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Former U.S. Presidents: #04 James Madison Historical Markers

 
Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker image, Touch for more information
By Sandra Hughes, May 31, 2018
Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Second Battle of Fort BowyerFebruary 8-12, 1815
American Forces 370 Men 28 Cannon Casualties 1 Killed; 18 Wounded British Forces 3000 Men 38 Ships 28 Cannon (not including those on ships) 13 Killed; 18 Wounded A map of the Second Battle of Fort . . . — Map (db m118334) HM
2Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Lauderdale County
A County Older Than the State Lauderdale County created Feb. 6, 1818 by Alabama Territorial Legislature (Alabama became a state in 1819). Named for Col. James Lauderdale, cavalryman under Gen. John Coffee and Andrew Jackson, War of . . . — Map (db m35185) HM
3Alabama (Limestone County), Elkmont — Sims Settlement
Side A (North side) In the fall of 1806 a group of settlers led by William and James Sims, traveled from east Tennessee on flatboats down the Tennessee River and up the Elk River to this area. They landed near Buck Island and spread out . . . — Map (db m85454) HM
4Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Revolutionary War1775 - 1783
I am Ezekiel Reynolds, a citizen of Concord, Massachusetts Colony. My neighbors and I banded together to defend our families and farms and resist the taxation without representation in the British Parliament. We are called Minutemen for our speed in . . . — Map (db m71404) WM
5California (San Luis Obispo County), Atascadero — Your American Heritage Monument
The purpose of this monument is to forever stand as a tribute to our nation's Founding Fathers who created the two most important documents that laid the foundation of our country: the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. This . . . — Map (db m67581) HM
6Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stamford — Freedom Shrine
Freedom Shrine Created by the National Exchange Club to strengthen citizen appreciation of our American heritage Presented by the Exchange Club of Stamford Dedicated June 14, 1979 [ Reproductions of historic American documents are . . . — Map (db m38610) HM
7Connecticut (New Haven County), Madison — Captain Frederick Lee1776-1831 — Citizen of Madison and Hero of War of 1812 —
Commissioned in 1809 by U.S. President Madison, Frederick Lee served in the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service until 1829, providing security for the New Haven port and protection of American Ships on Long Island Sound. On October 10, 1814, while the East . . . — Map (db m66474) HM WM
8Connecticut (New Haven County), Madison — James Madison Memorial1751-1836
Fourth President of the United States-Father of the Constitution-Author of the Bill of Rights-Madison Connecticut Incorporated 1826 — Map (db m66472) HM
9Connecticut (New London County), New London — The Third System
Although the United States won the War of 1812, the searing memory of the nation’s capital in flames continued to disturb the public and Congress alike. The British had entered the Chesapeake Bay, continued up the Potomac River, and set fire to . . . — Map (db m48353) HM
10District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 15 — For the ChildrenTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
From 1927 until the late 1950s, the landscaped grounds across the street were the Hillcrest Children’s Center. It was founded downtown in 1814 as the Washington City Orphan Asylum by Marcia Burnes Van Ness and President Madison’s wife Dolley. . . . — Map (db m130930) HM
11District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Destroying the LibraryStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The original Library of Congress occupied a room in the U.S. Capitol. When British troops burned the Capitol in 1814, the collection was destroyed. After the war Thomas Jefferson helped re-establish the library by selling to Congress at a . . . — Map (db m80848) HM
12District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — "The Seven Buildings"Erected c. 1795
The Embassy of Mexico incorporates the two surviving facades of a set of seven row houses known as “The Seven Buildings”. This complex has an intimate relationship with American history, and the government of Mexico is proud to honor and . . . — Map (db m89348) HM
13District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Discover DC / McPherson Square
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. St. John's Church Every US president since James Madison . . . — Map (db m112204) HM
14District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — Fleeing the Executive MansionStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On August 24, 1814, President James Madison rode out to Bladensburg, Maryland, to observe the state of the American troops defending the nation's capital. U.S. General William Winder, now sure of the direction of the British approach, marched . . . — Map (db m87590) HM
