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Washington County Maryland Historical Markers

701 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 501
 
An Indian Deed Marker image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, July 28, 2007
An Indian Deed Marker
Maryland (Washington County), Antietam — An Indian Deed
Israel Friend in 1727 secured a deed from the Indian chiefs of the Five Nations. Beginning “at the mouth of Andietum Creek thence up the Potomack River 200 shoots as fur as an arrow can be slung out of a bow” thence “100 shoots . . . — Map (db m1972) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Antietam — Lock 34, Harpers Ferry
Lock 34 was often referred to as "Goodheart's Lock". Willard Goodheart was the last locktender at this location. Like nearby Lockhouse 33, the lockhouse at Lock 34 was destroyed in the great flood of 1936. Of the 1936 flood, Mr. Goodheart as quoted . . . — Map (db m23872) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — "Old Fort Frederick"
During the American War for Independence Fort Frederick was revitalized for military purposes. The Continental Congress turned the fort into a prison camp to house captured British soldiers. As a result the fort became extremely overcrowded, and . . . — Map (db m96137) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — “...a place of Arms...would be absolutely neccessary”
Throughout the 18th Century, the major colonial powers of France and Great Britain were vying for control of North America. By the 1750's the British extended their settlements westward over the Appalachian Mountains and the French moved south out . . . — Map (db m96135) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — “...to protect, preserve...and provide access thereto for the public.”
During the American War for Independence Fort Frederick was revitalized for military purposes. The Continental Congress turned the fort into a prison camp to house captured British soldiers. As a result the fort became extremely overcrowded, and . . . — Map (db m96138) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Big Pool JunctionWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The eighteen miles of rails between Hagerstown and Big Pool were the busiest of the Western Maryland Railway. It was here in 1892 that a connection was made with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad across the Potomac River at Cherry Run, West . . . — Map (db m735) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickMaryland State Park
Colonial stone fort built 1756 for Province of Maryland by Gov. Horatio Sharpe to protect frontier against French and Indians after Braddock’s defeat. Detention camp for British prisoners 1776–83. Occupied 1861–2 by Union troops. George . . . — Map (db m681) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickA Witness to War
Built by the Maryland colony in 1756 during the French and Indian War, Fort Frederick’s stone walls surrounded three large buildings. The colonists abandoned the frontier fort in 1759, when the threat of Indian raids subsided. During the . . . — Map (db m821) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort Frederick
. . . — Map (db m103762) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort Frederick Officers’ Quarters
A Ghost in the Ground. Before you is the foundation of “The Governor’s House,” the building that served as the officers’ quarters, ceremonial hall and storeroom for Fort Frederick. What did that building look like? We know the size . . . — Map (db m823) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Four Locks
Here the Potomac River makes a meandering four-mile loop around Prather’s Neck. To avoid the bend in the river, the canal engineers cut the canal one-half mile across the neck. Because of the rapid elevation change, these four locks were necessary . . . — Map (db m15285) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m32675) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Mule Power
“Here at Four Locks mule barn, mules rested during the winter months. Boat captains left their mules here, paying a mule tended to care for them. Often the mules grew thin because the keeper did not feed the mules as well as their owners did. . . . — Map (db m15278) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Nathan WilliamsA Prosperous Farm
Nathan Williams was the son of Samuel “Big Sam” Williams, a slave who in 1826 bought freedom for himself, his wife, and his four children. In 1839, the elder Williams purchased a farm near Four Locks, about 3.5 miles east of Fort . . . — Map (db m5571) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m820) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m32677) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Three Eras of Transportation Side by SideWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Facing west, the C&O Canal is visible at the lower left. The coming of the railroad helped to end the usefulness of canals. To the right is the Interstate 70 bridge over the creek. The building of modern roads played a part in making the Western . . . — Map (db m96153) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Spring — Four Locks
Four Locks – locks 47 through 50 – were built between 1836 and 1838, all within a half-mile stretch of the canal. Nestled amongst these four locks, a close-knit community thrived while the canal was in operation. Businesses prospered, . . . — Map (db m36716) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Spring — Lancelot Jacques
A French Hugenot who in partnership with Thomas Johnson in 1768 built "Green Spring Furnace." He and Johnson dissolved partnership in 1776 when Johnson became first governor of Maryland. Jacques' house built about 1766. — Map (db m47120) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonesboro — The Maryland Campaign of 1862
On September 4, 1862, General Robert E. Lee, hoping to shorten the war by winning a decisive victory on Northern soil, crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. Lee planned to draw the Army of the Potomac through South Mountain into Pennsylvania and . . . — Map (db m2041) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — “Crampton’s Gap” “Maryland Heights” and “Pleasant Valley”
Important points during the first invasion of Maryland by the Army of the Confederacy in 1862. — Map (db m1879) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Battle of BoonsboroBuying Time — Gettysburg Campaign
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart faced a difficult assignment: to locate the Union cavalry and prevent it from severing Gen. Robert E. Lee’s avenue of retreat to Williamsport and the Potomac River after the Battle of Gettysburg. The result was the . . . — Map (db m1630) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — BoonsboroLee's Headquarters — Antietam Campaign 1862
After Gen. Robert E. Lee issued Special Order 191 near Frederick dividing the Army of Northern Virginia into four columns, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command marched across South Mountain on September 10, 1862. His column . . . — Map (db m1872) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Cannon of Revolutionary War
(War of American Independence) 1775–1783 forged Mount Aetna, Maryland Dedicated July 4, 1906 Rededicated July 5, 1992 Charles F. Kauffman, Jr. Mayor, Town of Boonsboro Robert J. Shifler, Assistant Mayor • Kevin M. Chambers, Councilman • . . . — Map (db m2005) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Deaths of Two Generals“Hallo, Sam, I’m dead!” — Antietam Campaign 1862
The fight for Fox’s Gap on September 14, 1862, claimed the lives of two generals, one from each side. Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland, a Lynchburg, Virginia native, attended the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington and later obtained his law . . . — Map (db m455) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m1913) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gettysburg CampaignThe Battle of Boonsboro
