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Maryland Civil War Trails Historical Markers

 
Clarysville General Hospital Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2006
Clarysville General Hospital Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Maryland (Allegany County), Clarysville — Clarysville General HospitalCenter for Healing
On Clarysville Road SW at Vale Summit Road (Maryland Route 55), on the right when traveling south on Clarysville Road SW.
The Clarysville Inn once stood in front of you to the right. In this tavern, and in a complex of buildings constructed around it, the United States established a general hospital during the Civil War. On March 6, 1862, U.S. soldiers commandeered the . . . — Map (db m37540) HM
2Maryland (Allegany County), Cresaptown — Brady's CrossingPartisan Ranger Raid
On Darrows Avenue, on the left when traveling east.
In the early morning darkness on February 21, 1865, Lt. Jesse McNeill and his 66 Partisan Rangers (Confederate guerrillas) descended Knobly Mountain and stopped briefly at the residence of Felix R. Seymour, a Southern sympathizer. They then forded . . . — Map (db m4680) HM
3Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Allegany County AcademyCivil War Hospital
On Washington Street at Prospect Square, on the right when traveling west on Washington Street.
During the Civil War, enormous numbers of sick and wounded soldiers overwhelmed both medical science and available hospitals. Approximately fifteen buildings in Cumberland were pressed into service to care for the maimed and ill. Besides . . . — Map (db m139091) HM
4Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Civil War in Allegany CountyStrategic Location
On Canal Street south of Baltimore Street, on the left when traveling south.
During the Civil War, thousands of United States soldiers were stationed here in Cumberland and Allegany County to guard against raids and incursions by Confederate forces. Located only about 130 miles from the capital at Washington. . . . — Map (db m1049) HM
5Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
Near Fort Avenue. Reported damaged.
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m14038) HM
6Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
On Prospect Square at Washington Street, on the left when traveling north on Prospect Square.
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m17674) HM
7Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Cumberland SurrendersBetween the Line — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near Fort Avenue just north of Reservoir Avenue, on the left when traveling north.
In June 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. John D. Imboden to protect the army's left flank as it marched north through the Shenandoah Valley. Imboden was to draw Union forces into Hampshire County, West Virginia, and destroy bridges . . . — Map (db m139122) HM
8Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Folck's MillConfederate Raid
Near Ali Ghan Road NE.
Late in July 1864, Confederate Gen. John C. McCausland led his two cavalry brigades (about 2,800 men) northward into Pennsylvania and Maryland to capture Chambersburg and Cumberland and either collect a ransom or burn the towns. McCausland burned . . . — Map (db m19328) HM
9Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
On Canal Street at Baltimore Street, on the left when traveling south on Canal Street.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north . . . — Map (db m1051) HM
10Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — McNeill’s RaidCapture of Crook and Kelly
On Baltimore Street at Queen City Drive, on the left when traveling east on Baltimore Street.
In the predawn darkness of February 21, 1865, Confederate Lt. Jesse McNeill and his partisan (guerrilla) rangers rode into Cumberland from the west on this road. Unlike most raiders who targeted the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for attack, McNeill . . . — Map (db m155354) HM
11Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Picket Post No. 1McNeill's Raid to Steal Generals
On McMullen Highway Southwest (U.S. 220) 0.2 miles south of National Freeway (Interstate 68), on the right when traveling south.
In the predawn darkness of February 21, 1865, Confederate Lt. Jesse McNeill and his Partisan Rangers approached Cumberland from the west on this road. Unlike most guerrilla raiders, who targeted the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, McNeill had other . . . — Map (db m139089) HM
12Maryland (Allegany County), Flintstone — McCausland's RaidA Pause to Rest — 1864 Chambersburg Raid —
On 15 Mile Creek Road Southeast north of National Pike Northeast, on the left when traveling north.
During the Civil War, retribution by one side for "atrocities" committed against civilian by the other quickly escalated. Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early, during his 1864 Maryland invasion, demanded that several towns pay "ransoms" or be . . . — Map (db m134413) HM
13Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Pvt. Benjamin Welch OwensAn Outstanding Example of Courage
On Mt. Zion Marlboro Road (Maryland Route 408) 0.1 miles west of Ed Prout Road, on the right when traveling west.
This monument, dedicated on June 17, 1999, honors the memory of a local man, Benjamin Welch Owens, who left his nearby West River farm to join Confederate forces during the Civil War. Owens was among the tens of thousands of men from Maryland who . . . — Map (db m22146) HM
14Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Skidmore — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Near South Beach Road 0.8 miles south of Oceanic Drive.