15District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — St. John's ChurchLafayette Square — Protestant Episcopal —
Every President of the United States since President James Madison has attended occasional services here. Many of them were communicants of the parish. This building was completed in 1816 from plans of Benjamin Henry Latrobe. an adjacent . . . — Map (db m39126) HM
16District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — The Dolly Madison House
Site of dwelling house owned by Ex-President of the United States James Madison 1828 to 1836 ———— Home of his widow Mrs. Dolly Payne Madison 1837 to 1849 ———— Home of Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes, . . . — Map (db m2174) HM
17District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — White House AblazeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
For Americans, August 24, 1814, was one of the darkest days of the War of 1812. After a victory at nearby Bladensburg, Maryland, British soldiers marched on Washington, destroying the U.S. Capitol and many other public buildings. . . . — Map (db m130366) HM
18District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Peace at Last!Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Octagon Once was the city residence of wealthy Virginia landowner Colonel John Tayloe III. After the British burned the White House and other government buildings, President James Madison accepted Tayloe's invitation to use the Octagon as a . . . — Map (db m87563) HM
19District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The Octagon
Built between 1799 and 1802 by Colonel John Tayloe III (1771-1828) and his wife Ann Ogle Tayloe (1772-1855) Dr. William Thornton (1759-1828) Architect Occupied by President and Mrs. Madison from August 1814 to March 1815 after the burning . . . — Map (db m40225) HM
20District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — The Octagon
This building known as the Octagon built in 1800 for Col. John Tayloe of Mount Airy, Virginia, was occupied by President Madison after the burning of the President's House by the British on August 14, 1814. Here the Treaty of Ghent was ratified by . . . — Map (db m117643) HM
21District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Francis Scott Key1779-1843
The author of our National Anthem was a lawyer, patriot, community leader and poet. His home and law office stood approximately 100 yards west of here. Francis Scott Key lived there from 1803 to about 1833 with his wife, the former Mary Taylor Lloyd . . . — Map (db m120) HM
22District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Georgetown RefugeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812 — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
In 1814 this was the home of the Charles Carroll family, fiends of President James Madison and his wife, Dolley. Carroll came to the President’s House on August 24, as Madison was returning from the defeat at Battle of Bladensburg. Soon word arrived . . . — Map (db m95914) HM
23District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — Discover DC / Metro Center
Welcome to downtown Washington, DC — an area rich in history, culture, and places to see. You will enjoy visiting the following sites located in the vicinity of this sign. Clockwise from top left: St. John's Church Every . . . — Map (db m113345) HM
24District of Columbia (Washington), West Potomac Park — Forgotten FounderNational Mall and Memorial Parks, George Mason Memorial — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
"All men are born equally free and independent. And have certain inherent natural rights... among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, pursuing and obtaining happiness and . . . — Map (db m111342) HM
25Florida (Santa Rosa County), Milton — The War Of 18121812 - 1815 — Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Plazza —
June 12, 1812 America Declares War April 27, 1813 York Captured August 30, 1813 Creeks Attack Fort Mims September 10, 1813 Battle Of Lake Erie October 5, 1813 . . . — Map (db m152435) WM
26Georgia (Madison County), Danielsville — 097-1 — Madison County
This County, created by Act of the Legislature December 5, 1811, is named for James Madison, Virginia Democrat, fourth President of the United States, 1809-‘17. The site for Danielsville was given by Gen. Allen Daniel of Revolutionary fame. In . . . — Map (db m29863) HM
27Georgia (Walton County), Monroe — 147-3 — James Monroe
This City of Monroe, settled in 1818 and incorporated Nov. 30, 1821, was named for James Monroe, fifth President. Born in Virginia in 1758 he fought in the Continental Army. He served in the Virginia legislature, in Congress and the Senate, and as . . . — Map (db m20718) HM
28Illinois (St. Clair County), Cahokia — John Jacob Hays(1770-1836)
John Jacob Hays was born in New York circa 1770. His family emigrated to North America from the Netherlands in 1720. The Hays family belongs to Congregation Shearith Israel, the oldest Jewish Congregation in the United States. John Jacob Hays . . . — Map (db m140422) HM
