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Tennessee Civil War Trails Historical Markers

 
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By Joel Seewald, June 2, 2018
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Tennessee (Anderson County), Norris — Civil War in Anderson County"Skulking bushwhackers"
Divided loyalties in Anderson County, as elsewhere in East Tennessee, often erupted in violence. It was commonplace for guerillas on both sides to raid farms and capture opposing sympathizers. In the county seat of Clinton, Confederates . . . — Map (db m119021) HM
2Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — Violent Clashes"Flying...in the wildest disorder"
With the threat of war looming, Anderson County residents voted overwhelmingly against secession in 1861. When Confederate forces occupied East Tennessee and established a conscription center at nearby Clinton, Unionists slipped into Kentucky to . . . — Map (db m112103) HM
3Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Fighting in ShelbyvilleRain, Muddy Roads, and Swollen Rivers — Tullahoma Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg's . . . — Map (db m85714) HM
4Tennessee (Benton County), Camden — Fighting on the Tennessee RiverCavalry versus Navy
During the Civil War, several engagements occurred along the strategically important Tennessee River within about five miles of here. In each one, cavalrymen engaged naval forces. On April 26, 1863 near the mouth of the Duck River east of here, . . . — Map (db m74512) HM
5Tennessee (Benton County), Holladay — Fort JohnsonControlling the Tennessee River
Take Exit 133, State Route 191, and drive north to visit two state parks associated with the struggle to control the Tennessee River during the Civil War. In 1861, the Confederates built Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River and Fort Henry . . . — Map (db m96639) HM
6Tennessee (Benton County), Holladay — Parker's Crossroads“Charge ‘em both ways” — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
Late in 1862, the Union army Gen. Ulysses S. Grant threatened Vicksburg, Mississippi. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg ordered Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest to sever Grant's West Tennessee supply line, which extended from Columbus, Kentucky, via the . . . — Map (db m118580) HM
7Tennessee (Bledsoe County), Pikeville — Pikeville During the Civil WarHistory Around You
The Bledsoe County Courthouse in front of you stands on the site of the first courthouse, which was completed by 1821. During the Civil War, in August 1862, Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg led his Army of Tennessee north from Chattanooga to invade . . . — Map (db m109175) HM
8Tennessee (Blount County), Friendsville — The Underground RailroadFriendsville Quakers and Cudjo's Cave
Members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) came to Blount County in the 1790s looking for a place to worship in peace. Hardworking and industrious, opposing war and slavery, they developed the land and founded the prosperous settlements . . . — Map (db m81361) HM
9Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — Maryville During the Civil War"A shameful...fire"
During the antebellum period, Blount County supported abolitionism. In 1822, local Quakers and other residents formed an abolitionist society, and in the decades following, local clergymen preached against the evils of slavery. When the county . . . — Map (db m69452) HM
10Tennessee (Bradley County), Charleston — Charleston on the HiwasseeA Strategic Crossing
Charleston, formerly Fort Cass during the “Trail of Tears” (Indian removal of 1838), was strategically important in the military struggle for East Tennessee. The East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad bridge here, the line’s only crossing . . . — Map (db m69343) HM
11Tennessee (Bradley County), Charleston — The Henegar House"A bird can't live here!"