Two U.S. Cavalry divisions repulsed five rebel cavalry brigades in a day-long fight north of Boonsboro on July 8, 1863. The South Mountain passes remained open to the Federal Army in pursuit of the Confederates retreating from Gettyburg via . . . — Map (db m7008) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gravesite of William Boone
Gravesites of William Boone, d. 1798 and his wife Susanna Parks Boone, b. 1755 - d. 1844 William and his brother, George, founded Boone's Berry, now known as Boonsboro, in 1792 The graves are located near the original Boone . . . — Map (db m107565) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno
(front) 9th Army Corps. September 14, 1862. Reno. (west side) This monument marks the spot where Major Gen. Jesse Lee Reno, commanding 9th Army Corps U.S. Vol’s, was killed in battle Sept. 14, 1862. (south . . . — Map (db m389) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Near Here in Wise’s Field
Near here in Wise's field on the morning of Sept. 14, 1862, Brigadier General Samuel Garland, Jr. C.S.A. of Lynchburg, Virginia fell mortally wounded while leading his men. — Map (db m429) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — North Carolina
(Front Side): In Memory of the North Carolinians who fought at or near here September 14, 1862. The 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 20th, 23rd, 30th Infantry and Manly's and Reilly's Battery, 1st NC Artillery. General . . . — Map (db m4325) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Roxbury Mills Bridge
This bridge was built in 1824, in close proximity to Roxbury Mills, an early sawmill and later a large distillery complex which operated into the 20th century. A three-arch bridge over the Antietam, it was one of a series of bridges built for the . . . — Map (db m5036) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — St. Mark's Episcopal ChurchRefuge for the "sick and wounded"
St. Mark's Episcopal Church is located just six miles north of Sharpsburg, site of the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, the bloodiest one-day battle in American history. With approximately 23,000 Americans on both sides killed, wounded, or . . . — Map (db m103404) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Stonewall Jackson's Way
Under Special Order 191, Maj. Gen Thomas J. Jackson led Confederate troops from Frederick to capture Harper's Ferry. On Sept. 11, 1862, Jackson's Second Corps moved by this road from its encampment near Boonsborough to cross the Potomac at . . . — Map (db m3912) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — S580C — Stonewall Regiment
More than 90,000 Michigan men served in the Union Army and Navy during the Civil War. The 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment was mustered at the Detroit Barracks in August 1862 under the command of Colonel William H. Withington. The regiment . . . — Map (db m398) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Battle for Fox’s Gap“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.” — Antietam Campaign 1862
As Confederate Gen. D.H. Hill’s division struggled to hold the gaps of South Mountain on September 14, 1862, the fighting here at Fox’s Gap raged throughout the day. About 9 a.m., Gen. Jesse L. Reno’s corps attacked Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland’s . . . — Map (db m454) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg
The bloodiest conflict of the War Between the States occurred September 17, 1862, a few miles from this point (turn left in the center of Boonsboro). — Map (db m456) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Boys from Boonsboro DistrictWorld War: 1914 - 1918
[Street side]: [Emblem of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics] Erected in honor of the boys from Boonsboro District by South Mountain Council No. 88, Jr. O.U.A.M. and Citizens of the community. July 4th, 1919. . . . — Map (db m16491) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Dahlgren Chapel
This chapel was built around 1881 by Madeline Vinton Dahlgren, widow of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, USN, inventor of the Dahlgren gun, the armament used by the USS Monitor against the CSS Virginia, formerly the steam frigate USS Merrimack. — Map (db m1297) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Lost Orders
No other document of the Civil War has generated so much controversy as Lee's Special Orders No. 191. These “Lost Orders” detailed the movements of Lee's army for the operation against Harpers Ferry. On September 9 Lee sent copies of the . . . — Map (db m2042) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m1911) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Town of Boonsboro Maryland uses Macadam to Complete the National Road
The National Road from Baltimore to Cumberland was comprised of a series of privately funded turnpikes. By 1822, the road was complete except for the ten miles between Boonsboro and Hagerstown. In August of the year, under pressure from the state . . . — Map (db m1162) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Washington MonumentSignal Station — Antietam Campaign 1862
During the Antietam Campaign, the U.S. Signal Corps used the stone structure in front of you and to your left as a signal station. On July 4, 1827, citizens of the town of Boonsboro paraded to the top of the mountain here and began building this . . . — Map (db m1161) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — Battle of Maryland HeightsMaryland's First Civil War Battle — Antietam Campaign 1862
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's smashing victory over Union Gen. John Pope at the Second Battle of Manassas, Lee decided to invade the North to reap the fall harvest, gain Confederate recruits, earn foreign recognition, and . . . — Map (db m59630) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — Brownsville-Burkittsville Pass
Marching from Middletown to seize Maryland Heights, McLaws’ and Anderson’s Confederate Divisions crossed South Mountain by this road September 11, 1862. On September 14th Manley’s N.C. Battery and elements of Semmes’ Brigade defended the pass and . . . — Map (db m2068) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — St. Luke’s Episcopal ChurchBrownsville, Maryland — Founded 1837
During the civil war, St. Luke’s served as headquarters for General Lafayette McLaws, who’s troops from the Army of Northern Virginia were bivouacked around Brownsville, September 11, 1862. It served as a hospital for his wounded following the . . . — Map (db m2072) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cascade — War Returns to South MountainBattle of Monterey Pass — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface):After a stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland into Pennsylvania, marching next to threaten Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. . . . — Map (db m31048) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Crossing the Mason and DixonPennsylvania, at Last! — Gettysburg Campaign
Four thousands of Confederates in Gen. Robert E. Lee's invasion of the North in 1863, the rate of march exceeded thirty miles a day. Since this part of Maryland is so narrow, splashing across the Potomac River in the morning and crossing the Mason . . . — Map (db m11608) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m11609) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Mason and Dixon Line105th Mile Stone
500 feet beyond this point, on private property, this stone is located. It bears the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore and William Penn. the 104th mile stone and the 103rd mile stone bear the letters M and P Maryland-Pennsylvania and are located along . . . — Map (db m11610) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Sping — Clear Spring Veterans Memorial