29Kansas (Shawnee County), Topeka — Corridor of Flags
Delaware, 1st State December 7, 1787 1609 • Henry Hudson visited Delaware Bay 1638 • Swedish colonists established Fort Christina, Delaware's first permanent settlement, and founded the colony of New Sweden 1655 • Dutch captured New . . . — Map (db m47214) HM
30Kentucky (Hart County), Munfordville — William Clark and Family
In the fall of 1809, William Clark was summoned to Washington from St. Louis by President Madison to discuss the governance of the Louisiana Purchase Territories, which he had explored with Meriwether Lewis during the Jefferson administration. . . . — Map (db m39981) HM
31Kentucky (Logan County), Russellville — 871 — John Littlejohn
Born Eng., 1756, came America, 1767. Became Methodist preacher at age 20, riding the circuits in Md., Va., Ky. Came to Louisville from Leesburg, Va., 1818. Moved Warren Co., Ky., and then 7 miles south of Russellville in 1822. Died in 1836 after 60 . . . — Map (db m123367) HM
32Kentucky (Logan County), Russellville — 2275 — John Littlejohn Cemetery
Burial place of John Littlejohn, esteemed Methodist preacher. He came to Russellville in 1822 and conducted camp meetings, services, & ministered throughout Logan Co. While he was a sheriff in Virginia, during the War of 1812, he was entrusted by . . . — Map (db m123402) HM
33Kentucky (Madison County), Richmond — 1223 — County Named, 1786 / County Formed
(Side A) For James Madison, Virginia patriot whose political foresight led to the formation of many of our basic democratic principles. He was a member of Virginia's Constitutional Convention and her First Assembly, 1776. He was also . . . — Map (db m30883) HM
34Kentucky (Mason County), Maysville — Limestone Landing — 1780's —
Simon Kenton, local militia leader, often greeted new families at Limestone Creek, emptying into the Ohio. Tobacco is inspected and weighed in the late 1780s, when Limestone is chartered as Maysville and Mason County created by Virginia. Folks . . . — Map (db m83961) HM
35Louisiana (Ascension Parish), Gonzales — The War of 1812
Panel 1Only twenty-nine years after winning its independence from Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War, the United States found itself at war once again with its former mother country. The War of 1812 began on June 18, 1812 when Congress . . . — Map (db m114827) HM
36Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Baton Rouge — Philogene Joseph de Favrot1791-1822
1st Lieut., 24th Infantry, U.S. Army, appointed by President Madison, 1812-1815. Judge of W. Baton Rouge parish. Mortally wounded in duel with another judge, fought with sabres at Pinckneyville, Miss. — Map (db m143804) HM
37Maine (Kennebec County), Augusta — 22 — Flag Protest ~ War of 1812 / Drapeau en berne - Guerre de 1812The Museum in the Streets
The embargoes leading to war caused economic hardship in Augusta, and news of war generated disdain in this Federalist Town. Citizens mounted a protest by hanging an effigy of President Madison from the public wharf and flying an . . . — Map (db m153146) HM
38Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Light House Bistro
Light House Bistro serves the community as a gathering place for patrons from all walks of life. This Artwork by Sally Wern Comport pays tribute to the area's history and the people that make it special. The Presidents Hill neighborhood is named . . . — Map (db m114544) HM
39Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Mann's TavernSite of the Annapolis Convention — September 11-14, 1786 —
Just north of this building, facing Main Street, stood Mann’s Tavern where twelve delegates from five states met in 1786 to discuss commercial problems of the new nation. Their call for another convention in Philadelphia to render the government . . . — Map (db m130220) HM
40Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — 9 — Maryland State HouseThe Naval War of 1812 in Annapolis — Don't Give Up the Ship! —
The seat of Maryland government, the State House was at the center of the state's planning for the War of 1812, both locally and in coordination with President Madison's administration in Washington, D.C. Near constant fear of invasion by the . . . — Map (db m63499) HM
41Maryland (Baltimore), University of MD at Baltimore — Monumental Lives
The William and Robert Smith vault, another of Maximilian Godefroy's Egyptian-flavored designs, belonged to one of early Baltimore's most successful and accomplished families. William Smith followed his brother John from Lancaster, Pennsylvania . . . — Map (db m6638) HM
42Maryland (Calvert County), St. Leonard — “The Commodore Can Beat Any…Barges…Sent Against Him”Maryland Republican, June 18, 1814 — Second Battle of St. Leonard Creek —
As dawn approached on June 26th, 1814, the United States Chesapeake Flotilla and American shore batteries launched a poorly-coordinated attack against the British. Under the cover of darkness, U.S. Army and Marine units, aided by 20 flotillamen, . . . — Map (db m81031) WM
43Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — The British are ComingStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Residents along the Patuxent watched nervously as wave after wave of British warships approached the tiny town of Benedict. For months enemy raiders had terrorized Southern Maryland. Benedict felt their sting twice in June 1814. Now, August 19-20, . . . — Map (db m68046) HM
44Maryland (Charles County), Hughesville — Test of a New Nation
In 1812, the United States of America was less than 30 years old, and only one generation had been raised to adulthood under the American flag. Many people still personally remembered the daring and exhausting fight to win independence from . . . — Map (db m128731) HM
45Maryland (Charles County), Hughesville — War of 1812Benedict—Charles County, MD — Site of the First Foreign Invasion of the United States of America —
War of 1812 Great Britain had been at war with France since 1793 and imposed several trade restrictions that the newly formed United States of America found unbearable. On June 18, 1812, the United States of America declared War on Great . . . — Map (db m128748) HM
46Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Revolution on the River
The Chestertown waterfront seems quiet today, but it was a flashpoint in the American colonists' struggle for liberty. Kent County, long loyal to England, found its ancestral ties weakening with each new generation born on American soil. . . . — Map (db m138241) HM
47Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — A RefugeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Many Washington residents fleeing the British invasion in August 1814 converged on this quiet village. Brookeville also provided a haven for hungry soldiers as they headed for Baltimore following the American Defeat at Bladensburg. . . . — Map (db m76403) HM
48Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — August 26, 1814
In this village President Madison and members of his official family found refuge in the home of Caleb Bentley, first Postmaster of Brookeville, following the burning of the Capitol and the White House by the British army. Many other refugees from . . . — Map (db m363) HM
49Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Bentley HouseUnited States Capital for a Day — War of 1812 Bicentennial Brookeville, Maryland —
Erected in ca. 1798, the Federal style Bentley House was the first substantial structure to be built in Brookeville. In 1814 it was the home of Caleb and Henrietta Bentley. Caleb was the town's first postmaster and merchant, and the house includes a . . . — Map (db m76398) HM
50Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — In This House
In this house August 26-27 1814 President James Madison and Richard Rush Attorney General • were sheltered after the burning by the British of the public buildings at Washington August 24-25, . . . — Map (db m364) HM
51Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Madison House
On August 26, 1814 this house provided shelter for President Madison and his official party during the British burning of the federal buildings in Washington, D.C. in the War of 1812. The following day, August 27th, the Secretary of State James . . . — Map (db m365) HM
52Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Clearing the Way to WashingtonStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Battle of Bladensburg on August 24, 1814, ended in defeat for the United States and allowed the British to invade Washington, D.C. Once the Americans realized the British route of advance, there was little time to prepare. They hastily . . . — Map (db m61550) HM
53Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Famous FootstepsBattle of Bladensburg — Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail —
As the militia – local citizens—defended this road, then known as the Bladensburg or Washington turnpike, from approaching British troops in 1814, three historical figures stood in the thick of the battle at or near this point: . . . — Map (db m73241) HM
54Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Second Line FallsStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Second of three defensive lines blocking the British advance on Washington stretched along here. It was located on the first set of hills overlooking the river. The American militia was unprepared to face seasoned war veterans. Holding firm . . . — Map (db m69353) HM
55Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Second Line FallsStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Second of three defensive lines blocking the British advance on Washington stretched along here. It was located on the first set of hills overlooking the river. The American militia was unprepared to face seasoned war veterans. Holding firm . . . — Map (db m73131) HM
56Maryland (Prince George's County), Glenn Dale — MariettaHome of Gabriel Duvall — (1752-1844) —
