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Historical Marker Pages Containing “portsmouth, va”

 
Cedar Grove Cemetery Plaque image, Touch for more information
By James Thomson, October 13, 2010
Cedar Grove Cemetery Plaque
Virginia, Portsmouth — Cedar Grove Cemetery
Cedar Grove Cemetery was established in 1831 as the first secular cemetery by the Town of Portsmouth. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. The four-acre parcel cost $400.00 and was sectioned into 167 lots which sold for . . . — Map (db m119425) WM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Chevra T'helim Synagogue
Chevra T'helim, (translation: House of Psalms), housed an Orthodox Jewish Congregation, established in 1917. It served the religious needs of a congregation largely composed of merchants who emigrated from Eastern Europe th the port city of . . . — Map (db m36890) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Lincolnsville
The four houses directly across the street are the last remaining original houses of Lincolnsville, Portsmouth's first middle-class African American community, established in 1890. It was an area of about 34 acres and operated as a city within a . . . — Map (db m36911) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Civil War 1861-1865” — Fort Nelson Park
Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861. On April 2, the Governor ordered the 3rd Virginia Regiment to occupy and fortify the Navy Hospital grounds. A battery of earthen works was hastily erected on the point and renamed Fort Nelson, after . . . — Map (db m83920) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Spanish-American War 1898” — Fort Nelson Park
After the Spanish defeat at the battle of Santiago, Cuba, in July 1898, the sick and injured needed treatment. The newly converted hospital ship USS Solace transported 55 sick U.S. Navy and 48 wounded Spanish sailors to the hospital. The . . . — Map (db m83924) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“World War II and Korea 1937-1953” — Fort Nelson Park
World War II created the need to rapidly expand the hospital in 1941. The $1.5 million program increased the number of hospital beds to 3,441. A dental clinic, ships service, library and a bank were added. The staff -- medical officers, nurses, . . . — Map (db m83925) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Hospital Renovation 1907-1910” — Fort Nelson Park
By 1900, time and use had taken its toll on the hospital building. In October 1907, the Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery ordered hospital personnel to remove patients to tent-covered wooden platforms constructed several hundred yards away from . . . — Map (db m83926) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Building 215, Portsmouth’s First Skyscraper 1960” — Fort Nelson Park
Building 215 was constructed to provide a much needed modern hospital and to centralize the medical departments scattered around the base. The 500-bed hospital became the command’s second primary hospital facility when commissioned in April 1960. . . . — Map (db m83930) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“The Navy’s First Corps School 1902” — Fort Nelson Park
On June 17, 1898, President William McKinley signed a bill establishing the Navy Hospital Corps. Navy Corpsmen are trained in the science of health and nursing skills necessary to provide proper patient care at hospitals, ships at sea and to the . . . — Map (db m83932) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Yellow Fever Epidemic” — Fort Nelson Park
In June 1855, the steamer Franklin put into Norfolk for repairs while sailing from the West Indies to New York. Mosquitoes carrying yellow fever escaped when the vessel docked. The Naval Hospital’s first yellow fever patients came from . . . — Map (db m83935) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“The U.S. Navy’s First Hospital” — Fort Nelson Park
In 1826, Philadelphia architect John Haviland submitted construction plans for this hospital. This building, which houses offices is now known as Building 1, was made of granite and freestone. Its style is classical Greek Revival architecture, which . . . — Map (db m83939) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Hospital Point” — Fort Nelson Park
The Naval Hospital faces a peninsula surrounded by the Elizabeth River. In 1636, Captain Thomas Willoughby received a land grant from the King of England that included this peninsula. The land was used as a plantation and changed owners several . . . — Map (db m83941) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Hospital Fund” — Fort Nelson Park
The British had a custom of taxing its sailors for their health care. In 1798 Congress established the “Hospital Fund" based on the British system. 20 cents per month was deducted from the pay of each officer, sailor and marine to provide for . . . — Map (db m83944) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Early Naval Medicine” — Fort Nelson Park
Naval regulations of 1798 state: ”A convenient place be set apart for sick or hurt men, to which they are to be removed with their hammocks and bedding when the surgeon shall advise the same, and some of the crew appointed to attend . . . — Map (db m83945) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Navy Nurse Corps 1908” — Fort Nelson Park
The Navy Nurse Corps was created by Congress in 1908, allowing women to perform duties that previously had been done by men. They held no rank and were titled “Nurse.” The first 20 to graduate were known as the “Sacred . . . — Map (db m83946) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“World War I 1917-1918” — Fort Nelson Park
When the United States entered World War I, immediate steps were taken to expand the hospital. Several temporary wood-framed buildings were constructed to accommodate the ever-growing number of patients. These buildings included 34 patient pavilions . . . — Map (db m83947) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital“Naval Burial Ground 1838” — Fort Nelson Park
There are 840 graves of seamen and soldiers in the naval cemetery on the hospital grounds. They include the remains of seamen from the U.S., Great Britain, France, Spain, Germany, Russia, Brazil, Denmark and Japan. The oldest known burial was a . . . — Map (db m83936) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — The Yellow Fever of 1855
On June 19th, 1855, following a twelve day quarantine, the merchant ship Benjamin Franklin arrived from the West Indies and docked at Gosport Shipyard for repairs. While emptying its bilge, mosquitoes carrying yellow fever were released. After . . . — Map (db m36892) HM

