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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Montgomery County Maryland Historical Markers

515 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 315
 
Two Civil War Trail Markers at St. Mary's Church, Barnesville image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
Two Civil War Trail Markers at St. Mary's Church, Barnesville
Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnesville — Barnesville“... a bad night of it...” — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Barnesvile Road at West Harris Road, on the left when traveling west on Barnesvile Road.
The advance of Union Gen. John F. Reynolds’ I Corps began slogging through Barnesville on the morning of Friday, June 26, 1863, having crossed the Potomac River the afternoon before and camped west of town. Continuous heavy rain made marching muddy . . . — Map (db m1678) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnesville — Barnesville“Before night our town changed hands five times!” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Barnesvile Road just west of West Harris Road, on the left when traveling west.
On the evening of September 5, 1862, Gen. Wade Hampton’s and Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s Confederate cavalry brigades bivouacked around Barnesville. They rode the next day to their base camp at Urbana, leaving the 9th Virginia Cavalry to guard Barnesville. . . . — Map (db m1679) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnesville — Barnesville StationDedicated October 8, 1977
On Bealsville Road (State Highway 109) just south of Hillrise Lane, on the right when traveling south.
Built about 1930 as the first metering station for the Washington area gas supply, this building was saved from imminent destruction by concerned citizens dedicated to both the preservation of the visible past and revitalization of the railroad. On . . . — Map (db m139683) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — African American Soldiers from Montgomery County1861-1865
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) 1 mile north of Beallsville Road (Route 109), on the right when traveling north.
Black men — both free and enslaved — were called upon to fight in the Civil War which ultimately led to the dismantlement of slavery, that ‘peculiar institution.’ As the Civil War dragged on, the state newspapers exaggerated . . . — Map (db m86905) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — BeallsvilleSquabble at the cemetery: Whose flag flies today? — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Beallsville Road (Maryland Route 109) at Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28), on the right when traveling south on Beallsville Road.
On September 9, 1862, the running engagement between Illinois, Indiana, and Virginia cavalry units that began the day before in Poolesville continued in Beallsville when two Federal regiments forced the single regiment of Virginia cavalrymen posted . . . — Map (db m1681) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — Brewer Farmstead
On Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) 1.1 miles north of Beallsville Road (Maryland Route 109), on the right when traveling north.
Family Farming Dr. William Brewer acquired 583 acres in a land grant known as “Woodstock Manor,” in 1838. Woodstock was two miles from Dr. Brewer's primary residence, Aix-La-Chappell where he provided medical treatment to the . . . — Map (db m86904) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — Equestrian Heritage
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) 1.1 miles north of Beallsville Road (Maryland Route 109), on the right when traveling north.
Importance of Horses Horses were brought to this continent by Spanish explorers in the 16th centu­ry. Their speed and endurance were invaluable in the New World. In early America. specific breeds were relatively unknown. Horses were . . . — Map (db m86431) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — In Loving MemoryConfederate Memorial
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) at West Hunter Road, on the left.
“In loving memory of the valor and self-sacrifice of the Maryland soldiers in the Confederate Army whose names are inscribed hereon” War of 1861 — 1865 J. Collison White     Richard R. Hays Thomas H. White     James . . . — Map (db m86183) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — Seneca Stone Barn
Near Wasche Road 0.3 miles north of Farm Road Trail, on the right when traveling north.
Restoring History This circa 1800 stable was built either by the Young family or the Fisher family of Seneca sandstone most likely quarried nearby on the Potomac River. Seneca stone was prized for its ruddy variegated color, local . . . — Map (db m86368) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — "All are Welcome to the Healing Plaza"Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Near Palmer Road North 0.2 miles east of Wood Road (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling east.
This plaza is a tribute to the history and legacy of two great military medical institutions and their contributions to military medicine. Through this garden’s peaceful landscape, sculpture, and memorials, visitors are reminded of our commitment to . . . — Map (db m70946) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — "The Linden Oak"- 1976 -
On Grosvenor Lane at Rockville Pike (Maryland Road 355), on the right when traveling north on Grosvenor Lane.
Known locally as "The Linden Oak," this white oak tree (Quercus alba) is the fourth largest of its species in the state of Maryland and the largest in Montgomery County. How it came to be called "The Linden Oak" is unknown. Recognized in the . . . — Map (db m22317) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — A Totem For Healing
Near Center Drive just west of Wisconsin Avenue (Maryland Route 355), on the left when traveling west.
The National Library of Medicine's healing totem was created to promote good health, in keeping with the mission of the doctors and scientists who work here at NIH to advance our knowledge of health and medicine. Master carver Jewell James of the . . . — Map (db m77836) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — A Way for FishChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath, on the right when traveling south.
If you walk down the short path to the water's edge and look upriver to your right, you can see Snake Island in the middle of Little Falls Dam. Just behind the island, hidden underwater, is a fishway—a passage that enables fish to swim beyond . . . — Map (db m136927) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — At This LocationQuercus alba -- White Oak
On Center Drive at North Drive, on the right when traveling west on Center Drive.
The 192 year old, 84 foot tall white oak that grew here was felled on February 14, 1998 to make way for the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center. The U.S. Navy used the 14 ton, 35 foot trunk segment for repairs to the USS Constitution, . . . — Map (db m73322) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Battery Bailey
On Elliott Road 0.4 miles west of Ashfield Road, on the right when traveling west.
During the Civil War, fortifications were constructed around the perimeter of Washington to defend the city from attack by the Confederate Army. Paramount to survival under siege was protection of the city's water supply. Forts Sumner and Mansfield . . . — Map (db m17647) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Bear and the Steelhead
Near Center Drive just from Wisconsin Avenue (Maryland Route 355), on the left when traveling west.
The carvings on this bench depict a story from the Salish people of the northwestern United States and British Columbia, Canada. The story teaches respect for natural cycles, represented by the salmon’s annual migration upriver from the sea to . . . — Map (db m77878) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Bethesda Meeting House
Near Rockville Pike (Route 355) 0.5 miles south of Elsmere Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
Bethesda Meeting House Founded 1820 – Rebuilt 1850 — Map (db m77717) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Cemetery of the Bethesda Presbyterian Church
On Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355) 0.6 miles south of Elsmere Avenue.
The Bethesda Meeting House was erected on this site in 1820. The original sanctuary was destroyed by fire. A second edifice was built in 1850 about 100 yards south of the cemetery. In 1926 the church was moved to its present location at Wilson Lane . . . — Map (db m78047) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Col. Guilford Dudley Bailey — The Fallen Union Officer for Whom the Battery Was Named —
On Elliott Road 0.4 miles west of Ashfield Road, on the right when traveling west.
Born June 4, 1834, in Martinsburg, New York, this 1856 West Point graduate returned to his alma mater as an instructor following a tour of duty in the west and midwest. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Bailey organized the First New York Light . . . — Map (db m17695) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Five Points, historic crossroads
On Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) at Wisconsin Avenue (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling north on Old Georgetown Road.
This commemorative site known as "Five Points," has been used as a commercial crossroads for almost 300 years. Its name was derived from the old Indian trails which are now merged and identified as Edgemoor Lane, Wisconsin Avenue, East West Highway . . . — Map (db m84) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Fort Sumner
On Sangamore Road at Westpath Way, on the left when traveling north on Sangamore Road.
Forts Alexander, Ripley and Franklin, built to protect the Washington water system in 1861, were connected by earthworks in 1863 and renamed Ft. Sumner to honor Maj. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, A hero of Antietam. The fort’s 28 cannon providea a . . . — Map (db m3448) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — From Trolley to TrailA Brief History
Near Glenbrook Road at Rugby Avenue.
After the Civil War, America's cities created new transportation systems that enabled them to prosper and grow. During this time, major rail lines were built to connect Washington, D.C. with other cities. Smaller electric streetcar or 'trolley' . . . — Map (db m116775) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Home of Samuel Wade Magruder1728-1792
Near Westlake Terrace 0.1 miles west of Westlake Drive, on the left when traveling west.
Lieutenant of Volunteers French and Indian War, Magistrate of the 1st. court, Montg. Co. MD. 1777 Major of Maryland Battalion Member of Committee to effect resolutions of first Continental Congress. — Map (db m72752) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — In Loving Memory of Robert W. LeblingHusband | Father | WWII Captain | Community Leader | Executive — 1923 - 2000 —
On Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) at Wisconsin Avenue (Maryland Route 355), on the left when traveling north on Old Georgetown Road.