During the war, Henegar House’s occupants, as in many other Tennessee homes, were divided in their loyalties. Henry Benton Henegar, the owner, was a Unionist while his wife, Margaret Lea Henegar, was a secessionist. Whenever Confederates occupied . . . — Map (db m69346) HM
12Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Cleveland During the Civil WarStruggle for Control
When the Civil War began, Cleveland was a divided community with most residents being sympathetic to the Union. Confederate troops occupied the area in 1861 to control the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad and to protect the vitally important . . . — Map (db m69342) HM
13Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Fort Hill CemeteryDefending Cleveland
First called City Cemetery, this is the resting place of both Confederate and Union soldiers. On November 4, 1862, a train wreck south of Cleveland killed 17 Confederate soldiers who are buried here in a mass grave. Nearby engagements in 1863 . . . — Map (db m102186) HM
14Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Masonic Female Institute"Sadly abused"
Masonic Lodge No. 134 and the town of Cleveland established the Masonic Female Institute in 1848 and opened the school in 1856. At the beginning of the war, student and diarist Myra Inman wrote of a disruption in the school's leadership: "Mr. . . . — Map (db m153687) HM
15Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Union IV Corps at Blue SpringsThe Calm Before the Storm
After Union victories at Chattanooga in November 1863, the Union Army IV Corps's First Division, led by Gen. David S. Stanley, camped in this valley and made preparations for the Atlanta Campaign. By April 1864, more than 9,000 men were present, . . . — Map (db m153744) HM
16Tennessee (Campbell County), Jellico — Civil War in TennesseeWar in the Mountains
Tennessee’s mountain residents were bitterly divided about secession in 1861, although most were Unionist. In Huntsville (Exit 141), Scott County residents voted to secede and join Kentucky if Tennessee joined the Confederacy. Confederate . . . — Map (db m74227) HM
17Tennessee (Campbell County), Jellico — Conflict in Campbell CountyWar in the Mountains
The Civil War in Campbell County was often personal. Few residents owned slaves, and a large majority – 1,094 to 60 – voted against secession in June 1861. Local men formed what became Co. A and Co. B, 1st Tennessee Infantry (US), at the . . . — Map (db m119921) HM
18Tennessee (Campbell County), LaFollette — Big Creek GapNatural Opening
The road in front of you winds through Big Creek Gap, one of the few natural openings through the Cumberland Mountains in the region. During the Civil War, this corridor was much narrower and steeper, and even lightly loaded wagons found travel . . . — Map (db m74229) HM
19Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — Woodbury in the Civil War"A Brilliant Little Affair"
Woodbury, located on the Murfreesboro-McMinnville Turnpike, experienced two significant Civil War actions in 1862–1863. On July 12–13, 1862, when Confederate Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest marched through Cannon County to raid . . . — Map (db m150449) HM
20Tennessee (Carroll County), Clarksburg — ClarksburgPrelude, Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec 15, 1862-Jan 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m74967) HM
21Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — Harris-Collier-Holland FarmOne Family's Story
Albert Gallatin Harris purchased this farm in 1829 and built the present house in 1857. After camping on the land during the Civil War, Union troops ransacked the farm, killing or stealing all the livestock. They did not burn the house because the . . . — Map (db m74514) HM
22Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — McKenzie's StationA Strategic Junction — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m74532) HM
23Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — Samuel P. CarterAdmiral and General
Although Tennessee voted to secede from the Union in June 1861, East Tennessee remained staunchly loyal. The residents of Carter County voted against secession, 1,343 to 86. One of those residents, Admiral and General Samuel P. Carter (born . . . — Map (db m135600) HM
24Tennessee (Cheatham County), Kingston Springs — Connection To JohnsonvilleU.S. Military Railroad
In November 1863, Federal troops occupied Kingston Springs to serve as headquarters for the supervisors of the U.S. Military Railroad Construction Corps. They oversaw the construction of this section of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. When . . . — Map (db m69365) HM
25Tennessee (Chester County), Henderson — Fighting For ControlMobile & Ohio Railroad
The three-year fight in present-day Chester County for control of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad often touched the lives of Henderson's residents. Henderson's Station, as it was called, served as a Confederate recruiting center for the 51st and 52nd . . . — Map (db m155291) HM
26Tennessee (Chester County), Henderson — Henderson at WarUnder Occupation
At the time of the Civil War, Henderson was a stop on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad line. First called Dayton and later renamed Henderson Station, the village consisted of houses and stores in a line facing the tracks. After the fall of Fort Donelson . . . — Map (db m148486) HM