Virginia, Portsmouth — Court Street Baptist ChurchPath of History, Portsmouth, VA
Established in 1789, the Portsmouth and Norfolk Baptist Church served as the first Baptist congregation in South Hampton Roads. The name was changed in 1791 to Portsmouth Baptist Church and again in 1855 to its current name, Court Street Baptist . . . — Map (db m20467) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Towne SquarePath of History, Portsmouth, VA
The intersection of High and Court Street was known as Towne Square, the cornerstone of the community. The square that you are standing on was known as Courthouse Square, the site of the original courthouse from 1803-1846. In 1855 the Ocean Hotel . . . — Map (db m20463) HM

Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“The Beginning” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Founded November 1767 under the British flag by Andrew Sprowle, a Scottish-born merchant, the Norfolk Naval Shipyard is the U.S. Navy's oldest, continuously operating shipyard and actually predates the United States Navy Department by nearly 30 . . . — Map (db m76823) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“1774-1800” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Leased in 1794 by the federal government, as part of its response to acts of piracy by the Barbary States, the shipyard produced in 1798-99 the 36-gun frigate Chesapeake, a sister ship of the USS Constitution known as "Old Ironsides." . . . — Map (db m76825) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Hammerhead Crane” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Built between December 1939 and June 1940, this 20-story crane can lift 350 tons. The Hammerhead is the largest crane of its type in the world. Its uses have included lifting a tugboat from the water, hoisting 16-inch gun turrets onto battleships . . . — Map (db m76826) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“1889-1904” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
With the advent of the Spanish-American War, an era of wood and canvas gave way to steel and steam in naval shipbuilding. The first U.S. Navy battleship to be commissioned, the USS Texas, and the first modern cruiser, the USS . . . — Map (db m76828) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“World War I” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
World War I ushered in a new period of growth for the shipyard. Three new dry docks and a major ship building way were added, in addition to new shop facilities. With the focus on ship repairs, along with construction of destroyers and 110-foot . . . — Map (db m76829) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“World War II” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
The yard’s employment peak of 43,000 workers was reached during World War II when the yard bustled with activity, building nearly 30 major vessels and repairing 6,850 U.S. and Allied ships. The shipyard also built 20 tank-landing ships and 50 . . . — Map (db m76830) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Dry Docks Construction” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Dry Dock 2, first built of wood, was completed in November 1887, but rebuilt with concrete in 1933. Dry Dock 3 was completed in November 1903. Dry Dock 4 was opened on April 1, 1919, with the King and Queen of Belgium in attendance. Dry Dock 5 . . . — Map (db m76827) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Korea - 1965” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
The outbreak of hostilities in Korea in 1950 increased the workload once again. The shipyard completed work on more than 1,250 naval vessels and also built its last two warships, the wooden-hulled minesweepers Bold and Bulwark. . . . — Map (db m76835) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“1907-1922” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
In 1907 President Theodore Roosevelt launched the "Great White Fleet" from the shipyard as it began its journey around the world. Norfolk Naval Shipyard built the first flight deck on a ship, the USS Birmingham (CS-2). When . . . — Map (db m76836) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Dry Dock 1” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Convinced of the need to more quickly and efficiently repair the nation's Navy ships, President John Quincy Adams and Congress agreed in 1827 to follow engineers' recommendations to build two dry docks, one here and one in Boston. The . . . — Map (db m76838) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“1833-1862” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Following the evacuation and burning of the yard by Federal forces, Dry Dock 1 was used by the Confederate States Navy to convert the partly burned steam frigate Merrimack into an ironclad, renamed CSS Virginia. In March 1862, the . . . — Map (db m76839) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“1812-1833” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
After the War of 1812, the shipyard helped repel an invasion of Craney Island and the USS Chesapeake was captured off Nova Scotia. Gosport continued to expand and improve. The keel of the USS Delaware was laid in the summer of 1817. . . . — Map (db m76840) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Norfolk Naval Shipyard“Quarters A” — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
Three prominent structures stand out along a one-block stretch of Portsmouth's Lincoln Street – Quarters A, B and C. On an 1827 map of the shipyard they are designated as the “Proposed Commandant's House,” the “Proposed . . . — Map (db m76841) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital"Naval Medical Center Portsmouth" — Fort Nelson Park • Path of History • Portsmouth, VA
Naval Medical Center Portsmouth is known as the “First and Finest.” It was the nation’s first Naval Hospital and has served the military since 1830. The hospital complex is 112 acres and serves approximately 430,000 active duty service . . . — Map (db m62263) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Portsmouth Naval Hospital"Charette Health Care Center 1999" — Fort Nelson Park • Path of History • Portsmouth, VA
The Charette Health Care Center was dedicated in April 1999 and it is the third naval hospital built in Portsmouth. The 1 million square foot, five story, state-of-the-art hospital contains 17 operating rooms, 300 exam rooms, 120 beds, 140 special . . . — Map (db m62279) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Sail portion of the USS Thomas Jefferson(SSBN 618) later SSN 618 — Path of History Portsmouth, VA
During USS Thomas Jefferson's 22 years of service, it was both a ballistic missile submarine and an attack vessel. Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company built USS Thomas Jefferson, which was commissioned on January 4th, 1963. The . . . — Map (db m76837) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — The 1846 CourthousePath of History — Portsmouth, VA
The 1846 Courthouse building at the corner of Court & High Street in Olde Towne Portsmouth was designed in the classic Greek Revival style by architect, William R. Singleton and built by Willoughby G. Butler. It housed the Norfolk County Court until . . . — Map (db m76790) HM

