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George Washington Slept Here Historical Markers

He slept in a lot of places.
 
Ridgebury – George Washington Slept Here Marker in front of the Ridgebury Congregational Church image, Touch for more information
By Michael Herrick, June 2, 2010
Ridgebury – George Washington Slept Here Marker in front of the Ridgebury Congregational Church
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 28 — Ridgebury – George Washington Slept HereRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Ridgebury, "The New Patent," was one of the last land purchases made by the Proprietors. Tradition says that the First Congregational Church in Ridgebury had its beginnings in the "New Patent Meeting House" as early as 1738. In 1768 the . . . — Map (db m32052) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgebury Congregational Church
Gathered       Built 1760            1851 This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior < Second Plaque: > Connecticut Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m23423) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — To Honor George WashingtonWho Lodged Here May 17-18, 1791.
The game is yet in our own hands; to play it well is all we have to do – nothing but harmony, honesty, industry and frugality are necessary to make us a great and happy people. George Washington — Map (db m59851) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 17-1 — Washington’s Southern Tour
Traveling from Savannah to Augusta on his Southern tour of 1791, President George Washington stopped in Waynesboro on May 17. Departing from Savannah two days earlier, Washington lodged at "one Spencers " in Effingham County, fifteen miles north of . . . — Map (db m7800) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-10 — Waynesborough
On July 31, 1783, an Act was passed by the General Assembly meeting in Augusta to lay out a town, Waynesborough, on reserved or private land. Commissioners named (Thomas Lewis, Sr., Thomas Lewis, Jr., John Duhart, Edward Telfair, John Jones) were . . . — Map (db m7868) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Monteith — 25-4 — Washington's Southern Tour
Near here stood Mulberry Grove, plantation home of General Nathanael Greene and Catherine Littlefield Greene. President George Washington twice visited the widowed Mrs. Greene at Mulberry Grove during the Southern tour of 1791. Traveling downriver . . . — Map (db m18640) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — Site Of FilatureErected 1753
Where colony's production of silk was reeled until 1771. Building then used for public purposes. President Washington attended a ball here in 1791. Building destroyed by fire in 1859. — Map (db m9391) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 25-3 — Washington’s Southern Tour
During his Southern tour of 1791, President George Washington attended services at the original Christ Church on Sunday, May 15. While in Savannah from May 12-15, Washington lodged at a house on the corner of Barnard and State streets on St. James . . . — Map (db m5696) HM
Georgia (Effingham County), Rincon — 051-9 — Historic Taverns on this Road»—→
Five miles South on this road, George Washington spent Sunday night, May 15, 1791, at the house of "one Spencer." The occasion was Washington's Southern tour, and he was traveling in his carriage over this road from Savannah to Augusta. Four . . . — Map (db m7688) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — General George Washington
To Honor The Memory of General George Washington Guest of Our City 1791 Placed By Elizabeth Washington Chapter D.A.R. 1932 — Map (db m9742) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — 121-34 — Meadow GardenHome of George Walton ← 400 Ft. —«
400 feet west of here is Meadow Garden, home of George Walton, Revolutionary Patriot and soldier, Governor, Congressman, Senator, Jurist. With Button Gwinnett and Lyman Hall, he signed the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, for the State of . . . — Map (db m33358) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — 121-2 — Washington's Southern Tour
During his Southern tour of 1791, President George Washington visited Augusta--at that time Georgia`s capital--from May 18-21. Washington met with Governor Edward Telfair and other "principal gentlemen of the place," including George Walton and John . . . — Map (db m9708) HM
Georgia (Screven County), Farmdale — 124-10 — Washington Slept Here
"Monday, May 16th, 1791" wrote President George Washington in his diary as he recorded the date of his lodging in the Inn of Stephen Calfrey Pearce, 200 yards [from] this marker. Being forewarned, the Pearces had made lavish preparation for the . . . — Map (db m16434) HM
Georgia (Screven County), Sylvania — 124-11 — Washington's Route
President Washington passed here early on the morning of Tuesday, May 17th, 1791, enroute to the home of William Skinner with whom he had breakfast. The Skinner home, still standing (1953), is about 5 miles northwest. President Washington spent the . . . — Map (db m7795) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — George Washington at Will’s Creek — Fort Cumberland Trail
Our founding father spent much time in this vicinity when a young man as surveyor, ambassador, aide-de-camp to General Braddock, and commander of Virginia military forces. This cabin served as his headquarters during part of this time. Young George . . . — Map (db m17719) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Headquarters of George Washington
As colonel under General Braddock at Fort Cumberland during the French and Indian War 1755 - 1758 and as Commander-in-Chief of the American Army in 1794Presented to the City of Cumberland by James Walter Thomas, L.L.D.; Litt.D. dedicated April . . . — Map (db m17724) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Oldtown — Old Town(King Opessa’s Town)
Fording place for “Great Warriors Path” from New York to the South. Thomas Cresap built stockade fort here in 1741 used as a refuge during French and Indian War after Braddock’s defeat. George Washington was here on his first visit . . . — Map (db m447) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Mann's Tavern
site of the Annapolis Convention September 11-14, 1786 Just north of this building, facing main street, stood Mann’s Tavern where twelve delegates from five states met in 1786 to discuss commercial problems of the new nation. Their call . . . — Map (db m6302) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Galesville — Overlooking West RiverCedar Park, Tulip Hill