Robert W. Lebling gave to the community with passion, just as he loved his family and friends. Highly respected for his civic and business leadership, Mr. Lebling served on numerous boards and committees for the economic betterment of Bethesda. . . . — Map (db m85) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Inlet LocksChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath, on the right when traveling south.
Seven dams and one steam pump were built along the river to funnel water into the canal. In times of drought or low water, usually during the height of summer, river levels dropped dramatically. The canal could not get enough water from the river . . . — Map (db m136925) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Lockhouse 6Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On Clara Barton Parkway.
From its inception the vision of the C&O Canal has evolved, constantly finding ways to be relevant. Built in 1829, Lockhouse 6 stands a mile upstream from Little Falls, site of the canal's July 4th groundbreaking the previous year. Lockhouse 6 . . . — Map (db m112119) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Locust Grove
On Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just east of Fairmont Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
Locust Grove, the home of Lucy Beall, Daughter of George, and of Her Husband Samuel Wade Magruder, a local leader in the Revolutionary War, was built around 1770. Located near Montgomery Mall Shopping Plaza (at the intersection of Westlake Terrace . . . — Map (db m72958) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Looking North up Wisconsin Avenue at Old Georgetown Road in 1940
Near Arlington Road north of Edgemoor Lane, on the right when traveling north.
Looking north up Wisconsin Avenue at Old Georgetown Road in 1940. The Bank of Bethesda building, now Crestar Bank, is to the left. The sign to the right announces that the Hot Shoppe was coming soon — it opened in January, 1941. Behind the . . . — Map (db m129431) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — 12 — Madonna of the Trail
On Wisconsin Avenue (Maryland Route 355) at Montgomery Lane, on the right when traveling south on Wisconsin Avenue.
(East Face) N.S.D.A.R. Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days. (North Face) This the first military road in America beginning at Rock Creek and Potomac River, Georgetown, Maryland, leading our pioneers . . . — Map (db m18437) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Moreland
On Moorland Lane 0.1 miles north of Wilson Lane (Maryland Route 188), on the left when traveling north.
This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m137995) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — National Naval Medical Center — [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center] —
On Wood Road 0.6 miles north of Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling east.
Panel at main entrance: National Naval Medical Center Tower and View has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Cornerstone inscription at main entrance, north . . . — Map (db m70906) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — National Naval Medical Center in the 1940’s
On Wood Road (Maryland Route 355) 0.6 miles north of Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355).
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt selected this site on July 5, 1938. At the time, the site was a cabbage patch on a run down farm. This property was originally part of the “Clagetts’ Purchase” recorded in 1715. The original 772 acre . . . — Map (db m61969) HM WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Old Georgetown Road
Near Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just east of Arlington Road, on the right when traveling east.
Part of Old Georgetown Road Was once an Indian trail going from what is now Wisconsin Avenue to the Potomac River. In 1806, The Maryland Assembly created the Washington Turnpike Company to improve the Georgetown-Frederick Road. — Map (db m73385) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Old Georgetown Road
On Moorland Lane east of Arlington Road, on the left when traveling west.
Old Georgetown Road looking west, in the years just before World War II. Edgemoor Lane intersects — at the left. The Acme Market, a grocery store, is in the center of the picture. — Map (db m129432) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — NW5 — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 5
Near Westwood Drive west of Wetherill Road, on the left when traveling west.
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791 - 1792 Protected by John Hall Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 — Map (db m140895) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 6The District of Columbia Boundary Stones
On Western Avenue east of Park Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
In 1790, Congress authorized the establishment of a territory 10 miles square on the Potomac River to be the Capital of the United States. It was President Washington's recommendation to use land on both sides of the river. Surveyor Andrew Ellicott, . . . — Map (db m140887) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the NIH Bethesda campus on this site, October 31, 1940
On Center Drive 0.1 miles south of South Drive, on the right when traveling south.
"The National Institute of Health speaks the universal language of humanitarianism. It has been devoted throughout its long and distinguished history to furthering the health of all mankind....In dedicating this Institute, I dedicate it to the . . . — Map (db m67765) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Raven and the Sun
Near Wisconsin Avenue (Route 355) 0.1 miles south of Center Drive, on the right when traveling south.
The carvings on this bench depict a story from the Salish people of the northwestern United States and British Columbia, Canada. The story explains how Raven delivered the sun, moon, stars, and fire to humanity. These treasures are necessary for . . . — Map (db m77864) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad
Near Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just east of Arlington Road, on the right when traveling east.
In 1890, the Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad ran along Old Georgetown Road to Bethesda Park, a favorite amusement spot in the area. The park entrance was located on the corner of what is now Old Georgetown Road and Sonoma Road. — Map (db m73284) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Bank of Bethesda Building
On Moorland Lane west of Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187), on the right when traveling east.
The Bank of Bethesda building, now Crestar Bank, as it is looked in the 1940's. The bank was established in 1919. This structure was built in 1926, with an addition in 1940, and is constructed of locally-quarried stone. — Map (db m129433) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Centennial AnchorOctober 16, 1987
On South Drive at Center Drive, on the right when traveling west on South Drive.
This centennial anchor, originally from a Coast Guard cutter, rested for many years in front of the Staten Island Marine Hospital where the National Institutes of Health began in 1887 with the founding of the Hygienic Laboratory. It was presented to . . . — Map (db m69105) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Church that Named a Community
On Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355) 0.6 miles south of Elsmere Avenue.
The Church that Named a Community was built on this site in 1820 and called Bethesda House of Mercy The entire district came to be called by that name. The community of Bethesda is known the world over as a center of . . . — Map (db m77895) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The First Building for the Bethesda Fire Department
On Arlington Road north of Edgemoor Lane, on the right when traveling north.
The first building for the Bethesda Fire Department, which is shown here, was located at 7620 Old Georgetown Road. It was built in 1926 and an addition was completed in 1931. The photograph was taken in the 1940's. — Map (db m129430) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Georgetown Branch Railroad
Near Bethesda Avenue at Woodmont Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
The Capital Crescent Trail follows the route of an old railroad line called the Georgetown Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O). It's all that remains of an unrealized attempt by the B&O to construct a major rail link between the . . . — Map (db m83) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Louis Stokes Laboratories
Near Center Drive just south of South Drive, on the right when traveling south.
By Act of Congress This building is designated as the (sic) The Louis Stokes Laboratories Congressman Louis Stokes served as a distinguished member of the United States Congress for 30 years, representing his native state of Ohio. He was . . . — Map (db m68454) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Mary Woodard Lasker Center for Health Research and Education
On Cloister Drive just south of Center Drive, on the right when traveling south.
Mary Woodward Lasker (1900-1994), with her husband Albert, founded the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation in 1942 to deepen the national commitment to medical science, and to raise awareness of extraordinary basic and clinical research discoveries . . . — Map (db m73073) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Walter Reed Memorial
Near Palmer Road 0.2 miles east of Wood Road.
The 1903 Walter Reed Memorial Association's vision for a memorial in honor of Major Walter Reed was finally realized on 21 November 1966 on the ground of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC. After the center's closure on 15 September . . . — Map (db m75846) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — The Washington and Glen Echo Railroad
Near River Road (Maryland Route 190) west of Willard Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
From 1891 to 1900, the Glen Echo Railroad Company, later known as the Washington and Glen Echo Railroad, operated a trolley line through what is now Willard Avenue Park. This line comprised part of a series of interconnecting systems that provided . . . — Map (db m126644) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — This Complex of Buildings and Gardens
Near Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just west of Moorland Lane, on the left when traveling west.
This complex of buildings and gardens stands on part of the land associated with Descendants of Ninian Beall, who came to Maryland in 1650. His son George reputedly gave his name to Georgetown which in 1752 was carved out of property he owned. — Map (db m73142) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Tree of HippocratesPlantanus Orientalis
On Center Drive at NIH Gateway Drive, on the right when traveling west on Center Drive. Reported missing.
