Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
63 entries match your criteria.
 
 

Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation Markers ✡️ Historical Markers

This series is for historical markers associated with (funded by or installed, in part or in whole), by the Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation.
 
View of marker and some of the current businesses nearby. image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, September 20, 2019
View of marker and some of the current businesses nearby.
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 9 — "Trade With Your Friends"The Tuskegee Boycott — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
In 1957, local government officials in Tuskegee, Alabama sought to gerrymander the city's limits in an attempt to diminish the number of black votes in upcoming elections. Alabama state senator Sam Engelhardt sponsored Act 140, which transformed . . . — Map (db m139876) HM
2Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 7 — Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Churches within the African American community played an important role during the civil rights movement. They were places beyond control of white power structure, as well as locations where people could express themselves without reprisal. They . . . — Map (db m139884) HM
3Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 13 — Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church developed out of the Tuskegee Baptist Church, originally organized in 1842. Although both whites and blacks (slaves) initially worshipped at the same location, the white congregants built a new facility in 1858, . . . — Map (db m139880) HM
4Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 10 — Rosa Parks — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (1913 – 2005) was an iconic activist during the mid twentieth century civil rights movement. Born in Tuskegee, Parks later moved with her mother to Pine Level located near Montgomery, Alabama. She was encouraged by . . . — Map (db m134670) HM
5Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 12 — Samuel "Sammy" Leamon Younge, Jr. — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Samuel "Sammy" Leamon Younge, Jr. (1944-1966), a civil rights and voting rights activist, was the first African American university student killed during the civil rights movement. A Tuskegee native, Younge was attending Tuskegee University when . . . — Map (db m139875) HM
6Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 11 — Tuskegee High School — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
In August of 1963, the United States District Court M. D. Alabama sided with the plaintiff in Lee v. Macon County Board of Education. This pivotal civil rights case involved the integration of, the all-white Tuskegee High School (located on . . . — Map (db m139878) HM
7Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 8 — William P. Mitchell(1912-1986) — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Following World War II, Tuskegee's black population began to grow, and many sought to register to vote. Perceiving a threat to their political power, white politicians tried to control the black vote through a variety of techniques. These actions . . . — Map (db m139877) HM
8Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 1 — Amelia Boynton Robinson — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Amelia Boynton Robinson (1911 2015) was a voting rights activist and civil rights icon. Born on August 18, 1911, in Savannah, Georgia, she received her bachelor's degree in home economics from Tuskegee University in 1927. In 1934, Mrs. Boynton . . . — Map (db m139890) HM
9Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 2 — Charles Goode Gomillion — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Charles Goode Gomillion (1900-1995) was born on April 1, 1900, in Johnston, South Carolina. He joined the faculty at Tuskegee University in 1928, where he served as dean of students and chair of the social sciences department. He was president of . . . — Map (db m140006) HM
10Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 6 — Jessie Parkhurst Guzman — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Jessie Parkhurst Guzman (1898-1996) was born in Savannah, Georgia, educated at Howard University (BA, 1919) and Columbia University (MA, 1924), and worked at Tuskegee University for over forty years. During Guzman's time at Tuskegee University, she . . . — Map (db m139885) HM
11Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 4 — Julius Rosenwald — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) was a Jewish multimillionaire merchant and one of the founders (1906) of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, then the largest department store in the United States. Rosenwald was a member of the Tuskegee University Board of . . . — Map (db m134671) HM
12Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 3 — The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League (TIAL) was a student-based organization started in 1963 and reorganized in 1965 during the school integration crises. It originally sought to gain a measure of academic freedom through input with the . . . — Map (db m139886) HM
13Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Shaarai ShomayimFirst Jewish House of Worship in Alabama - 1846
Jews have been part of Alabama’s economic, social and political life since 1764. It was not until 1841 that Mobile’s small Jewish community grew large enough to organize “Congregation” Shaarai Shomayim (Gates of Heaven). The community . . . — Map (db m27083) HM
14Arkansas (Pulaski County), Little Rock — Concordia Hall and Jewish Life in Little RockSite of the first Jewish house of worship in Arkansas
From 1882 to 1887, an ornate two-story space on the second floor of this building served as the social hall for the Concordia Association – an organization established in 1864 to help Jewish immigrant families adapt to their new lives in . . . — Map (db m78014) HM
15Arkansas (Pulaski County), Little Rock — Gilbert Maxwell AronsonThe First Cowboy-Western Movie Star — 1880-1971 —
Max Aronson was born at 713 Center Street, (a house formerly located across the street), on March 21, 1880, to Esther and Harry Aronson, a Jewish dry goods salesman. The Aronson family relocated to Pine Bluff, Arkansas in the 1890's. Aronson’s first . . . — Map (db m99370) HM
16Arkansas (Pulaski County), Little Rock — Max Henry Aronson – The First Cowboy-Western Movie StarMarch 21, 1880- January 20, 1971
Max Aronson was born at 713 Center Street, (a house formerly located across the street), on March 21, 1880, to Esther and Harry Aronson, a Jewish dry goods salesman. As a child, Max Aronson relocated to St. Louis, before moving to the . . . — Map (db m120205) HM
17Colorado (Fremont County), Cotopaxi — The Cotopaxi Jewish Agricultural Colony 1882-1884
"Set up for yourself roadmarks...the way by which you went. Return, O virgin of Israel" Jeremiah 31:21 Nearly 70 Jewish immigrants were settled in and near Cotopaxi. Facing insurmountable challenges, the ill equipped . . . — Map (db m134127) HM
18Colorado (Lake County), Leadville — Hebrew Cemetery: Final Resting Place of Leadville Jews
The Hebrew Cemetery The Hebrew Benevolent Association established the Hebrew Cemetery in January,1880, in the Southwest corner of Leadville’s Evergreen Cemetery with the transfer of 101,000 square feet from the Union Veteran’s Association. The . . . — Map (db m135782) HM
19Colorado (Lake County), Leadville — Temple Israel: A Frontier Synagogue and Museum
The Jewish Settlement The group of Jews in Leadville traced their roots to Germany. They tended to be assimilationists and practiced Reform Judaism, including worship services largely in English, women as members of the congregation, and the . . . — Map (db m135817) HM
20Colorado (Las Animas County), Trinidad — Temple Aaron 1889
Jews have been part of Trinidad's social, economic and political life since first arriving as traders along the Sante Fe Trail. Maurice and Isaac Wise opened a store on Main Street in 1867. The Jaffa Brothers' Trading Company was established in . . . — Map (db m135690) HM
21Florida (Alachua County), Micanopy — F-860 — Moses Elias Levy
Moses Elias Levy (1782-1854), a Moroccan born Jewish merchant, came to Florida after its cession from Spain to the United States in 1821. Before his arrival, Levy acquired over 50,000 acres in East Florida. In 1822, Levy began development on . . . — Map (db m93854) HM
22Florida (Escambia County), Pensacola — F-435 — First Jewish House of Worship in Florida
Jewish families in Pensacola began organized worship following the Civil War. On this site in 1876 a Reform Jewish Synagogue was constructed. The State of Florida granted a charter in 1878 for Congregation Beth El. Temple Beth El joined the Union of . . . — Map (db m134326) HM
23Georgia (Cobb County), Marietta — Georgia Anti-Lynching Memorial
In respectful memory of the thousands across America, denied justice by lynching; victims of hatred, prejudice, and ignorance. Between 1880-1946, ~570 Georgians were lynched. — Map (db m136757) HM
24Georgia (Cobb County), Marietta — 33-1 — Leo Frank Lynching