Cedar Park Patented to Richard Ewen in 1666 as “Ewen upon Ewenton.” Brick house built c.1697 by Richard Galloway II around earlier frame structure possibly dating back to 1656. Known as “West River Farm” in 18th Century. . . . — Map (db m65889) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Harwood — Rawlings’ Tavern
Jonathan Rawlings given a license to keep an “ordinary” (tavern) in 1771. George Washington dined here September 26, 1773, on his way to the Annapolis races. — Map (db m3141) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mt. Clare
1754–1914. This oldest colonial structure of Baltimore was built in 1754 upon the estate known as “Georgia Plantation” by Charles Carroll, Barrister 1723–1783 One of the foremost patriots of . . . — Map (db m41351) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Adam Good Tavern
Site of Adam Good Tavern visited by George Washington July 1st & 2nd 1791. — Map (db m3563) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Charlestown
Laid out and erected as a town by Act of Assembly in 1742 “there being as yet no such place settled at, or near the head of Chesapeake Bay.” George Washington records many visits to Charlestown in his diary. He lodged here August 10, . . . — Map (db m1685) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — The Hermitage
Part of Friendship Tract and home of Robert Alexander, delegate to the Provincial Convention of 1774 and to the Continental Convention of 1776. On August 25, 1777, he was host to Washington here and three days later offered allegiance to British . . . — Map (db m1475) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — Old Post Road: Lower Susquehanna Ferry
Old Post Road established 1666. Lower Susquehanna Ferry established 1695. Rodgers’ Tavern where George Washington frequently stopped between 1781–1798. — Map (db m1482) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Warwick — “Worsell Mannor”1000 Acres
Patented 5th June, 1685, to Major Peter Sayer, a prominent Catholic. Later acquired by the Heath Family. On 14th May, 1773, George Washington “din’d and lodg’d at Mr. DL. Heath’s” taking his stepson Jackie Custis to King’s College, N.Y. . . . — Map (db m65392) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Warwick — George Washington
Visited Warwick Feby, 1756, March 1756. “Din’d and lodg’d at Mr. D’L Heath’s May 1773. Passed through Sept, 9 and Oct. 28, 1774. Breakfasted March 23, 1791 and again in September 1793.” — Map (db m1575) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Marbury — Smallwood's Home
One mile from here lived Gen. Wm. Smallwood, commander of the Maryland troops which saved Washington’s Army at Long Island. Governor of Maryland from 1785 to 1788. Washington visited here in 1786. — Map (db m6081) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Nanjemoy — Washington's Farm
← Two miles southwest Washington owned 600 acres of land bought in 1775 and retained until his death. In 1786 he visited this property accompanied by Gen. Smallwood. — Map (db m6231) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco
The Indian village of Potobac, visited in 1608 by Capt. John Smith, occupied this site. County Seat of Charles County, 1658 - 1895. Washington visited here frequently. Site of St. Columba Lodge No. 11 A. F.& A. M., chartered April 18, 1793. . . . — Map (db m963) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — The Retreat
Daniel St. Thomas Jenifer’s home. First President of the Maryland Senate 1777-1781. Close friend of George Washington who visited here June 3rd 1763. — Map (db m1235) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — George Washington
On August 5 and 6, 1785, and again June 30 and July 1, 1791, was the guest of Thomas Johnson at the latter's manorial residence which stood on the site of the present farm house, about 150 yards east of this point. Thomas Johnson, a member of the . . . — Map (db m1538) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Midway — George Washington
On his way to Philadelphia Friday July 1, 1791 stopped in this building known as Cookerly's Tavern. — Map (db m8645) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Tuscarora — The Dutchman’s
George Washington on his way to Frederick, August 5, 1785 dined in a building on this site known as The Dutchman's One mile south of here is Noland's Ferry frequently used by Washington on his travels. — Map (db m36841) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — George Washington
George Washington stopped in a building two hundred yards west of here known as Peter’s Tavern Thursday June 30, 1791. — Map (db m102967) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Crellin — Charles Friend’s Home
George Washington stopped here Sept. 26, 1784 on his trip to determine a feasible passage between the Potomac and the Ohio for a canal or easy portage between these rivers as a passage to western territory. — Map (db m479) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Bear Camp
General Braddock's 6th camp on the march to Fort Duquesne Saturday and Sunday June 20th and 21st, 1755. Washington was forced to remain behind with a guard on account of "violent fevers" until cured by "Dr. James's Powders (one of the most excellent . . . — Map (db m356) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Little Meadows
General Braddock's 4th camp on the march to Fort Duquesne June 17, 1755. Washington arrived here after Braddock's defeat July 15th, 1755. Washington also stopped here May 9th, 1754, July 7th or 8th, 1754, October 1st, 1770, November 26th, 1770 and . . . — Map (db m361) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Red House — McCulloch’s Path
(Named for an early pioneer.) The first trail through The Glades passed near this point. George Washington on his visit here in September 1784, wrote of it: “McCulloch’s Path which owes its origin to buffaloes, being no other than their tracks . . . — Map (db m457) HM
Maryland (Harford County), White Hall — Black Horse Tavern
George Washington stayed here the night of June 5, 1773 on his way back to Mt. Vernon from Columbia College, New York, where he had left his step-son Jackie Custis. — Map (db m1408) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elk Ridge Landing