From the Greek Island of Cos, Hippocrates is said to have held classes under the parent tree. The cutting for this tree is a gift the town of Cos presented to the National Library of Medicine at the dedication of its new building. — Map (db m62940) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Tree of HippocratesPlatanus Orientalis
Near Rockville Pike (Maryland Route 355) 0.1 miles south of Center Drive, on the right when traveling south.
From the Greek Island of Cos, Hippocrates is said to have held classes under the parent tree. The gift Tree was presented by the town of Cos to the National Library of Medicine at the dedication of its new building on December 14, 1961. This . . . — Map (db m73312) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Tree of HippocratesPlatanus Orientalis
Near Center Drive 0.3 miles east of Convent Drive, on the right when traveling east.
From the Greek Island of Cos, Hippocrates is said to have held classes under the parent tree. The gift Tree was presented by the town of Cos to the National Library of Medicine at the dedication of its new building on December 14, 1961. This . . . — Map (db m74964) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Walter Johnson
On Rock Spring Drive just west of Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187), on the right when traveling west.
. . . — Map (db m84499) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Walter Johnson House
Near Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just north of Oakmont Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m84498) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Walter Reed MonumentHealing Plaza — Walter Reed National Military Medical Center —
On Palmer Road North 0.2 miles east of Wood Road, on the right when traveling east.
Text inscribed on north face of monument: Walter Reed 1851 - 1902 Bacteriologist Research Scientist In honor of his great work in the fight for the eradication of yellow fever Text inscribed on south face of monument: . . . — Map (db m68989) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Boyds — Black Hill Gold Mine
Near Lake Ridge Drive 0.1 miles north of Lake Ridge Drive, on the left when traveling north.
Several pits for the mining of gold formerly existed in Black Hill Regional Park. A result of gold mining fever in Montgomery County between 1850 and 1950. In this open pit extraction site, miners used simple picks and shovels. Ore containing gold . . . — Map (db m67980) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Boyds — To Honor the Memory of George A, (Jay) Chadwick Jr.November 20, 1911 - July 20, 2001
On Lake Ridge Drive just north of Lake Ridge Drive, on the left when traveling north.
In 1946 Mr. George A. (Jay) Chadwick, Jr. bought the Gold Mine Farm which now makes up a large part of Black Hill Regional Park. He cleared the property of brush and Fieldstone for a dairy farm which was operated for many years. This beautiful stone . . . — Map (db m90477) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — A RefugeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On High Street (Maryland Route 97) just south of Market Street, on the right when traveling north.
Many Washington residents fleeing the British invasion in August 1814 converged on this quiet village. Brookeville also provided a haven for hungry soldiers as they headed for Baltimore following the American Defeat at Bladensburg. . . . — Map (db m76403) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — August 26, 1814
On High Street (Maryland Route 97) just south of Market Street, on the right when traveling north.
In this village President Madison and members of his official family found refuge in the home of Caleb Bentley, first Postmaster of Brookeville, following the burning of the Capitol and the White House by the British army. Many other refugees from . . . — Map (db m363) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Bentley HouseUnited States Capital for a Day — War of 1812 Bicentennial Brookeville, Maryland —
On Market Street 0.1 miles east of North Street, on the left when traveling east.
Erected in ca. 1798, the Federal style Bentley House was the first substantial structure to be built in Brookeville. In 1814 it was the home of Caleb and Henrietta Bentley. Caleb was the town's first postmaster and merchant, and the house includes a . . . — Map (db m76398) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Briggs HouseWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street east of South Street, on the right when traveling east.
The Briggs House was built in 1803 for Hannah Brooke Briggs and her husband Isaac Briggs, who were still living here in 1814. The Briggses also owned a house and farm known as Sharon in Sandy Spring. Hannah, a devout Quaker, married Isaac Briggs in . . . — Map (db m128850) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — BrookevillePrisoners Paroled — Gettysburg Campaign —
On High Street (Maryland Route 97) just south of Market Street (Maryland Route 97), on the right when traveling north.
On June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart left Rockville with three cavalry brigades, 125 captured Union supply wagons, and more than 400 military and civilian prisoners, arriving in Brookeville that night. At every opportunity, prisoners . . . — Map (db m366) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Brookeville AcademyWar of 1812 Bicentennial — Brookeville, Maryland —
On High Street (Maryland Route 97) south of Market Street, on the right when traveling north.
The Brookeville Academy was founded in 1810 by the town's leading citizens and built largely with donated materials. The building began as a one-story structure that was raised to two stories in 1834. The Academy provided a well-rounded education to . . . — Map (db m114387) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Brookeville Angel
Near High Street (Maryland Route 97) just south of Market Street, on the right when traveling north.
Sculptor Stefan Saal created the Brookeville Angel over a three-month period in 1994 from a white oak tree (Quercus alba) located on the east side of Georgia Avenue (Rt. #97) south of town. "Father Don" (Donald Van Alstyne) of the Marian Fathers . . . — Map (db m368) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Brookeville Schoolhouse
On North Street 0.1 miles north of Market Street, on the left when traveling north. Reported permanently removed.
The Brookville Schoolhouse sits upon land purchased for $300 in 1865, four years after the Maryland General Assembly established the Montgomery County public school system. At some subsequent point, the school began operation as a traditional . . . — Map (db m114395) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — EltonBirthplace of Ridgely Brown, CSA — 1833-1864 —
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) 0.1 miles north of Damascus Road (Maryland Route 650), on the left when traveling north.
May 15, 1862, with seventeen young Marylanders he organized First Maryland cavalry. He served consistently and gallantly, rising from Private to Lt. Colonel. Killed at South Anna River, Virginia, June 1, 1864. — Map (db m362) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Gassaway HouseWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street north of Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97), on the right when traveling north.
The Gassaway House was built about 1804 for Samuel and Anne Leeke. Brice John Gassaway purchased it in 1812 and he and his wife Dinah and two of their seven grown children were living here in 1814. Brice, a retired gentleman farmer from western Anne . . . — Map (db m114392) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Historic Brookeville
On Brighton Dam Road at Market Street, on the left when traveling east on Brighton Dam Road.
Welcome to Historic Brookeville Founded 1794 United States Capitol for a Day August 26, 1814. Incorporated 1808 — Map (db m3565) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — In This House
On Market Street 0.1 miles east of North Street, on the left when traveling east.
In this house August 26-27 1814 President James Madison and Richard Rush Attorney General • were sheltered after the burning by the British of the public buildings at Washington August 24-25, . . . — Map (db m364) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Madison House
On Market Street 0.1 miles east of North Street, on the left when traveling east.
On August 26, 1814 this house provided shelter for President Madison and his official party during the British burning of the federal buildings in Washington, D.C. in the War of 1812. The following day, August 27th, the Secretary of State James . . . — Map (db m365) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Margaret Brooke HouseWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street (Maryland Route 97) at Water Street, on the right when traveling west on Market Street.
One of the four federal style masonry houses that were standing in Brookeville in 1814, this house was built by real estate investor Caleb Pancoast about 1806 and sold shortly thereafter. In 1814 it was home of Margaret Brooke, the unmarried sister . . . — Map (db m114388) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Mills in the Upcounty
Near Zion Road south of Sundown Road, on the right when traveling north.
The streams of Montgomery County's Piedmont Region run faster and deeper than those of the Coastal Plain. Steam power fueled the early industrial age in Montgomery County in the late-18th and 19th centuries. Mills along the Hawlings River stream . . . — Map (db m114415) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Murphy HouseWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street (Maryland Route 97) west of Water Street, on the right when traveling north.
Greenbury Murphy, Brookeville's first blacksmith, built this exceptionally fine Federal style house about 1807, financing its construction and that of a blacksmith shop with a mortgage from local merchant Caleb Bentley. The brick house, a . . . — Map (db m114389) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Newlin’s Mill
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) at Brookeville Road, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue.
In 1800, Thomas Moore, Jr. and his wife, Mary Brooke Moore sold to David Newlin four acres inherited from Mrs. Moore's father, Roger Brooke IV, described as "standing below Newlin's Mill dam". Initially, Newlin operated an oil mill on this site, . . . — Map (db m369) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Newlin’s Mill Millstone
Near High Street (Maryland Route 97) south of Market Street, on the right when traveling north.
