Geographic Sort Historical Markers and War Memorials in West Virginia
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Historical Markers and War Memorials in West Virginia

 
Skirmishing at Laurel Hill image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2010
Skirmishing at Laurel Hill
1West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Battle of Laurel HillTempest on the Turnpike
Union and Confederate forces clashed along the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike (the narrow paved road in the foreground) on July 7-11, 1861. Union General Morris was ordered to "amuse" General Garnett at Laurel Hill - to make him believe the main attack . . . Map (db m34439) HM
2West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Battle of Laurel Hill
The "Battle of Laurel Hill,” a series of lively skirmishes between Union & Confederate Troops, took place here on July 7 - 11, 1861. Armies struggled for control of the strategic Beverly & Fairmont Turnpike leading to Confederates . . . Map (db m165056) HM
3West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Belington
Union troops under Brigadier General T.A. Morris, advanced from Philippi on July 7, 1861 and established a fortified camp near this site. Battle of Belington took place July 7-11. Confederates were two miles to east at Laurel Hill.Map (db m34424) HM
4West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Laurel HillA Key to Victory — The First Campaign —
On the nearby heights, Confederate General Robert Garnett's Army of Northwestern Virginia built fortifications to defend the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike in June 1861. Many received their baptism of fire here as Garnett's 4,000 Confederates skirmished . . . Map (db m34423) HM
5West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Camp Laurel Hill
Fortified camp occupied by Confederates under Brig. Gen. Robert S. Garnett. June 16 - July 12, 1861. The scene of sharp skirmishes July 7-11. Garnett retreated early in the morning of July 12 after the Rich Mountain defeat.Map (db m34425) HM
6West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — CannonsGrim Weapons of War
Confederate artillery was posted here. The cannons were placed behind protective earthworks, still faintly visible today. Their fire swept the Beverly-Fairmont Turnpike below. Model 1841 6-pounder field guns were used at Camp Laurel Hill. Although . . . Map (db m34440) HM
7West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War
To honor all who served North and South April 12, 1861 to April 9, 1865 donated by Laurel Mountain Post 410 Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Belington, West Virginia March 1, 1999Map (db m34447) HM
8West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Civil War on the Beverly & Fairmont Turnpike
"A few dozen of us who had been swapping shots with the enemy's skirmishers, grew tired of the result less battle and by a common impulse - and I think without orders or officers, ran forward into the woods and attacked the Confederate works. We . . . Map (db m34456) HM
9West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Confederate CemeteryFallen Heroes of Laurel Hill
Within this fenced burial ground lie Confederate soldiers who died at Laurel Hill. Their number is unknown. Inscribed headboards once marked the graves. During the Civil War, disease killed more men than bullets. One soldier reported 14 graves in . . . Map (db m34441) HM
10West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Forced FlightConfederates Abandon Laurel Hill
By July 10, 1861, Federal cannons bombarded the interior of Camp Laurel Hill. Confederates may have sought shelter among the boulders nearby. On July 11, General Garnett learned of defeat at Rich Mountain. Fearful of being trapped, Garnett . . . Map (db m155082) HM
11West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — In Honor of these whose Sacrifices Created this Hallowed Ground
Commonwealth of Virginia Sgt John B Pendleton-Co G 23rd VA Inf Pvt John H Blake-Co H 23rd VA Inf Pvt Charles H Goff- Co H 23rd VA Inf Pvt Robert M Oney-Co B 37th VA Inf Pvt Fendall C Whitlock-Co G 23rd VA Inf Pvt James K Davis-Co E . . . Map (db m165046) WM
12West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Laurel Hill
Battle of Laurel Hill, July 8, 1861, between Confederates and McClellan's army, followed by actions at Rich Mountain and Corrick's Ford, gave Federals control of State and established communication lines to the West. Fine view from peak.Map (db m34426) HM
13West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Laurel HillConfederate Encampment, 1861
Soldiers of the Confederate Army of the Northwest occupied this ground from June 16 to July 11, 1861. Led by General Robert S. Garnett, a West Point instructor of tactics, they dug fortifications on the Mustoe farm to block the Beverly-Fairmont . . . Map (db m34437) HM