This memorial is dedicated to all those who have served honorably in the armed forces of the United States of America. The citizens of Clear Spring, Maryland area thank you and your families for your service and sacrifice. — Map (db m67350) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — “The Bank Road”The Cumberland Turnpike Road
The portion of this highway from the west end of the Conococheague bridge to Cumberland (40 miles) was built between 1816 and 1821. The banks of Maryland financed it by purchase of the stock. — Map (db m699) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — A Road Nurtures A VisionThe Historic National Road and Clear Spring
“The citizens at all times aim to be surpassed by no other town in the County.” –Martin Lehr, Clear Spring historian, 1890’s. In 1821, Martin Myers chose a site that straddled a “clear spring” at the foot . . . — Map (db m694) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Capt. Samuel G. Prather
(North face): In memory of Capt. Samuel G. Prather. Who raised and commanded the 2nd Co. of the Potomac Home Brigade Maryland (Vols.) in Great Rebellion of 1861 against the only Free Government on the earth and died at his post of duty . . . — Map (db m25140) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Clear Spring
The spring from which the Town of Clear Spring acquired its name. — Map (db m693) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Fort FrederickMaryland State Park
Colonial stone fort built 1756 for Province of Maryland by Gov. Horatio Sharpe to protect frontier against French and Indians after Braddock’s defeat. Detention camp for British prisoners 1776–83. Occupied 1861–2 by Union troops. George . . . — Map (db m680) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Fort Mills
← One of the four stockade forts erected in 1756 along the North Mount Road as supports for Fort Frederick in preventing the Indians from descending upon the inhabitants living in the Cumberland Valley. — Map (db m5930) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gen. J. E. B. Stuart’s Cavalry
Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry on his raid around the Federal army, Oct. 19, 1862, crossed the National Road here after crossing the Potomac River at McCoy’s Ferry three miles south of this point. — Map (db m682) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m695) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m60555) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — McCoy's Ferry
On May 23, 1861 Confederates attempting to capture the ferry boat at McCoy's Landing were driven off by the Clear Spring Guard. Here on October 10, 1862, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart crossed the Potomac on his second ride around McClellan's army. — Map (db m3914) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Miller's Tavern & Spickler's Buggy FactorySurreys, Stagecoaches and Tin Lizzies
The Miller Hotel was one of the most popular destinations along the National Road in Washington County. Traveler T.B. Seabright recalled in 1894 “There were large rooms adapted to dancing purposes, and young men and maidens of the vicinity . . . — Map (db m60556) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Protecting Cultural Resources
Floods occur at regular intervals in the Potomac Valley. Between 1829 and 1998 there have been 144 recorded floods or high water occurrences. repairing flood damage was a continuing battle for the C&O Canal Company and is still a problem for the . . . — Map (db m25142) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Stonewall Jackson at Dam 5
At the outbreak of the Civil War, Maryland became a border between the Confederacy and the Union. The Confederacy knew that the canal and railroad were important Union supply lines. Stonewall Jackson’s Brigade made several attempts to destroy Dam 5 . . . — Map (db m23561) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — The Federal Signal Station
near this point was captured Oct. 10, 1862 by a detachment of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry. On clear days this station could communicate with stations on South Mountain which relayed messages via Catoctin Mt. to Sugar Loaf Mt. to Washington, D.C. — Map (db m5588) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Vital CrossroadsClear Springs in the Civil War
This was a lively Unionist community on the important National Road during the war. In nearby Four Locks on January 31, 1861, local residents raised a 113-foot-high “Union Pole” with a streamer proclaiming the “Union . . . — Map (db m60553) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Springs — Wilson’s StoreStore of Three Wonders
"You wonder if we have it. We wonder where it is. You wonder how we found it!” That is how Janice Keefer remembered her father’s store during the 42 years that Dorsey Martin conducted business here. Originally opened by Rufus Wilson in 1850, . . . — Map (db m4932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Conococheague — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5925) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — D-Day Anniversary
On this day, June 6, in the year 1944 allied forces invaded Normandy - the most massive invasion attempt in history. By nightfall, they had liberated 80 miles of French soil and a toehold for the consequential drive into Germany was established. . . . — Map (db m103019) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — Military Intelligence Training Center
In the early days of World War II, Camp Ritchie, then a National Guard training camp, was taken over by the federal government. A Military Intelligence Training Center was established to train intelligence units. A tight wall of security was drawn . . . — Map (db m103022) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — Robert F. Barrick Memorial Library
Robert Frederick Barrick entered the military service in 1909 as a private in the Maryland National Guard in Frederick, Maryland. He was commissioned in 1917. In 1926, he was given the task of building a Maryland National Guard training camp on a . . . — Map (db m103021) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — The Ice Lakes
Until the mid-1920s, the Buena Vista Ice Company of Germantown (now Cascade), Maryland, was located on this site for the harvesting of natural ice used to preserve produce and dairy products during shipment. It was one of the southernmost operations . . . — Map (db m103023) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Fort Ritchie — WW II Veterans Memorial
This monument and a memorial woods are set aside to forever preserve the memory of the 7900 Washington County World War II veterans, 228 of whom gave their lives for the good of their country. Dedicated this 11th day of November, 2004. Historical . . . — Map (db m103020) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Baltimore StreetFunkstown’s Link to the Chesapeake
When the National Road was completed through Funkstown in 1823, a rush of “stagecoaches and wagon teams, droves of cattle, teamsters and travelers” flooded through the town. Although Baltimore was seventy miles to the east, the Funkstown . . . — Map (db m2007) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Battle of FunkstownJuly 10, 1863
After Gettysburg, in order to mask entrenching operations along the Potomac river by General R. E. Lee, Confederate troops, led by General J.E.B. Stuart, engaged Union forces under General John Buford. The day-long battle east of the road resulted . . . — Map (db m388) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Battle of FunkstownAt Bay another Day — Gettysburg Campaign
The Confederate presence at Funkstown threatened any Union advance against Gen. Robert E. Lee’s position near Williamsport and the Potomac River as he retreated to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, posted at . . . — Map (db m1158) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Building the Funkstown Bridge
