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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Ninety Six, South Carolina

 
Clickable Map of Greenwood County, South Carolina and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Greenwood County, SC (99) Abbeville County, SC (74) Edgefield County, SC (63) Laurens County, SC (53) McCormick County, SC (36) Newberry County, SC (39) Saluda County, SC (32)  GreenwoodCounty(99) Greenwood County (99)  AbbevilleCounty(74) Abbeville County (74)  EdgefieldCounty(63) Edgefield County (63)  LaurensCounty(53) Laurens County (53)  McCormickCounty(36) McCormick County (36)  NewberryCounty(39) Newberry County (39)  SaludaCounty(32) Saluda County (32)
Location of Ninety Six, South Carolina
    Greenwood County (99)
    Abbeville County (74)
    Edgefield County (63)
    Laurens County (53)
    McCormick County (36)
    Newberry County (39)
    Saluda County (32)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — "Light Horse Harry" Lee Takes the Stockade Fort — June 12, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
You are standing in a partial reconstruction of the Stockade Fort as it appeared in 1781. Archaeologists have identified remnants -- see the outlines -- of log buildings that existed here. An elevated firing step, called a banquette, was located . . . — Map (db m11345) HM
2South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 96 — Ninety Six National Historic Site
On State Highway 248 north of Louden Road, on the right when traveling north.
An unusual name for a place! But there is a logical reason, of course. Notice on the map the location of the frontier Indian trails that later became roads. This place was chosen for a trading post because it was a convenient campground along the . . . — Map (db m99686) HM
3South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Approach Trench — June 2, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
"Not a man could shew his head but what he was immediately shot down." General Nathanael Green Approach trenches, called saps, connected one parallel to the next. These angled ditches allowed troops to move toward the fort without . . . — Map (db m125699) HM
4South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Cherokee — (Tsalagi)
Near South Cambridge Road (State Highway 248).
The Cherokee referred to themselves as Tsalagi or Aniywiyai which means the "Principal People". Cherokee used the area around Ninety Six as a hunting ground, where they hunted deer, turkey and even buffalo. — Map (db m48494) HM
5South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Covered Way — 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
The trench that ran here, from the fort to the stockaded town, was not actually covered, but was used for cover. It was the route for official couriers, Loyalist relief troops, and slaves who risked Patriot fire to bring water from . . . — Map (db m125703) HM
6South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Early Life in the Backcountry — Gouedy's Trading Post and Fort Ninety Six
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
Robert Gouedy established a trading post on this site in 1753. He supplied cloth, tools, gunpowder, lead, and rum to the soldiers, Indians, slaves, and settlers who passed through Ninety Six on the way to or from Charleston and the Cherokee . . . — Map (db m33594) HM
7South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Environmental Change From Forest to Park
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
Once dense forest, this area was gradually cleared by people. Fire, storms, and the introduction of non-native plants and animal species also contributed to changing the landscape. If you lived here in the 1700s, you would have seen these woods . . . — Map (db m32790) HM
8South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — First Blood Shed for Liberty
On South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) at Louden Road (State Highway 225), on the left when traveling south on South Cambridge Street.
. . . — Map (db m11327) HM
9South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — First Parallel — May 28-June 1, 1781
On South Cambridge Street.
After several days of digging an approach trench to get to this point, a first parallel was established. In siege warfare a series of trenches that face the enemy's defenses are called parallels. The first parallel established a secure position . . . — Map (db m11179) HM
10South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Gouedy Trail and Charleston Road
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
The Gouedy trail is a 1.5-mile nature path that takes you through the woods and into a lesser known for historically significant part of the park. This route passes the presumed location of Robert Gouedy's trading post, established in 1751, and . . . — Map (db m33537) HM
11South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — In Memoriam
On Saluda Street (State Highway 248) south of Cross Avenue, on the left when traveling south.
Left Column: Raymond H. Barnett, Milton Capps, Robert E. Chaney, George W. Chapman, Lewis F. Ferguson, J. Leonard Goldman Right Column: J. Jennings Jamison, R. Fielding Jones, Morris T. Matthews, Lewis O. McIntosh, William . . . — Map (db m35026) HM
12South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Island Ford Road
Near South Cambridge Street (County Highway 248).