Connecticut (New Haven County), Meriden — Meriden Soldiers Memorial
To The Memory Of Our Fellow Citizens Who Died In Defense of the Government. 1861 – 65 Erected     1873 [ battle names on the column ] Antietam • Gettysburg • Vicksburg • Fort Fisher • Appomattox • Atlanta • New Berne • . . . — Map (db m27336) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Charlotte — L 56 — Confederate Navy Yard
Established here 1862 following its removal from Portsmouth, Va. Produced ordnance for the Confederate Navy. — Map (db m125678) HM

Virginia, Portsmouth — Lightship Portsmouth101-WAL524
Lightships were “floating lighthouses.” They were anchored at the entrances to ports, bays and outer limits to off-lying danger areas such as shoals and reefs. These vessels served as aids to navigation. Lightships were originally . . . — Map (db m20407) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Lightship Portsmouth101-WAL524
Lightships and the City of Portsmouth go back to the beginning of lightship duty in this country in 1820. The first lightship was established off Craney Island at the mouth of the Elizabeth River. Working lightships were constant visitors on the . . . — Map (db m20408) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — Seaboard Air Line Railroad
The Portsmouth & Roanoke Railroad was incorporated in March 1832 and began operations in July 1834 when the first train, pulled by horses, ran a full circuit from Portsmouth to Suffolk. A locomotive replaced the horses later that year. By late 1836, . . . — Map (db m20387) HM
Virginia, Portsmouth — The Coast Guard
The City of Portsmouth has had a long history of supporting U.S. Coast Guard operations. Today it serves as a center for Coast Guard regional administration and operational oversight through the Atlantic Area Command headquarters, Fifth District . . . — Map (db m20431) HM

Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 5 — Confederate ForcesMunford’s Brigade and Mahone’s Brigade
Confederate Forces Col. T. T. Munford, 2nd Virginia Cavalry, Commanding, Munford’s Brigade, 2nd & 12th Virginia Cavalry. Mahone’s Brigade, Lt. Col. Wm. A. Parham, 41st Virginia, Commanding. 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Virginia Infantry . . . — Map (db m2045) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 3 — Crampton’s Pass Tablet C.P. 3
(September 14, 1862) Upon the approach of the Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, from Jefferson, Col. T. T. Munford, Commanding Cavalry Brigade, prepared to dispute its advance through this Pass. Mahone’s Brigade, Lt. Col. Parham, Commanding, was . . . — Map (db m2023) HM

Rhode Island (Washington County), Narragansett — The S.S. Black Point
The S.S. Black Point was built in 1918 at Camden, New Jersey as a coal collier. She was owned by Sprague Steamship Co. of Boston, Mass. And was 369’ long 55’ at the beam and was carrying 7500 tons of coal. Captain Charles Prior was master with a . . . — Map (db m76004) HM WM

New York (Ontario County), Bloomfield — East Bloomfield to the Memory of her Sons
East Bloomfield To the memory of her sons who died in defence of the Union 1861-5 Peninsula Richmond 85. Regt. N.Y. Vols. Co. B. Lieut. Amos Brunson Died. Bottoms Bridge, Va. May 24, 1862 Serg. John Buell Died. Andersonville, Ga. Sept. . . . — Map (db m125793) WM

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