“The turnpike bridge at Funkstown is the only one...which seems to belong to a town” —Helen Ashe Hays, The Antietam and its Bridges This bridge, finished in 1823, is perhaps the oldest one over Antietam Creek. . . . — Map (db m2010) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Civil War Hospital SiteAngela Kirkham Davis House
Civil War Hospital Site Angela Kirkham Davis House Was used as a hospital during The Maryland Campaign 1862 Private Property courtesy of S.H.A.F. — Map (db m2008) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Claggett’s Millrace Bridge
Although it vaults only a millrace deflected from Antietam Creek proper, this small but well-designed one-arch bridge is typical of many others that have not survived at mill sites in the county. It is not certain that John Weaver built this 53' . . . — Map (db m5669) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Claggett's Mill Bridge
This three-arch bridge over Antietam Creek was completed by John Weaver in 1840 for $2,800. It was near the mill operated for generations by the Claggett family. The house, barn, and outbuildings of the Claggett estate, "Valentia," stand nearby. . . . — Map (db m5031) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Funkstown Bridge No. 2
This bridge over Antietam Creek at Funkstown was built in 1833 by George Weaver for $1,800. At this site was Shafer’s Mill where flour was ground. The most notable feature of this bridge is the graduated size of its three arches, growing larger from . . . — Map (db m2009) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Keller Home
Used to treat Confederate officer H.D. McDaniel 11th GA. Regt. during the battle of Funkstown July 10, 1863, who suffered a severe wound and was brought to this house. He survived to later become governor of Georgia. — Map (db m2006) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — M3A1 Light Tank"Stuart"
Crew: 4 men - commander, loader, gunner, driver Weight: 28,500 lbs. Max Speed: 36 mph Cruising Range: 70 miles (road) 135 miles (with drop tanks) Weapons System: M6 37mm main gun M1919A4 .30 caliber flexible on turret M1919A4 .30 caliber . . . — Map (db m25453) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Rose's Mill Bridge
This handsome three-arch bridge over Antietam Creek was constructed by John Weaver in 1839 and was specially adapted to the grain mill which was built at the same time. The westernmost of the three arches was designed to accommodate the millrace . . . — Map (db m4930) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — This Plot is Dedicated to Public Use
By the citizens of the Funkstown District in grateful appreciation of the services of those of her citizens who were engaged with the military, navy and marine forces of the United States in the World War. 1914-1918 E. Blanche Hoffmaster, Army . . . — Map (db m6539) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Gapland — “Crampton Gap”
An important part of the Battle of South Mountain was fought here September 14-15, 1862, when the Federal forces pressed the Confederate troops back into Pleasant Valley and on to Sharpsburg — Map (db m3901) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Gapland — Confederate Retreat
Driven from Crampton’s Gap on Sept. 14, 1862, by Gen. Franklin’s Sixth Corps, elements of McLaws’ Confederates formed across Pleasant Valley to bar Union advance on Maryland Heights and Harper’s Ferry. Later these Confederates joined Lee about . . . — Map (db m2065) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — A City Divided
The Hagerstown Mail offices were located on the second floor of this building during the Civil War. Due to the newspaper's pro-Southern columns, the Mail's editor and co-owner, Daniel Dechert, was arrested in 1862 and sent to Old Capitol Prison in . . . — Map (db m20792) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — A City Divided
The Lyceum, a public debating hall constructed circa 1848, stood on this site during the Civil War. Heated debates took place here prior to the Civil War on the state of the Union. Following the Battles of Antietam and Gettysburg, the Lyceum was . . . — Map (db m20847) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Ammon H. Kreider & Lewis E. Reisner
The fathers of the Hagerstown aircraft industry, Lewis Reisner and Ammon Kreider formed the Kreider Reisner Aircraft Company in 1923. They developed highly regarded models of civilian use aircraft. In 1929, they sold the company to the Fairchild . . . — Map (db m107148) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Anna Spencer Brugh Singer1878-1962 — Artistic And Business Figure
Anna Spencer Brugh Singer was born in Hagerstown and married William H. Singer, Jr. in 1895. Together they pursued an artistic life; he as an artist, she as an art collector and musician. They traveled the United States and Europe, befriended many . . . — Map (db m107264) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Antietam Battlefield
12 miles to Antietam National Battlefield Site, where on Sept. 17, 1862, about 41,000 Confederates under the command of General Robert E. Lee were pitted against 87,000 Federals under General George B. McClellan. — Map (db m1965) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Bench Mark "A"
"In October 1877, Bench Mark "A" was cut on the water table of the recently rebuilt courthouse in Hagerstown, Maryland", reads the report of the coast and geodetic survey to President McKinley. This was the beginning point of a . . . — Map (db m6529) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Bloom Park
Bloom Park was one of the very first monuments erected in the United States to honor the veterans of the Spanish-American War (1898-99). It was dedicated on July 4, 1900. The keynote speaker at the ceremony was Henry Kyd Douglas a former Adjutant . . . — Map (db m107396) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Christian Newcomer Home
Christian Newcomer, 1749-1830, was one of the founders of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, the first American-born denomination. He moved to Washington County in 1775 and in his journal described crossing the Allegany Mountains ... . . . — Map (db m6789) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Corporal William Othello Wilson
United States Army Medal of Honor Recipient and Buffalo Soldier William Othello Wilson, a native of Hagerstown, Maryland, enlisted in the U.S. Army on August 21, 1889, at age 22 in St. Paul, Minnesota. He was subsequently assigned to the . . . — Map (db m5755) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Crossroads of HistoryRoute 40 & 11 Cross At This Point
In the court house that stood on this site Confederate Gen. John McCausland was given $20,000 in cash and all of the suits, hats, shoes, boots, shirts and socks that could be found as ransom upon his threat to burn Hagerstown in July of 1864. . . . — Map (db m1934) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Edward Mayberry Mobley1825-1906 — Military Figure
In 1862 Mobley organized volunteers from Hagerstown to serve in the Civil War, forming Co. A, 7th Maryland Infantry (US). He served as its captain. He was promoted to major in January, 1864 and commanded the regiment in numerous battles. on August . . . — Map (db m107262) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Elliott-Bester House
Boyhood home of Commodore Jesse D. Elliott, USN, (1872-1845) of Battle of Lake Erie fame during War of 1812. This National Register property preserved in memory of Mrs. Mary B.K. Bowman. — Map (db m46719) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Fighting House to House,Yard to Yard
“Several others who were hidden in houses escaped by donning citizen’s clothing, and Private Anitpas H. Curtis (Company D), while so dressed, had the distinction of saluting General Lee in person.” George G. Benedict in “Vermont in . . . — Map (db m60557) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — First Battle of HagerstownVicious Fighting in the Streets — Gettysburg Campaign
