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North Carolina Civil War Trails Historical Markers

 
Johnston Moves West Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2012
Johnston Moves West Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1North Carolina (Alamance County), Alamance — Johnston Moves WestHolt's Mill — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began of February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m45341) HM
2North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Confederate OccaneechiPiedmont Indians in the Civil War
When North Carolina passed laws in 1833 to restrict the rights of free blacks; they also limited the rights of Indians. In old Orange (later Alamance) County, many Occaneechi Indians including Dixon Corn, Jesse Jeffries, Enoch Jones, and Andrew . . . — Map (db m46084) HM
3North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Johnston Moves WestLogisticians at Work — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m46046) HM
4North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The Regulators' FieldA Lesson for the Defeated — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began of February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m42335) HM
5North Carolina (Alamance County), Graham — Johnston Moves WestRuffin Mills — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m46022) HM
6North Carolina (Alamance County), Haw River — Nathaniel Polk DeShongThe Southern Diaspora
Nathaniel Polk DeShong descended from Huguenot immigrants who settled near the Haw River about a mile and a half north of here. He enlisted on June 21, 1861, at 17 years of age under Capt. James W. Lea “for the War” in the 6th North . . . — Map (db m46081) HM
7North Carolina (Alamance County), Mebane — Johnston Moves WestHardee's Column — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m46023) HM
8North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — Cane Creek Meeting HouseSuffering for Peace
The Quakers (Society of Friends) were early anti-slavery supporters of the Underground Railroad. Once the war erupted and Alamance County residents chose sides, supporters of the Confederacy regarded the Friends as Unionists. Never attacked directly . . . — Map (db m45538) HM
9North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — Freedom Hill ChurchNo Slaveholder can be a Christian!
A mile south of here is the site of Freedom Hill Wesleyan Methodist Church, a simple frame building that measured 27 by 36 feet and was dedicated in March 1848. When local residents sent a plea for a minister to the Wesleyans in Ohio in 1847, the . . . — Map (db m46020) HM
10North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — Micajah McPhersonWe have Fought the Good Fight and Kept Our Faith
Micajah McPherson, a trustee of Freedom Hill Wesleyan Methodist Church and abolitionist, was lynched about a mile and a half southeast of here. Although there are different stories about his lynching, they agree that he was an innocent man lynched . . . — Map (db m46021) HM
11North Carolina (Avery County), Banner Elk — Banner ElkUnionist Haven
In 1860 Banner Elk was a small community in the mountains of Watauga County (present-day Avery County). Then called Banner’s Elk, it was named for the local Banner family and the Elk River. During the last years of the Civil War, an organized system . . . — Map (db m77533) HM
12North Carolina (Avery County), Elk Park — Cranberry Iron MineIron for the Confederacy
During the Civil War, natural resources such as salt, lead, and iron were highly prized commodities in the Confederacy. The government relied especially on small rural ironworks to manufacture cannons, swords, and firearms. Ruben White first mined . . . — Map (db m77479) HM
13North Carolina (Avery County), Linville — A Woman of WarSarah Malinda Blalock
Sarah Malinda Blalock and her husband, William McKesson “Keith” Blalock, lived in Coffey’s Gap on the Watauga and Caldwell County line in 1860. Keith Blalock was an avowed Unionist, but with the passage of the first Confederate . . . — Map (db m77492) HM
14North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — Oakdale CemeteryTo Our Confederate Dead
After the Civil War, women’s associations throughout the South sought to gather the Confederate dead from battlefield burial sites and reinter the remains in proper cemeteries, while Confederate monuments were erected in courthouse squares and other . . . — Map (db m76917) HM
15North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — Siege of WashingtonMarch 30 - April 20, 1863
To protect Confederate supply lines and to gather much-need provisions in eastern North Carolina, Gen. Daniel H. Hill planned demonstrations against Union-occupied New Bern and Washington in March 1863. He acted under orders from Gen. James . . . — Map (db m70502) HM
16North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — Tranter's CreekBrothers in Battle
After Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s army captured Roanoke Island in February 1862, Federal troops occupied New Bern the next month and then secured the undefended town of Washington on March 20. Although several weeks passed with only a few . . . — Map (db m70506) HM
17North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — USS PicketBattle of Washington
