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Former U.S. Presidents: #06 John Quincy Adams Historical Markers

 
Amistad Memorial image, Touch for more information
By Michael Herrick, September 1, 2010
Amistad Memorial
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — “Make Us Free”Amistad Memorial
[ south side ] “Make Us Free” This monument is a memorial to the 1839 Amistad Revolt and its leader, Sengbe Pieh, also known as Joseph Cinque. Sengbe Pieh was one of the millions of Africans kidnapped from their homes and . . . — Map (db m48428) HM
2Connecticut (New London County), New London — First Step to Freedom
On this site, August 29. 1839, federal investigative inquiry indicted 38 enslaved Mende Africans accused of revolt on the high seas and murder of the Captain and cook of the Spanish slave ship Amistad which was captured and brought into New London . . . — Map (db m66444) HM
3District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 16 — Building a Better NeighborhoodRoads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Across the street you can see the Marie H. Reed Community Learning Center. It opened in 1977 on the former sites of Morgan Community School and Happy Hollow Playground. Both the Adams and Morgan elementary schools became "community schools" . . . — Map (db m130703) HM
4District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 2 — Meridian Hill/Malcolm X ParkRoads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
Long before Europeans arrived, Meridian Hill was a sacred place for Native Americans. As recently as 1992, a delegation of Native Americans walked across the continent to this park to mourn the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival. They were . . . — Map (db m130706) HM
5District of Columbia (Washington), Adams Morgan — 11 — Walter Pierce ParkRoads to Diversity — Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —
The Rock Creek Valley, once home to Native Americans, had attracted European settlers by 1703. Before he became president in 1825, John Quincy Adams purchased Adams Mills on Rock Creek from his cousin. The mills, just down the hill, processed . . . — Map (db m130713) HM
6District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 12 — Christ Church and Its ParishionersTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail —
This is Christ Church, Washington Parish, the first Episcopal church established in Washington City (1794), and attended by Presidents Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams. At first Christ Church met in a nearby tobacco warehouse. In 1806 . . . — Map (db m130727) HM
7District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — White House Kitchen GardenNational Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
”. . . Now I shall plant, if at all, more for the public than for myself.” John Quincy Adams, diary entry for July 5, 1826, shortly before beginning the first major planting program at the White House. Massachusetts . . . — Map (db m61677) HM
8District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Marquis de Lafayette Hall
Dedicated in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834), a hero of the American Revolution, defender of liberty, statesman, and good friend of George Washington. In 1777 the 20-year old Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, Marquis . . . — Map (db m95180) HM
9District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.3 — Senator Daniel WebsterCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail —
“Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable,” Senator Daniel Webster, January 1830 Senator Daniel Webster, eloquent advocate for the preservation of the Union and a political giant . . . — Map (db m29708) HM
10Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-224 — Eastern Boundary of Lafayette Land GrantN.E. Corner 3 mi. North S.E. Corner 3 mi. South
Side 1 During the American War of Independence, the Marquis de Lafayette came from France to the United States to offer not only his personal services as a major general in the Continental Army but also some $200,000 of his private fortune . . . — Map (db m146794) HM
11Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-225 — Northern Boundary of Lafayette Land GrantN.W. Corner 2.3 mi. West N.E. Corner 3.7 mi. East