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander's hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m72089) HM
15Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Skidmore — Sandy Point FarmWilliam Evans, Soldier and Sailor
Near South Beach Road 0.8 miles south of Oceanic Drive when traveling south.
William Evans, a slave of Capt. Thomas Mezick, the owner of Sandy Point Farm here, enlisted in the 30th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, in March 1864. The 22-year-old, thereby, gained his freedom. He joined 122 other area slaves who had been . . . — Map (db m72087) HM
16Maryland (Baltimore), Carroll Park — Camp CarrollFrom Plantation to Federal Camp
Near Washington Boulevard.
This land was part of a 2,568-acre tract named Georgia Plantation, that Charles Carroll purchased in 1732. By 1760, his son Charles Carroll, a lawyer, had constructed a Georgian summer home, Mount Clare. the Carroll family lived here until 1852. . . . — Map (db m2537) HM
17Maryland (Baltimore), Druid Hill Park — Druid HillStrategic Union Encampment
On Swann Drive at Druid Park Lake Drive, on the right when traveling north on Swann Drive.
Within a year of the April 1861 Baltimore Riots, the first of several U.S. Army camps and fortifications began encircling Druid Hill, and important location high above the city and adjacent to the Northern Central Railroad. The 114th and 150th . . . — Map (db m7594) HM
18Maryland (Baltimore), Federal Hill — Federal HillBuilding the Fort
Near Warren Avenue.
On the evening of May 13, 1861, U.S. General Benjamin E. Butler’s troops occupied Federal Hill and brought their guns to bear on Baltimore. For the next four years the hill, garrisoned by 10 different regiments, served as a strategic Union strong . . . — Map (db m2560) HM
19Maryland (Baltimore), Franklintown — Crimea MansionThe Arrest of Ross Winans
On Eagle Drive.
On May 11, 1861, Union Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's troops occupied the railroad depot southwest of Baltimore at Relay, where a spur of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's main line turned south to Washington. The seizure of Relay yielded a surprise . . . — Map (db m6403) HM
20Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Riot TrailDeath at President Street Station — Baltimore – A House Divided —
On President Street at Fleet Street, on the right when traveling south on President Street.
In 1861, as the Civil War began, Baltimore secessionists hoped to stop rail transportation to Washington and isolate the national capital. On April 19, the 6th Massachusetts Regiment arrived here at the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore . . . — Map (db m2418) HM
21Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Riot Trail"Keep back ... or I Shoot" — Baltimore - A House Divided —
On Light Street (Maryland Route 2) at East Pratt Street, on the left when traveling south on Light Street.
On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the city's role in . . . — Map (db m6151) HM
22Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Riot TrailFlag Waving at Fawn Street — Baltimore – A House Divided —
On President Street at Fawn Street, on the left when traveling north on President Street.
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6208) HM
23Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Riot TrailBarricade at Jones Falls Bridge — Baltimore – A House Divided —
On President Street at Pratt Street, on the left when traveling north on President Street.
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6209) HM
24Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Riot TrailCombat on Pratt Street — Baltimore – A House Divided —
On Pratt Street at Commerce Street, on the right when traveling east on Pratt Street.
(Preface) On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m71978) HM WM
25Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — USS ConstellationFlagship of the Anti-Slave Trade
Near East Pratt Street.
Though the Civil War was a period of great innovation for the navy, with widespread use of steam power and the innovation of ironclads there was still a place in the fleet for sailing ships. Built at the Gosport yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, in . . . — Map (db m6153) HM
26Maryland (Baltimore), Stadium Area — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Near West Camden Street near South Howard Street.
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m37537) HM
27Maryland (Baltimore), Stadium Area — Baltimore Riot TrailLast Shots at Camden Station — Baltimore – A House Divided —
Near South Howard Street near West Camden Street.
On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the city’s role . . . — Map (db m37538) HM
28Maryland (Baltimore), Washington Hill — Church Home and Hospital“I am a Massachusetts woman”
On North Broadway at Lamley Street, in the median on North Broadway.
Church Home and Hospital, formerly Washington Medical college, was where Edgar Allan Poe died on October 7, 1849, and where many doctors were trained who served in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. On April 19, 1861, Adeline . . . — Map (db m2427) HM
29Maryland (Baltimore), Washington Village/Pigtown — Baltimore & Ohio RailroadThe Mount Clare Shops
On West Pratt Street.