During the summer of 1862, Union forces firmly controlled eastern North Carolina, with garrisons stationed at Plymouth, Washington, New Bern and elsewhere. Federal detachments raided the countryside at will, while Confederate . . . — Map (db m64899) HM
18North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Engagement at WindsorAction on the Cashie River
To disrupt Confederate recruiting efforts here in Windsor, the Bertie County seat, three Federal transports steamed from Plymouth on the night of January 29, 1864, under U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Charles W Flusser. USS Whitehead and USS . . . — Map (db m60627) HM
19North Carolina (Brunswick County), Southport — Fort JohnstonGuardian of the Cape Fear River
Confederate Lifeline. On January 9, 1861, as secession fever swept the South, an armed body of civilians overwhelmed Fort Johnston’s lone occupant, Ordinance Sgt. James Reilly, and demanded the keys. Reilly quickly surrendered them and received . . . — Map (db m4761) HM
20North Carolina (Brunswick County), Winnabow — Fort AndersonOne Shovelful at a Time — Confederate Lifeline —
In 1861–1862, Col. William Lamb and Maj. John Hedrick constructed Fort Anderson, one of several Confederate strongholds that protected Wilmington, a major blockade-running port. They enlarged Fort St. Philip (for St. Philip’s Anglican Church . . . — Map (db m6515) HM
21North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — 1st U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery"Ready to Take the Field"
Gen. Davis Tillson raised 1,700-man 1st U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery in Tennessee and North Carolina in 1864. The unit encamped nearby while garrisoned in Asheville in 1865. Assigned to Tillson's 2nd brigade, the men participated in operations in . . . — Map (db m55571) HM
22North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Asheville's Enslaved PeopleWartime Servitude
When the war began, more than 15 percent of Buncombe County’s residents were enslaved people. James Patton housed slaves behind his Eagle Hotel (straight ahead), where they worked as waiter, maids, grooms, cooks, and trail guides. Three blocks to . . . — Map (db m75507) HM
23North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Battery PorterNapoleons on Stony Hill
Near the end of the Civil War in 1865, Confederate Battery Porter was positioned uphill to your right on Stony Hill, at that time the highest point in Asheville. The battery included four 12-pounder field pieces known as Napoleons, a model 1857 . . . — Map (db m75505) HM
24North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Battle of AshevilleKirby's Expedition
On April 3, 1865, Union Col. Isaac M. Kirby left Tennessee with 900 men including his own 101st Ohio Infantry for “a scout in the direction of Asheville.” Three days later, local resident Nicholas Woodfin spotted the Federals on the . . . — Map (db m75534) HM
25North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Landsman Riley PowersMountain Sailor
Early in 1861, Buncombe County farmer William Riley Powers joined the Rough and Ready Guards (Co. F, 14th North Carolina Infantry). The regiment was assigned to southeastern Virginia. There, Confederate Gen. Benjamin Huger discharged Pvts. Powers . . . — Map (db m75532) HM
26North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Private George AverySouth Asheville Colored Cemetery
George Avery, a 19-year-old enslaved blacksmith, joined Co. D, 40th United States Colored Troops, in Greeneville, Tennessee, in 1865. According to local tradition, his master, Confederate Maj. William W. McDowell, sent Avery to enlist for a post-war . . . — Map (db m75527) HM
27North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Smith-McDowell HouseOur Businessman-Soldier
After John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, in 1859, new militia companies were formed in the South. Businessman William W. McDowell, whose wife acquired this house from her father’s and brother’s estates, raised a company called the . . . — Map (db m75524) HM
28North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Wartime JailAsheville's Prisons
During the war, many large buildings such as schools, warehouses, and churches became temporary prisons in Southern cities. After Asheville's jail on Pack Square overflowed with Confederate draft evaders, deserters, Union prisoners of war, and . . . — Map (db m59170) HM
29North Carolina (Buncombe County), Fairview — Gen. William J. PalmerQuaker Warrior — Stoneman's Raid —
(preface) On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m75541) HM
30North Carolina (Buncombe County), Ridgecrest — Swannanoa Gap EngagementBlocking the Way
Stoneman's Raid On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m55971) HM
31North Carolina (Buncombe County), Weaverville — Brothers In ServiceZebulon and Robert Vance Brithplace
Here were born two notable Buncombe County brothers, Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) and Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899). Zebulon Vance was a Whig and supporter of the Union who opposed secession until the last moment. At the outbreak of war in . . . — Map (db m23138) HM
32North Carolina (Burke County), Morganton — MorgantonRocky Ford Engagement — Stoneman's Raid —