An important colonial port for shipment of Tobacco. Here in 1765 Zachariah Hood, Maryland’s “Stamp Act” agent, was hanged in effigy. Lafayette’s troops camped here April 17-18, 1781 on the way to engage Cornwallis in Virginia. George . . . — Map (db m3144) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elk Ridge Landing
An important colonial port for shipment of Tobacco. Here in 1765 Zachariah Hood, Maryland’s “Stamp Act” agent, was hanged in effigy. Lafayette’s troops camped here April 17-18, 1781 on the way to engage Cornwallis in Virginia. George . . . — Map (db m3145) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Waterloo — Spurrier's Tavern
Thomas Spurrier's stood at nearby crossroads connecting two important overland routes in colonial days (now U.S. 1 and MD. 175.) George Washington stopped here at least 25 times between 1789 and 1798. His diary noted July 18, 1795: "Dined and lodged . . . — Map (db m3236) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Waterloo — Spurrier's TavernStood on this Site
George Washington stopped here at least twenty five times between 1789 and 1798. On July 18, 1795, his diary says: "Dined and lodged at Spurrier's where my sick horse died." — Map (db m3238) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Chestertown, Maryland
County seat of Kent County. Established in 1706. Situated on the most traveled highway between south and north during the revolutionary period. George Washington made eight known visits here between 1756 and 1793. Rich in Colonial History. — Map (db m3059) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Worrell’s Tavern
Site of the tavern where George Washington dined and lodged on his return from Philadelphia, March 23, 1791, while he was President of the United States of America. Originally erected 1932 by Chester Lodge 115 A. F. & A. M. — Map (db m3068) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Galena — Downs’ Cross RoadsGalena, Maryland
On this site stood the tavern erected by William Downs in 1763. Burned in 1893, George Washington stopped here in 1774 en route to and from the first Continental Congress. He traveled this road on his eight visits to Kent County. — Map (db m3040) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Georgetown — Georgetown, Maryland
Erected by act of Assembly of Maryland, May 1736, on a tract called Tolchester. A base of Continental supplies, 1775 to 1783. Port of Entry and ferry landing. George Washington stopped here enroute to points north and south. • Burned by British May . . . — Map (db m1577) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Rock Hall — Rock Hall
Formerly known as Rock Hall Cross Roads. Main Street is part of first road cut in Kent County in 1675. George Washington passed here eight known times. Tench Tilghman used this route from Yorktown to Philadelphia in October 1781. — Map (db m3075) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Washington's Farm
519 acres owned 1794-1799 by the First President Thomas Sprigg, Jr., patented in 1725 as "Woodstock" 1,102 acres here, inherited in 1782 by Sprigg's three granddaughters, Sophia, Rebecca, and Elizabeth. Sophia married John Francis Mercer (later . . . — Map (db m5098) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Beltsville — Van Horn’s Tavern
On Vansville Hill, Prince George's County, Maryland. President George Washington stopped there on July 19, August 7, and September 12, 1795. — Map (db m355) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — “Warburton Manor”Patented 1661
Home of the Digges Family (descendants of Edward Digges, governor of Virginia, 1652–1668). The most intimate friend of George and Martha Washington in Prince George’s County, where they visited many times. Washington spent his forty-third . . . — Map (db m3663) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — Prince George’s County - St. John’s Church
Erected 1723. (King George's Parish established 1692). Credible evidence and honest tradition record that Washington attended services here on numerous occasions. — Map (db m3662) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Kettering — “Mount Lubentia”
(Patented by Ninian Beall as “Largo,” 1686) Known as “Castle Magruder” where lived Rev. Jonathan Boucher, tutor to “Jackie” Custis. George and Martha Washington, Nelly and John Parke Custis, Benedict . . . — Map (db m3631) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Laurel — Montpelier
The home of Major Snowden. Original Grant 1686. George Washington stopped here May 9 and September 21, 1787 on his way to and returning from the Constitutional Convention. — Map (db m3632) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Upper Marlboro — “Melwood Park”Patented 1672
The home of Ignatius Digges whose daughter Mary, married Thomas Sim Lee, twice Governor of Maryland. Lee died here, 1819. General George Washington visited here four times and Martha Washington once. In the War of 1812 British officers stopped here . . . — Map (db m62919) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Upper Marlboro — Marlborough(County seat of Prince George's County since 1721)
George Washington "lodged" here August 31, 1774, going to First Continental Congress. On May 4, 1775, on his way to Second Continental Congress where, on Jun 15, 1775, he was elected "General and Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the United . . . — Map (db m34330) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — “Old Mr. Flint’s” Home
George Washington’s diary (while he visited Berkley Springs in 1769) states: “Aug. 30 Old Mr. Flint dined with us” and on Sept. 4: “Rid to the Potomac where my horses were. From thence to Mr. Flint’s and to the Pennsylvania Line, . . . — Map (db m61485) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Williamsport — Springfield Farm(Circa 1755)
Home of Brig. Gen. Otho Holland Williams, Revolutionary War hero and founder, 1786, of Williamsport, and of Col. Elie Williams, president of commission to lay out National Road and chief surveyor Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. President George . . . — Map (db m3909) HM
Massachusetts (Middlesex County), Cambridge — Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow HouseLongfellow National Historic Site
Built in 1759 Headquarters for George Washington 1775 – 1776 . Home of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Family & Descendants 1837 1950 — Map (db m19085) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Fort Lee — General George Washington1732-1799