14West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Laurel Hill Battlefield Veterans Memorial1861
Pvt D. Adams Co D 1st GA Killed July 8 Pvt J. Davis Co E 23rd VA Died July 9 Pvt R. Oney Co B 37th VA Killed July 11 Ilt W. Wheeler Co I 1st GA Killed July 8 Pvt J. Blake Co H 23rd VA Killed July 9 Pvt C. Goff Co H 23rd . . . Map (db m165051) WM
15West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Meadowville
Meadowville, on the site of an Indian fort built in 1784, is a few miles north. New Jersey colonists settled there before 1800, and tavern, mills, and stores made it a trading center of the Tygarts Valley for a hundred years.Map (db m34448) HM
16West Virginia (Barbour County), Belington — Welcome to Camp Laurel HillGateway to the Northwest
Confederate forces retreated from this area after the "Philippi Races" (June 3, 1861), first land battle of the Civil War. At Huttonsville, 26 miles south, Confederate General Robert S. Garnett took command of the Army of the Northwest. His goal was . . . Map (db m34455) HM
17West Virginia (Barbour County), Hopewell — Ida L. Read
Northeast, 3 1/2 miles, is the birthplace of Ida L. Reed, born November 30, 1865. She became famous for her religious writings, chiefly cantatas, poems and hymns, of which she wrote over 2000. Her hymns have been used in the services of . . . Map (db m165045) HM
18West Virginia (Barbour County), Junior — Barbour County / Randolph County
Barbour County. Formed from Harrison, Lewis, and Randolph in 1843. It is named for a distinguished Virginia jurist, Philip Pendleton Barbour. Scene of opening hostilities on land between the armies of the North and South in 1861. Randolph . . . Map (db m33928) HM
19West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County Korean War Memorial
Barbour County Post 44 Dedicated to all Barbour County Veterans who served in the Korean War. July 29, 1989Map (db m33701) WM
20West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial
This monument and park are dedicated in sincere appreciation of all Barbour County Vietnam era Veterans who served this great nation - United States of America 1961 - 1973 Dedicated on May 25, 1987 by United States Senator John D. Rockefeller IV . . . Map (db m33758) HM
21West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Barbour County War Memorial
(Front):1917 - 1919 In Memory of Oscar Granville Alexander Clayton Bosworth Brandon Jesse Gordon Cole Quincy C. Dadisman Okey E. Duckworth James Blaine Hovatter Everett Earl Ice David Oren Jones Fred E. Jones John Irvin Kramer Andrew . . . Map (db m155093) WM
22West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Battle of PhilippiTalbott's Hill — The First Campaign —
(Preface):In the spring of 1861, Union forces rushed into northwestern Virginia to secure the vital Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, protect important turnpikes, and support Unionists against Confederates. The two sides fought numerous . . . Map (db m58700) HM
23West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Battle of PhilippiThe Covered Bridge — The First Campaign —
(preface) In the spring of 1861, Union forces rushed into northwestern Virginia to secure the vital Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, protect important turnpikes, and support Unionists against Confederates. The two sides fought numerous . . . Map (db m165311) HM
24West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Benjamin F. Kelley
Born in New Hampshire In 1807, he moved to Wheeling and worked as a merchant and as a freight agent for the B&O. He was appointed colonel of the 1st WV (90-day regiment) in 1861 and led the unit at Philippi, where he was seriously wounded. He was . . . Map (db m165028) HM
25West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Birthplace - W.D. Zinn
One mile east is Woodbine Farm, birthplace of W.D. Zinn, noted farmer, writer and lecturer. He contributed much to scientific farming in this and adjoining states. "The Story of Woodbine Farm" is an autobiography of his work.Map (db m33776) HM
26West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Churchville Cavalry Flag
Churchville cavalry flag made by women of Augusta County, Virginia, and presented to the 14th Virginia Cavalry before they left for Phillipi, captured by Union troops on June 3, 1861. Original flag is at Battle Abbey in Richmond, Virginia.Map (db m165035) HM
27West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Colonel Porterfield's Headquarters Flag
Flown over the Confederate headquarters a the Virginia house on the main street in Philippi. Headquarters flag was cut down and taken by First Lieutenant Charles A. Griffin of the First (West) Virginia Volunteers from Wheeling. Original flag (6 . . . Map (db m165030) HM
28West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Confederate Regimental Flag
Captured at the Battle of Philippi on June 3,1861. Original flag is at Battle Abbey in Richmond, Virginia,Map (db m165037) HM