Newlin's Mill was located on the west side of Brookeville in the vicinity of Brookeville Road and Market Street (Route 97) and was operated from the early 19th century to the early 20th century. This versatile mill sawed lumber, pressed oil from . . . — Map (db m367) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Oakley Cabin
On Brookeville Road 0.3 miles east of Grayhaven Manor Road, on the right when traveling east.
This log structure, acquired as part of Reddy Branch Stream Valley Park, was once part of Oakley Farm. Built before or just after emancipation, the cabin is representative of slave or tenant housing and is a rare surviving example. Reddy Branch, . . . — Map (db m5415) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Our Agricultural Heritage
Near Zion Road south of Sundown Road, on the right when traveling north.
Until World War II, Montgomery County's economy and landscape were primarily agricultural. The American Indian tribes of the county grew corn, squash, and beans on their villages near streams. The earliest settlers from Europe grew tobacco for . . . — Map (db m114417) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — The Miller's CottageUnited States Capital for a Day — War of 1812 Bicentennial Brookeville, Maryland —
On Market Street 0.1 miles east of North Street, on the left when traveling east.
Known as the Miller's House, this modest stone structure was likely built by the town's founder Richard Thomas, Jr. in the 1790s for the operator of his mill, which stood adjacent to this house, along Reedy Branch of the Hawlings River. The house . . . — Map (db m76416) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — The Moore CottageWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street (Maryland Route 97) west of Water Street, on the right when traveling north.
The Moore built this worker's cottage, probably in the late 1790s. Moore was married to Mary Brooke, one of Deborah Thomas's sisters, and the Moores lived on a farm adjacent to Brookeville. Moore was a farmer, inventor, engineer and entrepreneur who . . . — Map (db m114390) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — The Rachel Carson Greenway
Near Zion Road south of Sundown Road, on the right when traveling north.
In 2004, this trail corridor was named in honor of the mother of the modern environmental movement, Rachel Carson. When complete, the Rachel Carson Greenway Trail will be 25 miles long, connecting the Anacostia Trail System in Prince George's County . . . — Map (db m114413) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Thomas House SiteWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street east of South Street, on the right when traveling east.
Richard Thomas, Jr. and his wife, Deborah Brooke Thomas, the founders of the town of Brookeville, built their large frame house here ca. 1801. In 1814, they were living here with their five children. The town was established on land that Deborah . . . — Map (db m114394) HM WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Town of BrookevilleTown of Brookeville, Maryland — United States Capital for a Day August 26, 1814
On Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) south of Church Street, on the right when traveling north.
Town of Brookeville National Register of Historic Places — Map (db m114420) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Valley Mill HouseWar of 1812 Bicentennial — United States Capital for a Day —
On Market Street (Maryland Route 97) south of Brookeville Road, on the left when traveling north.
The original section of what is known as the Valley Mill House (on the right) consisted of a single-story, one-room stone cottage with a large open hearth and stair to a sleeping loft. David Newlin built it about 1800, adjacent to his mill complex, . . . — Map (db m114391) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookmont — A Canal HomeChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Near Clara Barton Parkway (southbound only) south of the Glen Echo Exit. Reported permanently removed.
“When I was 7, we moved [to the] lock, and we were very happy. My mother was so happy to have a home; she was just about wild. And we did love it here, as a locktender, you know?” —Lavenia Cross Waskey The . . . — Map (db m112121) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — At All Hours
Near Clara Barton Parkway 1 mile east of Capital Beltway Inner Loop (Interstate 495).
It shall be the duty, at all hours, by night as well as day, to pass all boats and floats presenting themselves at their locks. — Charles Mercer, President, C&O Canal Company Every time his boat passed through a lock, a boat captain . . . — Map (db m103222) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — Cabin John
On MacArthur Boulevard, on the right when traveling east.
[ Panel 1] “... in our midst exists one of the most imposing and wonderful structures which engineering skill could devise ...” --William T.S. Curtis, November 1, 1897, from a paper read before the Columbia Historical Society. . . . — Map (db m22636) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — Drop Gate Locks
Near Clara Barton Parkway.
The “drop gate” on this lift lock was a technological advance over the more common swing-gate lock. It was faster and could be more easily operated by a single employee. Only a few drop-gates were installed on the canal, most of . . . — Map (db m103200) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — Lockhouse 10Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Near Clara Barton Parkway 1.5 miles from Capital Beltway Inner Loop (Interstate 495), on the right when traveling east.
After being neglected for nearly a decade, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal received new life with the New Deal programs in the late 1930s. Two African American Civilian Conservation Corps camps were setup at nearby Cabin John and Carderock to restore . . . — Map (db m105328) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — Swing-Gate Locks
Near Clara Barton Parkway 2 miles east of Capital Beltway Inner Loop (Interstate 495), on the right when traveling east.
Most canal locks were "swing-gate" locks, opened by pulling or pushing long balance beams that projected from the gates. Stone for the Seven Locks (locks 7 through 14) was cut and finished by stonemasons who were paid by the "piece." Arrows, . . . — Map (db m125187) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Cabin John — The Lock-Keepers
Near Clara Barton Parkway 2 miles east of Capital Beltway Inner Loop (Interstate 495), on the right.
A long blast on a tin horn followed by the boatman's shout of "Hey-ey-ey! Lock! Aw, Lock!" summoned the lock-keeper to duty. Lock-keepers were hired to "attend constantly and diligently by day and night," during the nine month boating season. They . . . — Map (db m125189) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Clean Drinking Manor
Near Susanna Lane 0.2 miles east of Jones Mill Road, on the right when traveling north.
This Spring is on the site of Clean Drinking, a land grant surveyed for Col. John Courts in 1699. Descendants of Courts, the Jones family, lived at nearby Clean Drinking Manor for many years. Placed by the National Society of the Colonial Dames . . . — Map (db m61517) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Colonel Joseph Belt1680 Maryland 1761
On Western Avenue at Chevy Chase Circle, on the right when traveling west on Western Avenue.
. . . — Map (db m70204) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Meadowbrook Stables
On Meadowbrook Lane 0.2 miles south of East-West Highway (Maryland Route 410), on the right when traveling south.
Hailed as one of the finest saddle clubs in the East when it opened in 1934, Meadowbrook Stables is a handsomely detailed Colonial Revival style house barn with accompanying club unit reportedly modeled after a tavern in Charlottesville, Virginia. . . . — Map (db m140241) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 7
Near Western Avenue at Cedar Parkway.
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Place 1791 - 92 Protected by Patriots' Memorial Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1965 — Map (db m140888) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 9
Near Daniel Road at Western Avenue.
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed - 1791 - 1792 Protected by the Margaret Whetten Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 — Map (db m140889) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — The 4-H Club Pledge
Near Connecticut Avenue (Maryland Route 185) south of Thornapple Street, on the right when traveling south.
I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health to better living, for my club, my community my country and my world. Responding to the 1918 national contest, Otis Hall, . . . — Map (db m116017) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — W.K. Kellogg HallNational 4-H Center
Near Connecticut Avenue (Maryland Route 185) south of Thornapple Street, on the right when traveling south.
W.K. Kellogg Hall commemorates this breakfast cereal pioneer and his personal commitment to 4-H. It was made possible by generous contributions from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, a major supporter of 4-H educational programs. The foundation's . . . — Map (db m116016) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Woodend
Near Jones Mill Road 0.5 miles south of Woodhollow Drive, on the right when traveling south.
This Property Has Been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of Interior — Map (db m81466) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Woodend Manor House
On Jones Mill Road 0.5 miles south of Woodhollow Drive, on the right when traveling south. Reported missing.
The Woodend Manor House was designed in Georgian style by John Russell Pope in 1927, on what was once the hunting grounds for Algonquin Indians. The house was originally the residence of Chester and Marion Wells, who wanted the house to recreate the . . . — Map (db m61560) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — A Real Field of Dreams
Near Western Piedmont Trail 4.9 miles west of Clarksburg Road, on the left when traveling west.
James “Jim” Wims, who acquired this land in 1919 operated a farm with an orchard on this land. In an effort to provide a local place for his children to play ball, Jim took acrage out of crop production and converted it into the . . . — Map (db m95723) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Archaeology at Dowden's Ordinary
Near North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) just south of Stringtown Road.