General Washington was in Fort Lee many times during the Battle of New York. His main headquarters was in Hackensack, but had a temporary headquarters in Fort Lee near Anderson Avenue and Elizabeth Street. His main objective in Fort Lee was to . . . — Map (db m7647) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Hackensack — The Green
Hackensack was a small village centered around The Green which served as a strategic point during the American Revolution. Washington headquartered here in November 1776 while he surveyed the local roads and bridges. — Map (db m6867) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Oakland — 94 — Hendrick Van Allen House
This Dutch Colonial house was built by Hendrick Van Allen before the Revolutionary War on a farm that consisted of over two-hundred acres. General George Washington used this house as his Headquarters on July 14-15, 1777, when he moved his troops . . . — Map (db m12336) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Oakland — Hendrik Van Allen House
Located on Ramapo Valley Road key military highway for troops and supply units during the Revolutionary War this building served as General George Washington’s headquarters on July 14, 1777 and as the Bergen County Court House in 1778 – 1779 . . . — Map (db m12335) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Paramus — 1 — Washington Spring
Howland Avenue divided the farms of miller Cornelius Van Saun to the south and Christian Dederer to the north. Hendrick Banta lived west of Mill Creek. The Continental Army moved into Bergen County in August 1780 to forage for food and to await the . . . — Map (db m8412) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Paramus — Washington Spring1780
The Continental Army is reported to have utilized the old spring at the base of these slopes during the September encampment west of the Hackensack River. Reports indicate that General Washington visited here and drank water from the spring. Bergen . . . — Map (db m8413) HM
New Jersey (Bergen County), Ridgewood — 43 — Old Paramus Reformed Church
Organized in 1725 by pioneer Dutch settlers, the congregation of this church has worshipped here over 240 years. First church, built 1735 on this land given by Peter Fauconier, a French Huguenot, was a headquarters of Gen. George Washington in 1778 . . . — Map (db m24983) HM
New Jersey (Essex County), Montclair — Cranetown
Colonial hamlet, named for the Crane family, in whose home Washington stayed in October, 1780. Became Montclair in 1870’s. — Map (db m62505) HM
New Jersey (Essex County), Montclair — Washington’s Temporary Headquarters
This boulder which lay from time immemorial on this site near the turn of the old road marks the location of a house used by General George Washington as temporary headquarters on October 26, 1780 while on march from Totowa now Paterson to . . . — Map (db m7572) HM
New Jersey (Essex County), Newark — Soldiers of the Revolution
. . . — Map (db m6925) HM
New Jersey (Hunterdon County), Lambertville — Holcombe House
First section built about 1733. Washington stayed here, July, 1777, and June 1778, prior to battles of Germantown and Monmouth. — Map (db m62002) HM
New Jersey (Hunterdon County), Oldwick — Site of Colonel John Mehelm House
George Washington stayed in this house while his troops camped between White House and New Bromley. House burned in mid 1960’s. — Map (db m16606) HM
New Jersey (Middlesex County), New Brunswick — Buccleuch
Built about 1735 and occupied until 1774 by Anthony White whose wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Lewis Morris, and whose son was General Anthony White. Owned and occupied from 1774 by General William Burton of the British Army. Owned by the . . . — Map (db m8979) HM
New Jersey (Middlesex County), New Brunswick — New Brunswick Inn Site
Under the rooftree of the Inn which occupied this site General Washington tarried when in New Brunswick ----- On the adjoining square upon the arrival of the express rider the Declaration of Independence was acclaimed by all loyal citizens on July . . . — Map (db m8954) HM
New Jersey (Middlesex County), Woodbridge — Cross Keys TavernUnited States Constitution Bicentennial
This tavern, operated at the time by John Manning, hosted the overnight stay of George Washington April 22, 1789 on route to his inauguration on April 30, 1789. Washington was accompanied on the part of the journey from New Brunswick to Rahway by . . . — Map (db m8987) HM
New Jersey (Middlesex County), Woodbridge — Cross Keys Tavern
On April 22, 1789, George Washington stayed the night at this Tavern on his way from Mount Vernon, Virginia, to New York City for his inauguration as the first President of the United States. Circa 1740 — Map (db m62697) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Chatham — Chatham Historic District
. . . — Map (db m8877) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Morristown — Arnold Tavern
Site of Col. Jacob Arnold's Tavern. It was used as Washington's Headquarters January - May, 1777. Troops were in Lowantica Valley. — Map (db m5949) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Morristown — Arnold’s TavernWashington’s Headquarters from January 6 to May 28, 1777 — The Morristown Green
On January 6, 1777 General George Washington established his winter headquarters at Jacob Arnold’s Tavern, then located at what is now 20 Park Place. He occupied rooms on the second floor. His officers and men were quartered in every house and barn . . . — Map (db m32723) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Morristown — Morristown
Morristown was a village of about 70 buildings in 1777. General George Washington, Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, brought his tired troops to Morristown for rest and reorganization in January 1777. They had just completed . . . — Map (db m7471) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Morristown — Washington’s Headquarters
Washington made his winter headquarters at the Arnold Tavern, January 6, 1777, now a part of All Souls Hospital. December, 1779, he established quarters at the Ford Mansion, now maintained as a museum. — Map (db m5946) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Towaco — Henry Doremus House
