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Chesterfield County Virginia Historical Markers

 
A Bomb Proof Church ? Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bernard Fisher, January 25, 2017
A Bomb Proof Church ? Marker
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — A Bomb Proof Church ?The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
A Bomb Proof Church ? The purpose of this structure remains a mystery. It may be the remains of one of the "Bomb Proof” churches that were built in this part of the Howlett Line. One such church was built by men of the 17th Virginia, . . . — Map (db m101030) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Battery DantzlerDueled with Union Gunboats
In 1862, Confederate authorities considered locating the main defensive James River battery here to block the Union navy’s approach to Richmond. They chose Drewry’s Bluff instead because they feared that Union forces would bypass this position by . . . — Map (db m16058) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Battery DantzlerMay 1864-April 1865
First named Ft. Howlett, the battery was renamed after Col. Olin M. Dantzler, who was killed on June 2, 1864, in an attempt to capture Ft. Dutton. Leading the 22nd South Carolina Inf. the attack failed. Battery Dantzler played a major role in . . . — Map (db m16066) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K-201 — Battery Dantzler
A half-mile northeast stands Battery Dantzler, named for Col. Olin Miller Dantzler, 22d South Carolina Infantry (killed in action nearby on 2 June 1864), and constructed in May-June 1864 to block the Union navy's approach to Richmond. The battery . . . — Map (db m17113) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Battle of Chester StationMay 10, 1864
On May 5, 1864, Gen. Benjamin F. Butler’s Union Army of the James landed at Bermuda Hundred to sever direct communication between Richmond and Petersburg. Five days later, desperate to keep the connection open, 2,000 Confederates under Gen. Robert . . . — Map (db m17090) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Battle of Chester Station
Here, on May 10, 1864, as part of Butler’s Bermuda Hundred Campaign, 3400 Federals and 2000 Confederates fought the Battle of Chester Station. This monument is erected in their memory by the Chester Station Camp #1503. Sons of Confederate . . . — Map (db m17092) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Bermuda Hundred
Established 1613 by Sir Thomas Dale. First incorporated Virginia town 1614. Home of John Rolfe, colony recorder, who married Pocahontas. Rev. Alexander Whitaker ministered here. Early port of Richmond. Erected … 1938 by Bermuda Hundred . . . — Map (db m17109) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 13 — Bermuda HundredCaptain John Smith’s Adventures on the James — www.johnsmithtrail.org
Before determining to settle at Jamestown, the English sought a safe place to plant their colony further west along the James River. On that trip, John Smith and his fellow Englishmen found an Appamattuck Indian town in the vicinity of Bermuda . . . — Map (db m17134) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Bermuda Hundred LandingButler’s Campaign Begins — Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Union Gen. Benjamin Butler’s 30,000-man Army of the James landed here without opposition on May 5, 1864. Despite his surprise arrival, Butler proved unable to take advantage of the unprepared Confederate defenders below Richmond. He pushed west . . . — Map (db m17108) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Boy CompanyRichmond National Battlefield Park
This prominent battery in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia often went by its nickname, “The Boy Company.” Although the average battery member was 25 years old, the company had several lads between the ages of 14 and 19. . . . — Map (db m66324) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Changes Over TimeThe intertwined history of the land and the water
The story of Dutch Gap demonstrates the importance of the river throughout history revealing a partnership of man’s use of land and water. Today, the river’s commercial and recreational activities continue, providing a backdrop to Dutch Gap’s . . . — Map (db m16159) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-17 — Chester Station Fight
At this station, two miles west, the Union army of the James, turning toward Richmond, fought an action on May 10, 1864 and tore up the railroad. — Map (db m17097) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Chief Opechancanouch
On March 22, 1622, the Powhatan chiefdom launched a coordinated offensive against the English settlements along the James River. Sixty-six men, women and children were killed within the Henrico settlements including five dead at Henricus. Over . . . — Map (db m87591) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K-203 — Colonel Thomas Lygon
Colonel Thomas Lygon, who came to the Virginia colony in the early 1640s from Worcestershire, England, patented several large parcels of land on the north bank of the Appomattox River in an area known as The Cowpens, near Mount My Lady, which was . . . — Map (db m17131) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-19 — Confederate Reconnaissance Mission
On 2 June 1864, Confederate Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard sent Maj. Gen. Bushrod Johnson's troops toward nearby Federal pickets to reconnoiter their strength. The Confederate troops initially captured the northern portion of the Federal picket line, but . . . — Map (db m17122) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Construction of the Howlett LineThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Construction of the Howlett Line The earthworks here were constructed after the Battle of Ware Bottom Church. Prior to that, this area was the advanced picket line for the Army of the James and would have consisted of a series of rifle . . . — Map (db m73982) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 57 — Drewry’s Bluff Battlefield
On a line that here crossed the Richmond–Petersburg turnpike, Confederate troops under command of General G.T. Beauregard attacked the Federal army of Major-General B.F. Butler on May 16, 1864 and forced its withdrawal to the Bermuda Hundred . . . — Map (db m14275) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 56 — Drewry’s Bluff Defences
Here, on the second line of the Drewry’s Bluff defences, Confederate troops were concentrated May 12-15, 1864, to take the offensive against a Federal force that had advanced from Bermuda Hundred under command of General B.F. Butler and had cut the . . . — Map (db m14274) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Dutch Gap
1611 Sir Thomas Dale and his men, using a tactic developed in the Dutch Low Country, dug a ditch and erected a fence across the neck of the peninsula for the defense of Henricus. 1864 Federal forces under General Benjamin Butler began . . . — Map (db m87885) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Dutch Gap CanalButler's Bypass — Bermuda Hundred Campaign
With the opposing armies locked in a protracted struggle around Petersburg and Bermuda Hundred, the James and Appomattox Rivers assumed added importance. In August 1864, Union Gen. Benjamin Butler began excavations at Dutch Gap. When completed, . . . — Map (db m16150) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 10 — Dutch Gap Conservation AreaCaptain John Smith’s Adventures on the James — www.johnsmithtrail.org
The trail at Dutch Gap traces the old channel of the James River. Before the river was rerouted, there was a ferry landing on the opposite shore called Osborne’s Landing. This may have been the location of the enigmatic Port Cotage referenced by . . . — Map (db m87594) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K-200 — Enon Baptist Church
Enon Baptist Church was organized on 8 October 1849. The church was built here on a one-acre tract given by the founder, John Alexander Strachan. In May 1864, during the Civil War, Union army troops under Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler dismantled Enon . . . — Map (db m24990) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K-199 — Farrar's Island