Side 1 During the American War of Independence, the Marquis de Lafayette came from France to the United States to offer not only his personal services as a major general in the Continental Army but also some $200,000 of his private fortune . . . — Map (db m146797) HM
12Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-226 — Southern Boundary of Lafayette Land GrantS.W. Corner 1.4 mi. West S.E. Corner 4.6 mi East
Side 1 During the American War of Independence, the Marquis de Lafayette came from France to the United States to offer not only his personal services as a major general in the Continental Army but also some $200,000 of his private fortune . . . — Map (db m146795) HM
13Florida (Nassau County), Fernandina Beach — Shipwreck, Slavery and SurvivalThe Saga of the Slave Ship Guerrero — Fernandina Plaza Historic State Park —
A nearly two year ordeal for 100 enslaved Africans in Florida ended when they departed from Fernandina in 1829 and relocated to a settlement for freed slaves called New Georgia, in Liberia, Africa. The Spanish slave ship Guerrero, . . . — Map (db m144894) HM
14Florida (Santa Rosa County), Gulf Breeze — First Federal Tree FarmGulf Islands National Seashore — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
From small acorns come massive live oak trees-and mighty ships. The live oak's dense, rot-resistant wood and large arching branches were ideal for building ships in the 1700s and 1800s. Over 2,000 live oaks might be used to build one hull. To . . . — Map (db m120482) HM
15Georgia (Laurens County), Dudley — Vallombrosa Plantation of Governor George Michael Troup
Governor of Georgia 1823 - 1827 United States Senator 1816 - 1818 and 1829 - 1833 Champion and militant defender of State Rights. This principle above all in his answer to President John Quincy Adams: “The argument has been . . . — Map (db m107338) HM
16Georgia (McDuffie County), Thomson — 094-7 — The Birthplace of George McDuffie
From these humble and obscure Georgia pinelands, assisted by the plantation-owning South Carolina Calhouns, George McDuffie rose to become Congressman, Senator, and Governor of South Carolina. McDuffie's political prominence involved him in a . . . — Map (db m16065) HM
17Georgia (Walker County), Fort Oglethorpe — Mark Thrash
Mark Thrash ===================== This former slave served the National Military Park for 28 years During the early 1900s a two-room log cabin stood not far from here. This was the home of Mark Thrash, known locally as . . . — Map (db m107119) HM
18Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Quincy
In 1804, the Sac and Fox cede their land between the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers to the United States. Nine years later, General Howard and 1,400 mounted rangers burn a Sac village near the future site of Quincy. Legend has it that the . . . — Map (db m150073) HM
19Indiana (Wabash County), Wabash — Quarters of Major General John TiptonIndian Agent
A veteran of the Battle of Tippecanoe, General Tipton was apointed to the Indian Agency located in Ft. Wayne Indiana, by President Monroe. John Quincy Adams appointed Major General Tipton Indian Commissionder to oversee treaties with the Indians . . . — Map (db m76577) HM
20Kentucky (Fayette County), Lexington — Henry Clay
Henry Clay, born in Virginia in 1777, came to Lexington at the age of twenty and quickly established a successful law practice. In 1799 he married Lucretia Hart, daughter of one of this city’s most prominent families. He served six years in . . . — Map (db m119135) HM
21Kentucky (Nelson County), Bardstown — The Harrison-Smith HouseCirca 1795 & 1815
One of the oldest houses in Bardstown, the west side stone portion has to date from before 1795. On one side of the "settled lots," improved by Samuel Duncan under the lottery terms of settlement, it was the residence of both William Pope Duval and . . . — Map (db m74288) HM
22Kentucky (Trimble County), Bedford — 765 — County Named, 1836
County named, 1836, for Robert Trimble, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, 1826-28, appointed by Pres. John Quincy Adams. Born in Va., 1777, came to Ky., 1780. Capt., Bourbon County regiment, 1796. Practiced law in Paris, Ky., 1800. Member State . . . — Map (db m136154) HM
23Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandTown Map and Directory
Downtown Cumberland The Flood of March 29, 1924 inflicted almost $5 million worth of destruction in the City of Cumberland. Telephone, telegraph, roads and electric wires were washed away. Though not as bad, another flood occurred on May 12th . . . — Map (db m139111) HM