Combat raged here in the town square and in adjoining city blocks for six hours on Monday, July 6, 1863. Holding Hagerstown was crucial to Gen. Robert E. Lee's retreat to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. If the Confederates lost this . . . — Map (db m6533) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — For God and Country
In loving memory of those who gave their lives in the World Wars 1917-1918 [list of names] 1941-1945 [list of names] In loving memory of those who gave their lives in the Korean Conflict 1950-1953 [list of names] Rededicated by . . . — Map (db m6528) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Gen. Robert E. Lee
Gen. Robert E. Lee with Longstreet’s Corps entered Hagerstown Sept. 11, 1862 to make it a base for operations in Pennsylvania. On Sept. 14, 1862 this force hastened to the battle of South Mountain and then to the battlefield of Antietam. — Map (db m1156) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m6531) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Great Indian Warrior/Trading Path
The most heavily traveled road in Colonial America passed through here, linking areas from the Great Lakes to Augusta, GA. Laid on ancient animal and Native American Trading/Warrior Paths. Indian treaties among the Governors of NY, PA, & VA and the . . . — Map (db m797) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hager House and Museum
When German immigrant and founder of Hagerstown, Jonathan Hager, arrived in this country in 1736, western Maryland area was frontier. Maryland’s colonial governor was offering cheap land to those willing to settle here. In 1739, Hager obtained . . . — Map (db m1160) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hager MillHeart of the Civil War Heritage Area
Hager Mill was constructed in 1790 by Daniel Stull and Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and the nearby miller's house has a date stone inscribed 1791. Prior to the Civil War, it was owned by the Hager Family. During the war, Andrew Hager operated this . . . — Map (db m106780) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hager’s Fancy(Circa 1740)
Third dwelling was built by Jonathan Hager, founder of Hagerstown Maryland, 1762; Captain of Scouts, French and Indian War, 1755–1763; member of the Non-Importation Association and of the Committees of Safety and of Observation, 1775; member . . . — Map (db m1159) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians In The Civil WarBrevet Brigadier General George Bell, USA 1828 - 1907
George Bell was the son of William Duffield Bell, developer of South Prospect Street and editor of the Hagerstown Torchlight newspaper. He grew up in this neighborhood. An 1853 graduate of West Point, Bell served at several posts in . . . — Map (db m44835) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians In The Civil WarCongressman James Dixon Roman 1809-1867
This building was Congressman Roman's home from the time he purchased it in 1845 until his death in 1867. A prominent member of the Whig Party, Roman was elected to the House of Representatives during the 30th Congress (1847-1849). He declined . . . — Map (db m45185) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians in the Civil WarGovernor William T. Hamilton, 1820-1888
William T. Hamilton was born in Boonsboro. He attended the Hagerstown Academy and Jefferson College in Pennsylvania. Hamilton passed the bar in 1845 and opened a law practice in Hagerstown. After serving one year in the Maryland Legislature, he was . . . — Map (db m60558) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians in the Civil WarMargaret Greenawalt, 1824-1911 Catharine Bonebrake Bowman, 1821-1902
Many communities in this region boast of stories similar to Frederick's Barbara Fritchie or Middletown's Nancy Crouse, who defied the Confederates during their invasions of Maryland. Hagerstown is no exception. Although the specific date of . . . — Map (db m107235) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians in the Civil WarDr. John Absalom Wroe, 1817-1874
This home was constructed around 1838. During the Civil War, it was the home of Dr. John Absalom Wroe and his family. A native of Virginia, Wroe helped to treat wounded Confederate and union soldiers who were left in the City when the rebel army . . . — Map (db m107241) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstonians in the Civil WarColonel Henry Kyd Douglas, CSA 1838-1903
Douglas was raised at Ferry Hill Place, on the Maryland side of the Potomac River at Shepherdstown. In 1861, he enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Infantry and fought in the Battle of First Manassas. From April to October, 1862, Douglas was the youngest . . . — Map (db m107394) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — HagerstownBringing Farm Products to Maryland's Great Valley
Following Jonathan Hager’s arrival in 1739, German and Scots-Irish immigrants settled in Maryland’s Great Valley, developing prosperous farms. By the mid 1790’s, agriculture was booming and the region needed a way to get its products to market. . . . — Map (db m6532) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Hagerstown Ransomed
On July 6th, 1864, Confederate Cavalry General John McCausland and his 1,500 troops demanded a ransom of $20,000 from Hagerstown, or the town would be burned. Three local banks gave up the money, underwritten by the town council. After the war, a . . . — Map (db m6530) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Henry Kyd Douglas1838 - 1903 — Military And Literary Figure
An officer in the Confederate army, Douglas served with distinction on the small personal staff of General “Stonewall” Jackson during the Valley Campaign (1862) which made Jackson a legend in military history. Wounded six times, Douglas . . . — Map (db m107553) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — In Memory Of1898-1902
In memory of the the men from Washington County Maryland who served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America during the war with Spain, the China Relief Expedition and the Philippine Insurrection. — Map (db m8139) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jacob Francis Wheaton1835-1924 — Civil Rights And Education Figure
Jacob Wheaton was born in Middletown, Maryland and moved to Hagerstown in the 1850s. he is believed to be the first African-American to vote in Maryland after the civil war for casting h1s vote in the Hagerstown Mayoral Election of 1868. In 1897, he . . . — Map (db m107266) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jacob Wheaton1835-1924
Raised in Middletown in Frederick County, Wheaton had a prominent role in the post-civil war civic involvement of African Americans in the state. Contemporary accounts credit Wheaton as the first African American in Maryland to vote when he . . . — Map (db m107361) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jesse Duncan Elliott1782 - 1845 — Military Figure
Elliott was born in Hagerstown and raised on South Potomac Street. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1804 and rose to the rank of Commodore. He served in the Tripolitan War (1804 -1807) and the events between the American and British navies that led to . . . — Map (db m107147) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — John Brown
The Washington House Hotel was a major stop on the National Pike and served as a hospital at times throughout the Civil War. Prior to organizing his raid on the Federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, John Brown registered under the assumed name of "I. . . . — Map (db m20846) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — John D. Zentmyer
Principal Hagerstown High School 1926-1946 Educator of youth for thirty-eight years. Leader in character building & academic excellence. Thousands, young & old, benefited by his example & guidance. Memorial erected by students & friends of . . . — Map (db m6526) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — John V. Jamison, Sr. and John V. Jamison Jr.