In 1611, Farrar's Island was the site of the "Citie of Henrico," one of Virginia's first four primary settlement areas under the Virginia Company of London. Later, it was part of a 2,000-acre land patent issued posthumously to William Farrar in . . . — Map (db m16018) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-89 — First Baptist Church (Centralia)
In 1867, the African American members of nearby Salem Baptist Church separated and founded Salem African Baptist Church. The new congregation held worship services under a brush arbor before constructing a building here on a one-acre tract . . . — Map (db m107773) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — First Virginia Infantry Regiment
Dedicated to the memory of the men of the First Virginia Infantry Regiment. Army of Northern Virginia. Killed near this place on 16 May 1864. Alphonzo A. Figner, Company I Archibald D. Govan, Company D Jerry Toomey, Company B James A. . . . — Map (db m25012) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Fort Wead
C.H.S. Civil War Sites S.U.V. Army of the James — Map (db m17135) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-10 — Halfway House
This old inn was the headquarters of Major-General B. F. Butler's Union Army of the James during the Battle of Drewery's Bluff, May 16, 1864. The inn was so named because of its location about midway between Richmond and Petersburg. — Map (db m16043) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Half-Way HouseButler’s Headquarters — Bermuda Hundred Campaign
As Grant grappled with Lee in the Wilderness and near Spotsylvania Court House in May 1864, Union Gen. Benjamin Butler landed with 30,000 troops at Bermuda Hundred, eight miles east of here. Butler’s objective was to open another front and to . . . — Map (db m16041) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Henricopolis
The Colonial Dames Of America in the State of Virginia A.D. 1910 Erect this monument on the site Of the Town of Henricopolis To commemorate the college And university which on May 26, 1619. The Virginia Company of London decreed . . . — Map (db m16149) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 9 — Henricus Historical ParkCaptain John Smith’s Adventures on the James — www.johnsmithtrail.org
Near this spot, the Arrohateck Indians greeted John Smith and his compatriots during their May 1607 exploration upriver from Jamestown. Smith’s 1612 Map of Virginia shows Arrohateck towns on both shores of the James below present-day Richmond. . . . — Map (db m16335) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Howlett Line
These earthworks are part of the strong Confederate defensive position known as the “Howlett Line.” Composed of a string of interconnected redoubts and trenches, the line ran eight miles north and south and was named for the Howlett . . . — Map (db m16079) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Howlett LineRichmond National Battlefield Park
These earthworks are part of the Confederate defensive position known as the Howlett Line. It was a string of interconnected redoubts and entrenchments that stretched for eight miles. The line took its name from the Howlett House located at its . . . — Map (db m66325) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Howlett Line Gun PositionThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
The ground you are standing on would have been a very dangerous place from May of 1864 until the fall of Petersburg in April of 1865. In front of you is one of the many gun positions that the Confederates used to protect the Howlett Line. This . . . — Map (db m73964) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-12 — Into the "Bottle"
The Union Army of the James, retiring across Proctor's Creek in this vicinity after the battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864, turned east into the Peninsula between the James and Appomattox Rivers, where it was "Bottled" by Confederate forces. — Map (db m16045) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — John Smith Explores the ChesapeakeCaptain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail
(panel 1) John Smith Explores the Chesapeake Captain John Smith explored the Chesapeake Bay in the early 1600s seeking precious metals and a passage to Asia. He traveled the James, Chickahominy, and York rivers in 1607, and led . . . — Map (db m73985) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-38 — Lee's Headquarters
To the east, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee briefly made his headquarters at Clay's house on 17 June 1864. There he received full details of the Union army's attack on Petersburg that began the evening of 15 June 1864. Lee learned that Lt. Gen. . . . — Map (db m17124) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K-267 — Mary Randolph(9 Aug. 1762 - 23 Jan. 1828)
Mary Randolph, a native of Chesterfield County and author of the first American regional cookbook, lived nearby at Presquile Plantation during the last two decades of the 18th century after her marriage to David Meade Randolph in 1782. The couple . . . — Map (db m11678) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Mount Malady
Mt. Malady, the first hospital in the American colonies, was built in Coxendale near Henricus in 1612. It had 40 beds for 80 patients! Many colonists arrived in poor health from their long sea voyage. Others acquired diseases, such as . . . — Map (db m87884) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Olin Miller Dantzler
Olin Miller Dantzler (1826-1824) was a native of South Carolina. He graduated from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia in 1846. He married Caroline Clover on July 10, 1850, and they had five children. Prior to the war Dantzler served as a South . . . — Map (db m16060) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — K 202-a — Opposunoquonuske
In 1607, Opposunoquonuske, sister of the Appamattuck Indian chief Coquonasum, headed an Appamattuck town on the James River at the mouth of the Appomattox. On 24 May 1607, Opposunoquonuske received a party of Englishmen in a stately fashion, greatly . . . — Map (db m54254) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-14 — Osbornes
The town of Osbornes was named for Captain Thomas Osborne who settled nearby at Coxendale in 1616. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Osborne's plantation wharf was a tobacco inspection station and local shipping center. Thomas Jefferson, . . . — Map (db m16019) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Parker’s BatteryRichmond National Battlefield Park
(left panel) Parker’s Battery A one-quarter-mile walking trail through the site offers a window into the existence of a typical Civil War artillery company on the front lines during the final year of the war. The men depended on the . . . — Map (db m66323) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Parker's Battery
Parker’s men improved this earthen redoubt, referred to as a battery, so as to better protect their guns stationed behind its walls. Supporting infantry, from the 15th and 17th Virginia regiments, filled the adjacent trenches and manned the forward . . . — Map (db m16086) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Parker's BatteryRichmond National Battlefield Park
Parker’s men improved this earthen redoubt, referred to as a battery, so as to better protect their guns stationed behind its walls. Supporting infantry, from the 15th and 17th Virginia regiments, filled the adjacent trenches and manned the forward . . . — Map (db m66326) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-11 — Proctor's Creek Fight
To the west of the road here at Proctor's Creek Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's Union Army of the James attacked the outer line of the Confederates' Drewry Bluff defenses on 13-14 May 1864. On the first day, Union Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore struck . . . — Map (db m16044) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Remembrance
Many of the men, like Major Parker and Lieutenant J. Thompson Brown, returned to their homes in and around Richmond after the war. In 188, Lieutenant Brown, then a successful local businessman, purchased the ground here in order to preserve the area . . . — Map (db m16087) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — RemembranceRichmond National Battlefield Park