The earliest roads in Ninety Six were Indian trails, used for travel by foot and horse and for hunting. White settlers followed these trails to explore the countryside, trade, and eventually, to settle. As the stream of settlers into the region . . . — Map (db m11159) HM
13South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — James Birmingham
Near South Cambridge Street.
Sacred to the Memory of James Birmingham Volunteer Long Cane Militia Killed at this Site In the Battle of November 19-24, 1775 The First South Carolinian To Give His Life in the Cause of Freedom ---------- Erected by . . . — Map (db m11314) HM
14South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 24-10 — John Waller — 1741-1802
On East Scotch Cross Road (County Route 131) 0.1 miles north of Pembroke Road, on the right when traveling south.
One half mile south is the grave of John Waller, early minister of the Baptist faith in Virginia, where he is credited with founding eighteen churches. He was persecuted and imprisoned by the established church and civil authorities. In 1793, he . . . — Map (db m11332) HM
15South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Lake Greenwood — A Changing Landscape
Near State Park Road.
A Lake is Formed The Great Depression of the 1930s altered the economy and landscape of Greenwood County. Farmers were impoverished, land values declined, and local textile mills struggled to survive. President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New . . . — Map (db m30443) HM
16South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Law and Order in the Carolina Backcountry — 1773 — The Jail and the Courthouse —
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
The Ninety Six jail stood on this site and the courthouse was about 100 yards from it, near the Charleston Road. After the Revolutionary War, the jail fell into disrepair and its bricks were reused for other purposes. But from 1772, when it was . . . — Map (db m125704) HM
17South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Logan Log House
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
Andrew Logan built this house in the late 1700s. The house was the first home built in the nearby town of Greenwood, SC and was actually found hidden in the core of an old house. It was moved here in 1968 where it was put under the protection of . . . — Map (db m30719) HM
18South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Logan Log House
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
Built by Andrew Logan in the late 1700s, this well preserved example of a log house of that time was discovered in nearby Greenwood. The historic stricture has been hidden under siding and obscured by alterations from a much later period. . . . — Map (db m30731) HM
19South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — M-60 A3 Main Battle Tank
On Saluda Street (State Highway 246) south of Cross Avenue.
WT 52 Tons Main Gun 105 MM Produced 1956-1987 This tank was acquired from the SC ARNG with the help of Sgt. Charles A. Price. This marker was dedicated by VFW Post #8131 Star Fort Post 103 Ninety Six American Legion This model . . . — Map (db m35021) HM
20South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Militiamen
Near South Cambridge Road.
(A part-time soldier who was not part of a standing army.)

During both battles at Ninety Six, citizens took part. These men were not trained regular soldiers. After the battles ended, they returned back to their homes and . . . — Map (db m48559) HM
21South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Monument to James Birmingham
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
This stone honors James Birmingham, the first South Carolinian to lose his life for freedom during the Revolutionary War. Birmingham, a member of the Long Cane Militia, received his fatal wound from a Loyalist musket ball. He fought under the . . . — Map (db m11312) HM
22South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — New Priorities of Protection
On State Park Road at Ware Street / Woodland Way (South Carolina Highway 702), on the right when traveling north on State Park Road.
Rock walls communicate that a place is important and worth of protection -- a sanctuary. In the 1940s, Civilian conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees were using the boulders scattered before you to erect a rock wall guarding Lake Greenwood State . . . — Map (db m30424) HM
23South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six — 1775 — A Colonial Center in a Time of Change —
On South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
The convergence of roads at Ninety Six ensured its success as a hub of commerce, center for law and order, and haven for settlers in colonial times. In 1775 the village had a dozen dwellings, a jail, and, most importantly, a courthouse, making it . . . — Map (db m11304) HM
24South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 24-21 — Ninety Six Colored School
On Ninety Six Highway (State Highway 34) 0.1 miles west of Cambridge Street N, on the right when traveling east.
