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Original Federal Boundary Stones Historical Markers

The original Federal boundary stones set in 1791-1792 that delimited the 100 square miles of the District of Columbia.
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 9 Marker image, Touch for more information
By David Chandler, February 6, 2021
Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 9 Marker
1District of Columbia (Washington), Bellevue — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 9
Jurisdiction of the United States Miles 9 291 P 1792 Maryland Var 0⁰ 37’ EMap (db m154797)
2District of Columbia (Washington), East Corner — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, East Cornerstone
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Dist. of Co. Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m190187) HM
3Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — NW5 — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 5
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791 - 1792 Protected by John Hall Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154768) HM
4Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 6 — The District of Columbia Boundary Stones
In 1790, Congress authorized the establishment of a territory 10 miles square on the Potomac River to be the Capital of the United States. It was President Washington's recommendation to use land on both sides of the river. Surveyor Andrew Ellicott, . . . Map (db m154770) HM
5Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookmont — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 4
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed • 1791 • 1792 Protected by Columbia Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution July 12, 1915Map (db m154767) HM
6Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 7
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Place 1791 - 92 Protected by Patriots' Memorial Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1965Map (db m154771) HM
7Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 8
Jurisdiction of the United States 1792 Maryland Var 0⁰ 2’ EMap (db m154772) HM
8Maryland (Montgomery County), Chevy Chase — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 9
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed - 1791 - 1792 Protected by the Margaret Whetten Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154774) HM
9Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 1
This plaque marks the site of the District of Columbia North-East Boundary Stone No. 1 originally placed here 1791 - 1792 Presented by The Mary Washington Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution and United States . . . Map (db m154777) HM
10Maryland (Montgomery County), Takoma Park — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 2
Jurisdiction of the United States Miles 2 1792 Maryland Var. 1.12Map (db m154778) HM
11Maryland (Montgomery County), Woodside — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, North Cornerstone
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Maryland Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154844) HM
12Maryland (Prince George's County), Brentwood — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 7
Placed in 1791-1792, this is one of forty Aquia Creek sandstone markers outlining the original boundaries of the Federal District as commissioned by President Washington. In 1916, The District of Columbia Daughters of the American Revolution . . . Map (db m154783) HM
13Maryland (Prince George's County), Capitol Heights — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 8
Jurisdiction of the United States Miles 8 Maryland 1792 Var 2⁰ 0’ EMap (db m154784) HM
14Maryland (Prince George's County), Capitol Heights — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 1
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Sarah Franklin Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154788) HM
15Maryland (Prince George's County), Capitol Heights — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 2
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Marcia Burns Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154789) HM
16Maryland (Prince George's County), Chillum — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 3
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Our Flag Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154779) HM
17Maryland (Prince George's County), Chillum — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 4
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Elizabeth Jackson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154780) HM
18Maryland (Prince George's County), Fairmount Heights — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 9
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Capt Molly Pitcher Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154786) HM
19Maryland (Prince George's County), Forest Heights — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 8
Jurisdiction of the United States Miles 8 1792 Replica Erected 2015 Maryland Var 0⁰ 34’ EMap (db m154796) HM
20Maryland (Prince George's County), Forest Hills — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 3
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Ruth Brewster Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154790) HM
21Maryland (Prince George's County), Glassmanor — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 7
Original Federal Boundary Stone Southeast 7 District of Columbia Placed in 1791-1792 This plaque placed here on the 222nd anniversary of the founding of Washington, DC 1790-2012Map (db m154911) HM
22Maryland (Prince George's County), Mount Rainier — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 5
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Constitution Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154781) HM
23Maryland (Prince George's County), Mount Rainier — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 6
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791–1792 Protected by Livingston Manor Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154782) HM
24Maryland (Prince George's County), Temple Hills — Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 6
On March 30, 1791, a group of six men, bundled in great coats, could be seen riding on horseback over a "wilderness" on the Potomac River. The leader was George Washington, first President of the United States, who was to approve the site . . . Map (db m154948) HM
25Maryland (Prince George's County), Temple Hills — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 4
Jurisdiction of the United States Miles 4 1792 Replica Erected 2015 MarylandMap (db m166717) HM
26Maryland (Prince George's County), Temple Hills — SE5 — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 5
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Louisa Adams Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916 Map (db m154927) HM
27Maryland (Prince George's County), Temple Hills — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southeast 6
