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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Pender County, North Carolina

 
Clickable Map of Pender County, North Carolina and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Pender County, NC (47) Bladen County, NC (13) Brunswick County, NC (62) Columbus County, NC (4) Duplin County, NC (13) New Hanover County, NC (173) Onslow County, NC (19) Sampson County, NC (8)  PenderCounty(47) Pender County (47)  BladenCounty(13) Bladen County (13)  BrunswickCounty(62) Brunswick County (62)  ColumbusCounty(4) Columbus County (4)  DuplinCounty(13) Duplin County (13)  NewHanoverCounty(173) New Hanover County (173)  OnslowCounty(19) Onslow County (19)  SampsonCounty(8) Sampson County (8)
Burgaw is the county seat for Pender County
Adjacent to Pender County, North Carolina
      Bladen County (13)  
      Brunswick County (62)  
      Columbus County (4)  
      Duplin County (13)  
      New Hanover County (173)  
      Onslow County (19)  
      Sampson County (8)  
 
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1 North Carolina, Pender County, Ashton — D-7 — Samuel Ashe — 1725–1813
Governor, 1795–1798; one of the first three state judges; president, Council of Safety, 1776. His grave is 3 miles east.Map (db m29946) HM
2 North Carolina, Pender County, Ashton — D-58 — William S. Ashe
Railroad president, congressman, state senator. In charge rof Confederate railroad transportation, 1861–62. Home stands 1 mile west.Map (db m29947) HM
3 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — Burgaw Depot — Circa 1850
Built as a fuel station, 30 ft. long, RR ran from Wilmington to Weldon, longest in the world when completed in 1840. Gen. Robert E. Lee called the RR "the lifeline of the Confederacy". Wilmington fell in 1865 & the Depot became the Confederate . . . Map (db m226332) HM
4 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — Burgaw Station — Antebellum Railroad Station — Confederate Lifeline —
Burgaw Station, a stop on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, was located on the rail line known as the “Lifeline of the Confederacy,” Gen. Robert E. Lee’s main supply route for his Army of Northern Virginia by 1864. This rail line transported . . . Map (db m191883) HM
5 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — D-32 — George Burrington — ca. 1682–1759
Colonial governor; 1724–1725, 1731–1734; opened lower Cape Fear region to settlement. His home was ¾ miles east.Map (db m30202) HM
6 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — D-13 — Hinton James — Reported missing
First student to enter the University of North Carolina, 1795. Civil engineer, state legislator. Grave 300 yards east.Map (db m226253) HM
7 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — Our Heroes — 1861 – 1865 —
In honor of the Confederate Soldiers of Pender County. Major General William Dorsey Pender, Feb 6, 1834 – July 18, 1863. Let future generations remember that these were men whom death could not terrify, whom defeat could not dishonor. . . . Map (db m30273) HM
8 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — D-18 — S. S. Satchwell
A founder of State Medical Society, 1849, head of Confederate Hospital at Wilson, first president of the State Board of Health, 1879. Home stood here.Map (db m30271) HM
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9 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — D-33 — Stag Park
Named by Barbadian explorers, 1663. Home of Gov. George Burrington and Samuel Strudwick, colonial official. The house stood ¾ miles east.Map (db m30203) HM
10 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — Town of Burgaw — 1879
Pender County formed in 1875. South Washington, now Watha, was designated the temporary County Seat. Pender citizens voted & chose Burgaw for the County Seat in 1877. The town was first named Cowan, then Stanford, & then. In 1879, by Act of the . . . Map (db m226329) HM
11 North Carolina, Pender County, Burgaw — D-117 — Van Eeden
Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany lived, 1939-46, at agricultural colony founded in 1909 and revived by Alvin Johnson. Two mi. SW.Map (db m134334) HM
12 North Carolina, Pender County, Castle Hayne — D-99 — Prisoner Exchange
Thousands of Civil War soldiers, including many held in Confederate prison at Salisbury, were exchange here, Feb. 26–Mar 4, 1865.Map (db m29205) HM
13 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — A Changing Landscape — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Soil records reveal a varied historic landscape in the area surrounding Moores Creek Bridge – creek, swamp, savannah, bottomland forest and high ground. This savannah has been both open and forested throughout history. North Carolina's . . . Map (db m218466) HM
14 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — A Trap is Set — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Patriots established a small camp here on the 26th of February. Visited by loyalist emissary James Hepburn that evening under a flag of truce, the patriots declined the chance to lay down their arms. Hepburn reported back to loyalist leaders . . . Map (db m218479) HM
15 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — A Very Bad Swamp ... — from a letter written by Gen. William Howe, April 25, 1776 — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
As you walk across this modern boardwalk spanning Moores Creek, imagine marching an army through tangled forests and swampy lowlands like these on a dark February night. Days of rain have drenched troops and pushed creeks out of their . . . Map (db m218477) HM