Near this location on August 17, 1915, Leo M. Frank, the Jewish superintendent of the National Pencil Company in Atlanta, was lynched for the murder of thirteen-year-old Mary Phagan, a factory employee. A highly controversial trial fueled by . . . — Map (db m16574) HM
25Georgia (Fulton County), Atlanta — 60-14 — Gov. John M. Slaton1866-1955
John Marshall Slaton was born in Meriwether County and graduated from the University of Georgia before practicing law in Atlanta. Slaton served in both houses of the Georgia legislature and two terms as governor (1911-12 and 1913-15). While in . . . — Map (db m99371) HM
26Idaho (Ada County), Boise — Reinhold ChrystmanAn Evangelical Christian "Chose"
As manager of the Piotrkow Trybunalski Glass Factory, he saved over 700 Jews during the Holocaust while risking his own life. (Poland 1944) Memoir of Alina Braun Rindler, A Survivor Donated by the Jewish American Society for Historic . . . — Map (db m134549) HM
27Illinois (St. Clair County), Cahokia — John Jacob Hays(1770-1836)
John Jacob Hays was born in New York circa 1770. His family emigrated to North America from the Netherlands in 1720. The Hays family belongs to Congregation Shearith Israel, the oldest Jewish Congregation in the United States. John Jacob Hays . . . — Map (db m140422) HM
28Iowa (Lee County), Keokuk — First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in IowaB'nai Israel Congregation
Jews have been part of the social, economic and cultural life of Iowa since the early 19th century. It was not until 1855 that the Jewish population in Keokuk grew large enough to establish a religious community, Congregation B’nai Israel ( Children . . . — Map (db m27084) HM
29Kansas (Leavenworth County), Leavenworth — Temple B'Nai Jeshurun
On this site the first Jewish place of worship in the state of Kansas was built. After a large Jewish community established residence in Leavenworth City, Kansas Territory. Temple B'Nai Jeshurun was constructed in 1866. Initially, the first group of . . . — Map (db m103870) HM
30Kansas (Saline County), Salina — August Bondi (1833-1907)Jewish-American Abolitionist, Salina Resident
“August Bondi was born July 21, 1831, in Vienna, Austria. The Bondis, Jewish European refugees, fled the Austrian Empire after the failed revolutions of 1848 and settled in St. Louis, Missouri. August Bondi moved to Pottawatomie Creek in . . . — Map (db m134060) HM
31Louisiana (Orleans Parish), New Orleans — Shangarai Chasset - Gates of Mercy
Site of the first permanent Jewish house of worship in the State of Louisiana, Gates of Mercy Synagogue, 1845; located at 410-420 N. Rampart St. Gates of Mercy, chartered by the State in 1827, confirmed the abolition of the Code Noir, which had . . . — Map (db m13167) HM
32Maine (Penobscot County), Bangor — Site of First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in Maine
Site of First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in the State of Maine Congregation Beth Israel, 1897 — Map (db m40493) HM
33Montana (Lewis and Clark County), Helena — Temple Emanuel
Site of first Jewish house of worship State of Montana 1890 — Map (db m134336) HM
34Nebraska (Douglas County), Omaha — Congregation of Israel - 1884
Jews have been part of Nebraska’s social, economic and political life since the mid 1800’s. It was not until 1871 that the small Jewish community in Omaha grew large enough to organize and formally found Congregation of Israel. On Sept. . . . — Map (db m40743) HM
35Nevada (Storey County), Virginia City — Engineering Marvels on the Comstock
From the first recorded ore discoveries in 1859, the Comstock area was part of a global community. Arriving from places as diverse as the Germanies, Poland, Russia, and North America, Jewish immigrants with engineering backgrounds, entrepreneurial . . . — Map (db m40485) HM
36Nevada (Storey County), Virginia City — The Jewish Cemetery - Virginia City 1862
The Jewish cemetery is located a few miles north of where you stand. It was the norm for organizations to have separate cemeteries. However the commonalities of the Comstock population are of more significance than separatism. Like their neighbors, . . . — Map (db m134333) HM
37New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Temple Israel1910
First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in New Hampshire Star of David New Hampshire's Jewish community dates back to the pre colonial ear. Temple Israel, established as a formally organized community in 1910, affirmed the American principles . . . — Map (db m76462) HM
38New Jersey (Monmouth County), Roosevelt — Borough of RooseveltJersey Homesteads Historic District