You are standing on the site of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad’s Mount Clare Shops, a large industrial complex critical to maintaining every aspect of the railroad’s daily operations. Because of their strategic importance, the shops were among . . . — Map (db m60965) HM
30Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
Near Frederick Road (Maryland Route 144) at Osborne Avenue, on the right when traveling west.
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland’s residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m71334) HM
31Maryland (Baltimore County), Cockeysville — Gilmor's RaidCapturing Cockeysville — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
Near Paper Mill Road (Maryland Route 145) 0.3 miles east of Arrowwood Road, on the left when traveling east.
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m75286) HM
32Maryland (Baltimore County), Lansdowne — Lansdowne Christian ChurchHull Memorial
On Clyde Avenue at Baltimore Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Clyde Avenue.
This church is a monument to one Civil Wary veteran’s love for his comrades. Charles W. Hull and his wife, Mary A. Hull, gave the land and the building as a memorial to the men who fought to preserve the Union. The deed stipulated that a memorial . . . — Map (db m115237) HM
33Maryland (Baltimore County), Phoenix — Glen EllenMaj. Harry Gilmor's Childhood Home — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
On Dulaney Valley Road at Loch Raven Drive, on the left when traveling east on Dulaney Valley Road.
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early . . . — Map (db m75287) HM
34Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
On 2nd Street at Gay Street, on the right when traveling north on 2nd Street.
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m3390) HM
35Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
On North 2nd Street at Gay Street, on the right when traveling north on North 2nd Street.
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here . . . — Map (db m113505) HM
36Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Revolution or Fraud?Emancipation in Caroline Co.
On Market Street at 2nd Street, on the right when traveling west on Market Street.
Maryland slaves were not freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, which excluded states that remained in the Union from its provisions. It was Maryland's new constitution, adopted by the narrow margin of 291 votes of almost 60,000 cast on . . . — Map (db m3389) HM
37Maryland (Caroline County), Federalsburg — A Paradise For SmugglersNanticoke River, 1861-1863
On South Main Street (Maryland Route 308) north of Smith Street, on the right when traveling north.
During the Civil War, Maryland's Eastern Shore became a "smuggler's paradise," as coasting vessels from New York made daily runs with contraband goods to the unguarded rivers of Delaware. Cargoes were then carried by wagon to the upper reaches of . . . — Map (db m137738) HM
38Maryland (Caroline County), Greensboro — Letter to LincolnChaos on the Eastern Shore
On Main Street (Maryland Route 480) at Bernard Avenue, on the left when traveling south on Main Street.
The war divided communities in Maryland, pitting neighbor against neighbor. During Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, which ended at Antietam, a Greensboro resident wrote to President Abraham Lincoln for assistance on . . . — Map (db m3398) HM
39Maryland (Caroline County), Hillsboro — Frederick DouglassTales of Horror
On Main Street (Alternate Maryland Route 404) 0.4 miles west of Ridgely Road (Maryland Route 480), on the left when traveling west.
The anti-slavery movement was a major factor in the regional contention that led to the Civil War. During the 1840s and 1850s, no individual generated greater support in both America and Europe for that movement than Frederick Douglass. His eloquent . . . — Map (db m154338) HM
40Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — The Underground RailroadSeed of War
On Linchester Road 0.1 miles north of Maryland Route 331, on the right when traveling south.
Among the factors that contributed to the coming of the Civil War was the increasing animosity between Southerners and Northerners over the issue of slavery. The operation of the Underground Railroad to help slaves escape to the free North and . . . — Map (db m5411) HM
41Maryland (Carroll County), Manchester — ManchesterMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Manchester Road (Maryland Route 27) 0.3 miles west of Main Street (Maryland Route 30), on the right when traveling west.
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade was . . . — Map (db m75696) HM
42Maryland (Carroll County), Middleburg — MiddleburgMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Middleburg Road (State Highway 77), on the right when traveling west.
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and to engage it in battle. Meade was uncertain of Lee's . . . — Map (db m29498) HM
43Maryland (Carroll County), Mount Airy — Mount AiryUnder the Barrels — Gettysburg Campaign —
On South Main Street (Maryland Route 808), on the right when traveling north.