Front The Ninety Six Colored School, built nearby between 1927 and 1953, was a combined elementary and high school through the 1951-52 school year and an elementary school through the 1955-56 school year. It was a six-room frame . . . — Map (db m83914) HM
25South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six in the American Revolution — The War in the Southern Colonies
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) 1.2 miles south of Johnston Road (State Highway S-24-72), on the left when traveling south.
Ninety Six played a significant role in the struggle for American independence from British rule. It was the site of the first southern land battle of the Revolutionary War, in 1775, and the scene of its longest field siege, in 1781. Early in the . . . — Map (db m95759) HM
26South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six National Historic Site — A Revolutionary War Landmark
On South Cambridge Road (State Highway 248) at County Route 225, on the right when traveling south on South Cambridge Road.
Ninety Six National Historic Site is a unit of the National Park Service, which preserves lands of national significance. This park features the site of the old town of Ninety Six, an important seat of power in the backcountry of South Carolina . . . — Map (db m30565) HM
27South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six National Historic Site — A Revolutionary War Landmark
On State Highway 27, on the right when traveling south.
Ninety Six National Historic Site is a unit of the National Park Service, which preserves lands of national significance. This park features the site of the old town of Ninety Six, an important seat of power in the backcountry of South Carolina . . . — Map (db m35098) HM
28South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six National Historic Site — A Revolutionary War Landmark
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) 0.1 miles north of Louden Road, on the left when traveling south.
Ninety Six National Historic Site is a unit of the National Park Service, which preserves lands of national significance. This park features the site of the old town of Ninety Six, an important seat of power in the backcountry of South Carolina . . . — Map (db m125710) HM
29South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Ninety Six National Historic Site / Greenwood County
On South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) at County Route 225 on South Cambridge Street.
Ninety Six National Historic Site A Brief History of Ninety Six National Historic Site The Ninety Six National Historic Site is an area of unique historical and archaeological significance. In the late 1700s traders gave the town its . . . — Map (db m11129) HM
30South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 24-3 — Old Ninety Six — (2 miles south)
On Highway 246 South (State Highway 246), on the right when traveling west.
Even before 1730 the fork in the Cherokee Path 96 miles south of Keowee, was called Ninety Six. Here a trading post was operated, a fort was built and a courthouse town was established. Here the first land battle of the Revolutionary War was . . . — Map (db m11465) HM
31South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Patriot Soldier
Near South Cambridge Road.
General Nathanael Greene had about 1,000 Patriot troops from Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. The average height of an adult during the Revolutionary War was 5 feet 5 inches. See how you stand up to this Patriot while standing in the . . . — Map (db m48534) HM
32South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 24-4 — Preston Brooks Dinner
On Main Street West at Cambridge Street (South Carolina Highway 248), on the right when traveling south on Main Street West. Reported missing.
National attention was focused here on Oct. 3, 1856, when some ten thousand people honored Preston S. Brooks, Congressman from this district, with a public dinner in vindication of his assault on Charles Sumner of Massachusetts on the Senate floor . . . — Map (db m11466) HM
33South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Second Approach Trench — June 6, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street.
"Our approaches are going on but slowly owing to the want of men to dig." General Nathanael Greene Early in the siege Greene set up a rotation to relieve the exhausted sappers. One team dug while another returned to camp to fashion . . . — Map (db m125700) HM
34South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Second Parallel — June 3, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (Route 248).
By June 3, the sappers had finished the approach trench and established a second parallel. Now that he was in position to attack Cruger's stronghold, Greene, in keeping with the etiquette of siege warfare, made a formal demand for the Loyalists' . . . — Map (db m11229) HM
35South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Sharpshooter
Near South Cambridge Road.
. . . — Map (db m48558) HM
36South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Siege Trenches
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248). Reported missing.
On the night of May 22, Greene began constructing an assault position only 70 yards from Star Fort, hoping to overrun the fort quickly with a frontal attack. The Americans were driven away, however, by heavy cannon fire and an attack party from . . . — Map (db m11346) HM
37South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — 24-15 — Siloam Baptist Church
On Siloam Church Road (State Highway S-24-29) 0.3 miles west of State Highway 246, on the right when traveling west.