Front Organized as an agro-industrial Jewish cooperative community by the Provisional Commission for Jewish Farm Settlements in the United States, led by Benjamin Brown (1885-1939), Jersey Homesteads was one of approximately 100 communities . . . — Map (db m95997) HM
39New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Temple Montefiore 1884
Site of the First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in New Mexico Territory. Temple Montefiore - 1884 — Map (db m134321) HM
40New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Temple Montefiore, Las Vegas, New Mexico
Site of the First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in New Mexico moved to this site — Map (db m134320) HM
41New York (Westchester County), Pound Ridge — Hiram Halle (1867-1944)
Born in Cleveland, Ohio to German Jewish immigrants, Hiram Halle bought his first house in Pound Ridge on Trinity Pass Road, February 1929. From 1916-1944 he was head of the petrochemical giant, Universal Oil Products. From 1933 through the onset of . . . — Map (db m134062) HM
42North Dakota (Barnes County), Valley City — 001 — Herman SternN.D. Businessman, Community and Social Leader, Holocaust Rescuer
Born in Germany in 1887, Herman Stern immigrated to America in 1903, where he took work at the Straus Clothing store in Carrington. Stern later managed the Straus’ North Dakota businesses from his store in Valley City, where he lived for the . . . — Map (db m99291) HM
43North Dakota (Cass County), West Fargo — North Dakota Jewry
Jews have been part of North Dakota's social, economic, agricultural and political life since territorial days. Between the 1880's and the 1920's, aided by the Jewish Agricultural and Industrial Society, primarily Russian and Romanian Jews came to . . . — Map (db m134335) HM
44North Dakota (McIntosh County), Ashley — Ashley Jewish Homesteaders Cemetery - Left Marker
On November 17, 2015, the United States Department of the Interior officially named this site to the National Register of Historic Places. From the 1880s through the 1930s, 1200 Jewish farmers lived on over 250 homesteads in North Dakota - the . . . — Map (db m103862) HM
45North Dakota (McIntosh County), Ashley — Ashley Jewish Homesteaders Cemetery -Right Marker
Unlike most of their Jewish brethren who remained on or near the East Coast in big cities, these first-time farmers boarded trains to "The Great Northwest," staking their claims 20 years after McInstosh County was opened for homesteading. They . . . — Map (db m103863) HM
46Oklahoma (Oklahoma County), Oklahoma City — Temple B'Nai Israel(Children of Israel) — First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in Oklahoma —
Jews have lived in Oklahoma since the mid 19th century. In 1903, Jews in Oklahoma City organized Temple B'Nai Israel. During its first few years, the congregation met at several local churches. The synagogue, located at 50 Broadway Circle, was . . . — Map (db m134144) HM
47Oregon (Douglas County), Glendale — City of Glendale
After construction of a railroad line South from Roseburg in 1881-1883, Solomon Abraham, the local right of way agent, platted the community and named it Julia after his wife. After a dispute with Abraham, A.F. Morris, the Chief Engineer for the . . . — Map (db m134058) HM
48Pennsylvania (Lancaster County), Lancaster — Joseph Simon(1712 - 1804)
Jewish pioneer and merchant, Simon played a significant role in the development of central and western PA. He participated in expeditions as far as the Mississippi and helped establish Lancaster as a center for exploration, trade & settlement. . . . — Map (db m147204) HM
49South Dakota (Lawrence County), Deadwood — Hebrew Hill (Mt. Zion)
Deadwood is recognized as the site of the first organized Jewish Community in South Dakota. The Hebrew Cemetery Association was the first to purchase a section of Mount Moriah Cemetery, August 20, 1896. The section is located higher up on Jerusalem . . . — Map (db m27070) HM
50South Dakota (Lawrence County), Deadwood — The Franklin’s Fine HomeDeadwood's Jewish American History
Harris Franklin, his wife Anna, and son Nathan arrived in Deadwood, Dakota Territory in 1877. A Jewish immigrant from humble beginnings, Harris Franklin earned his fortune through the wholesale liquor business and gradually diversified into cattle, . . . — Map (db m34144) HM
51South Dakota (Minnehaha County), Sioux Falls — Congregation Sons of IsraelFirst Jewish House of Worship in South Dakota — 1916 —
Since the territorial days of 1870s, Jewish people have played an important role in the social, economic and cultural life of South Dakota. In the 1880s, Sioux Falls experienced an influx of Reformed Jews from Germany, who became some of the city’s . . . — Map (db m134205) HM