Artifacts from the Site Tell the Story The Dowden's Ordinary site tells archaeologists use the tools of historical archaeology to uncover rural tavern life in Montgomery County. Historical records indicated when the tavern was built, who . . . — Map (db m69741) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Dowden’s Ordinary
On North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) just south of Stringtown Road.
. . . — Map (db m43631) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Dowden's Ordinary: A French & Indian War Site
On North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) south of Stringtown Road, on the right when traveling south.
On April 15, 1755 a British seaman wrote in his diary:   On the 15th: Marched at 5 in our way to one Dowden's, a Publichouse ... and encamped upon very bad ground on the side of a hill. We got our tents pitched by dark when the wind shifted . . . — Map (db m43676) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Dowden's Ordinary: The Elephant Comes to Clarksburg
On North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) just south of Stringtown Road, on the right when traveling south.
"This elephant, a female, is ten Years old, 8 feet 6 inches high. Her tusks have been broken off, but are growing again, having lengthened about an inch in the last 3 Months. . . . She takes a whip and cracks it, eats 2 Bushels of corn in [sic] the . . . — Map (db m50927) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Our Daily BreadThe Hyattstown Mill
Near Hyattstown Mill Road 0.2 miles east of Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling east.
In operation since 1798, Hyattstown Mill was known for its “fine stone-ground white and yellow cornmeal." Destroyed by fire in 1918, the new mill was quickly rebuilt on the old foundation and remained a crucial local business until the . . . — Map (db m99498) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Tavern Life at Dowden's Ordinary
On North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) near Stringtown Road.
The Role Of Taverns In early America, taverns or "ordinaries" offered food and shelter. both for travelers and their horses. The term "ordinary" originally applied to a tavern meal regulary offered at a fixed price, but later designated the . . . — Map (db m43873) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Welcome to Froggy Hollow
Near Kingsley Road.
This area was named in honor of the large and loud frog population around Little Bennett Creek. Before Kingsley School was built, white children living on nearby. were sent to neighboring community schools. With no bus transportation, students had . . . — Map (db m95137) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Clarksburg — Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County1861 – 1865
On North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) 0.1 miles north of Prescott Road, on the right when traveling north.
During the Civil War, most women attempted to live “normally,” maintaining homes, attending to children, and even taking over traditional male responsibilities on the farm. Yet the war brought severe hardships to most absent family men, . . . — Map (db m90435) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Comus — Comus Inn
Near Old Hundred Road (Maryland Route 109) at Comus Road, on the left when traveling north.
This Property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of Interior — Map (db m118337) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Comus — Mt. Ephraim CrossroadsSharpshooters Hold the Line — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Old Hundred Road (Maryland Route 109) at Comus Road (Maryland Route 95), on the right when traveling south on Old Hundred Road.
You are looking at Sugarloaf Mountain, where the running cavalry fight that began in the late afternoon on September 9, 1862, in Barnesville came to a halt. By the next morning, the 7th and 9th Virginia Cavalry had been brought to bay here at the . . . — Map (db m1683) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Damascus — Damascus
On Main Street (Maryland Route 108) west of Woodfield Road (Maryland Route 124), on the left when traveling west.
The "Town of Damascus" was founded in 1816. This marker stands on one of the original 14 lots laid out by the founder and first postmaster, Edward Hughes. The earliest part of the town was located in the southwestern corner of "the Pleasant Plains . . . — Map (db m129441) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — A 19th Century CrossroadsDarnestown
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) just east of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
The thriving crossroads community of Darnestown during the 1880s looked much different than it does today. Photographs from that time, however, help us understand what someone traveling through Darnestown might have experienced. Darnestown grew . . . — Map (db m69722) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Andrew Small AcademyDarnestown
Near Darnestown Road.
The years following the Civil War were a booming time for Darnestown. Local residents repaired damages from the war and returned to their daily means of livelihood. Andrew Small was a C&O Canal contractor and became familiar with Darnestown during . . . — Map (db m69716) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Civil War Troops & Darnestown ResidentsThe Civil War
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) east of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
Military Hardships Before becoming soldiers with military spirit, the men endured a series of hardships and deprivations. Even with their close proximity to Washington D. C. the men of Banks' division suffered shortages of clothing, . . . — Map (db m69839) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Clues to the Past: Oral History and ArchaeologyThe Graveyard — Darnestown —
Near Darnestown Road just from Seneca Road.
Several recorded accounts identified that 20 to 30 individuals, including members of the Darne family, were buried here. Given the high infant mortality rates until the mid-19th century even the youngest residents of Darnestown were vulnerable to . . . — Map (db m69787) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — DarnestownConfederate Visit — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) 0.4 miles west of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the right when traveling west.
On June 25-27, 1863, the Federal Army of the Potomac used two temporary pontoon bridges to cross the Potomac River from Virginia back into Maryland at Edwards Ferry. On the evening and morning of June 27-28, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart led 5,000 . . . — Map (db m1684) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Darnestown: A Strategic Point of DefenseThe Civil War
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) at Seneca Road (Route 112), on the right when traveling west.
By the summer of 1861, the Union recognized Darnestown as an ideal location for establishing a major division headquarters. The town was strategically situated at the intersection of roads leading to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and to Washington, . . . — Map (db m69731) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Disease, Death, and Medical Discoveries During the Civil WarThe Graveyard — Darnestown —
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) east of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
Soldiers feared bullets and bayonets on the battlfield, but the greater danger was the invisible presence of bacteria in both Union and Confederate camps. By 1865, 620,000 men were casualties of war; the bulk succumbed to communicable diseases like . . . — Map (db m69818) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — Life During Encampment in Montgomery County1861 - 1865
Near River Road (Maryland Route 190) 0.4 miles east of Petit Way, on the right when traveling east.
Troops stationed in Montgomery County did not sit idle while waiting to fight. In addition to preparing for battle, they also had to combat many deprivations, including proper food, clothing and shelter. Life as a soldier was difficult on all counts . . . — Map (db m74711) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — The Civil War in DarnestownThe Civil War
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) at Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
Although no major battles were fought in Darnestown, major troop movements occurred throughout the war. April 13, 1861    - -  Fort Sumpter Falls April 15 1861    - -  Lincoln calls out 75,000 state militia May 3, 1861    - -   Lincoln . . . — Map (db m69981) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — The Origins of DarnestownDarnestown
Near Darnestown Road (Route 28) just east of Seneca Road (Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
Darnestown Road is one of the oldest roads in Montgomery County. Once an old trail, the route dates back to 1600 when it was used by the Seneca Indians. Native Americans Established villages, planted maize, and fished along the Potomac Palisades. . . . — Map (db m69645) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — The Signal Corps and Wartime CommunicationsThe Civil War
Near Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) east of Seneca Road (Maryland Route 112), on the left when traveling east.
A Signal Corps station and training camp was established near Darnestown in 1861. Signaling with flags was invented by army surgeon Albert J. Meyer and first used against the Navahos in border warfare before the Civil War. Signaling with flags . . . — Map (db m69854) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dawsonville — White’s Ferry12 miles →
On Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) at Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107), on the right when traveling west on Darnestown Road.
An old ferry and ford across the Potomac River often used during the war between the states by Confederate forces under Generals Robert E. Lee, Jubal Early, J.E.B. Stuart and others during campaigns and raids in Maryland. — Map (db m1680) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Derwood — Agricultural History Farm Park
On Rock Creek Park Road 0.3 miles north of Muncaster Road, on the right when traveling north.
Magruder-Bussard Farm In 1734, John Magruder established a tobacco plantation on this property. Tobacco cultivation continued with his son, Nathan and grandson, Isaac, both of whom were active patriots during the American revolution. Otho . . . — Map (db m105112) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Derwood — Bussard Farmhouse
Near Rock Creek Park Road 0.4 miles north of Muncaster Road, on the right when traveling north.
The main house was built by Thaddeus Bussard in 1908 on the foundations of an original house that had been built by Nathan Magruder around 1778. The oldest part of the structure is the kitchen wing to the right, thought to date to the early 1800s. . . . — Map (db m105115) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Derwood — Farming and Labor in Montgomery County1861-1865
Near Rock Creek Park Road 0.5 miles north of Muncaster Road.