Circa 1760 Dutch Stone House where George Washington and Alexander Hamilton stayed June 25-27, 1780, following the Battle of Springfield. French forces under Gen. Rochambeau rested in the orchard August 27, 1781, en route to Yorktown. . . . — Map (db m33492) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Passaic — The Blanchard House
Washington’s Headquarters Nov. 21, 1776 was situated about one hundred feet west of this tablet. The entrance to the old Revolutionary Bridge was nearly opposite this spot. Reset by the Acquackanock Landing Chapter D.A.R. 1930 — Map (db m7045) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Colonel Theunis Dey
The Mansion of Colonel Theunis Dey The Headquarters of General Washington July ~ Oct ~ Nov ~ 1780 Acquired and restored 1930-1934 by The Passaic County Park Commission Marked by Capt. Abraham Godwin Chapter New Jersey Society S.A.R.       . . . — Map (db m39733) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Dey Mansion
Home of Col. Theunis Dey, built about 1740. Twice used by Washington as headquarters in 1780, when the army was in Totowa. — Map (db m7700) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Headquarters of General George Washington
This brick Georgian mansion was built by Colonel Theunis Dey in 1742. It was used as headquarters by General George Washington from July 1 to July 29, 1780 and again from October 8 to November 27, 1780 because of its strategic position and . . . — Map (db m7701) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Schuyler – Colfax
This house is an example of 18th century architecture. The Schuyler and Colfax families were prominent in shaping New Jersey history. — Map (db m7703) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Schuyler Colfax House
This house, which is Wayne’s oldest, was built in 1695 by Ardent Schuyler, one of the leaders of the original settlement. William Colfax, who married Hester Schuyler in 1783, gave the house the Colfax name. — Map (db m7704) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Washington Headquarters~ Preakness ~
July 1 – 29, and October 9 - November 27, 1780, Washing- ton had headquarters here at the house of Colonel Theunis Dey. The main army encamp- ed along Totowa Heights. — Map (db m39732) HM
New Jersey (Passaic County), Wayne — Washington Headquarters — Preakness
July 1-29, and October 9 – November 27, 1780, Washington had headquarters here at the house of Colonel Theunis Dey. The main army encamped along Totowa Heights. — Map (db m39903) HM
New Jersey (Somerset County), Basking Ridge — “George” 2001
Did General George Washington sleep here? Maybe. We do know, history says our “Grain Room” stored grain for his troops during the winter of 1778. Artist: Adrienne Crombie, Frenchtown, N.J. Millstone 18th CenturyOne of the two stones used . . . — Map (db m32680) HM
New Jersey (Somerset County), Bound Brook — MiddlebrookEnigma of the British Army
During the 1777 encampment, Washington’s heavily entrenched stronghold defied the massed British Army of 18,000 under Howe and prevented the British movement against Philadelphia by land (June 14 to 30). This delay caused Howe to move by sea, with . . . — Map (db m7761) HM
New Jersey (Somerset County), Bound Brook — Thirteen Star Flag
By special Act of Congress, the Betsy Ross flag is flown here 24 hours each day. This is to commemorate Washington’s Army having encamped in this area June 14, 1777, the day Congress adopted the Flag Resolution. The period of encampment extended . . . — Map (db m7759) HM
New Jersey (Somerset County), Bound Brook — Washington Camp Ground
Dedicated a historic site in 1889 by citizens of the community to memorialize the encampment of Washington’s Army in 1777 and from Nov. 1778 to June 1779. The Middlebrook encampment in New Jersey entered the National Register of Historic Places . . . — Map (db m7762) HM
New Jersey (Union County), Rahway — Rahway
Here, on April 23, 1789, on his way to New York City, Washington was received by troops from Elizabethtown and Newark. He was entertained at the Inn kept by Samuel Smith by gentlemen of the Town. — Map (db m7785) HM
New Jersey (Union County), Union — Washington’s Headquarters
On June 8, 1780 General George Washington established Headquarters at this site in Connecticut Farms (now Union Township) after the British and Hessian army’s retreat of June 7. — Map (db m6934) HM
New York (Montgomery County), Fort Plain — Fort Plain
"Let the Work of Our Fathers Stand" * * * * * On the Adjacent Hill Summit Stood Fort Plain, Erected 1776, and Its Blockhouse, Built 1780. Military Headquarters of the Mohawk Valley 1780 -1784 Gen. Washington Here July 30, 1783 * * * * * Erected by . . . — Map (db m5282) HM
New York (New York County), New York — Black Horse Inn
In 1783 the Black Horse Inn stood on this site and the Bull's Head Tavern adjoined it. Here General George Washington began his triumphal march into the city upon its evacuation by the British November 25, 1783. The Citizens Savings Bank, organized . . . — Map (db m26880) HM
New York (New York County), New York — First Presidential MansionNo. 1 Cherry St.
Occupied by George Washington from April 26 1789 to February 25 1790. — Map (db m43173) HM
New York (New York County), New York — Fort Amsterdam
Adjoining this site was the first Dutch fort on Manhattan Island known as Fort Amsterdam. The first house was erected here before 1664. In 1771 Captain Archibald Kennedy built here his residence which was used in 1776 by General George Washington as . . . — Map (db m20275) HM
New York (New York County), New York — Morris-Jumel Mansion
This Georgian country seat was built by Colonel Roger Morris in 1765. Colonel Morris, a Loyalist, left the house when he returned to England at the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. From September 14 through October 18, 1776, the house was . . . — Map (db m12680) HM
New York (New York County), New York — Morris-Jumel MansionRoger Morris Park, 1,524 acres
Manhattan’s oldest surviving house, Morris-Jumel Mansion, is a monument to colonial grandeur. Built in 1765 as a summer retreat for British colonel Roger Morris and his American wife Mary Philipse, this house is the only survivor of a number of . . . — Map (db m19682) HM
New York (Orange County), Newburgh — Washington’s Headquarters
Washington’s Headquarters has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark. Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the history of the . . . — Map (db m8204) HM