Many of the men, like Major Parker and Lieutenant J. Thompson Brown, returned to their homes in Richmond after the war. Brown became a successful local businessman, and in 188 purchased the ground here in order to preserve the area where the battery . . . — Map (db m66327) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — Richmond BattlefieldsParker's Battery Trail — Richmond National Battlefield Park 1862, 1864
McClellan’s Federals attacked in 1862, then Grant in ’64, while Joseph E. Johnston and then Robert E. Lee defended. The two major assaults on the Confederate capital fanned out in a series of battles, skirmishers and marches. Tour the . . . — Map (db m16076) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-18 — The "Bottle"
Here in 1864 on the Bermuda Hundred peninsula between the James and Appomattox Rivers, the Union Army of the James, commanded by Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, was "bottled up" by Confederate Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, defender of Petersburg. The . . . — Map (db m17118) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Battle of Trent’s Reach
On Jan. 23, 1865, the ironclads Virginia II, Richmond, and Fredericksburg, with five smaller vessels, descended the James River in an effort to attack the Union supply depot at City Point. A reliable report indicated that recent . . . — Map (db m16067) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Battle of Ware Bottom ChurchThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
On the evening of May 16, 1864 the Army of the James completed its retreat from The Second Battle of Drewry's Bluff and returned to its earthworks in Bermuda Hundred. Too disorganized to effectively pursue the retreating Federals, the Confederates . . . — Map (db m73961) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This is a fragment from the breech of a 5.8 inch “Sawyer Gun”. This gun was located at Battery Sawyer, a Federal gun position across the river to your front where the River’s Bend community is today. This gun burst on August 5, 1864 . . . — Map (db m87592) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 2 — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Photograph of the ironclad ram Atlanta. The Atlanta was built by the Confederacy and was captured at Savannah Ga. by Federal forces in 1863. It saw service on the James River in the US Navy. The ship was decommissioned in 1865 and was . . . — Map (db m87876) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 6 — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Photograph of the Union ironclad Saugus taken from near this location in March 1865. The log boom on the bow of the Saugus is a field adaptation to protect it from Confederate mines in the river. This sign was sponsored by Edwin . . . — Map (db m87877) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 3 — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This photograph of the Dutch Gap Canal was taken from near this location in 1865. It shows the canal with a dredge boat in the background. The canal was dug in an attempt to bypass Confederate gun positions at Battery Dantzler approximately one mile . . . — Map (db m87880) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Boy CompanyParker's Battery 1864
This site seems remote from Richmond, but Confederate defenses extended well beyond the city. From mid-June 1864 a unit of artillerymen called Parker’s Battery manned these earthworks. Despite the proximity of a large enemy force, this line was . . . — Map (db m16077) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Church of Henricopolis
Near this spot was built Anno Domini 1611 The Church of Henricopolis Under the auspices of Sir Thomas Dale High Marshall of Virginia The Reverend Alexander Whitaker, M.A, Minister This cross is erected to Commemorate the . . . — Map (db m16147) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 58 — The Half-Way House
The house that stood here, midway between Richmond and Petersburg, was a landmark in the campaign of 1864. East and Southeast were Batteries Brooks, Semmes, Wood and Dantzler which defended the South side of James river from Drewry’s Bluff to the . . . — Map (db m14277) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — S-6 — The Howlett Line
Just east of this point running from the James River to the Appomattox River, was the Confederate defense line known as the Howlett line, named for the Howlett House that stood at the north end of the line. Established in May, 1864, by General . . . — Map (db m17116) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The James River...Floating Through The Centuries
Native Americans 1500's These boats were used by the Powhatan Indians to carry furs, food, and other trading items. First Settlers 1600's Shallops were wider and sometimes longer than canoes. They were propelled by oars or by . . . — Map (db m87886) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The LagoonTransformation of Land — Dutch Gap Conservation Area - A Changing Story
Civilization has dramatically transformed the landscape. Before 1930s, the land around you was probably swamp and bottomland forest. From the 1930s to around the 1960s, companies mined the area for sand and gravel. During this time, the large open . . . — Map (db m87881) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The Lightkeeper’s HouseThe lights of Dutch Gap
The foundation is all that remains of the lightkeeper’s house. The lightkeeper had to live on site to maintain the gas-powered lights which were once located on the bluff. Lights were constructed after the first Dutch Gap channel was completed in . . . — Map (db m16153) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — 30 — The Siege of Petersburg
The Battle of Trent's Reach On the night of Jan. 23, 1865, the ironclads Virginia II, Richmond, and Fredericksburg, with five smaller vessels, descended the James River in an effort to attack the Union supply depot . . . — Map (db m87879) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — The TidesA changing landscape — Dutch Gap Conservation Area - A Changing Story
One of the most dramatic changes along the James River is the daily tide. The tides originating in the Atlantic Ocean influence the river all the way to the City of Richmond. Constant sources of freshwater from replenishing rainfalls and streams in . . . — Map (db m87883) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chester — USCTs At Dutch GapU.S. Colored Troops Construct the Canal — Bermuda Hundred
(overview) Early in 1864, Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, commander of all Federal armies, ordered advances throughout the Confederacy in the spring. On May 5, Union Gen. Benjamin F. Butler landed his Army of the James on Bermuda Hundred to . . . — Map (db m66321) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — Apostles of Religious Liberty
On this spot were imprisoned 1770-1774 John Tanner William Weber Augustine Eastin David Tinsley Joseph Anthony Jeremiah Walker John Weatherford Apostles of Religious Liberty “Whether it be right . . . — Map (db m19527) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — CCC Camp Site
This is the site of the former camp of two Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) companies and a Works Progress Administration (WPA) work force of 300 men who constructed the recreation area along Swift Creek from the spring of 1935 to the summer of . . . — Map (db m28861) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — S-7 — Chesterfield County Courthouse
This area, known originally as "Cold Water Run," is the site of the first Chesterfield County courthouse, erected in 1750. In 1917 it was demolished and replaced by a larger Georgian Revival brick building that served the county until the 1960s. The . . . — Map (db m19523) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — Chesterfield Court HouseSoldiers and Refugees — Lee’s Retreat
Late on the morning of Monday, April 3, 1865, part of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia briefly halted here at the Chesterfield County seat. The day before, a series of Federal attacks had broken through Lee’s lines at . . . — Map (db m19518) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — S-29 — Civilian Conservation Corps - Company 2386