(Preface): On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m20348) HM
33North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — St. John's Lutheran ChurchCommunity Sacrifice
During the Civil War, about two hundred members of St. John’s Lutheran Church served in at least eight Confederate army units. The units included companies in the 8th, 20th, 33rd, 52nd, and 57th North Carolina Infantry regiments, as well as a . . . — Map (db m77374) HM
34North Carolina (Caldwell County), Lenoir — Patterson MillStruck by Stoneman's Raiders — Stoneman's Raid —
(preface) On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m77560) HM
35North Carolina (Caldwell County), Lenoir — Raiders in LenoirSt. James Episcopal Church and Prison — Stoneman's Raid —
(preface) On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m77565) HM
36North Carolina (Camden County), South Mills — Battle of South MillsFight for the Canal — Burnside Expedition —
Early in 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside led an expedition to secure the coast of North Carolina and occupy strategically important sites such as New Bern and Elizabeth City. After Burnside learned of the March 9 clash between USS . . . — Map (db m56761) HM
37North Carolina (Carteret County), Atlantic Beach — Hoop Pole CreekFerrying Troops and Equipment at High Tide — Burnside Expedition —
In March 1862, Union Gen. John G. Parke’s brigade of Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’ Coastal Division advanced from New Bern to capture Beaufort Harbor and Fort Macon. During March 22-26, Parke’s forces took possession of Carolina City, Morehead City . . . — Map (db m77046) HM
38North Carolina (Carteret County), Beaufort — BeaufortUnion Occupation and Confederate Spies
Before the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, local citizens formed the Beaufort Harbor Guards. These Confederate sympathizers, led by Capt. Josiah Pender, occupied Fort Mason when the sole guard, U.S. Army Ordnance Sgt. William Alexander, quietly . . . — Map (db m77029) HM
39North Carolina (Carteret County), Newport — Bogue Sound BlockhouseVermonters' Spirited Resistance
Company K, 9th New Jersey Volunteers, built the Bogue Sound Blockhouse here in the summer of 1862 to guard the junction of the Bogue Sound Road and Newport Road. Protected by a surrounding ditch and earthworks, the log blockhouse was armed with one . . . — Map (db m77094) HM
40North Carolina (Carteret County), Newport — Newport BarracksWinter Quarters Ablaze
The 7th North Carolina Infantry built Newport Barracks here as a set of log winter quarters in 1861-1862. Union soldiers later took possession and added a hospital, headquarters, stables, storehouses, earthworks to protect the complex, and an . . . — Map (db m31225) HM
41North Carolina (Chowan County), Cannon Ferry — War on the Chowan RiverBuffalo Country
After Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside captured Roanoke Island in February 1862, U.S. Navy vessels patrolled the Chowan River from its mouth in North Carolina to Franklin, Virginia, located on the Blackwater River, a tributary. The Chowan River here . . . — Map (db m60626) HM
42North Carolina (Chowan County), Edenton — EdentonBattle of Albemarle Sound
On May 5, 1864, the Confederate ironclad ram CSS Albemarle under Commander James W. Cooke, with gunboats Cotton Plant and Bombshell, steamed out of the Roanoke River into Bachelor's Bay and Albemarle Sound before you, bound for . . . — Map (db m34832) HM
43North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — Attmore-Oliver HouseUnder the Stars & Bars
Like many other North Carolinians, New Bern’s residents enjoyed close economic and family ties with the North and were reluctant to leave the Union. Once the war began, however, many North Carolinians passionately supported the Confederate cause: . . . — Map (db m76993) HM
44North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — Battle of New BernSmoke and Flames — Burnside Expedition —
On March 13, 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside prepared to capture New Bern after seizing Roanoke Island in February. Confederate Gen. Lawrence O’B. Branch defended the city in a line of fortifications located several miles down the Neuse . . . — Map (db m77003) HM
45North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — Greenwood CemeteryHistoric Burial Site
Greenwood Cemetery, established in 1882 on the grounds of an earlier cemetery, is New Bern’s second-oldest public cemetery and the first city-owned cemetery for African Americans. Thirteen grave markers are dated between 1816 and 1859. At least . . . — Map (db m76972) HM
46North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — New Bern AcademyFrom School to Hospital
In 1861, Confederate authorities converted the New Bern Academy from a school to a hospital. The U.S. Army commandeered the structure to care for the wounded almost immediately after defeating Confederate forces in the Battle of New Bern on March . . . — Map (db m23659) HM
47North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — New Bern National CemeteryHonoring the Union Dead
On March 14, 1862, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside captured New Bern after seizing Roanoke Island in February and moving his army inland. After the battle for the town, the Federals established hospitals in the New Bern Academy, the Masonic Lodge, . . . — Map (db m76946) HM