Local farmers attempted to maintain their agricultural operations despite disorder caused during the Civil War. Out of necessity, planters paid particular attention to weather and planting information provided by Almanacs and newspapers. The . . . — Map (db m105097) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Derwood — Newmantown
Near Rock Creek Park Road 0.6 miles north of Muncaster Road, on the left when traveling north.
A small grouping of houses and outbuildings near this spot became a kinship-based community known as Newmantown. There were numerous post Civil-War African American communities in Montgomery County similar to Newmantown. There were also several Free . . . — Map (db m105151) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
On the White’s Ferry parking lot near White"s Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107).
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m809) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Near Old Hundred Road (Maryland Route 109) at Comus Road, on the left when traveling north.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m76266) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Chesapeake & Ohio Canal
On Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107) at River Road, on the left when traveling west on Whites Ferry Road.
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park. The canal and towpath are dedicated to Justice William O. Douglas of White Ferry. — Map (db m810) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Chesapeake and Ohio AqueductAcross the Monocacy River
On Dickerson Road (Maryland Route 28) at Mouth of the Monocacy Road, on the left when traveling north on Dickerson Road.
Largest of eleven C&O aqueducts. Finished 1833, Alfred Cruger, Principal Engineer. Constructed of quartzite from Sugarloaf Mountain. It served until 1924, when after a flood, commercial operations ceased. Administered by the National . . . — Map (db m15016) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
Near Whites Ferry Road 0.1 miles west of River Road, on the right when traveling west.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m808) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Historic Site[B&O Railroad Station]
On Mount Ephraim Road (Maryland Route 170) at Dickerson Road (Maryland Highway 28), on the right when traveling east on Mount Ephraim Road.
Historic Site ★ ★ ★ Montgomery County Master Plan For Historic Preservation — Map (db m4288) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Linden FarmA living, thriving slice of Maryland history
Near Martinsburg Road 0.2 miles north of Wasche Road, on the left when traveling north.
Prior to 1840, virtually all Montgomery County farms produced tobacco and corn primary crops of the era. In 1845, the emergence of guano fertilizer allowed farmer to Introduce a new Cash crop grain which provided feed for livestock. The 1873 . . . — Map (db m86483) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Monocacy AqueductToo Tough To Crack — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Near Mouth of Monocacy Road at Dickerson Road (Maryland Route 28).
Confederate Gen. D. H. Hill’s division crossed the Potomac at Point of Rocks on September 4, 1862, and marched south to clear Union forces from the area. His men breached and drained the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at several places, burned canal . . . — Map (db m65210) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Springing Over the Monocacy / The Enduring AqueductChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On Mouth of Monocacy Road 1.3 miles west of Dickerson Road (Maryland Route 28), on the right when traveling west.
Springing Over the Monocacy Captain William McNeill of the U.S. Topographical Engineers called this aqueduct “...a work which, while it is highly ornamental, unites...in its plan and execution, ‘the true principles of economy, usefulness . . . — Map (db m714) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — The Confederate Monument
On Whites Ferry Road 0.1 miles west of River Road, on the left when traveling west.
To Our Heroes of Montgomery Co. Maryland That We Through Life May Not Forget to Love The Thin Gray Line Erected A.D. 1913 1861 CSA 1865 — Map (db m106336) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Washington's Farm519 Acres Owned 1794-1799 by the First President
On Darnestown Road (State Highway 28) 3 miles south of Martinsburg Road.
Thomas Sprigg, Jr., patented in 1725 as "Woodstock" 1,102 acres here, inherited in 1782 by Sprigg's three granddaughters, Sophia, Rebecca, and Elizabeth. Sophia married John Francis Mercer (later Governor of Maryland, 1801-1803.) in 1794. Nearly . . . — Map (db m5098) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Near Whites Ferry Road (Maryland Route 107) at River Road.
Before you is the last operating ferry on the Potomac River. Early settlers recognized these relatively still waters would provide an ideal location for a ferry. The first known ferry operation here was Conrad’s Ferry in 1817. After the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m741) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryInvasion or Liberation? — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Near Whites Ferry Road 0.1 miles south of River Road, on the right when traveling west.
The serenity of the Maryland countryside was shattered on September 4-6, 1862, as 35,000 Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia waded across the Potomac River. Gen. Robert E. Lee, hoping to rally support in the divided state, sent . . . — Map (db m807) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FordCrossing the Potomac — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Near Martinsburg Road 2.5 miles west of Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28), on the right when traveling west.
A wing of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia commanded by Gen. James Longstreet, as well as part of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, crossed into Maryland just south of here on September 5-6, 1862. Other parts of the 40,000-man force, . . . — Map (db m812) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White's FordA Civil War Crossing and a Desperate Escape — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park —
Near Martinsburg Road, on the right when traveling south.
During the Civil War, White's Ford on the Potomac River was employed by Confederate troops on three separate occasions. Lee's troops crossed here in their invasion of Maryland, September 4-7, 1862. General Jubal A. Early's II Corps, after an . . . — Map (db m10145) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Emery Corners — Early Blacksmith Shop
On River Road (Maryland Route 190) at Old Seven Locks Road, on the right when traveling west on River Road.
Originally a blacksmith shop, this home was built in the middle of the eighteenth century. It stands on a tract once known as “Magruder’s Honesty.” Believed to have been built by Ninian Magruder, Senior (d. 1751), it is one of the oldest . . . — Map (db m916) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Forest Glen — Daniel Carroll II
Near Rosensteel Avenue just north of Forest Glen Road (Maryland Route 192), on the left when traveling north.
In Memory of Daniel Carroll II Member Continental Congress Signer Articles of Confederation and Constitution July 22 1730 † May 7, 1796 — Map (db m109918) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Forest Glen — Daniel Carroll of Rock CreekJuly 22, 1730 - May 7, 1796
On Forest Glen Road (Maryland Route 192) at Rosensteel Avenue, on the left when traveling east on Forest Glen Road.
Near this spot was the home of Daniel Carroll, member of the Second Continental Congress and of the Federal Constitutional Convention. He was a Representative from Maryland in the first United States Congress and served as one of the three . . . — Map (db m37017) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Friendship Heights — "Oh, It's You, Welcome!"by J. Seward Johnson, Jr.
On The Hills Plaza at South Park Avenue, on the left when traveling north on The Hills Plaza.
The name McAuliffe on the officer's badge honors a prominent former resident of the Village, Colonel James S. McAuliffe, Sr., who served as Montgomery County Chief of Police for 16 years and was a police officer for 42 years. Col. McAuliffe was a . . . — Map (db m123681) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — A Center of Culture and Commerce
Near South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the left when traveling south.
In July of 1889, John A. Belt, a leading merchant in Gaithersburg, purchased the southwest corner of Diamond and Summit Avenues for $200. On this site, Belt built a general store with a large upstairs public room, known as Norman Hall. The building . . . — Map (db m3355) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — A Night at the Gaithersburg Latitude ObservatoryLatitude Observatory Park
On DeSellum Avenue 0.1 miles west of George Street, on the right when traveling west.
Each night an observer would conduct a series of tasks as they made and recorded their observations; including rotating, aligning, and leveling the telescope, taking numerous readings of stars, weather and other factors. A typical night at the . . . — Map (db m128815) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Baltimore and Ohio Railroad StationBuilt: 1884
On South Summit Avenue south of East Diamond Avenue, on the left when traveling south.
The Gaithersburg Railroad Station and freight house were built in 1884 as handsome replacements for the adjacent small frame structure which served as a freight depot when the Metropolitan Branch of the B & O Railroad was extended to Gaithersburg in . . . — Map (db m1039) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Building The Future
On Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
The completion of the railroad and the city's incorporation in the 1870's established a solid base upon which Gaithersburg could grow and flourish. Following the City's incorporation in 1878, Henry Ward became the president of the town's . . . — Map (db m128819) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Chestnut/Meem Historic DistrictDesignated November 17, 1997 — By the City of Gaithersburg Historic District Commission —
On Chestnut Street at Meem Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Chestnut Street.
Martha Meem's 200 Acres, part of the 1793 Zoar Land Grant, was further subdivided as Meem's subdivision in 1896. The district preserves late 19th and 20th century structures, along with the Metropolitan Branch of the B&O Railroad, which drove town . . . — Map (db m101847) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — DeSellum Family Cemetery
Near South Frederick Ave (Maryland Route 355) just from Fairbanks Drive, on the left when traveling north.