24Maryland (Calvert County), St. Leonard — John Stuart SkinnerWitness to Fort’s Bombardment
“Ruffian, Patriot, and Philanthropist…” John Quincy Adams. Born in Calvert County, by 1813 John Stuart Skinner was a Purser for the U.S. Navy, in charge of purchases and accounts for the United States Chesapeake Flotilla. When the . . . — Map (db m81064) HM
25Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — 40 Members of the Col. John Addison Family
Here is the final resting place of 40 members of the Col. John Addison family, some of Maryland's earliest colonial settlers. Their story began when Col. John Addison, the Emigrant (1634 – 1706) arrived on Maryland shores from England (1667). . . . — Map (db m144137) HM
26Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians In The Civil WarCongressman James Dixon Roman 1809-1867
This building was Congressman Roman's home from the time he purchased it in 1845 until his death in 1867. A prominent member of the Whig Party, Roman was elected to the House of Representatives during the 30th Congress (1847-1849). He declined . . . — Map (db m45185) HM
27Massachusetts (Hampden County), Springfield — Old First ChurchFirst Church of Christ, CongregationalFounded in 1637
In the spring of 1636, a small band of early settlers from Roxbury, Massachusetts ventured up the Connecticut River to settle in Springfield, then known by its Indian name of Agawam. Together they executed an agreement which in part reads: "Wee . . . — Map (db m158500) HM
28Massachusetts (Norfolk County), Quincy — Abigail AdamsAdams Nat’l Hist Park — Quincy, Mass —
“Improve your understanding for acquiring useful knowledge and virtue, such as will render you an ornament to society, an Honour to your Country, and a Blessing to Your parents.” Abigail Adams in a letter to her 10-year-old . . . — Map (db m18502) HM
29Massachusetts (Norfolk County), Quincy — Abigail Adams Cairn
From this spot, with her son, John Quincy Adams, then a boy of seven, by her side, Abigail Adams watched the smoke of burning Charleston, while listening to the guns of Bunker Hill. Saturday, 17 June, 1775. < Lower Marker : > The Adams . . . — Map (db m107409) HM
30Massachusetts (Norfolk County), Quincy — Adams National Historical Park
John Adams John Quincy Adams Birthplaces — Map (db m40653) HM
31Massachusetts (Norfolk County), Quincy — Three Adams Brothers
In memory of Three Brothers who lived and died in the service of their Country. Sons of Thomas Boylston and Ann Harrod Adams ———————————— Thomas Boylston . . . — Map (db m119177) WM
32Massachusetts (Norfolk County), Quincy — United First Parish Church
Within this church are the tombs of two Presidents of the United States and their wives John Adams – Second President 1735 1826 Abigail Adams 1744 1818 their son John Quincy Adams – Sixth President 1767 1848 Louisa Catherine Adams 1775 . . . — Map (db m18051) HM
33Massachusetts (Plymouth County), Mattapoisett — Ned's Point LightHistorically Speaking ...
1835 Congressman John Quincy Adams, representing the Plymouth County District, recommended to the government that a lighthouse be built in Mattapoisett. 1837 Barnabus Hiller sold four acres at Ned's point to . . . — Map (db m88157) HM
34Massachusetts (Suffolk County), Boston — John Quincy Adams
. . . — Map (db m56643) HM
35Michigan (St. Clair County), Marine City — L0546 — Holy Cross Parish
Father Gabriel Richard received this triangular plot of land by way of a grant from President John Quincy Adams on April 1, 1825. This area, known as Catholic Point, contains, among other buildings a church, a rectory, a convent, the former high . . . — Map (db m41196) HM
36Michigan (Washtenaw County), Ypsilanti — YC-48 — Town Hall School
The Town Hall School built on the Geddes farm, carries with it a rich family and educational tradition. The first Geddes came to this area in 1824 and the family possesses the 1827 deed to the farm signed by President John Quincy Adams. In 1852, . . . — Map (db m95367) HM
37Missouri (St. Louis), Downtown — Action and ReactionJefferson National Expansion Memorial — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
I am threatened with violence and death because I dare to advocate, in any way, the cause of the oppressed...And I am prepared to abide the consequences. Elijah P. Lovejoy, 1835 Elijah Lovejoy printed his antislavery . . . — Map (db m139676) HM