29West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — First Land Battle
First land battle between the North and South here, June 3, 1861. Confederates under Col. Porterfield were dislodged by Federal troops from Gen. McClellan's army under Col. Kelley. The old covered bridge here was used by both armies.Map (db m33777) HM
30West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Historic Campbell School
After the Civil War, Barbour County residents built this one-room school house near Volga, 8 miles SW. As one of the county's first free schools, it was the center of education for hundreds of children, providing instruction for primary through . . . Map (db m155092) HM
31West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Palmeto Flag
One of the Confederate flags captured at the Battle of Philippi, June 3, 1861. The Palmetto Flag was raised over the Philippi Court House on January 1861, the firs Confederate flag to be flown in Virginia.Map (db m165031) HM
32West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Confederate Retreat — The First Campaign —
Col. George A. Porterfield moved his newly recruited Confederates from Grafton on May 28, 1861, after receiving word of a Federal advance on the B&O Railroad. Porterfield's force a Philippi totaled no more than 775 volunteers. Few were fully trained . . . Map (db m33672) HM
33West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — Philippi
Originally called Anglin's Ford for William Anglin but later named Booth's Ferry for Daniel Booth. Near by in 1780, Richard, Cottrill, and Charity Talbott settled. Philippi was named for Judge Philip Pendleton Barbour.Map (db m33702) HM
34West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Commands — The First Campaign —
Col. Benjamin F. Kelley Kelley, a railroad agent in Philadelphia and former resident of Wheeling, was called back to command the First Virginia (Union) Infantry - the first Union regiment raised in the South. He planned and led the attack on . . . Map (db m33760) HM
35West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Casualties
As Col Benjamin Kelley’s Federals pursued the Confederates through Philippi, he was shot in the upper right chest by Col. George A. Porterfield’s quartermaster. A surgeon declared it a mortal wound but Kelley recovered. In a show of respect, his men . . . Map (db m63852) HM
36West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — PhilippiThe Federal Attack — The First Campaign —
On June 2, 1861, Federal troops advanced on Philippi from the Baltimore & Ohio rail hub at Grafton in two columns of about 1500 men each. The left column, under Col. Benjamin Kelley, took the train six miles east to Thornton, and then marched . . . Map (db m155438) HM
37West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — The Covered Bridge
The Philippi Covered Bridge across Tygart Valley River was built in 1852 by Lemuel Chenoweth of Beverly. Made of wood, with the exception of the iron bolts used to hold the segments together, it is an example of the best in covered bridge . . . Map (db m33665) HM
38West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — The Philippi Covered BridgePhilippi, WV — Scene of the First Land Battle of the Civil War —
Constructed in 1852 by Lemuel Chenoweth; masonry by Emanuel J. O'Brien, cost $12,151.24. The covered bridge, erected in 1852, is the only two-lane bridge in the federal highway system. During the Civil War the bridge served both North and South in . . . Map (db m33762) HM
39West Virginia (Barbour County), Philippi — United States Flag
The 34-star United States Flag was in the possession of the Federals. West Virginia became the 35th state of the Union on June 20, 1863. Kiwanis Flag Circle Made possible by the estate of Dr. Hu C. Myers, a bequest to the Kiwanis Club of . . . Map (db m165034) HM
40West Virginia (Barbour County), Valley Furnace — Valley Furnace
Iron ore was discovered here, 1835, by John Johnson. The Old Iron Furnace, built, 1848, was operated for six years by C.W. Bryant and Isaac Marsh. In 1850, a steam engine replaced the water power used to run fan air blast. Charcoal was fuel used. . . . Map (db m33929) HM
41West Virginia (Berkeley County), Baker Heights — Veterans Administration Center
Established as the Newton D. Baker General Hospital, U.S. Army. Named for Newton D. Baker, native of Martinsburg and Secretary of War, World War I. Opened for patients in 1944. It became Veterans Administration Center in 1946.Map (db m12784) HM
42West Virginia (Berkeley County), Blairton — Van Metre Ford Bridge
Named for the property owners this stone bridge built in 1832 across Opequon Creek was major improvement for travellers on Warm Springs Road connecting Alexandria and Bath, Va., site of famous mineral waters. The Berkeley County Court established a . . . Map (db m12849) HM
43West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — "Morgan Acres"