In 1906, J. V. Jamison, Sr. and two partners founded the Jones Cold Store Door Company. He soon bought his partners' interest. Over five decades, he and his son, J. V. Jamison, Jr. grew the company (renamed the Jamison Cold Storage Door Company) . . . — Map (db m107056) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jonathan Hager1714 1775
Founder of Hagerstown. Co-founder of this church. Buried west of main building. — Map (db m8138) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jonathan Hager1714 -1775 — Business And Industry Figure
Jonathan Hager was the founder of the City of Hagerstown. He was born in Germany and immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1736. In 1739, he purchased 200 acres of land in what is now the western part of Hagerstown and engaged in numerous business ventures. . . . — Map (db m107144) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Jonathan Hager HouseCirca 1740
October 16, 1739, Jonathan Hager took up “Hager’s Fancy” 200 acres in the valley of Antietam Creek. A year later he married Elizabeth Kershner for whom Elizabeth-Town (Hagerstown) was named and established his home here. In 1944 it was . . . — Map (db m1157) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Mary Lemist Titcomb1857 - 1932 — Education And Business Figure
Titcomb began her career in library science in Concord, Massachusetts. in 1901, she became the first director of the newly-created Washington county free library on Summit Avenue. She served for over 30 years. Titcomb was an innovator in county-wide . . . — Map (db m107092) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Mason and Dixon Line100th Mile Stone
Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary line. Surveyed and marked 1763-68 by two English astronomers, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon. This is one of the "Crown" stones, set every five miles displaying the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore on south and Penns . . . — Map (db m6107) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Matthias Peter Möller1854 - 1937 — Business And Industry Figure
Möller was the founder of some of the most successful businesses in Hagerstown's history. He moved his organ factory to Hagerstown in 1881 and it grew to become the largest in the world. it produced over 11,000 instruments before closing in 1992. in . . . — Map (db m107055) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Maurice Edward Frock1899-1918
Frock enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1916. During World War I, he served in France with the 5th Marine Regiment. In June, 1918, he was detached from his company to serve at battalion headquarters. Frock earned two silver star medals for . . . — Map (db m107259) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Military Occupation
The Independent Junior Fire Company was formed in 1842. Their firehouse was constructed in 1852 and altered in 1881. During the Civil War, the Juniors' firehouse was used by the U.S. Army for various purposes and served as a field hospital to treat . . . — Map (db m20768) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — MillingGrist to the Mill
Before it was transformed into the Mural of Unusual Size, this industrial building operated one of the largest milling institutions in Western Maryland. The operations were so extensive, the mill consumed more grain than the community could produce. . . . — Map (db m107939) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Mount ProspectNathanial Rochester House
This is the original site of "Mount Prospect," also known as "The Rochester House." Nathanial Rochester built the house in 1789 on ground which once belonged to Jonathan Hager, the founder of Hagerstown. The home was used as a "way station" during . . . — Map (db m20852) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Mt. Aetna Cannon
 Mt. Aetna Furnace, at which this cannon was cast in 1776, was located one mile west along Mt. Aetna Road from its predecessor Antietam furnace which was along Mt. Lena Road. Numerous records from the Revolutionary period describe the . . . — Map (db m45455) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Old Forge Bridge
This three-arch bridge was erected at a cost $2,800 by W. H. Eirely in 1863 over a ford in Antietam Creek. The east arch of this bridge spans a path once used for cattle. A forge, part of a large ironworks operation owned by the Hughes brothers, was . . . — Map (db m6521) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Old Forge Farm
The main block of this house was built in 1762 by Ceorge French. In 1764, it was purchaed by the Hughes family and was Daniel Hughes' home until his death in 1818. He added the wing to the east. Hughes and his borther Samuel were iron manufacturers . . . — Map (db m6535) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — One of Lee’s Ammunition Trains
One of Lee’s ammunition trains was captured here Sept. 15, 1862 by 1200 Federal cavalry under Col. B. F. Davis, escaping from Gen. T. J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s capture of Harpers Ferry. This loss was felt by the Confederate army at the . . . — Map (db m386) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Peter Buys1881 - 1964 — Entertainment Figure
An E-flat clarinetist, Peter Buys joined the U.S. Military Academy Band in 1893. He joined John Philip Sousa's band in 1912 and became a protégé and friend of that music icon. In 1917, Buys left the Sousa band to become a band director, but he . . . — Map (db m107095) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Ransom of Hagerstown
The existing City Hall was constructed in 1939, replacing the 1818 City Hall on this location. Town Treasurer and City Councilman Matthew Barber negotiated with Confederate General John McCausland regarding the ransom of Hagerstown in 1864. Retreat . . . — Map (db m20767) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Ransom of Hagerstown
This courthouse was built in 1873, replacing the courthouse that stood at this site during the Civil War. In 1864, Confederate General John McCausland met with town officials and the directors of the Hagerstown Bank in the court clerk's office to . . . — Map (db m20848) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Retreat from Gettysburg
Zion Reformed Church was a stronghold for the Confederates on their retreat from Gettysburg on July 6, 1863. General Robert E. Lee passed through Hagerstown during the Confederate occupation following the Battle of Gettysburg. General George . . . — Map (db m20769) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Retreat from Gettysburg
St. John's Lutheran Church was erected in 1795. During the Civil War on July 6, 1863, cavalry of both armies clashed in the streets of Hagerstown from noon until dark. Observers recorded that the streets were full of dead and wounded soldiers and . . . — Map (db m20855) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Rose Hill
Part of an original grant of 10,000 acres known as Conococheague Manor, the mansion house was built early in the 1800's and tradition attributes its design to Benjamin H. Latrobe. It is noted for its Adam woodwork and for its great hall with a . . . — Map (db m7997) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Rose Hill Cemetery
....North and South Reunited For Eternity Some of the Civil War notables buried here in Rose Hill Include: Mary Landon Mason Alexander (1861-1946)- Second wife of Confederate General Edward Porter Alexander. Bvt. Brigadier . . . — Map (db m44845) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Second Battle of HagerstownCuster Captures the Town — Gettysburg Campaign
Six days had passed since the Federals had failed in their first attempt to seize Hagerstown as they pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate army retreating to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. On Sunday morning, July 12, 1863, a decisive . . . — Map (db m6534) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Shenandoah Valley Railroad
The Shenandoah Valley Railroad was chartered in 1870 to connect the Pennsylvania (Cumberland Valley) Railroad at Hagerstown, with Virginia and Tennessee Railroad in Salem, Virginia. The line was connected to this point in 1880. A large . . . — Map (db m45693) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — St. John's Church
Construction was begun in August of 1872 with the cornerstone being laid on September 4, 1872. Opening services were held on October 11, 1875. Cruciform in shape and Gothic in style, the structure is made of native blue hammered limestone . . . — Map (db m20861) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Cumberland Valley Railroad
