7 to 8 stories high. In the 18th century Picuris cooperated with the Spaniards against the raids of the Plains Indians. The church, the third at this pueblo, dates . . . — Map (db m44283) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Don Fernando de Taos
The Town of Taos was originally established on May 1, 1796 when 63 families who had petitioned Governor Don Fernando Chacón were placed in possession of the Don Fernando de Taos land grant by the Alcalde of the Pueblo of Taos, Antonio José Ortíz. . . . — Map (db m66698) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Don Fernando de Taos Plaza
This peaceful and historic plaza, shaded by cottonwood trees in summer and blanketed by snow in winter has been the site of military action, fiestas, and fiery speeches. Spanish colonists settled at scattered locations in this valley beginning . . . — Map (db m66543) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Historic Taos
Welcome visitors and Taosenos! You are invited to explore the diversity of this region through a self-guided tour. The two-hundred- year-old Taos Plaza, including the streets that radiate from it like spokes, forms the National Historic District of . . . — Map (db m66702) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Historic Taos Plaza
Capitan Hernan Alvarado and his conquistadors from the famous Francisco Vasquez de Coronado Expedition arrived here on August 29, 1540. It is estimated that the Tiwa Indians settled in this valley around 1350 A.D. The name Taos is believed to be an . . . — Map (db m66697) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Jack M. Campbell Highway — Taos to Tierra Amarilla
This road passes through some of the most spectacular scenery in the American Southwest. It is a key section of the east - west highway which brings visitors to this region from throughout the United States. Since this route became a reality through . . . — Map (db m58967) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Ledoux Street — Historic District
Ledoux Street was named after the French trapper and guide Antonine Ledoux, who settled in the area around 1844. Earlier the street was named after Charles Beaubien and then later Smith H. Simpson. The area was developed in the fortress style with . . . — Map (db m66865) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Padre Antonio José Martínez1793 – 1867
Born in Abiquiu, New Mexico, on January 17, 1793 to Don Severino Martínez and María del Carmen Santistevan (Martinez Hacienda), the life of the Presbyter Don Antonio José Martínez extended through the Spanish (1793-1820), Mexican (1821-1846), and . . . — Map (db m66666) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Palo Flechado PassElevation: 9101 ft
Palo Flechado (tree pierced with arrows) Pass was used by natives and newcomers traveling from the eastern plains to Taos by way of the Cimarron River. The name may be attributed to the Flecha de Palo Apache band (first mentioned by Juan de . . . — Map (db m45738) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Rio Grande Gorge Bridge
(Lower plaque) In recognition of George Lavender New Mexico State Highway Commissioner 1955-1961 for his dedicated efforts towards completion of this project for the benefit of Northern New Mexico (Upper . . . — Map (db m29664) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — TaosPopulation 3369 — Elevation 6983 ft.
The Spanish community of Taos developed two miles southwest of Taos Pueblo. It later served as a supply base for the “Mountain Men,” and was the home of Kit Carson who is buried here. Governor Charles Bent was killed here in the . . . — Map (db m66466) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — TaosPopulation 3369 — Elevation 6,983
The Spanish community of Taos developed two miles southwest of Taos Pueblo. It later served as a supply base for the “Mountain Men,” and was the home of Kit Carson who is buried here. Governor Charles Bent was killed here in the . . . — Map (db m73310) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Taos Canyon
In 1692, after having been driven from New Mexico by the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, the Spanish began to re-establish their rule. In one of the last battles of the reconquest, in September 1696, Governor Diego de Vargas defeated the Indians of Taos . . . — Map (db m45737) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Wheeler Peak13,161 Feet Above Sea Level — Highest Point in New Mexico
Named in honor of Major George Montague Wheeler (1832-1909) who for ten years led a party of surveyors and Naturalists collecting geologic, biologic, planimetric, and topographic data in New Mexico and six other southwestern states. — Map (db m50743) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Trampas — Las Trampas
The village of Las Trampas was established in 1751 by 12 families from Santa Fe, led by Juan de Argüello, who received a land grant from Governor Tomás Vélez Cachupín. The church of San José de Gracia is one of the finest surviving . . . — Map (db m32123) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Cedarvale — Cedarvale