Judge Gabriel Duvall built Marietta in 1812-13 and in the 1830s added a two-story wing on the north side. Duvall was distinguished for a lifetime of public service which included election to the Maryland state legislature and the United States . . . — Map (db m3630) HM
57Maryland (Prince George's County), Oxon Hill — The Burning of Washington, D.C.Oxon Hill Farm - Oxon Cove Park
“I cannot express to you the distress it has occasioned at the Battle of Bladensburg. We heard every fire. …Our house was shook repeatedly by the firing upon forts and bridges, and illuminated by the fires in our Capital.” . . . — Map (db m48949) HM
58Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — Captain Paul Cuffe
Captain Paul Cuffe Paul Cuffe (1759-1817) was a sea captain, merchant, philanthropist, community leader, civil rights advocate and abolitionist. Here are some significant details about his life. Westport, MA: site of the . . . — Map (db m77468) HM
59Massachusetts (Essex County), Marblehead — Fort Sewall
[ left panel ] Welcome – You Are Entering Fort Sewall Marblehead Massachusetts Fort Sewall is a unique earthwork fortification positioned to defend Marblehead for over three centuries. In 1644 the provincial government granted . . . — Map (db m36601) HM
60Massachusetts (Essex County), Marblehead — Marblehead LightLatitude 42 Degrees 30' 20" N Longitude 70 Degrees 50' 03" W
[Top Marker] In July of 1789, Representative Elbridge Gerry, native of Marblehead, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and Vice President of the United States under President James Madison, filed H.R. Bill 12 in Congress, . . . — Map (db m21453) HM
61New Jersey (Mercer County), Princeton — John Witherspoon1723 - 1794
Preacher “One of the most useful qualifications of a good minister is that he have a lively sense of religion upon his own heart.”             John Witherspoon Born in Gifford, Scotland, in 1723, Witherspoon was educated at the . . . — Map (db m44842) HM
62New Jersey (Monmouth County), Matawan — Philip Morin Freneau1752 – 1832 — "Poet of the Revolution" —
Eloquently fired the spirit of the people with poems and ballads promoting the cause of liberty. Friend of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, published the Jersey Chronicle, first newspaper in Monmouth County. — Map (db m76324) HM
63New Jersey (Morris County), Madison — James Madison1751 ---- 1836
4th President of the United States Dedicated 2003 President Madison Our namesake. Madison, CT. & N.J. [ Back of Monument: ] From ‘Bottle Hill’ to ‘Madison’ in 1834. This monument is hereby presented through the generosity of the Mayor and . . . — Map (db m33505) HM
64New York (Erie County), Buffalo — Niagara River and her Ships
Fitting the Ships of War at the Scajaquada Creek Boat Yard In the early 1800s, the United States being a country of less than 50 years, began to recognize the need to have military transport routes to connect and supply its forts. The waterways . . . — Map (db m97917) HM
65New York (New York County), New York — Daniel D. TompkinsA Great American
Son of a revolutionary patriot Born in Fox Meadows (Now Scarsdale) N.Y. June 21, 1774 Died in Tompkinsville, Staten Island N.Y. June 11, 1825 Governor of New York State 1807-1817 — Vice President of the United States 1817-1825 Military . . . — Map (db m41207) HM
66New York (New York County), New York — Madison Avenue Centennial1836       1936
. . . — Map (db m41362) HM
67New York (Putnam County), Cold Spring — Foundry Dock ParkOur Stretch of the River
This serene site was once the bustling lifeline to the West Point Foundry, an industrial marvel and a technological powerhouse of its day. On the Waterfront Just after the War of 1812, President James Madison designated Cold Spring as one of . . . — Map (db m44564) HM
68New York (Putnam County), Cold Spring — History of West Point FoundryA Birthplace of American Industry
Water and Power West Point Foundry was one of America’s great early ironworks. An internationally renowned center of innovation and manufacturing, it’s been called the Silicon Valley of its day. Shortly after the War of 1812, President James . . . — Map (db m71307) HM
69New York (Saratoga County), Waterford — Eagle Tavern SiteRiverspark
Site of the colonial Eagle Tavern, a leading haven of area rebels during the American Revolution. Operated by Gerardus van Schoonhoven. Famous guests included Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. — Map (db m115398) HM
70Ohio (Coshocton County), Warsaw — 2-16 — Colonel William Simmons1757 - 1823
Served in the Continental Army under the command of General Washington. Appointed as Accountant of the War Department by Washington and served under Presidents Adams, Jefferson and Madison. For his services in the Continental Army, received a land . . . — Map (db m14872) HM
71Ohio (Fairfield County), Pickerington — Francis H. Game Cemetery