16 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Aftermath of Moores Creek — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
The loyalists who survived the battle at Moores Crock were unable to mount another offensive. Within four months, the British fleet, which had sailed on without the loyalist volunteers, was repulsed at Fort Moultrie off the coast of . . . Map (db m218519) HM
17 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge — February 27, 1776
Here stood the bridge of Revolutionary fame where 1000 Patriot’s under Cols Richard Caswell and Alexander Lillington defeated 1600 loyalists led by Captain McLeod. Col James Moore commanded all the Patriots who embodied to oppose the loyalists under . . . Map (db m62491) HM
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18 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Blackwater Highways — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Nearby Moores Creek not only figured in the battle but was critical to the naval stores economy, Surrounded by pine forests that generated tar and turpentine but with few passable roads to get the heavy barrels to market, the colonists used an . . . Map (db m218596) HM
19 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Boxing the Pines — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
If we enter, in the winter, a part of the forest that is about to be converted into a "turpentine orchard," we come upon negroes engaged in making boxes [boxed pine trees], in which the sap is to be collected the following spring. . . . Map (db m218597) HM
20 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Brave Patriots
Placed in grateful memory of the brave patriots of the Lower Cape Fear Region who fought at the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge February 27, 1776Map (db m226637) WM
21 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Commemorating the Battle — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
On the 80th anniversary of the battle, a large crowd watched as officials laid the cornerstone of the Patriot monument, the first memorial to be erected on this battlefield. Since then, five other memorials have been added, all but one during the . . . Map (db m218535) HM WM
22 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Decisive Victory — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
From their well-defended position, hundreds of patriots trained their guns on the loyalist Scots who charged from the shadows in the light of dawn. But bravery and broadswords were no match for muskets and cannon. Within seconds, the front . . . Map (db m218518) HM
23 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Ghosts of an Industry — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
The change in forest says it all: longleaf pines are now rare in this area. Although the naval stores industry thrived well into the 19th century, it was doomed as soon as the first ironclad ships put to sea. Pine tar from longleafs was no longer . . . Map (db m218603) HM
24 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — John Grady Memorial
[Front] Here lie the remains of Private John Grady, of Duplin County, who fell bravely fighting for his country: the first martyr in the cause of freedom in North Carolina, and the only Whig killed in this battle. . . . Map (db m218532) WM
25 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — D-6 — Moores Creek Bridge
First battle of American Revolution fought in N.C. on Feb. 27, 1776. Was a Patriot victory. National Park Service Battlefield 5 miles SW.Map (db m226334) HM WM
26 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Moores Creek National Battlefield
Moores Creek National Battlefield is the 87-acre site of the Revolutionary War Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, fought on February 27, 1776, between the loyalist and patriot colonists of North Carolina. A visitor center with exhibits and an . . . Map (db m218415) HM
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27 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Old Wilmington and Fayetteville Stage Road — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Route taken by British and Tory Army from Cross Creek to joine Lord Cornwallis and Clinton at Wilmington. They were defeated in the battle of the place. 350 were captured as prisoners of war Feb. 27, 1776.Map (db m203760) HM
28 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Road to Independence — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
It is peaceful now. Quiet and secluded. But in the early morning hours of February 27, 1776, history was made here. As unlikely as it might seem today, a violent, deadly struggle in the forest before you determined the fate of North Carolina . . . Map (db m218418) HM
29 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Road to the Sea — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Patriot and loyalist forces marched along the sandy road that lies before you. Called the Negro Head Point Road, it linked interior North Carolina to the coast, the destination of the loyalist army led by Brig. Gen. Donald MacDonald. By late . . . Map (db m218469) HM
30 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Stunning Defeat — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