38New York (Erie County), Buffalo — "...With Liberty and Justice for All."Buffalo History and Architecture — Niagara Square East —
The vista along Court Street from Niagara Square to Lafayette Square embraces a continuum of human struggle for freedom and justice. In the center of the vista stands a monument to the soldiers and sailors who perished in the war to preserve the . . . — Map (db m92834) HM
39New York (Orleans County), Holley — First Norwegian Immigrants Landed in Holley, 1825
1. Fifty-two "Sloopers," the first group of Norwegian immigrants to North America, departed from Stavanger on July 4, 1825. Fifty-three arrived in New York City on October 9, a baby having been born en route. 2. Their 54 feet long slop, the . . . — Map (db m92529) HM
40New York (Suffolk County), Montauk Point — Amistad Memorial
July 1839, Joseph Cinque, leader of Mende Captives from Sierra Leone, overpowered the crew of the slave ship La Amistad off Cuba and landed at Culloden Point, Long Island. Captured and tried in a New Haven Court, the Africans were . . . — Map (db m140143) HM
41Ohio (Hamilton County), Cincinnati — Mt. Adams
Originally called Mt. Ida, Mt. Adams was a significant section of the Nicholas Longworth Vineyard, which developed the Catawba grape from which America's first champagne was produced. The name was changed to Mt. Adams in 1843 to honor President John . . . — Map (db m113323) HM
42Ohio (Hamilton County), Cincinnati — 23-31 — The Cincinnati Observatory"Lighthouse of the Sky"
Side A: Prompted by response to his popular lectures, astronomer Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel (1809-1862) founded the Cincinnati Astronomical Society (CAS) in 1842. With CAS funding, Mitchel traveled to Munich, Bavaria, to acquire the optical . . . — Map (db m24623) HM
43Oregon (Clackamas County), Oregon City — OregonAmerica's Manifest Destiny
"We claim that country - for what? To make the wilderness blossom as the rose, to establish laws, to increase, multiply, and subdue the earth..." -- John Quincy Adams, Congressional Globe, February 9, 1846 Arguing that God had manifestly . . . — Map (db m114064) HM
44Pennsylvania (Franklin County), Peters Township — President James Buchanan
The incorruptible statesman whose walk was upon the mountain ranges of the law.”           Life long friend Jermiah S. Black U.S. Attorney General 1857-1860, U.S. Secretary of State 1860-1861 This park commemorates the . . . — Map (db m58657) HM
45Pennsylvania (Philadelphia County), Philadelphia — The House & the People Who Worked & Lived In It
A Brief Timeline of Freedom and Slavery at this Site Before • For hundreds of years, Algonquian-speaking peoples lived here. 1682 • The city of Philadelphia was founded. 1767 • The house was built by Mary Lawrence Masters, a slaveholder . . . — Map (db m102465) HM
46Pennsylvania (Washington County), Claysville — Claysville
Claysville has the distinction of being one of the original “pike towns” along the National Road. In 1817, an early settler and land owner, John Purviance, learned that the new National Road, that was being constructed between . . . — Map (db m9372) HM
47Rhode Island (Newport County), Newport — The Elms & Its Neighbors: The Battle for Historic Preservation
Demolition threatened The Elms and the surrounding summer houses in the 1960s, a critical period when the architectural landmarks of Bellevue Avenue were on the verge of complete destruction. In 1962, The Preservation Society of Newport County saved . . . — Map (db m107353) HM
48South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Lexington County Veterans Monument
Obelisk [South] "I do not believe that the men who served in uniform in Vietnam have been given the credit they deserve. It was a difficult war against an unorthodox enemy." Gen. Wm. C. Westmoreland . . . — Map (db m88502) WM
49South Carolina (Pickens County), Clemson — Fort Hill Plantation Office
John C. Calhoun's Plantation Office was his private sanctuary and housed both his study and library during his twenty-five year residency at Fort Hill. In this building Calhoun developed and set forth his most historically significant . . . — Map (db m9566) HM
50Utah (Washington County), Zion National Park — Westward Expansion
Until the late 18th Century, Zion's only visitors were the original inhabitants of the region. The earliest appearance of Europeans came in 1776 when the Dominguez-Escalante expedition after abandoning their quest for an overland route to . . . — Map (db m80538) HM