The first railroad to serve Hagerstown was the Franklin Railroad (F.R.R.). The City of Hagerstown invested $20,000 in this venture. The F.R.R. connected Hagerstown to the Cumberland Valley Railroad (C.V.R.R.) which ran from Chambersburg to . . . — Map (db m45598) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Harmon Hotel
The Harmon Hotel stood here, one of more than 40 properties owned by Walter Harmon (1869-1915), a local African-American businessman who amassed a fortune in real estate. A McGaheysville, VA native, Harmon had 10 children and 20 grandchildren. Most . . . — Map (db m5675) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Last Confederate Incursion North of the Potomac River
On July 29, 1864, elements of Cole's Maryland Cavalry (Union) battled Brigadier General John C. Vaughn's cavalry brigade of Early's command for three hours in the streets of Hagerstown. By late afternoon, the Marylanders retreated north to . . . — Map (db m20856) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Long Meadow
Originally patented 1739 to Col. Thomas Cresap. Acquired 1746 by Daniel Dulany. Sold 1763 to Col. Henry Bouquet. Left by his will to Col. Haldimand. Acquired 1773 by Gen. Jos. Sprigg. Purchased 1789 by Thos. Hart, partner of Nathaniel Rochester . . . — Map (db m8137) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — The Ransom of Hagerstown
The Hagerstown Bank stood at this site until it was demolished in the mid-1930s. The current Hagerstown Trust Bank is a direct descendant of the Hagerstown Bank. The bank's Board of Directors, led by President James Dixon Rodman, took the lead in . . . — Map (db m20837) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — This Bronze Cannon
This bronze cannon was made at Douai France in 1751, by Berenger the great gun manufacturer, for the House of the Bourbons. After many travels and vicissitudes, it was discovered mounted in defence of Fort Morro Santiago, Cuba. Upon the surrender of . . . — Map (db m8140) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Thomas Kennedy(1776-1832)
The Maryland Constitution in 1818 maintained religious test requirements that effectively prohibited Jews from being elected to state office. Kennedy, a Scottish Presbyterian immigrant, was elected to the House of Delegates in 1817 from Washington . . . — Map (db m8141) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Thomas Kennedy1776 - 1832 — Civil Rights Figure
An advocate of religious liberty, Thomas Kennedy was born in Scotland and immigrated to America in 1795. He was elected to represent Hagerstown in the Maryland legislature in 1817 and served on a committee tasked with considering removing the . . . — Map (db m107053) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Treatment of the Wounded
Local Physician,Dr. Norman Bruce Scott, attended to Confederate and Federal wounded in the Franklin Hotel, which stood at this site during the Civil War. After the Battles of Antietam and Gettysburg, the military treated the wounded in private . . . — Map (db m20773) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Treatment of the Wounded
The Rochester House stood on this site until its demolition in the mid-1950s. During the Civil War, it was the home of Mrs. Frances Howell Kennedy, widow of Dr. Howard Kennedy. From the beginning of the War, Mrs. Kennedy provided food and comfort to . . . — Map (db m20853) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — United States Colored Troops
The Robert Moxley Band was a group of African-American musicians, mostly local slaves, who formed a military-style brass band in the years before the Civil War. The band held regular concerts in what is now Jacob Wheaton Park. In 1863 the U.S. . . . — Map (db m107363) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington Confederate Cemetery
The State of Maryland has provided this cemetery, and erected this monument, to perpetuate the memory of the Confederate dead, who fell in the Battles of Antietam and South Mountain. The State of Virginia, has contributed toward the burial of her . . . — Map (db m12203) HM WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington Confederate Cemetery
Immediately after the Civil War, Union casualties in the Frederick-Washington County areas were re-interred at a new National Cemetery at Sharpsburg. Yet no provisions were made to provide decent burial for thousands of hastily-buried . . . — Map (db m44898) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County Courthouse
This is Washington County's third courthouse. When the county was established in 1776, the first courthouse, a combination building that served also as a market house, was built in the middle of the town square, one block east of here. It proved too . . . — Map (db m6094) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County JailFugitive Slaves Detained at the County Jail
An African American Heritage Report prepared by the Heritage Resources Group for the City of Hagerstown in 2002 identified the following historical incidents which suggest that the Washington County Jail was a significant site of activity along the . . . — Map (db m5676) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County Jail
The first building used as the Washington Country Jail was a log house at 26-28 E. Franklin Street in Hagerstown. In 1818, the state legislature authorized the county to spend $12,000 to build a new jail. The new jail was built on this site on . . . — Map (db m5677) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — West Baltimore Street
The development and use of this area was heavily influenced by the presence of two rail yard areas owned by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the Western Maryland Railroad. Hood Street was named after John Mifflin Hood, a former Confederate army . . . — Map (db m108046) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — William Othello Wilson1867 - 1928 — Military Figure
Born and raised in Hagerstown, Wilson enlisted in the 9th U.S. Cavalry (“Buffalo Soldiers”) in 1889. on December 30,1890 (the day after the battle of Wounded Knee), Corporal Wilson was in a party escorting a supply train when they . . . — Map (db m107094) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — William Preston Lane, Jr.1892 - 1967 — Political And Civil Rights Figure
William Preston Lane was elected Maryland's attorney general in 1930. When local officials did not act, he personally supervised the investigation of a lynch mob in Somerset county. Although prosecution was unsuccessful, it was the last lynching . . . — Map (db m107093) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — William Thomas Hamilton1820 - 1888 — Political And Business Figure
A leading businessman and attorney, Hamilton served on the boards of nearly every major business and public improvement in Hagerstown in the mid-19th century, including efforts to improve the city's streets, water supply and public works. When . . . — Map (db m107146) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Willow Lane Park
The school campus was the location of Willow Lane Park in the early 20th Century. It was here that a stadium was constructed to serve as a home to Hagerstown's "Class D" minor league baseball teams. The teams were part of the "Blue Ridge . . . — Map (db m46024) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Wilson BridgeLink Between East and West
Built in 1819, this five-arch structure, named for nearby village, was first stone bridge in Washington County. Erected by Silas Harry at cost of $12,000, it was a major improvement to road system between Baltimore and Cumberland, providing . . . — Map (db m697) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Wilson BridgeStanding the Test of Time
“Keep these bridges in proper repair and they will last as long as any. They have stood many hard knocks for a long time.” —Elmer E. Piper, Washington County Surveyor, 1920s. This graceful, five-arch structure, . . . — Map (db m698) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Zion Evangelical and Reform Church
December, 1770 - A congregation of German-Swiss refugees organized The First German Reformed Church in Elizabeth Town, Canageschik, Fredrich County, Province of Mereland. The first pastor was Jacob Weimer. Land was acquired from Jonathan Hager, Jr. . . . — Map (db m20770) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — “Old Mr. Flint’s” Home
George Washington’s diary (while he visited Berkley Springs in 1769) states: “Aug. 30 Old Mr. Flint dined with us” and on Sept. 4: “Rid to the Potomac where my horses were. From thence to Mr. Flint’s and to the Pennsylvania Line, . . . — Map (db m61485) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — A New BeginningWestern Maryland Rail Trail