27Tennessee (Claiborne County), Harrogate — Lincoln And Cumberland GapPassage to the West
Cumberland Gap became the principal passage between the eastern and western theaters of operation in the Upper South during the war. Whichever side held the high ground here held the Gap. In 1861, Confederate Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer's men . . . — Map (db m35761) HM
28Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — Celina During the Civil WarHamilton's Tennessee Cavalry Battalion
During the Civil War, the residents of the eastern and Cumberland River sections of present-day Clay County (then part of Jackson and Overton Counties) were usually Confederate sympathizers, while those in the western section supported the Union. . . . — Map (db m74297) HM
29Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — Donaldson CemeteryA Cavalryman’s Resting Place
Capt. Jacob C. “Jake” Bennett, a native Kentuckian and noted Confederate partisan ranger, is buried in Donaldson Cemetery (four miles north of here). During the war, bushwhackers and guerrillas on both sides raided the sparsely populated . . . — Map (db m112197) HM
30Tennessee (Cocke County), Parrottsville — Johnson's Parrottsville SlavesOrigin of Tennessee Emancipation Day
In 1842, state senator Andrew Johnson, a resident of neighboring Greene County, purchased his first slave here in Parrottsville. Her name was Dolly, and she was fourteen. Her son claimed that she approached Johnson and asked him to buy her because . . . — Map (db m92476) HM
31Tennessee (Cocke County), Parrottsville — The Hanging of Peter ReeceSwift Retribution
During the Civil War, both Union and Confederate forces accused each other of committing atrocities against prisoners and civilians. The hanging of Peter Reece, a Unionist who lived near present day Harned Chapel United Methodist Church, illustrates . . . — Map (db m87171) HM
32Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — War Comes to ManchesterDuck River Defense Line — A Tale of Two Occupations — Tullhoma Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, . . . — Map (db m156117) HM
33Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Fortress TullahomaStrategic Rail Center — Tullahoma Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg’s . . . — Map (db m81382) HM
34Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Maplewood Confederate CemeteryHallowed Ground
Tullahoma was the headquarters and logistics center of the Confederate Army of Tennessee for the first six months of 1863 after the Battle of Murfreesboro. At least three hospitals here treated soldiers wounded during Gen. Braxton Bragg’s 1862 and . . . — Map (db m75310) HM
35Tennessee (Crockett County), Alamo — Cageville in the Civil WarDivided Loyalties
In 1861, this place was called Cageville, a small hamlet at an important West Tennessee crossroads. The residents here and at nearby Bells (then called Bells Depot) largely supported the Confederacy. In April 1861, 170 volunteers formed what would . . . — Map (db m156331) HM
36Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crab Orchard — Champ FergusonConfederate Partisan of the Cumberlands
Samuel "Champ" Ferguson was the most notorious Confederate guerilla leader in the Upper Cumberland mountains. In 1861, he formed a company and began attacking Unionist partisans. Such irregular forces were common on both sides during the war, . . . — Map (db m98849) HM
37Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — "Tinker Dave" BeatyUnion Partisan of the Cumberlands
David “Tinker Dave” Beaty, a native of Fentress County, was the best-known Union partisan in the Upper Cumberland mountains. In 1862, he formed a group called Beaty's Company of Independent Tennessee Scouts, also variously called . . . — Map (db m150754) HM
38Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — Cumberland County at WarDivided by Conflict
Divided loyalties in Tennessee produced a bitter and violent Civil War experience in Cumberland County, the only county that did not report a vote either for or against secession. Confederate supporters joined Co. B, Lt. Col. Oliver P. Hamilton’s . . . — Map (db m69232) HM
39Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — Cumberland County FamiliesDivided by War
When the war began, the residents of the Upper Cumberland Plateau were divided in their loyalties. In Cumberland County, for instance, the numbers of Confederate and Union enlistments were about equal. Some Confederate supporters joined Co. B, . . . — Map (db m107097) HM
40Tennessee (Cumberland County), Pleasant Hill — Affair at Cumberland MountainA Brief Fight
Less than half a mile west of here, on the Lewis Whitaker farm, the only engagement of the war in Cumberland County between regular Union and Confederate troops took place on December 9, 1863. Several companies of Col. Thomas J. Jordan’s 9th . . . — Map (db m69228) HM
41Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Baseball in Civil War NashvillePastime of War
In the spring of 1862, Nashville became the first Confederate state capital to fall to Union forces. As the Union army took control, it established camps around the State Capitol building, including in this area, one of the most historic places in . . . — Map (db m160531) HM
42Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationThe Battle of Nashville — Hood's Campaign —
(overview) In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to . . . — Map (db m68971) HM
43Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationChange of Ownership
Confederate Gen. William Hicks “Billy” Jackson (1835–1903), who acquired Belle Meade Plantation after the war, served with distinction throughout the Western Theater of the Civil War. He was an excellent horseman, a skill that . . . — Map (db m68973) HM
44Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Clover Bottom FarmJohn McCline's Story
Dr. James Hoggatt, owner of the 1,500-acre Clover Bottom Farm, also owned sixty slaves here. One of them was John McCline, who lived here with his three brothers and his grandmother. McCline cared for the farm's horses and cattle among other tasks. . . . — Map (db m147621) HM
45Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Fort NegleyDefending the Capital — Hood's Campaign —
In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Hood . . . — Map (db m74349) HM
46Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Travellers Rest"The proudest moment of my life" — Hood's Campaign —
In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Hood . . . — Map (db m74373) HM
47Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — War on the Home FrontBelle Meade and Union Occupation
William Giles Harding, the owner of Belle Meade Plantation, was an ardent Confederate supporter who provided thousands of dollars to help arm Tennessee’s Confederate forces. He served on the state’s Military Armaments Committee. In March 1862, he . . . — Map (db m81481) HM
48Tennessee (Decatur County), Parsons — Divided LoyaltiesDecatur County during the Civil War
In 1861 West Tennessee overwhelmingly supported secession. Many residents with strong attachments to the Union however, lived in several counties along the Tennessee River. despite enormous pressure from their neighbors to support the Confederacy, a . . . — Map (db m143707) HM
49Tennessee (Dekalb County), Alexandria — Morgan in AlexandriaPreparing for a Raid
From late in 1862 to mid-1863, Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg fortified his defenses in Middle Tennessee while Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans reinforced his army. To disrupt the extended Federal communication and supply lines, late in 1862 Bragg . . . — Map (db m74322) HM
50Tennessee (Dekalb County), Smithville — DeKalb County in the Civil WarA Country and a County Divided
DeKalb County differed from surrounding counties. A sizeable minority of its citizens opposed secession and voted against it in the June 8, 1861 referendum. Their champion was a slave owner, Congressman William B. Stokes. The majority followed . . . — Map (db m81483) HM
51Tennessee (Dickson County), Charlotte — Civil War In Charlotte"Marauding gangs of Freebooters"
In 1860, 300 people lived in Charlotte, the Dickson County seat. During the war, the residents witnessed considerable military activity, beginning February 17, 1862, when Confederate Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest, arrived here to reequip his men and . . . — Map (db m68958) HM
52Tennessee (Dickson County), Charlotte — Fighting for FreedomPromise Land Civil War Heroes
The Emancipation Proclamation, issued January 1, 1863, authorized the recruiting of African Americans as United States soldiers. It inspired men, like brothers John and Arch Nesbitt, to join the U.S. Colored Troops and fight for their freedom. John . . . — Map (db m81504) HM
53Tennessee (Dickson County), Charlotte — Harpeth ShoalsHazardous Navigation
After the fall of Fort Donelson in February 1862, Federal forces gained control of Nashville and transported most of their supplies to the city via the Cumberland River. Extending for five miles along the river here, the Harpeth Shoals made . . . — Map (db m68962) HM
54Tennessee (Dickson County), Dickson — Camp GillemGillem Station
In 1864, just to your left, the Federal army established Camp Gillem to protect the locomotive yard here at Gillem Station. Both were named for Gen. Alvan C. Gillem, commander of the troops guarding and constructing the Nashville and Northwestern . . . — Map (db m68922) HM
55Tennessee (Dickson County), Dickson — Civil War on Yellow CreekA Guerrilla Sanctuary
During the Civil War, Yellow Creek's rough terrain and the widespread Confederate sentiment of its inhabitants provided a safe refuge for guerrillas operating in Dickson County and the surrounding area. Regular Confederate cavalry also came through . . . — Map (db m151419) HM
56Tennessee (Dickson County), Dickson — Irish ShantyOnly Boiling Eggs
On July 2, 1863, as Federal forces conducted a campaign to rid the Yellow Creek valley of Confederate guerrillas, a forward detachment of the 8th Kentucky Cavalry (US) rode up to a grocery store and tavern located about two miles to the west. The . . . — Map (db m68923) HM
57Tennessee (Dickson County), Dickson — Mile Post 42The U.S. Military Railroad