New York (Orange County), Newburgh — Washington’s HeadquartersState Historic Site
The Hasbrouck house served as General Washington’s headquarters from April 1782 until August 1783. He issued the cease-fire orders here on April 19, 1783. Revolutionary War Heritage Trail — Map (db m8725) HM
New York (Rockland County), Suffern — Suffern’s Tavern
Erected     Oct. 4, 1924 Site of Suffern’s Tavern a noted hostelry of the Revolution Headquarters of • General • George Washington • July 15th to 20th, 1777 • Headquarters of Colonel Aaron Burr commanding the troops guarding the Ramapo . . . — Map (db m24974) HM
New York (Rockland County), Tappan — De Wint House
has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States. U.S. . . . — Map (db m7289) HM
New York (Rockland County), Tappan — De Wint House
Washington’s Headquarters Sept. 28-Oct. 2, 1780, during the trial of Andre, British spy, plotter with Benedict Arnold. — Map (db m7294) HM
New York (Rockland County), Tappan — The De Wint House
Dedicated to the American people as a shrine of Patriotism, an altar of Citizenship and a Memorial to George Washington, a great Mason, a great American. May 1, 1932. M.W.Charles H. Johnson Grand Master of Masons State of New York — Map (db m7317) HM
New York (Rockland County), Tappan — This House was Occupied by General George Washington
This House was occupied by General George Washington as Army Headquarters on four occasions during the Revolutionary War. ******** Here the General in 1780, after reviewing the evidence in the case of Major John Andre, Adjunct General of the . . . — Map (db m7316) HM
New York (Rockland County), Tappan — Washington and Carleton Meeting
Commemorating the 200th anniversary of the meetings between General George Washington and General Sir Guy Carleton at Tappan and aboard H.M.S. Perseverance. Jointly by the Historical Society of Rockland County and Tappantown Historical Society. . . . — Map (db m7291) HM
New York (Schenectady County), Schenectady — John Glen House 1740
John Glen House 1740 Washington Occupied N.E. Bedroom, Second Floor On First Visit to Schenectady In 1775 — Map (db m32541) HM
New York (Ulster County), Wallkill — Washington’s HeadquartersLiberty and Washington Streets, Newburgh — Historic New York
General Washington came to the farm home of the Hasbrouck family in Newburgh on April 1, 1782. He occupied the house until August 19, 1783, while his troops were encamped at Temple Hill, a few miles away. These were trying months while a peace . . . — Map (db m385) HM
New York (Westchester County), Cortlandt — House of Pierre Van Cortlandt
General George Washington with his aides slept in this house many nights while making Peekskill their headquarters in 1776, 1777 & 1778. --------------- It was the house of Pierre Van Cortlandt, member of Colonial Assembly, member of the 2nd., 3rd., . . . — Map (db m54295) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Shallotte — D-70 — Washington’s Southern Tour
President Washington, on April 27, 1791, was a guest at the home of William Gause, Jr., which stood four miles north. — Map (db m16277) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — L-84 — Red Hill
Home and tavern of John & Martin Pheifer. Gov. Wm. Tryon and President George Washington among guests. Stood 1 1/2 mi. W. — Map (db m42865) HM
North Carolina (Caswell County), Gatewood — G110 — Washington's Southern Tour
George Washington's last overnight stop in N.C., June 3, 1791, was at the home of Dudley Gatewood, which stood 1 mi. N.E. — Map (db m18522) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — C-19 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington visited in the Stanly home two nights, April 20-21, 1791. — Map (db m23509) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — E 24 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington spent the night, April 18, 1791, in the town of Tarboro. — Map (db m31083) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Halifax — E-25 — Washington’s Southern Tour
President Washington was a visitor in the town of Halifax, on April 16-17, 1791. — Map (db m16177) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 19 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington was a guest Apr. 24-25, 1791, at the Quince home which stood 2 blocks W. — Map (db m28723) HM
North Carolina (Pitt County), Ayden — F-10 — Washington's Southern Tour

President Washington spent the night, Apr. 19, 1791, at Shadrack Allen's Inn, which was 7 mi. E. — Map (db m64955) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Biglerville — Russell Tavern
The original building in which George Washington lodged in October, 1794, while engaged in quelling the Whiskey Rebellion is standing just west within view of this point. — Map (db m63676) HM
Pennsylvania (Adams County), Biglerville — Russell’s Tavern
- This is the original building - George Washington spent the night here Oct. 24, 1794. — Map (db m64297) HM
Pennsylvania (Cumberland County), Carlisle — Blaine House
Home of Gen. Ephraim Blaine, Commissary General of Revolutionary Army, stood on this site. George Washington was a guest here, Oct. 4-11, 1794, while mustering an armed force to quell Whiskey Rebellion in Western Pennsylvania. — Map (db m15855) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — Fort Necessity
Fort Necessity was located about 400 yards to the south in the Great Meadows. Built and commanded, 1754 by Lieutenant Colonel George Washington, aged 22. Here, after 9 hours engagement with M. Coulon de Villiers in command of 900 French regulars and . . . — Map (db m341) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — The Great Meadows
This tablet marks the site of The Great Meadows where Lt. Col. George Washington fought his first battle and made his first and last surrender, July 3-4, 1754. — Map (db m502) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Hopwood — Washington’s Spring
This spring lies in the direct path of what was known as Nemacolin’s Trail. Afterwards Braddock’s Road, and was a favorite sampling spot in early days.

George Washington visited here first in November, 1753, and again in May, 1954. On the . . . — Map (db m74911) HM

Pennsylvania (Montgomery County), King of Prussia — Washington’s Headquarters
For six months this quiet path was a congested thoroughfare. Express riders from Congress, civilians requesting passes, guards posted around the house, couriers rushing out with new orders, foreign officers seeking employment, continually jammed . . . — Map (db m5668) HM