When Ohio and the United States were mostly rural, cemeteries were often located on the family farm. For many of these cemeteries few or no records exist. Available records suggest that this small site is the Francis H. Game Cemetery established . . . — Map (db m66462) HM
72Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — Clintonville / Clinton Township
Clintonville This community located in Section 2 of Clinton Township, was settled in 1813 by Thomas Bull. The land was formerly owned by John Rathbone for whom Rathbone Road is named. Its early growth was due largely to a number of . . . — Map (db m92853) HM
73Ohio (Gallia County), Rio Grande — 20-27 — The Village of Adamsville
The Village of Adamsville commemorates life in this area as it was during the early to mid-19th century. The original Adamsville settlement was located on the banks of Raccoon Creek. roughly one-half mile east of this site. Adam Rickabaugh . . . — Map (db m123072) HM
74Pennsylvania (Cumberland County), Carlisle — Dickinson’s Historic Triangle
These three buildings are the three oldest structures on campus. Together they form Dickinson’s Historic Triangle. West College, “Old West”, to your left West College was designed in 1803 by Benjamin Latrobe, the architect . . . — Map (db m152465) HM
75Pennsylvania (Cumberland County), Carlisle — West College: A National Historic LandmarkWalking Tour Stop 16
West College – known affectionately as Old West – traces its roots to February 1803, when the college’s main building burned to the ground after four years of costly construction. In a bind, the college trustees appealed for help. . . . — Map (db m35322) HM
76Pennsylvania (Erie County), Erie — A Climate For War
What was the War of 1812? America declared war against Great Britain on June 18, 1812. The conflict lasted for over two years. Many historians believe that the war was the inevitable outcome of Britain's continued interference in U.S. affairs, . . . — Map (db m129898) HM
77Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — The National RoadFort Necessity National Battlefield — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
This "National Road" connected east and west in the 1800s. George Washington proposed a route to join the western frontier to the eastern seaboard in the late 1700s. His idea was later promoted by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under . . . — Map (db m342) HM
78Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Point Marion — Albert Gallatin
"...his personal Character, as well as his present Designs, entitle him to the most cordial Regards." Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia March 25, 1785 Early American Statesman In 1780, 19-year old Albert Gallatin . . . — Map (db m139472) HM
79Pennsylvania (Lancaster County), Lancaster — The War of 1812
On June 18th, 1812, the United States Congress declared war on Great Britain, at the request of President James Madison. The British had blockaded the U.S. coast, seized American ships, and impressed their seamen. Also, the Canadians supported . . . — Map (db m136458) HM
80Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — 654 — James Madison 4th President lived here
. . . — Map (db m94958) HM
81Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — Society Hill / The New Market and Head House
SOCIETY HILL. Where the past meets the present. You are now walking down streets laid out over three centuries ago. In the 18th century you might have crossed paths with Benjamin Franklin, George Washington or Thomas Jefferson. . . . — Map (db m31304) HM
82Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — The House & the People Who Worked & Lived In It
A Brief Timeline of Freedom and Slavery at this Site Before • For hundreds of years, Algonquian-speaking peoples lived here. 1682 • The city of Philadelphia was founded. 1767 • The house was built by Mary Lawrence Masters, a slaveholder . . . — Map (db m102465) HM
83South Dakota (Pennington County), Keystone — George Washington1st President — 1789-1797 —
Born: February 22, 1732, Westmoreland County, Virginia Married: Martha Danbridge Curtis, (1732-1802), January 6, 1759 Children: John and Martha Curtis (adopted) Died: December 14, 1799, at Mount Vernon, Virginia Education: No formal . . . — Map (db m89399) HM
84Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Establishment of Pulaski/Giles County
On November 14. 1809, the Tennessee General Assembly passed an Act which brought Giles County, and its County Seat, Pulaski, into being. The new six hundred square mile county was formed from land ceded to the State in 1805 by treaty with the . . . — Map (db m151155) HM
85Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Pulaski Cornerstone — Northeast
This marker is one of four which laid out one square mile (640 acres=one section) in 1841. A land grant was issued in 1809 and 1813 to the City of Pulaski and the County of Giles by James Madison, President of the United States. — Map (db m151109) HM
86Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Pulaski Cornerstone — Southeast