The railroad in front of you was part of a vital transportation network for the Federal army during the Civil War. W.H.Crutcher had purchased 533 acres and constructed a sixteen-by-sixteen foot log structure here in December 1860. After occupying . . . — Map (db m68931) HM
58Tennessee (Dickson County), White Bluff — McNairy’s AttackRaiding the Supply Trains
In May 1864, the Nashville and Northwestern Military Railroad was completed. The Federal high command hoped that the new line, running from the Tennessee River to Nashville, would provide safer and more effective transportation than either the . . . — Map (db m143835) HM
59Tennessee (Dickson County), White Bluffs — The Civil War in White BluffsBuilding the Railroad
In 1862, the extension of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad through White Bluffs to the Tennessee River brought not only growth to the area, but also chaos. Union forces stationed near here were responsible for constructing a depot, railroad . . . — Map (db m143833) HM
60Tennessee (Dyer County), Dyersburg — Dyer County in the WarA Scoured Countryside
At least fifteen Confederate companies were formed in Dyer County, including Capt. Otho F. Strahl’s Co. K, 4th Tennessee Infantry, and Capt. Tyree H. Bell’s Co. B, 12th Tennessee Infantry. Both men rose to the rank of brigadier general. Strahl was . . . — Map (db m74634) HM
61Tennessee (Fayette County), LaGrange — LaGrangeUnion Supply Base
Federal forces occupied LaGrange during the war, 1862-1865, and made it an important supply base. Gen. William T. Sherman established his headquarters here when the occupation began in 1862. In April 1863, Union Col. Benjamin H. Grierson left here . . . — Map (db m51816) HM
62Tennessee (Fayette County), Moscow — Battle of Moscow"The river seemed like running blood"
By late in 1863, the Union army occupying West Tennessee strongly defended the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, which ran eastward from Memphis through Moscow. Federal infantry, including the U.S. Colored Troops of the 2nd West Tennessee Infantry, . . . — Map (db m37273) HM
63Tennessee (Franklin County), Cowan — Passing Through CowanCumberland Mountain Tunnel — Tullahoma Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1853, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg’s . . . — Map (db m75267) HM
64Tennessee (Franklin County), Winchester — Winchester's Civil War SitesCounty Seceded before the State
When Tennessee failed to secede from the Union on February 9, 1861, Franklin County residents met here at the courthouse. They listened to attorney Peter Turney’s forceful speech offering resolutions in favor of secession and reportedly adopted them . . . — Map (db m75226) HM
65Tennessee (Gibson County), Humboldt — Fighting For HumboldtRaid on the Depot — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862—Jan 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and . . . — Map (db m156775) HM
66Tennessee (Gibson County), Trenton — Female Collegiate InstituteFreed House
Friendship Lodge No. 22, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, founded the Odd Fellows Female Collegiate Institute here in 1852. During the Civil War, Federal troops occupied the building, a two-story brick structure, and used it as a hospital. An . . . — Map (db m74600) HM
67Tennessee (Gibson County), Trenton — Fighting for TrentonRaid on the Depot — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's supply line between Columbus, Kentucky and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m74603) HM
68Tennessee (Gibson County), Trenton — Fighting for TrentonRifling the Courthouse — Forrest’s First West Tennessee Raid —
(Preface): Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862 - Jan. 3, 1863, destroying railroads an severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's supply line between Columbus, Kentucky and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m81556) HM
69Tennessee (Gibson County), Trenton — Fighting for TrentonForrest's Artillery Position — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid —
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862 - Jan. 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's supply line between Columbus, Kentucky and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m81557) HM
70Tennessee (Giles County), Ardmore — Civil War in TennesseeHood Campaign of 1864
Middle Tennessee experienced small-scale battles and engagements throughout the war, Many occurred along present-day I-65. At Elkton (Exit 6), Federal forces controlled the Elk River Bridge and protected the Prospect Railroad Bridge with a . . . — Map (db m108233) HM
71Tennessee (Giles County), Cornersville — Lairdland Farm HouseWar and Romance
Here on February 10, 1867, James Knox Polk Blackburn and Mary “Mackie” McMillan Laird were married on the porch of the Lairdland farm house. She was the daughter of Robert H. and Nancy Mildred Gordon Laird, who owned the thousand-acre . . . — Map (db m75135) HM
72Tennessee (Giles County), Elkton — Elkton BridgeA Strategic Crossing
The Elk River crossing here on the Columbia, Pulaski, Elkton, and Alabama Turnpike (earlier called the Bumpass Trail) was the narrowest part that could be bridged between Fayetteville, Tennessee, and Florence, Alabama. During the Civil War, a wooden . . . — Map (db m42500) HM
73Tennessee (Giles County), Minor HIll — Sam Davis Capture SiteMinor Hill