Two miles west is the site of the first house in present West Virginia. It was built by Col. Morgan Morgan who came from Delaware in 1726. It was destroyed and the one now there was built in 1800 by another Morgan.Map (db m57717) HM
44West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Christ Church
First Episcopal Church in West Virginia Established 1740 by Col. Morgan Morgan known as Morgan's Chapel Present building 1851Map (db m12848) HM
45West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Christ Church
300 yards west is one of the oldest Episcopal churches in West Virginia. Built in 1740 by Morgan Morgan. Five Revolutionary soldiers buried in church yard. Used as a barracks during war between the states.Map (db m134064) HM
46West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Col. Morgan Morgan
Nov. 1, 1688 — Nov. 17, 1766. Erected by the State of West Virginia. In commemoration of the first settlement within the present boundaries of said State, which was made by Col. Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, and Catherine Garretson, . . . Map (db m1169) HM
47West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Cool Spring Presbyterian Church
Founded 1764 100 yds. to the East Parent to Gerrardstown Presbyterian Church Map (db m148877) HM
48West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . Map (db m1975) HM
49West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — James Johnston Pettigrew Monument
Due west of this tablet, 650 feet, is the Boyd House in which died, July 17, 1863, Brig.-Gen. James Johnston Pettigrew, of North Carolina, C. S. A. At Gettysburg he commanded and led Heth’s Division in the assault on Cemetery Ridge, July 3; and in . . . Map (db m2615) HM
50West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan Cabin
Originally built 1731-34 as second home of Morgan Morgan-first white settler in West Virginia. Rebuilt with some of original logs in 1976 as a State and County Bicentennial project. It was here during the Revolution that James Morgan, the grandson . . . Map (db m12798) HM
51West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan ChapelWashington Heritage Trail
At Bunker Hill in 1726, Colonel Morgan Morgan founded the first permanent settlement of record in what is now West Virginia. In commemoration of this event, the state of West Virginia has erected a monument in Bunker Hill State Park, and has placed . . . Map (db m134056) HM
52West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan Morgan
Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, established his home at Bunker Hill before 1732, and was leader in Eastern Panhandle’s early development. His sons gave name to Morgantown, and fought in Indian and Revolutionary Wars.Map (db m1176) HM
53West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Zacquill Morgan House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Zaquill Morgan House 1761 [Lower plaque:] A Berkeley County Historic Landmark . . . Map (db m148875) HM
54West Virginia (Berkeley County), Darkesville — Darkesville
Named for Gen. William Darke, veteran of the Revolution and the Indian wars. He saved the remnants of St. Clair’s army from massacre in 1791 when badly defeated by the Miami Indians. His son, Capt. Joseph Darke, lost his life.Map (db m167181) HM
55West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersJackson’s Coolness Under Fire
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under Gen. Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched south toward Martinsburg. Colonel Thomas J. Jackson sent his men north from their camp north of town to block them and to . . . Map (db m41631) HM
56West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersStuart’s Surprise
Here at Stumpy’s Hollow on the morning of July 2, 1861, Confederate Lieutenant Colonel J.E.B. Stuart captured a Union infantry company almost single-handedly. The Federals – Company I, fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers – were acting as . . . Map (db m45596) HM
57West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersHarper’s 5th Virginia Infantry
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . Map (db m58078) HM
58West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersFour Apostles of the 1st Rockbridge Artillery
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . Map (db m58080) HM
59West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersCrockett-Porterfield House
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . Map (db m180733) HM
60West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battles of Falling Waters“A splendid falls”
During the Civil War, the strategically important Valley Turnpike crossed the stream just above the small waterfall here. Two battles were fought nearby. The first occurred on July 2, 1861, half a mile south on the Porterfield Farm. On the morning . . . Map (db m58083) HM
61West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — General “Stonewall” Jackson