By the time they reached this spot, McLeod's loyalists realized they were in a trap but had no choice except to charge the earthworks, broadswords in hand. Then the morning mist exploded with the blasts of hundreds of muskets and two cannon. . . . Map (db m226639) HM
31 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Tar Kiln — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
— This quiet mound of earth gives no inkling of the smoldering, pungent operation that occurred within. Here colonial workers extracted tar from pine logs to waterproof ropes and rigging and to coat and caulk ship's hulls. Because a tar kiln . . . Map (db m226643) HM
32 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Tarheel Trail — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
This easy, one-third mile loop trail meanders through pine woods with a few hints of the Revolutionary War scenery. At the time of the 1776 battle this was a very different forest, where towering longleaf pines dominated. Tapped for resin and . . . Map (db m218570) HM
33 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Trees for a Navy — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
… in those parts there is great plenty of Timber for building of Ships, and also to produce Pitch, Tarr & Rozin … – Colonial Records of North Carolina, 1704
At the time of the battle, patriot leaders . . . Map (db m218575) HM
34 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Vanishing Longleafs — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
This was a different forest in 1776. Dominated by stately longleaf pines and swept by periodic wildfires, the historic forest had more open glades and hardly any underbrush. By 190o the developing population was suppressing most wildfires and . . . Map (db m226642) HM
35 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — We Women Have...To Let Our Voices Be Heard — ---Mrs. Penelope Barker, October 25, 1774 after the events of the Edenton Tea Party. — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
Moores Creek National Battlefield is home to one of the only women's monuments on a Revolutionary War battlefield. Many women, on both sides, refused to stay on the sidelines of the conflict. They made their voices heard. They were women . . . Map (db m226640) HM
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36 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Widow Moores' Bridge — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
All bridges over deep or navigable Streams shall be made at least Twelve Feet Wide, with good sawed Plank, Clear of sap, at least two inches thick with firm and strong posts, Rails and Bearers, well secured and fastened. – . . . Map (db m218478) HM
37 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Wisely Chosen Ground — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
The patriot army had an advantage: Col. Alexander Lillington chose the battleground that surrounds you. He knew that his opponents, marching down the Negro Head Point Road to the coast, would be vulnerable when they crossed nearby Moores Creek . . . Map (db m218516) HM
38 North Carolina, Pender County, Currie — Women's Monument — Moores Creek National Battlefield —
[Northwest side] To the honored memory of the heroic women of the lower Cape Fear during the American Revolution 1775-1781 [Northeast side] Unswerving in devotion, self-sacrificing in loyalty to the cause of their country, their . . . Map (db m218539) WM
39 North Carolina, Pender County, Hampstead — D-100 — Topsail Battery
Confederate breastworks were constructed in this vicinity in 1862 to protect Wilmington from an attack from the north and for coastal defense.Map (db m77116) HM
40 North Carolina, Pender County, Rocky Point — D-10 — Alexander Lillington
Revolutionary leader; Whig colonel in the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, 1776. His grave is 9 miles northeast.Map (db m29231) HM
41 North Carolina, Pender County, Rocky Point — D-46 — Edward Moseley
Acting governor, 1724, president of the Council, speaker of the Assembly, leader of popular party. His home, “Moseley Hall,” was two miles east.Map (db m29842) HM
42 North Carolina, Pender County, Rocky Point — D-65 — General John Ashe
Stamp Act patriot; Speaker of the House. Colonel under Tryon in “War of Regulation.” Revolutionary General. Home stood 2 mi. east.Map (db m29234) HM
43 North Carolina, Pender County, Rocky Point — D-26 — James Moore
Commander of Whigs in Moore's Creek campaign, 1776, brigadier general North Carolina troops at Charleston. Died 1777. His home was 3 mi. S.E.Map (db m226328) HM
44 North Carolina, Pender County, Rocky Point — D-63 — Maurice Moore
Leader in Tuscarora and S.C. Indian Wars. One of original Cape Fear settlers. Founded Brunswick, 1726. His plantation was 3 mi. SE.Map (db m226326) HM
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45 North Carolina, Pender County, Topsail Beach — D-104 — Missile Tests
U.S. Navy successfully tested ram jet engines in rocket flights, 1946-48. Observation towers line Topsail Island; Assembly Building 2 blocks west.Map (db m226082) HM
46 North Carolina, Pender County, Wallace — D-34 — Welsh Tract
About 1730 a group of Welsh from the colony of Pennsylvania settled in this area, between the Northeast and Cape Fear rivers.Map (db m156976) HM
47 North Carolina, Pender County, Willard — D-106 — Timothy Bloodworth — 1736-1814
U.S. Senator, 1795–1801; member, U.S. House, in First Congress, 1790–91. Opposed ratification of U.S. Constitution, 1788, 1789. Lived near here.Map (db m28613) HM
 
 
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Dec. 4, 2023