Located north of this marker is the site of the camp of CCC Company 2386, Beach, Virginia. The camp was organized in 1935 and disbanded in 1942. The company consisted of 2 to 3 military officers, a civilian technical service staff, and approximately . . . — Map (db m28858) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — M-6 — Clover Hill Mining District
Coal mines, including Brighthope, Raccoon, Cox, Hill, Vaden, and others, were located a mile west of here. As early as 1822 coal was sold for local use. By 1845 the Clover Hill Railroad was constructed to transport the coal to the Appomattox River . . . — Map (db m28873) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — Dividends for the Future
I propose to create a civilian conservation corps…confining itself to forestry, the prevention of soil erosion, flood control, and similar projects. I call your attention to the fact that this type of work is of definite, practical value, not . . . — Map (db m28863) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — M-8 — Eppington
Two and one-third miles south stands Eppington, built in the late 1760s by Francis Eppes and his wife Elizabeth Wayles Eppes, half-sister to Martha Wayles Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson frequently visited Eppington. Lucy Jefferson, his daughter, died . . . — Map (db m28911) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — S-29 — Magnolia Grange
Built in 1822 by William Winfree, this Federal-style house was named for the large stand of magnolia trees in the front yard. It was originally surrounded by a 600-acre farm. A nearby tavern provided lodging for persons with business at the . . . — Map (db m19487) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — M-5 — Piney Grove Church Meeting Site
Late in the 18th century, the Methodist Episcopal Church confronted the possibility of schism. James O'Kelly, a Methodist minister, began challenging Bishop Francis Asbury regarding his appointive powers, his management of church affairs, and other . . . — Map (db m26013) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — S-16 — Pocahontas State Park
This park of 7604 acres was originally known as the Swift Creek Recreational Area. Its purchase in 1934 and subsequent development by the federal government were with the understanding that eventually the State would accept and maintain the . . . — Map (db m28856) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Chesterfield — M-60 — William Ransom Johnson1782-1849
William Ransom Johnson lived near here at Oakland. Called the “Napoleon of the Turf,” he dominated American horseracing early in the 19th century. He trained more than 20 champions and achieved national fame from the 30 North-South match . . . — Map (db m28915) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Colonial Heights — S-24 — Advance on Petersburg
Elements of the Union Army of the James, led by Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, landed at Bermuda Hundred on 5 May 1864 to cut the Confederate rail and supply lines between Richmond and Petersburg. On 9 May, Butler sent divisions to Port Walthall . . . — Map (db m17121) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Colonial Heights — Howlett Line Park
Following the Battle of Ware Bottom Church on May 20, 1864, Confederate forces began digging the earthworks that would become known as the Howlett Line. Named after the Howlett house, which stood at the northernmost point, the line stretched across . . . — Map (db m16096) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Colonial Heights — S-36 — Redwater Creek Engagement
While Union Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James entrenched at Bermuda Hundred on 11 May 1864, Confederate Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke led parts of two divisions north from Petersburg to unite with Maj. Gen. Robert Ransom's division near . . . — Map (db m17123) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Colonial Heights — S-20 — Union Army Railroad Raids
On 5 May 1864, leading elements of Union Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James disembarked off transports at Bermuda Hundred, located to the north of here. The next day this army began severing telegraph lines and nearby portions of the . . . — Map (db m17120) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Abraham Lincoln at Point of RocksThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
In March of 1865 Abraham Lincoln left behind the pressures of Washington and traveled to visit Lt. Gen. Grant at City Point. He spent two weeks at City Point, touring the front and reviewing troops. On March 27, 1865, Abraham Lincoln, his wife . . . — Map (db m109395) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Actions in the East 1861-1863The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Ending the war by a direct attack on Richmond was a key component of the Federal war effort in the east. Federal naval forces also blockaded the Confederate coast while the Federal army fought to capture key coastal cities and ports along the . . . — Map (db m73966) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — African-Americans in the Confederate War EffortThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Like its pre-war economy, much of the southern war effort relied on slave labor. When Richmond became the capital for the newly formed Confederacy, both freedmen and slaves were used to maintain railroads, build fortifications, and perform other . . . — Map (db m109390) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Appomattox River OverlookThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This is a composite of two photographs taken of the Appomattox River from this location. The signal tower in the background was near present day R. Garland Dodd Park at Point of Rocks. This sign was sponsored by Stewart O'Bannon III . . . — Map (db m109396) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Broadway LandingThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Broadway Landing was located three miles up the Appomattox River from City Point. It was the main supply depot for Federal artillery during the siege of Petersburg. Artillery pieces and ammunition were transported by ship or barge and offloaded . . . — Map (db m109393) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Confederate LeadersThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
When the Bermuda Hundred Campaign began, Confederate forces south of the James River were widely scattered across southern Virginia and eastern North Carolina. Confederate eyes were focused on events to the north where the Battle of the Wilderness . . . — Map (db m73969) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Crimean OvensThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
The wooded area in front of you contains rare examples of a radiant heat system called a Crimean Oven. This system was used to heat hospital tents at Point of Rocks during the Civil War. The concept behind Crimean Ovens dates back to the days of the . . . — Map (db m109398) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Federal War Plans for 1864The Bermuda Hundred Campaign
In March of 1864 Ulysses S. Grant was placed in command of all Federal forces. Grant's plan to end the war envisioned a multi-front invasion across the entire Confederacy to negate the South's ability to shift forces from one front to another. . . . — Map (db m73965) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Grant's Virginia CampaignsThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Lt. Gen. Grant’s strategy was to attack the Confederate armies on multiple fronts simultaneously so that they could not reinforce each other. In the early days of May 1864, Maj. Gen. George G. Meade moved the Army of the Potomac across the Rapidan . . . — Map (db m73970) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Historic Point of Rocks