Pennsylvania (Montgomery County), Schwenksville — Pennypacker's Mill and Mansion
Washington's headquarters, September, October, 1777. Last home of Samuel W. Pennypacker, Governor of Pennsylvania, 1903-1907. He died here on September 2, 1916. — Map (db m21492) HM
Pennsylvania (Montgomery County), Schwenksville — Washington's Headquarters
. . . — Map (db m21493) HM
Pennsylvania (Somerset County), Addison — Great Crossings
About one half mile above this point is the "Great Crossings" of the Youghiogheny River, where George Washington crossed November 18th, 1753, when sent as envoy by Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia to the French Commandant at Fort Le Boeuf. Washington, . . . — Map (db m351) HM
Pennsylvania (York County), Hanover — George Washington
1732 - 1932 Stopped at an inn located on this site when passing through Hanover during his presidency. In commemoration of which event this tablet has been erected and dedicated by the Bicentennial Committee of Hanover Pennsylvania in Honour of . . . — Map (db m5006) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Heyward-Washington House
[Upper Marker]: During His Visit to Charleston May 1791 the Guest of the Citizens President George Washington Was Entertained in This House ————— • ————— . . . — Map (db m50452) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Mount Pleasant — 10-20 — Snee Farm
The country home of Charles Pinckney (1757-1824), Snee Farm stands about 0.7 mi. west of here. One of SC's signers of the US Constitution, Pinckney also served in the General Assembly and in Congress. He was elected governor of SC four times and was . . . — Map (db m16340) HM
South Carolina (Georgetown County), Georgetown — 22-5 — Clifton Plantation
President George Washington on his southern tour traveled southward over this road, April 27-30, 1791. While in this vicinity the day and night of April 29, he was the guest of Captain William Alston on this plantation, Clifton, which was . . . — Map (db m4877) HM
South Carolina (Georgetown County), Georgetown — 22-45 — Robert Stewart House
The Robert Steward House was built between 1740 and 1770 by Robert Stewart (d.1776), planter and militia captain; it was acquired in 1787 by Daniel Tucker (d. 1797), prominent Georgetown merchant. When President George Washington arrived in . . . — Map (db m4856) HM
South Carolina (Georgetown County), Pawleys Island — 22-13 — Washington’s Visit
On his southern tour in 1791 President George Washington spent the night of April 28 here at Brookgreen Plantation. He was the guest of its owner, Dr. Henry Collins Flagg, a surgeon in the Revolution, and his wife, the former Rachel Moore Allston. . . . — Map (db m16797) HM
South Carolina (Horry County), Myrtle Beach — 26-1 — Washington’s Southern Tour
On April 27, 1791, President George Washington spent the night nearby at the indigo plantation of Jeremiah Vereen. He wrote in his diary that he was “entertained (& very kindly) without being able to make compensation.” The next day . . . — Map (db m27332) HM
South Carolina (Lancaster County), Heath Springs — 29-10 — James Ingram Home
While on his Southern tour, President George Washington spent the night of May 26, 1791, at the James Ingram house, near here. According to Washington's diary, he left Ingram's at four o'clock the next morning and continued his journey northward, . . . — Map (db m23892) HM
South Carolina (Lancaster County), Lancaster — 29-11 — Barr's Tavern Site
On the morning of May 27, 1791, President George Washington had breakfast near here at Nathan Barr's Tavern, which was located about a mile and a half north of the present Lancaster Courthouse. According to local tradition, Washington paid for . . . — Map (db m23794) HM
South Carolina (Lancaster County), Van Wyck — 29-12 — Major Crawford's Home
Near this site was the home of Major Robert Crawford, where President George Washington spent his last night in South Carolina on his Southern tour, May 27, 1791. Here Washington was met by a delegation of the Chiefs of the Catawba Nation, who set . . . — Map (db m23763) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-7 — The Cherokee Path
Before the Revolution, two major trading routes came together near here. Branching to the west was the road to New Windsor Township on the Savannah. The Cherokee Path extended north to Ninety Six and south through Saxe Gotha Township on the . . . — Map (db m43791) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-71 — Washington Street
This street is named for George Washington, commander of the Continental Army throughout the Revolution, first President of the United States, and president of the 1787 Constitutional Convention. Early in his presidency, Washington toured the . . . — Map (db m21768) HM
South Carolina (Saluda County), Monetta — 41-3 — Jacob Odom House
This site, approximately halfway between Augusta and Columbia, was the location of Jacob Odom's house, where George Washington spent the night of May 21, 1791, on his trip northward through South Carolina. His escort at this time consisted of . . . — Map (db m7115) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Washington’s Town House
Replica of Washington's Town House. Lot purchased by George Washington 1763. House completed 1769 – torn down 1855. Rebuilt by Gov. and Mrs. Richard Barrett Lowe 1960. Bricks & stones from excavation used in construction. Worth Bailey, . . . — Map (db m147) HM
Virginia (Alleghany County), Falling Spring — D 26 — Fort Breckenridge
Three miles west at the mouth of Falling Spring Creek was a post garrisoned by militia under Capt. Robert Breckenridge. Washington inspected it in 1756. It survived an attack by Shawnees under Cornstalk during Pontiac's war in 1763. — Map (db m1832) HM
Virginia (Bath County), Bacova — Q-5 — Fort Dinwiddie
Known also as Byrd’s Fort and Warwick’s Fort. Probably built in 1755, it was visited that year by George Washington. — Map (db m30366) HM
Virginia (Caroline County), Port Royal — The Fox Tavern: A Colonial Landmark
Until the coming of the railroads in the 19th century, the Rappahannock River town of Port Royal was the commercial center of what is now Caroline County, Virginia. Like many ports, it was a raucous place and boasted a disproportionate number of . . . — Map (db m57543) HM
Virginia (Clarke County), White Post — 1750 A.D.