This marker is one of four which laid out one square mile (640 acres=one section) in 1841. A land grant was issued in 1809 and 1813 to the City of Pulaski and the County of Giles by James Madison, President of the United States. — Map (db m151145) HM
87Texas (Madison County), Madisonville — 11258 — Madison County
. . . — Map (db m119572) HM
88Vermont (Addison County), Addison — Chimney Point
This strategic point on Lake Champlain was occupied by Native Americans for thousands of years. In 1690 Jacobus deWarm build a small stone fort here. The French build a wooden stockade in 1731, erecting Fort St. Frederic across the lake in 1734. . . . — Map (db m85414) HM
89Vermont (Grand Isle County), Alburg — The International Boundary is Settled / La frontière internationale est définie
The peaceful international border here owes some of its location to the War of 1812 and Vermonter William Czar Bradley. The War of 1812 between the United States and Great Britain officially ended with the Treaty of Ghent, signed December 24, . . . — Map (db m140028) HM
90Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Wood Trades
This chimney and foundation are all that remain of the “joiner’s shop”, one of the first structures on Mulberry Row. From about 1775, free and enslaved workmen produced some of the finest woodwork in Virginia. Sawyers and carpenters . . . — Map (db m80860) HM
91Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — War of 1812City of Alexandria Est. 1749
Few periods of Alexandria's history have been more tumultuous than the War of 1812. During the first decade of the 19th century, Great Britain's interception of American ships, impressment of U.S. seamen, and support of Indian aggression along the . . . — Map (db m115769) HM
92Virginia (Alexandria), Old Town — The Edmonson SistersAlexandria Heritage Trail — City of Alexandria, Virginia Est. 1749 —
The West End in the 19th century centered on Duke Street and Diagonal Road. Large undeveloped, the area was devoted to stockyards, agricultural shipment, and "a" notorious business: the slave trade. The house at 1707 Duke Street (left) was part . . . — Map (db m151028) HM
93Virginia (Alexandria), Taylor Run — Fighting BackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
With Alexandria under British control in August 1814, top-ranking U.S. military men gathered at this high point above the city. President Madison conferred with Secretary of the Navy William Jones, Brigadier General John Hungerford, and U.S. Navy . . . — Map (db m81243) HM
94Virginia (Charlotte County), Brookneal — 10 — Red Hill — Patrick Henry National Memorial —
One mile to the south is Red Hill, Patrick Henry’s last home and burial place. The marble stone covering his grave carries the simple inscription, “His fame his best epitaph.” Henry came here in 1794 and died at his beloved Red Hill . . . — Map (db m65398) HM
95Virginia (Charlotte County), Brookneal — Red Hill"Give me liberty or give me death!" Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775
After three decades of public service, Patrick Henry retired in 1794 to Red Hill plantation in Charlotte County, which he regarded as "one of the garden spots of the world." He purchased the 700-acre estate and simple story-and-half house in 1794 . . . — Map (db m128698) HM
96Virginia (Charlottesville), North Downtown — Historic Courthouse Square
This building, in continuous use as a courthouse for over 200 years, is one of America’s most historic. No other courthouse has been used by three early American Presidents at the same time, The original wood frame courthouse was erected on a . . . — Map (db m19723) HM
97Virginia (Charlottesville), University of Virginia — G-23 — James Monroe’s First FarmSite of the University of Virginia
In 1788 James Monroe purchased an 800-acre farm here to be close to his friend Thomas Jefferson and to establish a law office. In 1799 the Monroes moved to their new Highland plantation adjacent to Monticello and sold the first farm. In 1817 the . . . — Map (db m8762) HM
98Virginia (Charlottesville), Venable — I-3 — University of Virginia
Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. The cornerstone of its first building was laid on October 6, 1817, in the presence of three presidents of the United States—Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. In 1825, the . . . — Map (db m61101) HM
99Virginia (Culpeper County), Mitchells — Z-279 — Culpeper County / Orange County
(South facing side): Culpeper County Area 384 Square Miles Formed in 1748 from Orange, and named for Lord Culpeper, Governor of Virginia, 1680-1683. The Battle of Cedar Mountain, 1862, was fought in this county. (North facing . . . — Map (db m23774) HM
100Virginia (Fairfax County), Chantilly — C-18 — Sully Plantation
The dwelling house at Sully Plantation was built in 1794 by Richard Bland Lee on land that had been patented in 1725. Lee was the first congressman from Northern Virginia and an early member of Phi Beta Kappa. His vote brought the capital city to . . . — Map (db m216) HM

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Sep. 25, 2020