From May 1864 until the end of the Civil War in April 1865, this land was the site of a large hospital for Federal troops who fought in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign and the Siege of Petersburg. Historic Point of Rocks is within the historic boundary . . . — Map (db m73972) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Historic Point of RocksThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Point of Rocks takes its name from a 60-foot high sandstone cliff located here along the Appomattox River. The site was used by Native Americans as a camp and observation point, and was mentioned by Captain John Smith in his notes on Virginia. A . . . — Map (db m109399) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Nurses at Point of Rocks HospitalThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Patients at Point of Rocks Hospital were under the care of two pioneer women in the field of medicine, Clara Barton and Harriet Dame. At a time when most women were not allowed to be near the fighting, these women saw the war close up at field . . . — Map (db m109378) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Opening Actions of the Bermuda Hundred CampaignThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Battles at Port Walthall Junction At about 4:00 PM on May 6, 1864 Brig. Gen. Charles Heckman's brigade moved down Ruffin Mill Road toward Port Walthall Junction where 600 soldiers from Brig. Gen. Johnson Hagood's South Carolina brigade . . . — Map (db m73971) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Point of RocksU.S. Military Hospital Site — Bermuda Hundred
Point of Rocks, named for a sandstone cliff on the Appomattox River, marked the southern end of the Union defensive line that stretched across the Bermuda Hundred peninsula. In May 1864, the Union army seized property east of the present-day park . . . — Map (db m54255) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Point of Rocks HospitalThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Shortly after the Army of the James landed in Bermuda Hundred, a field hospital was established here at Point of Rocks. The hospital originally consisted of tents set up in the orchard around the Strachan House. The tents were 50 feet long and . . . — Map (db m109377) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Point of Rocks Hospital WardThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This photograph was taken from across the Appomattox River behind you. The large hospital ward in the photograph once stood in this field in front of you. This sign was sponsored by Douglas Waters, Carrollton, TXMap (db m109392) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — Pontoon BridgeThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This photograph was taken from this spot in 1865. The flat area in front of you is where the hut in the photograph once stood. In June of 1864 a pontoon bridge was built across the marshy ground in the photograph. The first attacks on . . . — Map (db m109374) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The Appomattox River Raid, June 26-28, 1862McClellan's 1862 Peninsula Campaign
”On June 26,...just as we were having roll call and the men were about to retire for the night, the boom of a cannon a little way down the river, and the whizzing of a shell as it sped us by, aroused us to the fact that the enemy was . . . — Map (db m109376) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign BeginsThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
On May 4, 1864, Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler began to load 38,000 men of the Army of the James on transport ships at Newport News and Yorktown, Virginia. Their goal was a neck of land in Chesterfield County known as Bermuda Hundred. Butler was to . . . — Map (db m73967) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The Bermuda Hundred Campaign-Federal LeadersThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
In April of 1864, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant met with Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler and approved his plan for attacking Richmond by moving an army up the James River. Grant decided that while the Army of the Potomac moved against Robert E. Lee and the . . . — Map (db m73968) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The First Attacks on PetersburgThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
"Petersburg at that hour was clearly at the mercy of the Federal Commander who had all but captured it" Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard on the June 15th attack at Petersburg. On June 9, 1864, as Grant prepared to shift his army . . . — Map (db m109381) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The Siege of Petersburg BeginsThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
After taking heavy losses at Cold Harbor, Lt. Gen. Grant made the decision to move his army across the James River and attack Petersburg. The capture of that city and its key rail links would cut off Richmond from the rest of the Confederacy. . . . — Map (db m109386) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The Strachan HouseThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
This house was constructed in 1841 by Rev. John Alexander Strachan, founder of Enon Baptist Church. Rev. Strachan also preached at several other congregations in the area. Family stories describe him rowing a boat across the Appomattox River to . . . — Map (db m74662) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — The United States Submarine Propeller Alligator
The United States Submarine Propeller Alligator The green, 47-foot-long Alligator was the U.S. Navy's first submarine—a technological wonder of the Civil War era. French engineer Brutus de Villeroi designed the . . . — Map (db m109375) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — United States Colored Troops in the Army of the JamesThe Bermuda Hundred Campaign
Thousands of African-American troops served in the Army of the James under the official designation of United States Colored Troops (USCT). Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler was a strong proponent of the use of African-American troops and had more . . . — Map (db m109389) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Enon — 15 — Welcome to R. Garland Dodd Park at Point of RocksCaptain John Smith's Adventures on the James — www.johnsmithtrail.org
Gabriel Archer wrote about a high rock cliff that projected into the channel of the Appomattox River upstream of its confluence with the James. When exploring the river in 1608, Smith found verdant marshes the likes of which can still be seen here . . . — Map (db m24903) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Ettrick — K-204 — Ettrick
The site of an Appomattox Indian village burned in 1676 in Bacon's Rebellion, the present town of Ettrick stands on land that belonged to "Ettrick Banks" and "Matoax," the boyhood plantation of John Randolph of Roanoke. In 1810 Campbell's Bridge . . . — Map (db m14622) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Ettrick — 11 — Virginia State UniversityEttrick, Virginia — Chesterfield County
Virginia State University was chartered by the Virginia legislature in 1882 as the Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute. Delegate Alfred W. Harris, an African-American attorney in Petersburg, championed the charter and supported it through . . . — Map (db m26005) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Ettrick — K-324 — Virginia State University
The Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute was chartered on 6 Mar. 1882. The Readjuster Party was instrumental in supporting a state institution of higher education in Virginia for African Americans with some unusual features to the institute's . . . — Map (db m26007) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Hopewell — K-202 — Bermuda Hundred
A mile north, on the site of an important Appamatuck Indian village, Sir Thomas Dale established Bermuda Hundred in 1613. The hundred was a traditional English jurisdiction of one hundred families. Dale, the deputy governor and marshal of Virginia, . . . — Map (db m11662) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Hopewell — S-23 — Point of Rocks
Point of Rocks is located two miles south on the Appomattox River. In 1608, Captain John Smith wrote abut this high rock cliff which projected out to the channel of the river. Known to all as Point of Rocks, it was severely damaged during a battle . . . — Map (db m11844) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Hopewell — S-22 — Port Walthall