This church was organized in 1799 by Rev. John Waller, Rev. David Lilly, William Chiles, and Meshec Overby, with 32 charter members. Waller, its first minister, served until his death in 1802. Other notable pastors included Revs. John Broadus, . . . — Map (db m27322) HM
38South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Spring Branch
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
A plentiful water source was essential for the colonial residents of Ninety Six and for both Patriot and Loyalist troops garrisoned here during the Revolutionary War. The water surely flowed more freely in colonial times. During the sweltering . . . — Map (db m125706) HM
39South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The American Revolution Comes to the South — November 18-21, 1775 — Six Years Before the Star Fort Siege There Was Williamson's Fort —
Near South Cambridge Street.
You are standing at the site of the first southern land battle of the Revolutionary War. The men fighting here were all Americans. The Loyalists supported British rule; the Patriots wanted independence from the Crown. The location of Ninety . . . — Map (db m11308) HM
40South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Artillery — June 1, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street.
Once a parallel was dug, troops could move artillery forward and place cannon in position to batter the enemy garrison. Greene's six-pounders (guns firing six pound cannon balls) were placed here on platforms that sat on earthen fortifications . . . — Map (db m125698) HM
41South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Attack
Near South Cambridge Street.
By June 17, the Ninety Six garrison was low on food and ammunition. Cruger had expected a relief expedition from Charleston, but hope was turning into despair. Suddenly, a farmer, casually riding near the American lines, spurred his gorse and . . . — Map (db m11249) HM
42South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The British Fortifications
On South Cambridge Street.
Cruger assumed command at Ninety Six in August, 1780, and quickly strengthened the defenses. By October he had built a stockade and ditch around "ye Court house and the principle houses" and added blockhouses, probably on the Island Ford and . . . — Map (db m11183) HM
43South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Forlorn Hope — June 18, 1781
Near South Cambridge Road (State Highway 248).
Having established the third parallel and dug a mine, the Patriot troops were exhausted. Promised reinforcements from the Virginia militia failed to arrive. A frustrated Greene wrote to Congress: "...our poor Fellows are worne out with fatigue, . . . — Map (db m33029) HM
44South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Lost Town of Cambridge — 1783 - c. 1850
On South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) at County Route 225, on the right when traveling south on South Cambridge Street.
After the Revolution, the American government confiscated land that belonged to prominent Loyalists. You are standing on such a tract, and it became the site of a new town of Ninety Six in 1783. The old town, near the Star Fort -- never rebounded . . . — Map (db m125707) HM
45South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Mine — Begun June 9, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street.
"We shall be in the ditch of the enemies works by tomorrow night or early morning; and the powder is wanting to blow up the works. I beg you will send the powder the moment this reaches you." General Nathanael Greene to General Andrew . . . — Map (db m125702) HM
46South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Patriot Force Arrives — May 21-22, 1781
On South Cambridge Street.
After a series of disastrous defeats in South Carolina, George Washington, head of the Continental Army, took action. He named General Nathanael Greene to command Patriot forces in the South in December 1780. Greene drove into the backcountry . . . — Map (db m11175) HM
47South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Patriots Lay Siege to the Star Fort — May 22-June 18, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (Highway 248).
"Our success is very doubtful." General Nathanael Greene May 23, 1781 General Greene entrusted Colonel Thaddeus Kosciuszko with the task of creating siegeworks -- a system of trenches -- that would allow his men to . . . — Map (db m32831) HM
48South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Patriots Lay Siege to the Star Fort — May 22-June 18, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
"Our success is very doubtful." General Nathanael Greene May 23, 1781 General Greene entrusted Colonel Thaddeus Kosciuszko with the task of creating siegeworks -- a system of trenches -- that would allow his men to . . . — Map (db m32863) HM
49South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Rifle Tower — June 13, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street.
In a single night -- June 13 -- a 30-foot tower made of interlocking logs was erected under Kosciuszko's supervision. From the wooden platform marksmen could aim down into the fort. The Loyalists responded to this threat by making the walls . . . — Map (db m125701) HM
50South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Siege of Ninety Six — 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) 1.2 miles south of Johnston Road (State Highway S-24-72), on the left when traveling south.