Gravestone Inscriptions James DeSellum // Born June 14 1773 // Died June 27 1847 // Aged 74 years // A useful citizen and sincere Christian. Cathrine DeSellum // Born July 20 1770 // Died June 20 1856 // Aged 88 years // Her . . . — Map (db m1725) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — DNC Building2013
On East Diamond Avenue just east of Park Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
This current building, developed by Inter-Continental Group (owned by the Blessing Family), stands on a site that has been a part of Gaithersburg's mercantile history since before 1894. This 2-story building was built circa 1915 by JL Burns and . . . — Map (db m101669) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — GaithersburgSummit Hall Farm — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Frederick Ave (Route 355) just north of Fairbanks Drive, on the left when traveling north.
On Sunday, June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville en route to Gettysburg. Armed with a list of Union supporters, Stuart’s men planned to arrest John T. DeSellum as he left Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m1709) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Gaithersburg Washington Grove Volunteer Fire Department
Near Summit Avenue just from East Diamond Avenue, on the left when traveling south.
The completion of the railroad in the 1870's brought increasing prosperity to Gaithersburg. As the town grew so did the need for protection from the ever present dangers of fire. In September of 1892, a committee of volunteers formed the . . . — Map (db m3352) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — General Edward Braddock
On South Frederick Avenue (Maryland Route 355) at South Summit Avenue on South Frederick Avenue.
General Edward Braddock in April 1755, accompanied by Gov. Horatio Sharpe of Maryland, traveled this road in a coach and six horses, on his way to Frederick, Md. to meet Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, to arrange for teams for the Fort . . . — Map (db m1012) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Goshen Mills
On Brink Road 0.1 miles east of Goshen Road, on the right when traveling west.
The original Goshen Mills consisted of a three-story brick merchant mill and a smaller frame grist mill. The facility was constructed after 1737 by Ignatius Pigman to serve this small farming community. It relied on water supplied by the Goshen . . . — Map (db m72556) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Grusendorf Log House
Near Seneca Creek Road 1.1 miles west of Clopper Road (Maryland Route 117), on the right when traveling south.
The Grusendorf Log House is one of a few remaining pre-Civil War structures in the Germantown/Gaithersburg area. The Cabin was relocated to its present site next to the Seneca Creek State Park Visitor Center in the 1990s to preserve it from . . . — Map (db m70455) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — History and Purpose of the Gaithersburg Latitude ObservatoryLatitude Observatory Park
On DeSellum Avenue 0.2 miles west of George Street, on the right when traveling west.
The Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory was constructed in 1899 as one of the original four stations selected by the International Geodetic Association to carry out systematic observations to measure the variations in latitude cause by the Earth's . . . — Map (db m128813) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — John A. Belt BuildingBuilt: 1903
On East Diamond Avenue at South Summit Avenue, on the right when traveling east on East Diamond Avenue.
According to an 1880’s newspaper report, John A. Belt was the proprietor of the largest mercantile establishment in Montgomery County. Belt’s store and upstairs hall, known as Norman Hall, became the pivotal structure of Gaithersburg’s social, . . . — Map (db m99502) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Meridian Mark Pier and Geodetic Survey MonumentsLatitude Observatory Park
On DeSellum Avenue 0.2 miles south of George Street, on the right when traveling south.
The Gaithersburg International Latitude Observatory is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been declared a National Historic Landmark. The designation includes the Observatory, the Meridian Mark Pier, and the five monuments. . . . — Map (db m56966) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Nike Missile Local Park
Near Snouffer School Road 0.1 miles south of Calypso Lane, on the left when traveling south.
This park occupies seven parcels of land in Montgomery county used by the U. S. Army for the air defense of Washington D.C. from the mid-1950's to the mid-1970's In the early days of the Cold War, the Soviet Union produced high-speed high-altitude . . . — Map (db m61671) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Pythian Temple
On North Summit Avenue just north of East Diamond Avenue, on the left when traveling north.
This building was built and occupied by Forest Oak Lodge #123, Knights of Pythias, Domain of Maryland, from October 2 1911 until November 11, 1970. The building was designed by Architect H. S. Kinsley, and was built by Hezekiah Day, General . . . — Map (db m99496) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Schwartz House / City HallBuilt: 1895
Near South Summit Avenue just from Old Towne Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
The house that would one day become City Hall was built for Henry Miller, an active businessman in early Gaithersburg, and his wife Rosa. In 1913, the house was bought by Edward P. Schwartz, a Washington, DC real estate broker. Here he established a . . . — Map (db m3312) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III
Near West Deer Park Road 0.7 miles south of Cedar Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross posthumously to Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III, United States Marine Corps Reserve, for service as set forth in the following Citation: For extraordinary . . . — Map (db m331) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Serving the Community's Health Care Needs
Near South Summit Avenue near East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
In 1893, Dr. Elisha C. Etchison purchased the northwest corner property at Diamond and Summit Avenues from John B. Diamond and opened a pharmacy / drug store. Although the business at this site has changed owners several times over the years, there . . . — Map (db m3354) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Summit Hall Farm
Near South Frederick Ave (Maryland Route 355) 0.1 miles north of Fairbanks Drive, on the left when traveling north.
Summit Hall, a 251-acre ridge-top farm in the heart of Gaithersburg, was officially named and patented in 1857 by John T. and Sarah DeSellum. The topography and 500-foot elevation with its panoramic view has attracted settlers since colonial times . . . — Map (db m1721) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Summit Hall Farm Smokehouse
Near South Frederick Avenue (Maryland Route 355) 0.1 miles north of Fairbanks Drive, on the left when traveling north.
This outbuilding located on the ridge of Summit Hall Farm is treasured as the oldest complete historic structure within the City of Gaithersburg. Historically known as the smokehouse, its notched logs and chinked mortar serve as a modern day . . . — Map (db m57606) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Supplying an Agricultural Community
Near South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Gaithersburg began as an agricultural community. With the coming of the railroad in the late 1800's, markets in Washington, D. C. and Baltimore were opened to area farmers. Wheat, vegetables, fruits, meats, dairy products, and cider could be easily . . . — Map (db m128821) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Business of Agriculture:Cannery and Mills
Near South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
As the area's agricultural community flourished and the railroad was introduced, Gaithersburg soon became the commercial hub of the mid-county region. The Gaithersburg town center shifted from Frederick Avenue to Diamond Avenue near the train . . . — Map (db m3349) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Chandler WobbleLatitude Observatory Park
On DeSellum Avenue 0.2 miles south of George Street, on the right when traveling south.
The Chandler Wobble is a small motion in the Earth's axis of rotation relative to the Earth's surface, which was discovered by American astronomer, Seth Carlo Chandler, Jr., in 1891. It is one of several wobbling motions that the Earth undergoes as . . . — Map (db m56968) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Early Years
Near South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Before the arrival of the first European settlers, the area that is now the City of Gaithersburg was a land of dense forests and gently rolling hills. Frederick Avenue was a well-traveled path for the Piscataway and Tuscarora Indians, who hunted the . . . — Map (db m3346) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Gaithersburg School
Near South Summit Avenue just south of Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
The original Gaithersburg High School was formerly located where Gaithersburg Elementary School now stands at 35 North Summit Avenue. Built in 1904, the school initially provided two general levels of education under the same roof: an elementary . . . — Map (db m128822) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The ObservatoryLatitude Observatory Park
On DeSellum Avenue 0.2 miles south of George Street, on the right when traveling south.
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Assistant, Edwin Smith or Rockville, Maryland, was assigned to oversee construction and operations at the Gaithersburg Observatory. Original plans for the Ukiah and Gaithersburg Observatories, prepared by the Central . . . — Map (db m128814) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Schwartz House / Gaithersburg City Hall / Schwartz Peony Garden
On South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
The building that now houses Gaithersburg's City government offices and Council chambers was originally a private residence built in 1895 by Rosa and Henry Miller. In 1913, this five-acre estate was purchased by Edward P. Schwartz, a successful . . . — Map (db m128820) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Summit Hotel
On South Summit Avenue just south of East Diamond Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
Built in 1881, the Summit Hotel was regarded as a trendy spring and summer resort for those fortunate enough to take a holiday from the hustle and bustle of Washington, D. C. The hotel was located at the northeast corner of Summit and Frederick . . . — Map (db m128823) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Thomas CanneryGaithersburg, Maryland
On East Diamond Avenue 0.4 miles west of North Frederick Avenue (Maryland Route 355), on the right when traveling east.