48North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — William Henry SingletonFrom Slavery to Freedom
During the Civil War, thousands of enslaved blacks freed themselves by escaping to Union lines. Craven County native William Henry Singleton (1843-1938) was one of them. According to his biography, Recollections of My Slavery Days (1922), as . . . — Map (db m24054) HM
49North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Burning of Clarendon BridgeConfederates Evacuate Fayetteville — Carolinas Campaign —
(preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m70380) HM
50North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cross Creek CemeteryConfederate Burial Grounds
This is the oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, begun in 1785. Mrs. Anne K. Kyle, who served as a nurse in the hospital here during the Civil War, established the Confederate Burial Ground soon after Union Gen. William T. Sherman and his army . . . — Map (db m30940) HM
51North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Edward J. Hale HouseCivil War Publisher — Carolinas Campaign —
Across the street is the Hale-Williams House, notable for the variety of architectural styles it incorporates as well as for the prominence of its builder, Edward Jones Hale. Hale bought this property in 1847 and constructed the house in the 1850s. . . . — Map (db m70360) HM
52North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Fayetteville Arsenal"Batter . . . into piles of rubble" — Carolinas Campaign —
[Preface at top left] The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. . . . — Map (db m24355) HM
53North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina's Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids, and the . . . — Map (db m24357) HM
54North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Parade GroundFayetteville Independent Light Infantry
The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry is North Carolina's oldest military unit and the second-oldest militia organization in the U.S. At the start of the Civil War, after North Carolina seceded, the company enrolled in active service for . . . — Map (db m31109) HM
55North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Market HouseSite of a Shootout — Carolinas Campaign —
On Saturday morning, March 11, 1865, a brief skirmish took place here at the Market House as Confederate forces evacuated Fayetteville while Union Gen. William T. Sherman's army entered the town. A rear guard detachment under Gen. Wade Hampton . . . — Map (db m24442) HM
56North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Sandford HouseBarracks for Union Troops — Carolinas Campaign —
Duncan McLeran constructed this two-story Federal-style dwelling in 1797. In 1820, the property was sold and remodeled to accommodate the Bank of the United States, the first federal bank in North Carolina. The house is named for John Sanford, a . . . — Map (db m70374) HM WM
57North Carolina (Cumberland County), Godwin — Battle of AverasboroConfederate First Defensive Line — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush . . . — Map (db m42002) HM
58North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — Old Bluff ChurchThe Muddy Road to Averasboro — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the "March to the Sea." Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to . . . — Map (db m160940) HM
59North Carolina (Currituck County), Currituck — Currituck County CourthouseConfederate Recruiting Center
Currituck has been the county government seat since 1723. The core of the present courthouse to the right and jail in front of you were here when the Civil War began. On March 31, 1862, the “Currituck Light Cavalry” began enlisting on . . . — Map (db m2764) HM
60North Carolina (Currituck County), Knotts Island — Knotts IslandSalts Works Center
During the Civil War, salt—essential for the preservation of meat—was vitally important to the massive Union and Confederate armies. Currituck County's location was ideal for salt works, and Knotts Island's residents made salt both here . . . — Map (db m76552) HM
61North Carolina (Currituck County), Moycock — MoycockShingle Landing
Currituck Sound and the surrounding area were under Union control by 1863. Local farmers and merchants sought permission from Federal authorities to sell their produce in Norfolk. They followed this route to the city. Union Gen. Henry M. Naglee, . . . — Map (db m56982) HM
62North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Lexington in the Civil WarOccupation and Fire
President Jefferson Davis and his entourage paused here in Lexington on April 16-17, 1865, as the Confederate government fled south after the April 3 evacuation of Richmond, Virginia. While here, Davis telegraphed Gen. Joseph E. Johnston as to the . . . — Map (db m34182) HM
63North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Pine Grove CampConfederate Government Seat
For an hour on the evening of Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, a pine grove outside Lexington became the de facto seat of government for the Confederate States of America and the state of North Carolina. President Jefferson Davis and his cabinet, . . . — Map (db m77700) HM