On Nov 20, 1863, scout Sam Davis stopped here while carrying dispatches to Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg. According to local tradition, he was asleep under a plum tree when two members of the 7th Kansas Cavalry, disguised as Confederates, arrested . . . — Map (db m75197) HM
74Tennessee (Grainger County), Bean Station — Battle of Bean's StationOpportunity Lost
Confederate Gen. James Longstreet abandoned his siege of Knoxville early in December 1863 and withdrew northeast with Union Gen. John Parke following distantly. Parke sent Gen. James Shackleford ahead to harry Longstreet, who camped with his main . . . — Map (db m69551) HM
75Tennessee (Grainger County), Blaine — Blaine's CrossroadsLittle to Gain; Much to Lose
After Confederate Gen. James Longstreet's defeat at Fort Sanders on November 29, 1863, he lifted the siege of Knoxville and headed northeast, hoping to intercept a Federal column marching toward Knoxville from Cumberland Gap. The Confederates paused . . . — Map (db m100816) HM
76Tennessee (Grainger County), Blaine — Janeway CabinWhen the Veterans Came Home
This single-room cabin was constructed about six miles east of here, the home of John Janeway and his wife, Gertrude. It is typical of such dwellings in Appalachian Tennessee. During the Civil War, Janeway join the fighting late, in June 1864, . . . — Map (db m100480) HM
77Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Bridge BurnersHangings at the Depot
After Unionists burned several East Tennessee railroad bridges on November 9, 1861, Confederate engineer Colonel Danville Leadbetter soon arrived to rebuild the brides and capture the perpetrators. Later that month, his forces captured Henry Fry, . . . — Map (db m58073) HM
78Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan"... bring Morgan out dead or alive."
On September 3-4, 1864, Lt.Col. William H. Ingerton led the 13th Tennessee Cavalry (USA) to Greeneville's outskirts, where he learned that Gen.John Hunt Morgan was at the Dickson-Williams Mansion. He told his company commanders, Capts. C.C. Wilcox . . . — Map (db m23081) HM
79Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — The Dickson - Williams MansionA House Divided
The Federal-style mansion in front of you was the home of Catharine Dickson Williams and Dr. Alexander Williams. Catharine Williams, a famous Greeneville hostess, counted Presidents Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson among her guests. . . . — Map (db m81613) HM
80Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Tusculum CollegePresident Andrew Johnson Museum & Library
During the 1861 secession debates, Greene County was mostly Unionist, but Tusculum College students were divided. Before the June secession vote, then-U.S. Sen. Johnson spoke in Greeneville in support of the Union. Afterward, secessionist students . . . — Map (db m69599) HM
81Tennessee (Greene County), Greeneville — Winter HeadquartersLongstreet in Greeneville
On February 28, 1864, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet established his headquarters here in the house of Judge Samuel Milligan, a Unionist. The Greeneville Town Hall now occupies the site. Gen. Robert E. Lee had detached Longstreet's First . . . — Map (db m158138) HM
82Tennessee (Greene County), Limestone — Unionist StrongholdThe Civil War in Greene County
Before the war began, Greene County had a long history of abolitionist sentiment. It was not surprising, then, that local residents overwhelmingly supported the Union when Tennessee seceded in June 1861. When 30 neighboring counties met in . . . — Map (db m84761) HM
83Tennessee (Greene County), Mosheim — Battles of Blue SpringsFighting on the Same Ground Twice
On the morning of October 10, 1863, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s campaign suddenly arrived at Blue Springs (present-day Mosheim) when Union cavalry attacked Confederate General John S. Williams’s troops. By noon, the Confederate lines were . . . — Map (db m69566) HM
84Tennessee (Greene County), Mosheim — Pottertown Bridge BurnersUnionists Pay the Ultimate Price
When Tennessee left the Union in June 1861, Greene County was a hotbed of divided loyalties. Several Unionists, who crafted multi-colored earthenware pottery which is still highly valued, were among the occupants of the nearby community named . . . — Map (db m81629) HM
85Tennessee (Hamblen County), Morristown — Caught in the CrossfireMorristown in the Civil War
In 1861, Morristown was a small railroad town strategically located where the East Tennessee & Virginia Railroad crossed the road to the Cumberland Gap. Although much of East Tennessee was Unionist, Morristown's residents held secessionist . . . — Map (db m101931) HM
86Tennessee (Hamblen County), Russellville — Bethesda Presbyterian ChurchA Church Divided
Bethesda Presbyterian Church, completed 1835, is a powerful reminder of the effect of the Civil War on the Tennessee home front. As the war clouds gathered, conflicting sympathies divided the congregation, and the church closed its doors. After the . . . — Map (db m35659) HM
87Tennessee (Hamblen County), Russellville — Longstreet's HeadquartersA Cold Command
In the winter of 1863-1864, after abandoning the siege of Knoxville, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet was given command of the Confederate forces in Upper East Tennessee. He chose Russellville, a small town on the East Tennessee and Virginia . . . — Map (db m81633) HM
88Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Chattanooga Creek Picket LinesSoldier's Truces — Chattanooga Campaign —
(Sidebar): After the Battle of Chickamauga in September 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans retreated to Federal-occupied Chattanooga, a strategically vital rail center, where Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg laid siege from Lookout Mountain . . . — Map (db m81653) HM
89Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Civil War in TennesseeControlling the River and Rails
Controlling the river and railroad junction at Chattanooga was important to both North and South during the war. As a Confederate general noted, Chattanooga "commands important passes into Georgia and Alabama, and would enable the enemy ... to cut . . . — Map (db m48198) HM
90Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Crucial Supply LinesEast Tennessee Railroads and Bridges
Two strategically important railroads met in Chattanooga. The Western & Atlantic Railroad (W&A) from Atlanta was finished in 1850. A few hundred yards to your left, it joined the East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad (ET&G), which was completed from . . . — Map (db m134925) HM
91Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Crutchfield HouseHeadquarters and Hospital — Chattanooga Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Chickamauga in September 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans retreated to Federal-occupied Chattanooga, a strategically vital rail center, where Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg laid siege from Lookout Mountain . . . — Map (db m69252) HM
92Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Headquarters RowGenerals and Ghosts
Beginning in 1862, Confederate Gens. Braxton Bragg, Daniel Ledbetter, and Joseph E. Johnston, followed by Union Gens. William S. Rosecrans and George H. Thomas, occupied the Greek Revival-style Richardson house, which stood nearby at 320 Walnut . . . — Map (db m59043) HM
93Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Occupied ChattanoogaThe Waterfront
Chattanooga's Tennessee River waterfront underwent major changes during the Civil War. The Confederate troops who occupied the town in the spring of 1862 constructed forts and batteries near the river. When Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans army . . . — Map (db m59048) HM
94Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Raccoon MountainEstablishing the Cracker Line — Chattanooga Campaign —
(preface) After the Battle of Chickamauga in September 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans retreated to Federal occupied Chattanooga, a strategically vital rail center, where Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg laid siege from Lookout Mountain . . . — Map (db m69994) HM
95Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Swaim's JailConfining Andrew's Raiders
Swaim’s Jail, a small two-story brick building set into the side of the slope and surrounded by a high board fence, stood across the street. Confederate authorities held Andrew’s Raiders there after their capture in April 1862. James J. Andrews, 22 . . . — Map (db m51690) HM
96Tennessee (Hamilton County), Lookout Mountain — Soldier TouristsThe View from the Top
Both the Confederate and the Union soldiers who fought in and around Chattanooga were struck by the region's scenic beauty. During the Union army's occupation of Chattanooga (November 1863 - Summer 1865), countless men hiked up Lookout Mountain to . . . — Map (db m59082) HM
97Tennessee (Hamilton County), Tiftonia — Civil War in TennesseeThe Fight for Lookout Mountain
Chattanooga, nestled along the banks of the Tennessee River and the northern gateway to the Georgia railroad system, was strategically important to both the United States and the Confederacy in the Civil War. Lookout Mountain (Exits 175 and 178) was . . . — Map (db m47082) HM
98Tennessee (Hardeman County), Bolivar — BolivarStrategic Position
Located midway between Memphis and Corinth, Mississippi, Bolivar's position on the Hatchie River (a navigable route to the Mississippi River) and its junction of north-south railroads made it a strategic location for both armies. By the fall of . . . — Map (db m84786) HM
99Tennessee (Hardeman County), Grand Junction — Grand JunctionCrossroads of Conflict
Grand Junction is named for its location, where the Memphis and Charleston and Mississippi Central Railroads intersect, and was strategically important to both Confederate and Union forces. After defeats at Shiloh and Corinth, Confederates tore up . . . — Map (db m37277) HM
100Tennessee (Hardin County), Savannah — Grant at Cherry Mansion"Gentlemen, the ball is in motion" — Battle of Shiloh —
After the February 1862 Union victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, Gen. Don Carlos Buell’s army occupied Nashville while Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s army penetrated to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. Buell and Grant planned to attack the . . . — Map (db m81776) HM

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Nov. 24, 2020