52South Dakota (Pennington County), Keystone — The Father of Mt. RushmoreDoane Robinson
Doane Robinson (1856-1946) was the South Dakota state historian from 1901 to 1926. Speaking to the Black and Yellow Trail Association in January 1924, Robinson proposed his idea to carve legendary figures of the American West into the Black Hills . . . — Map (db m103866) HM
53Tennessee (Shelby County), Memphis — Congregation B'Nai Israel(Children of Israel) — First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in Tennessee —
Jews have been part of Tennessee’s economic, social and political life since the late 18th century. Congregation Children of Israel, chartered by the State of Tennessee, March 2, 1854, rented and eventually purchased a building near this site at . . . — Map (db m84648) HM
54Utah (Salt Lake County), Salt Lake City — Congregation B'Nai IsraelSite of the First Permanent Jewish House of Worship in Utah
Jews have been part of Utah’s religious, economic, social, and political life since the mid-19th century. Congregation B’Nai Israel was organized in 1874. The first service was held in March, 1883. B’Nai Israel merged with Congregation Montefiore in . . . — Map (db m35792) HM
55Utah (Sanpete County), Gunnison — Life on the Land
In 1911, the Jewish Agricultural and Colonial Association of Philadelphia purchased 6,085 acres of land and water rights from the Utah State Land board for the agricultural experiment that they would name Clarion. Members of the association tasked . . . — Map (db m134341) HM
56Virginia, Richmond — SA-56 — Kahal Kadosh Beth Shalome
Jews have participated in Virginia’s social and economic life from the colony’s beginnings. Kahal Kadosh Beth Shalome (Holy Congregation House of Peace) was founded in Richmond in 1789, when the Jewish community grew large enough to establish the . . . — Map (db m27135) HM
57Washington (Spokane County), Cheney — Lucy Friedlander Covington (1910 – 1982)
From the 1940’s – 1960’s, U.S. Indian Policy was Termination. The policy strove for Native American Tribes to sell their lands to the government. The Tribes would disband and “assimilate” into American society, ending their unique . . . — Map (db m134142) HM
58Wyoming (Laramie County), Cheyenne — Mt. Sinai CongregationFirst Permanent Jewish House of Worship in Wyoming
The first Permanent Jewish Synagogue in Wyoming was erected in 1915 by Cheyenne’s Mt. Sinai Congregation. German Jewish merchants came to Cheyenne starting in 1867, organized but were unable to build a Synagogue. After 1900, with the arrival of . . . — Map (db m27087) HM
59Germany, Thuringia (Landkreis Weimarer Land), Weimar — Little Camp (Buchenwald Concentration Camp)
On this site was the infamous “Little Camp”. Separated by only a barbed-wire fence from the Main camp, its inmates were subjected to the greatest suffering of all those at Buchenwald. Begun in late 1942, its first inmates were Polish, . . . — Map (db m134689) HM
60Israel, Central District (Hefer Valley Regional Council), Avihayil — Lt. Col. John Henry Patterson
John Henry Patterson was born in Ireland on November 10, 1876. He was an Irish Protestant who had a thorough knowledge of the Bible, and was sympathetic to the Jewish people in biblical times and to the Zionist idea. He served in the British . . . — Map (db m134674) HM
61Israel, Haifa District, Haifa — ExodusThe Ship that launched a Nation.
The S.S. Exodus was an American Aliyah Bet ship crewed by American volunteers together with Haganah operatives from pre-state Israel. Her mission was to rescue Holocaust survivors trapped in Europe after the murder of 6 million Jews, bringing them . . . — Map (db m134635) HM
62Israel, Jerusalem District, Jerusalem — Machal / מח"לVolunteers from Abroad
During Israel’s War of Independence, 1948-49, more than 4,800 volunteers, including 168 Christians, came from 59 countries to Israel’s aid. Some had served as crew on the 10 American-purchased Aliyah Bet ships that brought so many Holocaust . . . — Map (db m134663) HM
63Israel, Jerusalem District, Jerusalem — Stephen Theodore Norman, 1918-1946. Last descendent of Theodor HerzlYou will be amazed at the Jewish Youth in Palestine... They have the look of freedom.
"You will be amazed at Jewish youth in Palestine...they have the look of freedom." Stephen Theodore Norman, 1918-1946. Last descendent of Theodor Herzl. Stephen Norman was the grandson of Theodor Herzl and his last descendent. Born in Vienna, . . . — Map (db m134639) HM
 
Paid Advertisement
Dec. 1, 2020