Edward Smith, William Taylor and Oliver P. DeWolfe of Cedarvale Kansas laid out this community in 1908. Hundreds of homesteaders arrived on immigrant trains. Most farmed pinto beans, shipping their crops to distant markets. In 1917 the community . . . — Map (db m72667) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Estancia — EstanciaPopulation 1,830 - Elevation 6,107
Incorporated in 1909 and county seat of Torrance County since 1905, Estancia is located in an enclosed valley or basin. It was ranching country until the early 20th century, when the coming of the railroad opened it to homesteaders and farmers. . . . — Map (db m72666) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Estancia — EstanciaPopulation 1,830 - Elevation 6,107
Incorporated in 1909 and county seat of Torrance County since 1905, Estancia is located in an enclosed valley or basin. It was ranching county until the early 20th century, when the coming of the railroad opened it up to homesteaders and farmers. . . . — Map (db m73507) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Estancia — EstanciaSalt Mission Trail — Longest Mainstreet In America
Estancia, "resting place", has been on the map since 1776. Known for its spring fed pond, now its city park. It become the county seat in 1905 and was the scene of the last hanging in New Mexico in 1922. — Map (db m73509) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), McIntosh — Homesteader Mary Ellen "Mollie" Hall Warren Klapp 1862-1933
Eighty-million acres of public land in the West went into private ownership by 1900 through the 1862 Homestead Act. New Mexico drew hundreds of settlers who built homes and farmed 160-acre allotments in pursuit of a better life. Mollie Klapp was . . . — Map (db m103053) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Mountainair — Abo RuinsSalinas Pueblo Misson National Monument
In English: Crossroads In the 17th century, an ancient trade route that linked the Rio Grande to the Great Plains shared this fragile mountain valley with a bustling pueblo full of people who spoke Tompiro. When a single Spanish . . . — Map (db m62066) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Mountainair — MountainairPopulation 1,170 - Elevation 6,535
Founded in 1902, Mountainair developed as a major center for pinto bean farming in the early 20th century until the drought of the 1940s. The region had been occupied earlier by Tompiro and eastern Tiwa pueblo Indians from prehistoric times through . . . — Map (db m75511) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Mountainair — MountainairPopulation 1,170 - Elevation 6,535
Founded in 1902, Mountainair developed as a major center for pinto bean farming in the early 20th century until the drought of the 1940s. The region had been occupied earlier by Tompiro and eastern Tiwa pueblo Indians from prehistoric times through . . . — Map (db m75512) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Mountainair — Salt Mission TrailMountainair
Located 10 miles from the center of the state, this high desert town was established in 1902. Ancient cities, pinto beans and ranching make its history. The railroad, natural beauty, Salinas Pueblo cultures and a pioneering spirit are reflected in . . . — Map (db m92608) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Tajique — Tajique
The pueblo-mission of San Miguel de Tajique was established in the 1620s. In the 1670s, famine, disease and Apache raids caused the abandonment of the Jurisdiccion de las Salinas (1598-1678) which included Tajique. Modern occupation of Tajique began . . . — Map (db m75510) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Willard — Laguna Del PerroElevation 6,110 FT
Numerous salt ponds and lakes of which Laguna del Perro is the largest, occur in the lowest part of the Estancia basin, a closed depression between the Manzano Mountains to the west and the lower Pedernal hills to the east. The Basin was filled by a . . . — Map (db m75513) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Capulin — Building a Cinder Cone
Cinder cones experience a single eruptive period, and then die. Several explosive eruptions created Capulin Volcano, during a period as short as one year or as long as nine or more years. Today Capulin Volcano is extinct. Volcanic ash, . . . — Map (db m89235) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Capulin — Capulin Volcano National Monument5.5 Miles
An outstanding example of an extinct volcanic cinder cone, Capulin Volcano was formed as early as 10,000 years ago. In cinder cones, lava pours from cracks in the base rather than over the top. Capulin itself was the escape hatch for gases that blew . . . — Map (db m88756) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Capulin — Capulin Volcano National Monument5.5 Miles
An outstanding example of an extinct volcanic cinder cone, Capulin Volcano was formed as early as 10,000 years ago. In cinder cones, lava pours from cracks in the base rather than over the top. Capulin itself was the escape hatch for gases that blew . . . — Map (db m88759) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Capulin — Grasslands Meet Mountains
The shortgrass prairie and mountain forest meet here in the high plains of northeastern New Mexico. This transition between two ecosystems provides habitat for many different plants and animals. The shortgrass prairie is the western limit of the . . . — Map (db m89230) HM

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