This post was originally placed here by George Washington under the direction of Lord Fairfax. It was erected in 1750 as a guidepost to direct strangers and travelers on the Old Dutch Wagon Road to Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax. — Map (db m1759) HM
Virginia, Covington — D-27 — Fort Young
Constructed nearby about 1756 as a wooden palisaded fort, Fort Young, originally known as Dickinson’s Fort, stood near the Jackson River. It was one in a series of forts authorized by the Virginia General Assembly to be built on the frontier to . . . — Map (db m84052) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Alexandria — George Washington, Farmer
One of the most progressive farmers of his day, George Washington believed America’s future depended on improvements in agriculture. From 1754-1799, he worked to improve his farming methods at Mount Vernon. Abandoning tobacco, which depleted the . . . — Map (db m829) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Great Falls — E 112 — Old Road To The West
Colvin Run Road is a remnant of an 18th-century wagon road from the Shenandoah Valley to Alexandria that probably originated as an Indian path. George Washington passed by here in 1753 and 1754 en route to persuade the French on the Ohio River to . . . — Map (db m1861) HM
Virginia (Fairfax County), Mount Vernon — E-68 — Mount Vernon Estate
George Washington acquired Mount Vernon in 1754. Over a period of 30 years, he transformed the simple farmhouse into a mansion embellished with rusticated wood siding, a cupola, and a portico overlooking the Potomac River. Every aspect of the . . . — Map (db m61098) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — BX 7 — Neavil's Ordinary
Near here stood George Neavil's Ordinary, built at an early date and existing as late as 1792. George Washington and George William Fairfax on their way to the Shenandoah Valley stopped here in 1748. — Map (db m4357) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Q 4c — George Washington in Winchester
In Mar. 1748, George Washington first visited Winchester, then known as Fredericktown, as a surveyor for Lord Fairfax. Washington purchased property in Winchester in 1753 and was an unsuccessful candidate for a House of Burgesses seat here in 1755. . . . — Map (db m2663) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — N 31 — Kenmore
Four blocks west stands Kenmore, built in 1775 by Col. Fielding Lewis for his wife, Betty, sister of George Washington. Near here, between Kenmore and the Rappahannock River, stood Lewis’s warehouses and docks. Kenmore’s intricate plasterwork is the . . . — Map (db m1149) HM
Virginia, Fredericksburg — Weedon’s Tavern
Constructed shortly after Fredericksburg’s founding in 1728, the tavern across the intersection became a popular gathering place under the proprietorship of its first owner, John Gordon, and then of his son-in-law, George Weedon. George Washington . . . — Map (db m1060) HM
Virginia (Madison County), Madison — G-12 — Joseph Early Home
One mile west was the home of Joseph Early, Revolutionary soldier. Washington, in going west and returning, stopped at Early’s overnight. His diary for October 2, 1884, shows that he spent the night before at “Widow Early’s.” — Map (db m1799) HM
Virginia (Orange County), Gordonsville — Gordon Inn
Built by Nathaniel Gordon, 1787. Visited by Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Philip and James Barbour, Clark, Rives, Randolph, Wirt, Waddell, and other celebrities of Revolutionary, post-Revolutionary, and Confederate War periods. Lafayette . . . — Map (db m4794) HM
Virginia, Petersburg — Tavern Park
You are standing within Lot Number One of the Old town of Petersburg, as laid out for Abraham Jones, Jr., in December of 1783. The first owner was William Byrd II of Westover. William Pride purchased the lot in 1745, and, entrepreneur that he was, . . . — Map (db m48486) HM
Virginia (Pittsylvania County), Chatham — L 50 — Peytonsburg
Nearby to the east once stood the community of Peytonsburg a part of Halifax County when the county was formed in 1752. Peytonsburg was incorporated as a town in 1759 by the Virginia General Assembly and became part of Pittsylvania County in . . . — Map (db m20774) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Woodbridge — The Old Potomac Path
The Old Potomac Path Originally an Indian Trail and traversed by early settlers, it later became the first coach and post road between Northern and Southern Colonies, and was called The King’s Highway General Washington often stopped . . . — Map (db m2491) HM
Virginia (Rockbridge County), Natural Bridge — A 72 — Natural Bridge
Natural Bridge holds a unique place in American history as one of the natural wonders and first tourist attractions in the New World. Artists and illustrators popularized its image. This natural semielliptical arch is made of limestone carved by . . . — Map (db m48) HM
Virginia (Stafford County), Ferry Farm — J 61 — George Washington’s Childhood Home
The Washington family moved to a plantation here in 1738 when George Washington was six years old. Along with his three brothers and sister, young Washington spent most of his early life here, where, according to popular fable, he cut down his . . . — Map (db m1708) HM
Virginia (Stafford County), Stafford — E-79 — Peyton’s Ordinary
In this vicinity stood Peyton’s Ordinary. George Washington, going to Fredericksburg to visit his mother, dined here, March 6, 1769. On his way to attend the House of Burgesses, he spent the night here, October 31, 1769, and stayed here again on . . . — Map (db m2187) HM
Virginia, Winchester — George Washington
In March of 1748, George Washington, at age sixteen, arrived in Winchester, then called Frederick Town. During the next four years, he worked as a surveyor throughout the colonial Virginia frontier. — Map (db m2647) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Q 4-h — George Washington’s Out-Lot
Here was located George Washington’s five-acre out-lot from Thomas Lord Fairfax, Baron of Cameron, by grant of 15 May 1753. Fairfax also granted him a companion in-lot 77 at North Braddock Street and Fairfax Lane. The out-lot was number 16 of 80 in . . . — Map (db m2661) HM
Virginia, Winchester — Washington’s Office
While constructing Fort Loudoun, George Washington used the center room of this building as an office from the fall of 1755 until he moved into the fort in December 1756. He was a Colonel in the Virginia Militia and responsible for protecting . . . — Map (db m2648) HM
Virginia (York County), Yorktown — Washington’s Headquarters
General George Washington established his headquarters in this area at the junction of the American encampments to the east and the French encampments to the north. Here he set up two tents: a large one for meeting with his staff and for dining, . . . — Map (db m10865) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Happy Retreat
Now called Mordington, home of Colonel Charles Washington, founder of Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia). His brother General George Washington often visited him here. Colonel Washington died in September 1799. He and his wife Mildred are . . . — Map (db m12070) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Charles Town — Harewood
Erected in 1771. The home of Colonel Samuel Washington, County Lieutenant. His brother General George Washington visited here and General Lafayette and Luis Phillipe of France were entertained here. In this house James Madison and Dolly Payne Todd . . . — Map (db m1914) HM
West Virginia (Monongalia County), Morgantown — George Washington Stopped Here
One half mile north of this marker stood the house where George Washington stopped in September 1784 and conferred with leading men of this section “pursuing my inquiries respecting the navigation of the western waters”. Eager to . . . — Map (db m73343) HM
West Virginia (Morgan County), Paw Paw — Washington Heritage Trail
The Washington Heritage Trail is a 136-mile national scenic byway inspired by the prominent footsteps of George Washington through the three historic counties of West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. Compelling history, spectacular scenery, geologic . . . — Map (db m450) HM
West Virginia (Preston County), Hopemont — Washington's Camp
In 1784 George Washington, Bushrod Washington, James Craik and his son made a horseback journey to inspect their western lands and investigate the feasibility of building a canal from the Potomac River to westward waters. On their return trip, they . . . — Map (db m20842) HM

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