64North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — The HomesteadUnexpected Houseguests
The Homestead was the home of Dr. William R. Holt, one of antebellum North Carolina’s most versatile and talented men, with interests in medicine, agriculture, education, religion, transportation, and manufacturing. In May 1865, when Dr. Holt . . . — Map (db m34190) HM
65North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — ThomasvilleCaring for the Sick and Wounded
During the Civil War, Thomasville became a hospital center that treated the sick and wounded, civilian and soldier alike. From 1862 to 1865, a local doctor, D. W. Smith, operated a smallpox hospital just outside of town. In March 1865, Surgeon Simon . . . — Map (db m34232) HM
66North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — ThomasvilleA Key Stop & Refuge
John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the new town, and the . . . — Map (db m70006) HM WM
67North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — Thomasville City CemeteryUnion of Combatants
(Preface): John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the . . . — Map (db m34234) HM
68North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Davie County in the Civil WarStoneman in Mocksville — Stoneman's Raid —
(Preface): On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m53207) HM
69North Carolina (Duplin County), Kenansville — Confederate States ArmoryCutting the Supply Line — Confederate Lifeline —
Throughout the Civil War, North Carolina furnished much of the material that the Confederate armies needed to sustain field operations. Here in Kenansville, the Confederate States Army produced military supplies ranging from swords to knapsacks. . . . — Map (db m77287) HM
70North Carolina (Duplin County), Kenansville — Confederate States ArmoryDetermined Production — Confederate Lifeline —
In April 1861, Louis Froelich, a Bavarian immigrant, began manufacturing uniform buttons in Wilmington for North Carolina soldiers. With Hungarian partner Col. Bela Estvan, Froelich operated his first arms factory for the Confederacy from November . . . — Map (db m77289) HM
71North Carolina (Duplin County), Warsaw — The War Comes to WarsawLewis's Railroad Raid — Confederate Lifeline —
During the war, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad was part of a rail network that transported vital supplies north to Confederate forces in Virginia. Cutting that line became an important Union objective. On July 5, 1863, Lt. Col. George W. . . . — Map (db m77306) HM
72North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Bennett PlaceThe End of War — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface, upper left) : The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. . . . — Map (db m3635) HM
73North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Brassfield StationA Path Both Traveled — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in . . . — Map (db m14710) HM
74North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Duke HomesteadProsperity from War
When North Carolina became the last state to secede from the Union in May 1861, Washington Duke’s small farm and homestead here consisted of more than 300 acres. He grew typical crops such as corn, wheat, oats, and sweet potatoes, and had raised . . . — Map (db m37834) HM
75North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Durham's StationPrelude To Peace — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in . . . — Map (db m14674) HM
76North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the . . . — Map (db m37830) HM
77North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the . . . — Map (db m58392) HM
78North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the . . . — Map (db m63217) HM
79North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — West Point Truce LineWaiting, Looting, and Shooting — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to . . . — Map (db m45346) HM
80North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — Civil War CemeteriesBuried with Honor
Civil War soldiers and veterans are buried in Calvary Episcopal Churchyard and Old Town Cemetery. Among the fifty Confederates interred in the churchyard are Gen. William Dorsey Pender and Lt. Col. John L. Bridges. In May 1863, Pender . . . — Map (db m45432) HM
81North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — Occupation of Tarboro"All were burned ..." — Potter's Raid —
(Preface): On July 18, 1863 Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and retreated to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m31074) HM
82North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — Occupation of TarboroDaniel's Schoolhouse Engagement — Potters Raid —
(Preface): On July 18, 1861, Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The Infantry feinted toward Kinston and returned to New Bern. Potter . . . — Map (db m62211) HM
83North Carolina (Franklin County), Louisburg — Camp Site for Sherman's ArmyLouisburg at the End of the War
On May 1, 1865, five days after Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Union Gen. William T. Sherman near Durham Station, approximately 12,000 to 15,000 troops of Sherman’s Army of the Tennessee camped in Louisburg en route to . . . — Map (db m77880) HM