In Memory of General “Stonewall” Jackson This tablet is erected by the Berkeley County Chapter United Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate an instance of General Jackson’s remarkable bravery at all times in the face of the gravest . . . Map (db m41626) HM
62West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Stumpy’s HollowJuly 2, 1861
Site of JEB Stuart’s capture of Union SoldiersMap (db m45769) HM
63West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Gerard House
Built by John Hays, 1743. Became home of Reverend David Gerard, who founded Gerrardstown in 1787. His father was Reverend John Gerard, the first Baptist Minister west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.Map (db m12793) HM
64West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Gerrardstown
Established as a town, 1787. Named for John Gerrard, first pastor of Mill Creek Baptist Church, which was organized by early settlers about 1743. The congregation reorganized after Indian hostilities during the French and Indian War.Map (db m12791) HM
65West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Gerrardstown Veterans Memorial
Members of the Gerrardstown Community who have proudly served their country in time of conflict Dedicated in 2004 World War I Davis Crim • Ashton Faircloth • George Maseur • Frank Miller • Carl Wiest World War II . . . Map (db m148878) WM
66West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Malin-Wilson-Gray House
C. 1795-1835-1890 National Register of Historic Places Map (db m148879) HM
67West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Mill Creek Baptist Church
Site of Mill Creek Baptist Church Organized prior to 1742 Grand-parent of First Baptist Church Martinsburg, West Va.Map (db m14596) HM
68West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 102 West Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m144121) HM
69West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 104 East Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148849) HM
70West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 104 West Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m144122) HM
71West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 106 East Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148848) HM
72West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 108 East Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148847) HM
73West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 108 West Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m144123) HM
74West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 200 South Mary Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 [Lower plaque:] circa 1842Map (db m148850) HM
75West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 201 East Main Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148851) HM
76West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 201 North Mary Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148852) HM
77West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 202 Town Spring Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m159446) HM
78West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 204 North Mary Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148854) HM
79West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 300 North Mary Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148855) HM
80West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — 307 North Mary Street
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148858) HM
81West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Battle of North Mountain Depot
This boulder marks the site on Camp Hill where the batteries were fired during the War Between the States in the raid on the federal blockhouse, located at North Mountain. On July 4, 1864, the 14th, 16th, and 17th Regiments of General McCausland's . . . Map (db m154841) HM
82West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Hedgesville
Site of stockade fort built during the early Indian wars. Mt. Zion Episcopal Church was built soon after. A mile west is the tavern, built, 1740–1750, by Robert Snodgrass on land patented in 1732 by William Snodgrass, pioneer settler.Map (db m990) HM
83West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Hedgesville Historic District National Register SiteWashington Heritage Trail
During the French and Indian War (c. 1750) Virginia Militia Col. George Washington supervised the construction of Fort Hedges, a stockade fort built along the Warm Spring Road at the heavily-traveled Skinner's gap atop North Mountain (740 feet . . . Map (db m117316) HM
84West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Morgan County / Berkeley County
Morgan County. Formed, 1820, from Berkeley and Hampshire. Named for Gen. Daniel Morgan of the Revolutionary Army. Many of his renowned “Riflemen” were from the Eastern Panhandle, where he once lived. Famed Berkeley Springs here. Berkeley . . . Map (db m1112) HM