Original Federal Boundary Stone Southeast 6 District of Columbia 1791–1792 Plaque placed in 2014 by Martha Washington Chapter NSDAR Washington, DCMap (db m154793) HM
28Virginia, Alexandria — A Tale of Three Jurisdictions
Did you know that you traverse the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia when you cross this bridge? The brass lines in the walkway mark the boundaries. They also commemorate the cooperation required to build this bridge. Follow the . . . Map (db m140997) HM
29Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria, D.C. — City of Alexandria Est. 1749
Alexandria was established by Virginia's colonial assembly in 1749, over four decades the U.S. Congress authorized creation of a national capital on the banks of the Potomac River. Once the final site for the Federal city was selected by President . . . Map (db m141166) HM
30Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria, Virginia — Market Square — Alexandria Historic District —
Wording on stone tablet to left: Alexandria, Virginia County seat of Fairfax 1742-1800 Organized 13th July, 1749 Incorporated by the Assembly of Virginia 1779 Ceded to the Federal Government 1789 First boundary . . . Map (db m167068) HM WM
31Virginia, Alexandria — D.C.'s First Building Block — Jones Point Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
In 1791, surveyors on Jones Point began to lay out the ten-mile square that would become Washington, D.C. The first marker for the survey—the south cornerstone—was set in place on this spot. Although the stone within this protective . . . Map (db m60162) HM
32Virginia, Alexandria — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, South Cornerstone — District of Columbia
. . . Map (db m154751) HM
33Virginia, Alexandria — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 1
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791 - 1792 Protected by Mt. Vernon Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154752) HM
34Virginia, Alexandria — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 2
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Mt. Vernon Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154753) HM
35Virginia, Alexandria — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 3
Original Federal Boundary Stone Southwest 3 District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 This plaque placed here on the 200th anniversary of the founding of the City of Washington D.C. Placed here and protected by Colonel John Washington . . . Map (db m154929) HM
36Virginia, Alexandria — The Federal District and Alexandria
On January 22, 1791, George Washington appointed Andrew Ellicott and Benjamin Banneker to survey the boundaries of the "District of Columbia," to be the home of the Federal government of the United States. The President instructed the surveyors to . . . Map (db m127771) HM
37Virginia, Alexandria — The Nation's Capital Begins Here 1791-1793 — Jones Point Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
After the Revolutionary War, the new nation searched for a permanent seat of government. President George Washington favored a 10-mile square territory along the Potomac River that encompassed the economically important ports of Georgetown and . . . Map (db m141071) HM
38Virginia, Alexandria — Welcome to Jones Point Park — National Park Service — U.S. Department of the Interior —
The open vistas, recreational fields, or fishing pier may be what drew you to Jones Point Park, but archaeological and historical evidence shows that this land has been attracting people for a multitude of reasons during the last 9,000 years. Over . . . Map (db m127766) HM
39Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Benjamin Banneker Park Playground — Dream Big! Explore Your World!
Did you know? Benjamin Banneker was a… ★ Son of freed slaves from Baltimore, Maryland ★ Member of the first appointed team to survey the nation's capital, Washington, D.C. ★ Pioneered innovative agricultural . . . Map (db m198327) HM
40Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 1
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed - 1791 - 1792 Protected by Richard Arnold Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1916Map (db m154764) HM
41Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — SW4 — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 4
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Continental Chapter Daughter of the American Revolution 1918 Map (db m154755) HM
42Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 5
Original Federal Boundary Stone 1921 - 1952 District of Columbia Placed 1791-1792 Protected by Keystone Chapter Daughters of the American RevolutionMap (db m154756) HM
43Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 6 — Southwest No. 6 Boundary Marker
The U.S. Government erected 40 sandstone markers on the boundaries of the District of Columbia in 1791 and 1792. The boundary survey was initiated by President George Washington and executed by Andrew Ellicott, who became Surveyor General of the . . . Map (db m172542) HM
44Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 7 — Arlington County Virginia Bicentennial 1801-2001 — 200 Years of Community —
In 1801, this stone represented Arlington's limits. In 2001, this school represents Arlington's boundless horizon.Map (db m154758) HM
45Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 8 — Southwest No. 8 Boundary Marker
The U.S. Government erected 40 sandstone markers on the boundaries of the District of Columbia in 1791 and 1792. The boundary survey was initiated by President George Washington and executed by Andrew Ellicott, who became Surveyor General of the . . . Map (db m154759) HM
46Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Southwest 9
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia 1791 Protected by Falls Church Chapter, NSDAR Dedication 1916   Rededication 1989Map (db m154760) HM
47Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, West Cornerstone
Original West Corner Stone District of Columbia 1791 - 1792 Dedication 1952 Rededication 1989 Falls Church Chapter, NSDARMap (db m154763) HM
48Virginia (Fairfax County), Alexandria — Historic Jones Point — Mount Vernon Trail — George Washington Memorial Parkway, National Park Service —
In the distance is Jones Point, designated as the southern corner of the District of Columbia by President George Washington. In 1790 Congress established the nation’s capital with a ten-mile square of land ceded by Virginia and Maryland. Alexandria . . . Map (db m154908) HM
49Virginia (Fairfax County), McLean — NW2 — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 2
No. 2 Stone of N.W. Leg Washington-Lee Society Children of The American Revolution Thomas Nelson Chapter D.A.R. October 12, 1969Map (db m154765) HM
50Virginia (Fairfax County), McLean — Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northwest 3
Original Federal Boundary Stone District of Columbia Placed 1791 - 1792Map (db m154766) HM
 
 
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Jul. 4, 2022