84North Carolina (Gates County), Gatesville — Gates County CourthouseCivil War Muster Ground
The Gates County militia had its headquarters here in the 1836 Gates County Courthouse. When the war began, the Gates Guards were organized and were mustered into Confederate service here as Co. B, 1st North Carolina Infantry. Other Gates County . . . — Map (db m60625) HM
85North Carolina (Graham County), Robbinsville — Civil War in Graham CountyUnion and Confederate Raiders
During the Civil War, Graham Country (the part of Cherokee County) offered scant support to the secessionist cause, although both ardent Confederates and staunch Unionists lived here. The region was not financially dependent on slavery. Most . . . — Map (db m75453) HM
86North Carolina (Greene County), Ayden — Scuffleton BridgeFailed to Burn — Potter's Raid —
(preface) On July 18, 1863, Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and returned to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m76875) HM
87North Carolina (Greene County), Hookerton — Hookerton DefensesConfederate Crossing and Headquarters — Potter's Raid —
(preface) On July 18, 1863, Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and returned to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m76890) HM
88North Carolina (Greene County), Snow Hill — Grimsley Baptist ChurchRest, Feed, and Forage — Potter's Raid —
(Preface): On July 18, 1863 Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and retreated to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m31170) HM
89North Carolina (Halifax County), Roanoke Rapids — Roanoke Canal"Duly Appreciated" — Confederate Lifeline —
The Roanoke Navigation Company - a collaboration among North Carolina, Virginia, and private shareholders - began building the Roanoke Canal in 1819. The company created an inland navigation system from the upper Staunton and Dan Rivers in Virginia, . . . — Map (db m58901) HM
90North Carolina (Halifax County), Weldon — Wilmington & Weldon RR TrestleLee's Lifeline — Confederate Lifeline —
Located on the Roanoke River, the town of Weldon was one of the South's major transportation hubs at the beginning of the Civil War. By 1861, the town served as an important stop for steamboats and canal boats, and it was the junction of the . . . — Map (db m43459) HM
91North Carolina (Harnett County), Dunn — Battle of AverasboroThird Confederate Defensive Line — Carolinas Campaign —
Preface: The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in . . . — Map (db m3741) HM
92North Carolina (Harnett County), Dunn — Battle of AverasboroUnion Route to Bentonville — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in . . . — Map (db m5091) HM
93North Carolina (Harnett County), Dunn — Battle of AverasboroSherman’s Left Wing Departs Averasboro — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in . . . — Map (db m160759) HM
94North Carolina (Harnett County), Godwin — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina's Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids, and the . . . — Map (db m42001) HM
95North Carolina (Haywood County), Canton — Locust Field CemeteryConfederate Rendezvous
The first Locust Old Fields Baptist Church was established here in 1803. It was among the first churches established west of Asheville. Although the original building no longer stands, it served the small community here for many years as a house of . . . — Map (db m75504) HM
96North Carolina (Haywood County), Maggie Valley — Kirk's RaidUnwanted Intruders
On February 1, 1865, Col. George Kirk, 2nd North Carolina Mounted Infantry (U.S.), left Newport, Tennessee, with 400 cavalry and 200 infantry for a raid into Haywood County. He passed through the mountains at Mount Sterling, following the . . . — Map (db m12895) HM
97North Carolina (Haywood County), Waynesville — Battle HouseSurrender-Role Reversal
Until it was demolished in 1899, the Battle House, a stagecoach house and inn, stood just to your left. There, on May 7, 1865, a proposed Union surrender was transformed into a Confederate capitulation. After Col. William C. Bartlett's 2nd N.C. . . . — Map (db m12892) HM
98North Carolina (Haywood County), Waynesville — Thomas's Resting PlaceGreenhill Cemetery
Col. William Holland Thomas (February 5, 1805-May 10, 1893) is among the Confederate officers and soldiers buried here in Greenhill Cemetery. His grave is located about thirty yards in front of you on the right. Thomas, who began trading with . . . — Map (db m75487) HM
99North Carolina (Haywood County), Waynesville — Waynesville EngagementAmong the Last to Die
Col. William C. Bartlett’s 2nd N.C. Mounted Infantry (U.S.) occupied Waynesville early in May 1865. The Federals raided the surrounding countryside, relieving civilians of their horses and provisions. On May 6, a company of Confederate Col. . . . — Map (db m75490) HM
100North Carolina (Hertford County), Murfreesboro — MurfreesboroNaval Target
Murfreesboro, a prosperous riverfront commercial center, interested both sides during the war. In June 1862, Confederate Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes ordered cotton destroyed here and in other nearby towns. Eighty Confederate cavalrymen executing his . . . — Map (db m43434) HM

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Jan. 20, 2021