Historical Background of the Canning Industry: In 1812, Thomas Kensett introduced the canning process to America with a small plant in New York, which canned oysters, meats, fruits, and vegetables. However, historians generally agree that . . . — Map (db m101861) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — The Woodlands
Near Seneca Creek Road at Clopper Road (Maryland Route 117), on the right when traveling west.
The Land Francis Cassatt Clopper began assembling The Woodlands in 1812 by purchasing a patchwork of neighboring farms. An assessment of Montgomery County properties in 178 listed a variety of framed houses, log cabins, and tobacco and corn . . . — Map (db m70452) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — We Will Never Forget
Near West Deer Park Road 0.1 miles north of Brighton Drive, on the right when traveling south.
In Honor and Memory Of William J. Christman III Charles Richard Dale Clayton Eugene Fraley John Ault LeCompte Frederick Richard Neff Francis Frank Novello James W. Prather James Paul Purkey who gave their lives in action . . . — Map (db m137365) WM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — Wells-Robertson HouseBuilt: 1885
Near Wells Avenue 0.1 miles east of South Summit Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
The Wells-Robertson House is sited on land that was once part of the 1723 land grant known as Deer Park. William R. Hutton, a well-known engineer, and his heirs began dividing and selling the land during the last half of the nineteenth century. In . . . — Map (db m101668) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Garrett Park — Garrett Park Waiting Room
On Rokeby Avenue near Waverly Avenue.
In 1989, this passenger waiting room was taken down from its location in Landover, MD., and brought to this site and re-assembled by the Montgomery County Conservation Corps. On behalf of the citizens of Garrett Park, the Mayor and Town Council . . . — Map (db m219) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Garrett Park — Garrett Park, MDIncorporated 1898
On Kenilworth Avenue, on the right when traveling south.
In 1887, the Metropolitan Investment and Building Company laid out the town, named after Robert W. Garrett, President of the B. & O. Railroad. It was to be primarily residential, a short commuter train ride to Washington, D.C. Now, over one hundred . . . — Map (db m103292) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Garrett Park — Garrett Park, Md.Incorporated 1898
On Waverly Avenue at Rokeby Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Waverly Avenue.
In 1887, the Metropolitan Investment and Building Company laid out the town, named after Robert W. Garrett, President of the B. & O. Railroad. It was to be primarily residential, a short commuter train ride to Washington, D.C. Now, over one hundred . . . — Map (db m218) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — A Mixed Community
Near Black Rock Road north of Grey Pebble Way, on the left when traveling north.
Black Rock Mill was the center of a diverse farming community extending along Black Rock Road. Nicholas Dorsey Offutt, a member of the Maryland House of Delegates and a successful businessman and merchant, purchased the mill in 1866 and built a . . . — Map (db m131606) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — Black Rock Mill and Great Seneca Creek
Near Black Rock Road north of Grey Pebble Way, on the left when traveling north.
Milling Comes to Great Seneca Creek In 1811 Thomas Hilleary purchased 355 acres of land here on Great Seneca Creek. Four years later he opened Black Rock Mill. an inscription on the east side of the mill reads "Black Rock Mill T.H. 1815." . . . — Map (db m131605) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — How the Mill Worked
Near Black Rock Road north of Grey Pebble Way, on the left when traveling north.
Black Rock Mill was powered by a water wheel. Water falling onto the wheel from above caused the wheel to rotate. The turning wheel powered a millstone. The millstone had two parts: a moving top stone, and a fixed bottom stone. Both stones had . . . — Map (db m131608) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — Liberty Mill — “Germantown Historic District 1873-1930” —
On Walter Johnson Road at Bowman Mill Drive on Walter Johnson Road.
“Feed the Liberty Way” was the slogan of Liberty Milling Company, mainstay of the little farming community of Germantown for many years. In its heyday, Liberty Mill put out 24,000 lbs. of flour each day and 9,000 lbs. of cornmeal each . . . — Map (db m69289) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — Railway Bed
Near Harvest Glen Way east of Father Hurley Boulevard, on the right when traveling east. Reported unreadable.
This hill was once a railway bed, and it includes some of the last original pieces of Metropolitan Branch of the B&O Railroad in this area. The recreated culvert built into this hill represents an original culvert that was removed during the . . . — Map (db m126712) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — Reflections of Old Germantown
On Walter Johnson Road at Wisteria Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Walter Johnson Road.
This lane of trees once led to the Madeline Waters House, built by Lloyd Dorsey in 1902 (see historic marker on Wisteria Drive north of Maryland Route 118). This house was typical of villa-style homes built on the outskirts of rural railroad towns . . . — Map (db m69348) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — The Germantown Bank
On Mateny Hill Road west of Blunt Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
The Germantown Bank was built in 1922 and was established by Augustus R. Selby, part-owner and manager of the Liberty Milling Company, and Andrew H. Baker, local entrepreneur and head of the A. H. Baker Insurance Company of Washington. Selby was . . . — Map (db m126711) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — The Musser Cemetery
Near Mateny Road south of Sutherby Lane, on the right when traveling north.
This little family plot was once on the farm belonging to William Musser. William Musser came to Germantown from Lancaster County, PA as the leader of a group of migrating Germans in 1832. He was the son of George Musser & Anna Maria Graff. The . . . — Map (db m126713) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Germantown — Waters' Mill
Near Lake Ridge Drive.
In the 1780s, the Waters family acquired acreage known as the William and Mary tract, described in tax records as “wooded saplin land, 30 miles from Georgetown.” Around 1810 Zachariah Waters built a saw and grist mill on a portion of the . . . — Map (db m99466) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — “A riotous country jumble”Clara Barton National Historic Site
On Oxford Road.
Clara Barton's property was a reflection of her personality: practical, thrifty, and just a bit eccentric. Visitors to her home frequently commented on the utilitarian grounds filled with fruit trees and rows of vegetables instead of formal gardens. . . . — Map (db m103973) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — 1921
Near Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
The Coaster Dips came to the park in 1921. Higher climbs and deeper dips added over the next 48 years guaranteed the ride remained a favorite. The roller coaster was dismantled after the park closed in 1968. — Map (db m3214) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — 1921
Near Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
The Dentzel carousel came to the park in 1921 as a replacement for a smaller carousel. Built in the Philadelphia style, the hand-carved, wooden animals create a menagerie type featuring rabbits, ostriches, a giraffe, a lion, a tiger and a deer in . . . — Map (db m3224) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — A Heroine's Home
On Oxford Road, on the left.
Beyond the trees stands a Victorian House as unique as its owner. This house was built for Clara Barton in 1891 by Edward and Edwin Baltzley as part of the National Chautauqua at Glen Echo. With 30 rooms serving as offices, bedrooms, and storage, . . . — Map (db m45000) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — A Life of Service(Clara Barton)
On Oxford Road.
"You have never known me without work; while able, you never will." —Clara Barton Clara Barton lived a life that transcended limitations. She built a career of humanitarian service in a society that did not grant her full rights . . . — Map (db m45245) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — A Trolley Returns to Glen Echo
Near MacArthur Boulevard south of Goldsboro Road (Maryland Route 614). Reported missing.
Development of Trolleys. Electric trolleys were introduced to the United States in 1888 in Richmond, Virginia, and quickly became the predominant mode of public transportation used throughout the first third of the 20th century. These vehicles . . . — Map (db m306) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — c. 1926
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
Known in the 1920’s as The Skooter and in the 1930’s as the Dodgem, Glen Echo Park’s bumper car ride was one of the first in any amusement park in the world. The Art Deco facade was added in the 1930’s. Today’s rehabilitated Bumper Car . . . — Map (db m3230) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Glen Echo — c. 1931
On Macarthur Boulevard 0.2 miles from Goldsboro Road.
In the midst of the Great Depression, the Crystal Pool provided a haven. It was big enough for 3,000 swimmers and featured a sand beach. The Art Deco style of the pool became Glen Echo’s new look. — Map (db m3229) HM

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