85West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Mt. Zion Episcopal Church
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 Map (db m148844) HM
86West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Payne-Kreglow House
National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by U. S. Dept. of Interior Hedgesville Historic District Est. 1978 [Lower marker:] Payne-Kreglow House circa 1905 Restored by James W. Poisal, Jr., . . . Map (db m148856) HM
87West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Saint Mark's Methodist Episcopal Church
[Left Plaque:] (Originally First Methodist Episcopal Church) 1790 - 1942 Place during U.S.A. Bicentennial Celebration [Right plaque:] National Register [of Historic Places] Structure by . . . Map (db m159447) HM
88West Virginia (Berkeley County), Kearneysville — Shaw Run Wetland ComplexWest Virginia 9 — Charles Town to Martinsburg —
The Shaw Run Wetland Complex is a calcareous fen. A "fen" is defined as low land covered wholly or partly with water. fed by Shaw Spring and Shaw Run, the wetland is a unique type of wetland for West Virginia because of its marl substratum (layer . . . Map (db m150612) HM
89West Virginia (Berkeley County), Kearneysville — Stone House MansionWest Virginia 9 — Charles Town to Martinsburg —
Stone House Mansion, predominantly Georgian in style, was constructed in 1757, and is one of the oldest stone structures in Berkeley County. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its association with the Hite vs. . . . Map (db m167518) HM
90West Virginia (Berkeley County), Marlowe — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . Map (db m60605) HM
91West Virginia (Berkeley County), Marlowe — Watkins' Ferry
By an act of the Virginia House of Burgesses, 1744, a ferry was established extending from the mouth of the Canagochego Creek in Maryland across the Patowmack to the Evan Watkins Landing, about 250 yards southeast. This landing was also the entrance . . . Map (db m131795) HM
92West Virginia (Berkeley County), Marlowe — West Virginia (Berkeley County) / Virginia
West Virginia (Berkeley County) "The Mountain State"—western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French . . . Map (db m131797) HM
93West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — “Oh Shenandoah, I Long to See You!”
“Big Apple Time Capsule” Dedicated: Oct 19, 1990 – Re-open in year of 2040 Sponsor: Martinsburg Jaycees This “community pride project” is an attempt to preserve the Apple Capital city and surrounding areas of . . . Map (db m1212) HM
94West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — 224 - 226 West King Street
Built as a YMCA in 1908. Constructed in the eclectic mission style. Used as the Martinsburg City Hall from 1932-1988.Map (db m132408) HM
95West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Adam Stephen House309 East John Street — 1774-1789 —
This structure was constructed of native limestone by Revolutionary War General Adam Stephen, founder of Martinsburg. Restored by the City of Martinsburg and the Adam Stephen Memorial Association, Inc.Map (db m132404) HM
96West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Adam Stephen House – 309 East John StreetWashington Heritage Trail
Adam Stephen (1720-1791) had a close acquaintance with George Washington through their association with Lord Fairfax and from their military involvements from the French & Indian War through the American Revolution. Stephen was present with . . . Map (db m167507) HM
97West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Apollo Theater128 East Martin Street — Built 1912 —
This theater was designed by Reginald Geare, architect for the well-known Knickerbocker Theater of Washington, D.C.Map (db m143931) HM
98West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Avenue of Flags Monument
The colonial village of Martinsburg was established by law enacted by the General Assemply of the Commonwealth of Virginia on October 21, 1778. Martinsburg’s founder was General Adam Stephen, a noted soldier of the American Revolutionary War. . . . Map (db m167514) HM
99West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Shop Complex
The roundhouse is the sole surviving cast-iron framed roundhouse and is an important example of mid-19th century industrial building design. Designed by Albert Fink, in collaboration with Benjamin H. Latrobe, it represents an early use of . . . Map (db m1199) HM
100West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Baltimore and Ohio Roundhouse and Shop Complex
National Civil Engineering Landmark. The re-construction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Roundhouse and Shop Complex commenced soon after the end of the American Civil War in 1865. This complex included two roundhouses and two significant . . . Map (db m167682) HM

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Sep. 28, 2021