In November 1775 — just months after American and British troops traded musket fire at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts — the first southern land battle of the Revolutionary War was fought here in Ninety Six. Later, in 1781, the . . . — Map (db m30623) HM
51South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Star Fort — Heart of the Loyalist Defense
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
On assuming command of Ninety Six in 1780, Lieutenant Colonel Cruger set out to fortify the town in the event of a Patriot attack. The Star Fort was the center of his defense and today offers a rare view of original British military field . . . — Map (db m11265) HM
52South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Stockade Fort — Ninety Six National Historic Site
Near State Highway 248 at Louden Road, on the right when traveling north.
The British built this “stockade fort on the right” in 1781 on property owned by James Holmes, a Loyalist, to protect the garrison’s water supply. An irregular fortification built around a barn and several out building, the . . . — Map (db m99687) HM
53South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — The Well — Begin June 12, 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (Route 248).
Water was critical to the survival of the men confined to the Star Fort, but the town's only water source, Spring Branch, lay well beyond its walls and within range of Patriot fire. Cruger hoped to remedy this dire situation by digging a well . . . — Map (db m11293) HM
54South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Trader with Pack Horse
Near South Cambridge Road.
Roads and paths allowed trade between the Cherokee and early traders. In 1753 Robert Gouedy set up the first permanent trading post at old Ninety Six. Many road traces can still be seen today. — Map (db m48532) HM
55South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Walking Tour of the Park
Near State Highway 248 0.1 miles north of Louden Road, on the left when traveling south.
Follow the paved path to explore a colonial roadbed, Revolutionary War siegeworks and the original Star Fort, the site of the early town of Ninety Six, the reconstructed Stockade Fort of 1781, and the Logan Log House. The one-mile walk starts out in . . . — Map (db m125696) HM
56South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Welcome to the Lake Greenwood State Recreation Area
On State Park Road, on the right when traveling east.
About Lake Greenwood State Recreation Area Lake Greenwood became a part of the South Carolina State Park System in April 1938. the land for the park was donated by Greenwood County. Originally the park consisted of 1,114 acres. Later the . . . — Map (db m30441) HM
57South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Why Did the British Burn Ninety Six? — July 1781
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248).
The quiet field before you was the site of the once-thriving 1700s town of Ninety Six. In 1781 it had about a dozen homes, a courthouse, and a jail. When Lieutenant Colonel Cruger arrived in 1780, he fortified it against attack. One visitor . . . — Map (db m33468) HM
58South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Why Is It Called Ninety Six? — A Colonial Backcountry Settlement
Near South Cambridge Street (State Highway 248) 1.2 miles south of Johnston Road (State Highway S-24-72), on the left when traveling south.
The origin of Ninety Six's unusual numeric name remains a mystery. There are many theories. One plausible explanation is that English traders who passed through here in the 1700s estimated this location to be 96 miles from the Cherokee village of . . . — Map (db m30703) HM
59South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Wm. Pierce Bennett Kinard
On Epworth Camp Grounds Road E at Gin House Road, on the left when traveling west on Epworth Camp Grounds Road E.
. . . — Map (db m56785) HM
60South Carolina (Greenwood County), Ninety Six — Woman and Child
Near South Cambridge Road.
As many as 100 Loyalist families took refuge in the town of Ninety Six during the 1781 siege. They had to suffer the same hardships and disease as the Loyalist soldiers. After the battle many families followed the British Army to . . . — Map (db m48535) HM
61South Carolina (Saluda County), Ninety Six — 41-5 — Lucinda Horn
On Chappells Highway (State Highway 39) at Chestnut Hill Road (County Road 135), on the right when traveling south on Chappells Highway.
At Chestnut Hill Baptist Church is the grave of Lucinda Horn, Confederate War heroine, wife of Cornelius Horn and mother of William Horn, both members of Company K, 14th S.C. Volunteers. She accompanied her husband and son to the front and remained . . . — Map (db m12967) HM
 
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