On this site a pedestrian park was constructed to provide access to Hancock's main street from the Western Maryland Rail Trail and to provide a comfortable rest area for bikers and walkers of the Rail Trail. The park was dedicated on April 11, 1998. . . . — Map (db m96130) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — A Work of ArtChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Looking at the remaining iron railings and graceful arch of the Tonoloway Aqueduct, it is easy to see why canal company officials referred to the eleven aqueducts along the canal as “works of art.” Built between 1835 and 1839, Aqueduct 7 . . . — Map (db m61165) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Discover the TrailWestern Maryland Rail Trail
1. Big Pool Junction The Big Pool Train Station was constructed in 1892 to make a connection with the B&O Railroad across the river at Cherry Run, WV. The Western Maryland Railroad was in a boom stage of growth with the 18 miles of rail . . . — Map (db m96129) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Discover the TrailWestern Maryland Rail Trail
1. Big Pool Junction The Big Pool Train Station was constructed in 1892 to make a connection with the B&O Railroad across the river at Cherry Run, WV. The Western Maryland Railroad was in a boom stage of growth with the 18 miles of rail . . . — Map (db m96131) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Fort Coombe
Fort Coombe, a Maryland stockaded fort of 1755–56 located north of this point. One of the frontier forts during the French and Indian War. The survey of the Mason and Dixon Line during 1763–68 placed it in Pennsylvania instead of . . . — Map (db m833) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m718) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m719) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m831) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockThe Busiest Village on the Road
“After the exhilaration of a gallop down the mountain without breaks, what appetite would not be set on edge, what refinement of palate displeased by venison cutlets, or even ham and eggs?” Harper’s Magazine, 1879 By . . . — Map (db m5931) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park
Situated on the Potomac River at the narrowest point in the state of Maryland the town of Hancock is rich in history. The town is named for Joseph Hancock, Jr., who ferried travelers, traders, and commerce across the Potomac. In 1818, the . . . — Map (db m96126) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockA Canal Town Community — History of the Town
1700’s Hancock is a settlement that was once on the frontier edge of Maryland. Early maps show European settlers here in the 1730s. As an outpost on the frontier, the area known as “Tonoloway Settlement” was subject to . . . — Map (db m96139) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockA Canal Town Community — History of the Town
1700’s Hancock is a settlement that was once on the frontier edge of Maryland. Early maps show European settlers here in the 1730s. As an outpost on the frontier, the area known as “Tonoloway Settlement” was subject to . . . — Map (db m96140) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock in the Canal EraChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Construction of the C&O Canal was completed through Hancock by the late 1830s. The network between the coal mines, dealers, merchants, canal company, and tidewater shipping became economically strong. As a result of the increasing prosperity in . . . — Map (db m96128) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock Station
The Cumberland Extension of the Western Maryland Railway reached Hancock by December of 1904. The Hancock Station was a combination passenger and freight station that was constructed in 1904–1905. Passenger service was discontinued in . . . — Map (db m736) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock's Orchard Industry
Hancock and its surrounding area during the main span of the 20th century was one of the largest fruit producers in the nation. In 1886 Edmund Pendleton Cohill began the cultivation of fruit crops. Over the years his planted acreage increased, and . . . — Map (db m5933) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Interstate 68 Maryland Vietnam Memorial
Interstate Route 68 is dedicated in recognition and memory of those Marylanders who served in the Vietnam War 1959 - 1975 - Dedicated August 2, 1991 - This plaque is donated to the State of Maryland by Chapter 172 Vietnam Veterans of . . . — Map (db m67091) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Little PoolWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Little Pool was part of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal which connected Cumberland to Georgetown and ran parallel to the Potomac River. The principal cargo hauled on the canal heading east was coal. Westbound boats hauled various cargoes such as . . . — Map (db m96155) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Major James Breathed"Hardest artillery fighter the war produced"
Maj. James Breathed was born near present-day Berkeley Spring, W. Va., on December 15, 1838, and moved while young with his family to Washington Co., Md. He attended St. James School in Lydia, where his father John Breathed was headmaster. At age . . . — Map (db m5932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Millstone & Moffet StationWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A small community originally called Millstone Point, but later changed to just Millstone, grew up along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Andrew Jackson (General and later U.S. President) met a committee from Hancock here. Harpers Monthly relates the . . . — Map (db m96154) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — National Pike Toll HouseCirca 1822
The significance of this structure lies both in its history and architecture. It is one of the few remaining “toll houses” along the old National Road. The National Road was chartered between Hancock and Cumberland in 1819 and completed . . . — Map (db m5799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Railroad Siding & Coal TrestleWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A railroad siding was constructed near here to allow the train's coal cars to unload their cargo at the coal trestle. From the trestle the coal cars would dump the coal to load the trucks that were waiting down below. The trucks would then deliver . . . — Map (db m96156) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park
Across the canal bed are the remains of the once prosperous Round Top Cement Mill. The abundance of high calcium limestone drew cement manufacturers to this area in 1838. A useful material, limestone can be cut into building blocks or burned and . . . — Map (db m96123) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Hydraulic Cement Company operated at this site from 1863 to 1909. The mill, which was powered by a 16 foot water wheel and eight coal fired kilns, produced 2200 barrels of hydraulic cement per week. The raw materials for the mill were . . . — Map (db m96160) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top GeologyChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
The layers of red sandstone, siltstone, shale and limestone beneath the limekilns on the other side of the canal are like pages in a book to geologists. These folded, even rock layers indicate that millions of years ago this area was covered by a . . . — Map (db m96125) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Heritage AreaWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Round Top Hill is ecologically sensitive due to its unique geology and topography. These characteristics have resulted in the formation of unique natural habitats (often referred to as natural communities which support a variety of unusual plants . . . — Map (db m96161) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Sand CompanyWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Sand Company and the Maryland Glass Company mined sand in this area during the early 1900's. On the ridge overlooking this area lies a thick bed of Oriskany Sandstone. This sedimentary rock formation yielded a fine, white sand that was . . . — Map (db m96162) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill and Town Hill Mountains
Rainwater enters the outcropping sandstones of Sideling Hill and collects in what is termed an aquifer. In this highway cut, the water runs out at the bottom of the fractured sandstone layers because it cannot go through the dense claystone below. . . . — Map (db m5543) HM

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