Port Walthall, which stood on the banks of the Appomattox River several miles to the south, was a major shipping and passenger embarkation point prior to the Civil War. The railroad tracks leading to the port were melted down to manufacture . . . — Map (db m11847) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Matoaca — K 324-b — Matoaca Mill Site
Originally named the Providence Manufacturing Company, Matoaca Manufacturing (Mill) had its beginning here late in the 1700s on land then known as Olive Hill Plantation. Initially operated as a grist mill, by 1838 it was producing cotton cloth and . . . — Map (db m48473) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-40 — Bellona Arsenal
In 1810 Major John Clarke and noted Richmond lawyer, William Wirt, established a weapons factory for the U.S. War Department on the south bank of the James River five miles north of here. Bellona Arsenal, (named for the Roman goddess of war,) was . . . — Map (db m19048) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Bellona Foundry
Gun and gun mold recovered by C. Merle Luck from the James River on August 18, 1962 having been put there during Col. Dahlgren's Raid during the Civil War. — Map (db m40598) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-50 — Bethel Baptist Church
In 1799 the local Baptist Society acquired this land and soon built a meetinghouse. The Bethel congregation worshiped in the meetinghouse and was constituted as a church in 1817. About 1820 the members built a brick church here--the first in . . . — Map (db m19051) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-34 — Black Heath
Half a mile north stood Black Heath, later owned by Captain John Heth, officer in Continental Army, whose son, Henry Heth, Major-General C.S.A., was born here in 1825. Coal of high quality was mined here. — Map (db m19043) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-64 — Chesterfield Railroad
In 1829 the Virginia General Assembly chartered the Chesterfield Rail Road Company, which built the first railroad in Virginia. Moncure Robinson (1802-1891), a railroad pioneer, designed the track, which once passed by here. In 1831, the company . . . — Map (db m19049) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — S-37 — Eleazar Clay
Eleazar Clay (1744-1836) led the establishment of the first Baptist church in Chesterfield County, known as Chesterfield (Baptist) Church, Rehoboth Meeting House, or Clay's Church, in 1773. He also supported the Baptist preachers imprisoned for . . . — Map (db m35993) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — S-30 — First Railroad in Virginia
Just south of here are the earthen remains and stone culvert of the Chesterfield Railroad. Chartered by the Virginia General Assembly in 1829, the company in 1831 constructed the first railroad in Virginia, one of the earliest in the United States, . . . — Map (db m35998) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-28 — Huguenot Settlement
In 1700-1701, Huguenots (French Protestant refugees) settled in this region on land provided to them by the Virginia colony. The Huguenot settlement, known as "Manakin Town" centered at the former site of a Monacan Indian town, located south of the . . . — Map (db m31544) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-35 — Midlothian Coal Mines
South of here are the Midlothian Coal Mines, probably the oldest coal mines in America. Coal was first mined here before 1730, and during the Revolution, coal from these mines supplied the cannon foundry at Westham. The first railroad in Virginia . . . — Map (db m19044) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Mid-Lothian Mines and Rail Roads
Welcome to the Mid-Lothian Mines Park The Mid-Lothian Mines Park is in the heart of Midlothian’s coal mining past and is encompassed by the Richmond Coal Basin. Mining in the Midlothian area of the Basin represents the first attempt at . . . — Map (db m31563) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Mid-Lothian Mines and Rail Roads
Local Coal Mining in the 18th and 19th Centuries Outcroppings of coal along the south bank of the James River in what is now Powhatan County were discovered circa 1700. A hunter from the nearby Huguenot settlement, Manakintown, dislodged . . . — Map (db m31569) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Mid-Lothian Mines and Rail Roads
Early History of the Grove Shaft 1836-61 The Grove Shaft plunged 625 feet and took workmen three years to dig. The Wooldridges employed 150 men and boys. Twenty-five mules stabled underground pulled coal carts on an underground railroad. . . . — Map (db m31570) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Mid-Lothian Mines and Rail Roads
The Mid-Lothian African Church Near the Grove Shaft, 54 free blacks, slaves and six white males at the Mid-Lothian Coal Mining Company started the Mid-Lothian African Church on February 8, 1846. Assisted by the company the 60 member . . . — Map (db m31571) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Mid-Lothian Mines and Rail Roads
Coal Mining Chronology in Chesterfield 1835 Mid-Lothian Coal Mining Company is chartered. 1836 The Company organizes with 3,000 shares valued at $100 each with 1,000 shares being sold to raise $100,000 capital. The Wooldridge family . . . — Map (db m31572) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-29 — Salisbury
Nearby stood Salisbury, built during the middle portion of the 18th century. It was a one-and-a-half-story frame house that had two asymmetrical brick chimneys. Patrick Henry leased Salisbury from Thomas Mann Randolph and lived there while he was . . . — Map (db m19042) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — Salisbury
On this site stood Salisbury, built in the eighteenth century as a hunting lodge. Here Patrick Henry lived during his fourth and fifth term as Governor of Virginia. The Confederate General Edward Johnson lived here in his later years and died here. — Map (db m46894) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — The Heath Gravity Railroad
Some 500 feet beyond this point along both sides of Salisbury Road, roadbed remains of the Heath Gravity Railroad are visible. The railroad ran through this area from 1838 until approximately 1850. It was used to transport coal mined from the . . . — Map (db m46893) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — M-7 — Trabue's Tavern
This was the home of Lt. John Trabue, Revolutionary War soldier and patriot, and of his descendants well into the 20th century. Trabue witnessed the surrender of the British forces at Yorktown in 1781 and later became an original member of the . . . — Map (db m19014) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-47 — Union Raid On Coalfield Station
On the first day of Union Brig. Gen. August V. Kautz's second raid (12-17 May 1864) on Confederate railroads around Richmond, 3,000 cavalrymen rode northwest from Bermuda Hundred and passed Chesterfield Court House at 1:00 P.M. Arriving about . . . — Map (db m19045) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Midlothian — O-62 — Winfree Memorial Baptist ChurchMidlothian Mine Disaster
Winfree Memorial Baptist Church, constituted in 1852 as Jerusalem Baptist Church, originally stood to the west on Buckingham Pike. In September 1881, to better serve the coal mining community, the frame structure was rolled here on logs. On 3 Feb. . . . — Map (db m35994) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Moseley — O-67 — Skinquarter Baptist Church
Pastor William Hickman and about 30 people founded Skinquarter Baptist Church in 1778. The first meetinghouse was located east of the church's cemetery. Hickman moved to Kentucky in 1784 and was an early Baptist leader there. Due to anti-missionary . . . — Map (db m28921) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Petersburg — O-26 — Mattoax
Mattoax was located to the south on the Appomattox River. John Randolph, Sr., built a house there in the 1770s that burned after 1810; it was the boyhood home of his son, John Randolph of Roanoke. Mattoax also was the residence of St. George Tucker, . . . — Map (db m19637) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Pickadat Corner — Battle of Swift Creek"Brave to Madness"