51Vermont (Addison County), Cornwall — William Slade / The Gag Rule1786–1857 / 1836–1844
William Slade was one of Vermont’s great public servants and an ardent abolitionist. Born when Vermont was an independent republic, he died just before the Civil War. A graduate of Middlebury College admitted to the bar in 1810, Slade was a . . . — Map (db m135841) HM
52Vermont (Windsor County), Woodstock — Hiram Powers
Hiram Powers, one of the most famous nineteenth century sculptors, was born in 1805 in a farmhouse that stood on this hillside. Although he went west with his family at a young age, and took up residence in Florence, Italy, in 1837, Powers always . . . — Map (db m32221) HM
53Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — The Alexandria LyceumCity of Alexandria Est. 1749
One block south is The Alexandria Lyceum, formed as a public education organization in 1834 by Quaker schoolmaster Benjamin Hallowell and other civic leaders. In 1839, the founders joined with the Alexandria Library Company to construct a . . . — Map (db m115718) HM
54Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — The LyceumThe Jean E. Keith Memorial
Built in 1839 by the Alexandria Lyceum Company under the leadership of Benjamin Hallowell, this building housed the Alexandria Library and was the scene of concerts, meetings, debates and lectures featuring such speakers as John Quincy Adams and . . . — Map (db m8607) HM
55Virginia, Fredericksburg — Hostages
In the summer of 1862, Confederate authorities imprisoned four Union men from Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County. The arrested Unionists were local citizens in good standing, but who refused to renounce their allegiance to the United States. . . . — Map (db m1146) HM
56Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — F-28 — Loudoun County Courthouse
The Loudoun County Courthouse, first occupied in 1895, is the third on this site, which was designated for that use on the 1759 plat of Leesburg. On 12 Aug. 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read from the doorway of the first courthouse. The . . . — Map (db m876) HM
57Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Temple Hall
Temple Hall was the home of William Temple Thomson Mason, son of Thomson Mason of Raspberry Plain and nephew of George Mason, author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights. The house was constructed about 1810 and was the centerpiece for the farm . . . — Map (db m106399) HM
58Virginia (Norfolk), Downtown — Moses Myers House, 1792
Moses Myers (1753-1835) was a shipping merchant who came to Norfolk in 1787 from New York. He acquired this site in September 1791 and built his distinguished Federal town house in 1792. It was one of the early brick buildings to be constructed in . . . — Map (db m35092) HM
59Virginia (Orange County), Montpelier Station — 24 — The Madison Family CemeteryDiscovering Madison
"The advice nearest to my heart and deepest in my convictions is that the Union of the States be cherished an perpetuated." -James Madison, Advice to My Country, 1834 The Madison Family Cemetery is the understated resting place for two of . . . — Map (db m24117) HM
60Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Dry Dock 1” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA —
Convinced of the need to more quickly and efficiently repair the nation's Navy ships, President John Quincy Adams and Congress agreed in 1827 to follow engineers' recommendations to build two dry docks, one here and one in Boston. The . . . — Map (db m76838) HM
61Washington (Clallam County), Forks — Fort Ross, California - Sitka Castle, Alaska - Fort Elisabeth, Kaua’i, Hawai’i
In the early 19th century what is today the northwest coast of Washington State might have become a Russian colony, an extension of Alaska, if the Sv. Nikolai voyage had been successful. This could have led to this section of New Albion, the . . . — Map (db m129579) HM
62West Virginia (Jefferson County), Harpers Ferry — The Race to the Ohio
Rail transportation in the United States began in Baltimore, Maryland on July 4, 1828, when Charles Carroll, the only living signer of the Declaration of Independence, laid the cornerstone of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the same day . . . — Map (db m12060) HM
 
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