You are standing in the middle of the Union line that faced the Confederate route of attack up the Richmond Turnpike on May 9, 1864, during Union Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's Bermuda Hundred Campaign. Here, along Swift Creek, elements of Butler's Army . . . — Map (db m14626) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Pickadat Corner — Swift Creek Battlefield: A Landscape of Change
The Bermuda Hundred Campaign began on May 5, 1864, when Union General Benjamin Butler and the 33,000-man Army of the James landed at Bermuda Hundred nine miles northeast of here. General Butler's westward advance threatened Drewry's Bluff and . . . — Map (db m14635) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Pickadat Corner — S-25 — Union Army Checked
Here the Army of the James, moving on Petersburg, May 9, 1864, was checked by the Confederate defenses on the creek and turned northward. — Map (db m14629) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — "A Very Neat Chapel"
The little white chapel that stood here was built by soldiers of the garrison and held 150 people. Different ministers came from Richmond each week to preach. A small burial ground was located just 50 yards beyond the chapel—a reminder that . . . — Map (db m37025) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — A Perfect Gibraltar
After the repulse of the Union Navy on May 15, 1862, Drewry’s Bluff became famous as a tangible symbol of Confederate resistance. Work crews made up of impressed slave labor continued construction of the fort, eventually completing a four-sided, . . . — Map (db m55349) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — A Permanent Post
By 1863 the Drewry’s Bluff post expanded into a military city. Hundreds of Confederate soldiers, sailors, and Marines camped on these grounds. The Confederate States Naval Academy held classes in buildings and aboard the side-wheeled steamer CSS . . . — Map (db m46891) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-3 — Ampthill Estate
Built before 1732 by Henry Cary, this was the home of Colonel Archibald Cary, a Revolutionary leader of Virginia. The house was moved, 1929-30, to its present location off Cary Street Road in Richmond's West End. — Map (db m24997) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-8 — Battle of Drewry’s Bluff
From this point the Confederates, on May 16, 1864, moved to attack the Union Army of the James under Butler advancing northward on Richmond. — Map (db m14893) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Battle of Drewry’s BluffDrewry’s Bluff - 1862
May 15, 1862 When Federal gunboats round the bend, they enter a shooting gallery. Confederate soldiers and marines along the riverbanks rake the decks with musket fire. These batteries, ninety feet above the water, are perched too high for . . . — Map (db m14897) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Bellwood Elk HerdWapiti (Cervus canadensis)
Around the turn of the 20th century, James Bellwood, an agriculturalist and the owner of this property set aside a few acres to be used as a wooded preserve and imported a pair of elk from Yosemite National Park and Washington State. The elk became . . . — Map (db m73984) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — O-27 — Bethlehem Baptist Church
Formerly Spring Creek Church. Organized, July 25, 1790. Benjamin Watkins, founder and first pastor, 1790-1831. Located four miles northwest, 1790-1855. Then four miles southwest, 1855-1897. Moved to this location, 1897. Home church of Nannie Bland . . . — Map (db m31545) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Bombproof and WellDrewry’s Bluff – 1862 / 1864
The soldier is sitting in the doorway of the bombproof, a shelter during heavy bombardment. — Map (db m15496) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Camp Beall
“Drewry’s Bluff, at least for the present, is the headquarters of the Corps, and I may consequently reasonably expect to stay here for some time at least.” Henry Lea Graves, 1862 From 1862 to 1865, the training of . . . — Map (db m55347) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Cary’s Mill Overlookcirca 1750 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
Archibald Cary established an iron forge on the south bank of Falling Creek in 1750. The Chesterfield forge, as it was known, converted pig iron into bar iron. Initially unprofitable and shut down, the forge would be restarted and become . . . — Map (db m101039) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Covered WayDrewry’s Bluff – 1862 / 1864
During battle, supplies could be brought into the fort through the Covered Way, a tunnel protected from shell-fire. — Map (db m15498) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Cultural History — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The history associated with Falling Creek Park spans more than 400 years. Numerous industries existed along the creek from the 17th to the early 20th century. The earliest industry that existed at this location was the first iron furnace . . . — Map (db m101036) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Drewry’s BluffRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Pk – 1862/64
The presence of the Confederate bastion here at Drewry’s Bluff was one reason that most of the Civil War action around Richmond occurred north of the James River. Strong earthen fortifications and river obstructions, erected in 1862, effectively . . . — Map (db m15080) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-15 — Drewry’s Bluff
A mile east is Drewry's Bluff, James River fortification of Richmond, 1862-1865. Earthworks remain. — Map (db m16020) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-5 — Drewry’s Bluff
This bluff on the James River, a mile east, was fortified by Captain A. H. Drewry in 1862. A Union fleet, attempting to pass it, was driven back, May 15, 1862; and thereafter it served as a bar to attacks on Richmond by water. On June 16, 1864, . . . — Map (db m16021) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — 7 — Drewry’s BluffCaptain John Smith’s Adventures on the James — www.johnsmithtrail.org
John Smith recalled visiting the Arrohateck Indian capital during a May 1607 expedition led by Christopher Newport. The town was located on the northern shore of the James River opposite of here and was noted on John Smith’s 1612 Map of Virginia. . . . — Map (db m37032) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Drewry’s Bluff TrailRichmond National Battlefield Park
Along this trail the first shots were fired in the campaign to capture Richmond that would last from 1862 to 1865. This one-half mile trail will take you to the Confederate fort named Fort Drewry by southerners and Fort Darling by the Federals. On . . . — Map (db m15169) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Drewry's Bluff
(left panel) Visiting Richmond National Battlefield Park The concentration of Civil War resources found in the Richmond area is unparalleled. The National Park Service manages 13 sites, giving visitors an opportunity to examine the . . . — Map (db m37022) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Duty Above and Beyond
“Mr. President, these are the young heroes of Fort Darling…. The President took them all by the hand and personally thanked them for their magnificent conduct and example, ordered that each one should receive a Medal of honor and to be . . . — Map (db m37027) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Falling Creek Iron Works1619-1622
Vanished now but for a trace, Falling Creek is the site of the first industrial ironworks in the New World. The close proximity of iron ore, wood for fuel and power provided by the falling water made the Falling Creek site perfect for this . . . — Map (db m32587) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-4 — Falling Creek Ironworks
Nearby on Falling Creek is the first ironworks in English North America. It was established by the Virginia Company to supply iron for the colony and for export to England. Construction began in 1619. The works, including a blast furnace, were . . . — Map (db m16015) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Falling Creek Stone Bridge1826-1828 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The site of Virginia’s first wayside park was established in 1934. It was developed to serve as a picnic area by the Virginia State Highway Department and the Chesterfield Garden Club in 1933-1934. A State Historical Marker located in . . . — Map (db m101031) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Falling Creek Stone Bridge1826-1828 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The site of Virginia’s first wayside park was established in 1934. It was developed to serve as a picnic area by the Virginia State Highway Department and the Chesterfield Garden Club in 1933-1934. A State Historical Marker located in . . . — Map (db m101042) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Finishing Fort Drewry
Immediately after the battle, men of Chesterfield County’s own Southside Artillery, along with others, worked to strengthen the fort. The section before you was likely their first project. Eventually the earthworks around you formed an enclosed . . . — Map (db m37029) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — 59 — Fort DarlingDefences of Drewry's Bluff
Eastward 150 yards was the Confederate Fort Darling which constituted, with the works at Chaffin’s Bluff across the James, the main defence of the approaches to Richmond by water. Often the target of Federal fire, Fort Darling held out till Richmond . . . — Map (db m14278) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Fort StevensButler’s Campaign Ends — Bermuda Hundred Campaign
“Neither army, however, manifested any disposition either to advance or retire. It was a case of stand and fire, each endeavoring to cripple the other the most, and gain, if it could, some advantage here or there. The enemy’s one battery . . . — Map (db m14895) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Fort Stevens
Built in 1862, Fort Stevens was part of the Confederate inter-defense line of Richmond. This fort was named for Col. W.H. Stevens, who was in charge of the construction of Richmond’s defenses. Most fortifications were built quickly and made of earth . . . — Map (db m14903) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Historic Route 11913-1926 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The United Daughters of the Confederacy conceived of the Jefferson Davis Highway in 1913, along the same series of roads in Virginia that U.S. Route 1 later followed. The Virginia General Assembly officially designated the United Daughters of the . . . — Map (db m101041) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Historic Route 11913-1926 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The United Daughters of the Confederacy conceived of the Jefferson Davis Highway in 1913, along the same series of roads in Virginia that U.S. Route 1 later followed. The Virginia General Assembly officially designated the United Daughters of the . . . — Map (db m101045) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Historic Village of Bensleycirca 1909 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
Located at this site was the beginning of one of the earliest residential communities in Chesterfield County. Historic Village Of Bensley Created by Albert Bensley in 1909, the Village of Bensley was marketed as a modem, convenient . . . — Map (db m101037) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Historic Village of Bensleycirca 1909 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
Located at this site was the beginning of one of the earliest residential communities in Chesterfield County. Historic Village Of Bensley Created by Albert Bensley in 1909, the Village of Bensley was marketed as a modem, convenient . . . — Map (db m101044) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Hot Shot and Wooden Ships
It was the end of an era: the advent of the ironclad made traditional wooden-hulled warships obsolete. Despite this, the Confederates used a centuries-old device here: the hot-shot furnace. Inside the furnace, solid shot were heated red-hot. Clay . . . — Map (db m55350) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Iron Furnace Overlook1619-1622 — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
This is the location of the first iron furnace established in the New World, started in 1619 and completed in 1622. Iron ore had been extracted from James River outcrops as early as 1608, and these samples were shipped to England. The Virginia . . . — Map (db m101038) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — May 15, 1862—The Battle of Drewry's Bluff
When Federal gunboats rounded the distant bend in the James, they entered a shooting gallery. Confederate soldiers and Marines along the riverbanks raked the decks with musket fire. Confederate guns here in the fort opened fire. The river . . . — Map (db m37028) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Natural History — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The Falling Creek Ironworks site is located seven miles south of Richmond, along Falling Creek, adjacent to Jefferson Davis Highway. The location also serves as a gateway to the area and is a draw for visitors to the Falling Creek Greenway with . . . — Map (db m101040) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Natural History — Falling Creek Ironworks Park
The Falling Creek Ironworks site is located seven miles south of Richmond, along Falling Creek, adjacent to Jefferson Davis Highway. The location also serves as a gateway to the area and is a draw for visitors to the Falling Creek Greenway with . . . — Map (db m101043) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Old Westham Bridge
The road ahead once led to a stone and steel bridge that connected the 20th century community of Southampton behind you with the colonial village of Westham on the north shore. Prior to its construction, the closest car link between Henrico . . . — Map (db m23938) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — O-37 — Providence United Methodist Church
Established by 1807, the Providence Church congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church became one of the first Methodist congregations in Chesterfield County to build a permanent house of worship when it constructed a meeting house here before . . . — Map (db m22698) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-9 — Second Battle of Drewry's Bluff
The Second Battle of Drewry's Bluff, or the Proctor's Creek engagement, began on 14 May 1864 when part of Union Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's Army of the James feigned an attack toward Richmond from Bermuda Hundred. After two days of skirmishing, . . . — Map (db m16022) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — Site of First Iron Foundry in America
Site of First Iron Foundry in America Established in 1619 — Map (db m16036) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — The Bermuda CampaignMay 1864
As part of Ulysses S. Grant’s overall strategic plan to win the Civil War, Gen. Butler’s Federal army advanced up the James River in the spring of 1864 in an effort to operate against Richmond from the south while the Army of the Potomac approached . . . — Map (db m14904) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — The First Marine Medal of HonorDrewry’s Bluff — Richmond National Battlefield Park, NPS
On May 15, 1862, during the Battle of Drewry’s Bluff, Southern marksmen in rifle pits – including two companies of Confederate States Marines – swept the gun deck of USS Galena, severely limiting its ability to fight. The U.S. . . . — Map (db m14901) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — The USS Monitor
During the Peninsula Campaign in the spring of 1862, a variety of innovative weapons saw action. But nothing captured the public’s attention more than ironclad warships, in particular the USS Monitor. After its epic duel with the CSS . . . — Map (db m55346) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Richmond — S-2 — Warwick
Located eight miles downstream from Richmond, Warwick was an important 18th-century James River port and manufacturing center. During the Revolutionary War, Warwick's craftsmen turned out clothing and shoes, and its mills ground flour and meal for . . . — Map (db m16014) HM
Virginia (Chesterfield County), Skinquarter — M-10 — Goode's Bridge
Here Anthony Wayne took station in July, 1781, to prevent the British from moving southward. Here, April 3, 1865, Longstreet's, Hill's and Gordon's corps of Lee's army, retreating from Petersburg toward Danville, crossed the river. — Map (db m18876) HM

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