In 1839, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad extended its line through Mount Airy Cut, and a village soon developed here. During the Civil War, Co. K, 14th New Jersey Infantry, guarded the railroad and National Road at Mount Airy. Pine Grove Chapel, . . . — Map (db m12493) HM
44Maryland (Carroll County), New Windsor — New WindsorVillage by Moonlight — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Main Street (Maryland Route 31) at Green Valley Road (Maryland Route 75), on the left on Main Street.
In June 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia marched north, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart’s Confederate cavalry rode east of the main army. Soon, Federal cavalry hunted Stuart. Gen. David McM. Gregg’s division left Frederick about 4 . . . — Map (db m105244) HM
45Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — TaneytownMeade’s Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On West Baltimore Street (State Highway 140) at Park Road, on the left when traveling west on West Baltimore Street.
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade . . . — Map (db m155348) HM
46Maryland (Carroll County), Union Bridge — Union Bridge - Reynolds’ Last Journey
On Main Street, on the left when traveling north.
Gettysburg Campaign Union Gen. John E. Reynolds was killed at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 while directing his command along the Chambersburg Turnpike in the early fighting. His body was carried to a house in town. Orderlies searched for a coffin . . . — Map (db m3017) HM
47Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Defiance at Union Mills"I'm a Union man!" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near Littlestown Pike (Maryland Route 97).
In 1863, brothers Andrew K. and William Shriver resided on either side of the Littlestown Turnpike here and likewise were divided in their loyalties, with William supporting the Confederacy and Andrew the Union. When officers at the head of Gen. . . . — Map (db m155368) HM
48Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion and Retreat
Near Littlestown Pike (Maryland Route 97). Reported permanently removed.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2994) HM
49Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion and Retreat
Near Littlestown Pike (Maryland Route 97) 0.4 miles north of Saw Mill Road West, on the right when traveling north.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason-Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m155337) HM
50Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Union Mills"Shining lights" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near Littlestown Pike (Maryland Route 97). Reported permanently removed.
At daybreak on June 30, 1863, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart arrived here from his bivouac at the Orendorff farm north of Westminster. He then gathered his brigade commanders to discuss Union Gen. Judson H. Kilpatrick’s cavalry division, which was encamped . . . — Map (db m2995) HM
51Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Union Mills"Shining lights" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near Littlestown Pike (Maryland Route 97) 0.4 miles north of Saw Mill Road West, on the right when traveling north.
At daybreak on June 30, 1863, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart arrived here from his bivouac at the Orendorff farm north of Westminster. He then gathered his brigade commanders to discuss Union Gen. Judson H. Kilpatrick's cavalry division, which was encamped . . . — Map (db m155339) HM
52Maryland (Carroll County), Uniontown — Uniontown“Patriotic, but Paralyzed” — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Uniontown Road 0.1 miles from Maryland Route 84, on the right when traveling east.
On June 27, 1863, Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s II Corps, Army of the Potomac camped at Monocacy Junction near Frederick. The next day, Gen. George G. Meade assumed command of the army and devised a plan to march it through Frederick and Carroll . . . — Map (db m3014) HM
53Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Aftermath of BattleHospitals and Graves — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near North Court Street.
After the cavalry engagement here on June 29, 1863, Westminster’s citizens cared for dozens of wounded of both sides. Besides the human toll, shattered and broken cannons, gun carriages, and caissons lined both sides of Court Street to Main Street . . . — Map (db m13848) HM
54Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Corbit's Charge“Suicidal Bravery” — Gettysburg Campaign —
On East Main Street (Maryland Route 32), on the right when traveling east.
In June, 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry marched through Maryland on its second invasion of the North, Lee lost contact with Gen. J.E.B. Stuart as the cavalry commander led his force east and north around the Union army. Here, on the . . . — Map (db m13832) HM
55Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesA U.S. Flag Goes South
Near North Court Street.
During the Civil War, some Westminster families supported the Confederacy while others stood by the Union. Among the latter was Mary Ann “Mollie” Huber, who organized a dozen other like minded ladies into a sewing circle that met at her . . . — Map (db m13849) HM
56Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesThe Neal Family — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Liberty Street (Maryland Route 27) at West Main Street (Maryland Route 32), on the right when traveling north on Liberty Street. Reported permanently removed.
A block away, at what is now 71 East Main Street, stood the Abner Neal house. In August 1862, Federal soldiers arrested sixteen Westminster residents as Southern sympathizers and escorted them to Baltimore for questioning. The group, soon released, . . . — Map (db m114404) HM
57Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Engagement at WestminsterWar at the Almshouse — Gettysburg Campaign —
On South Center Street, on the right when traveling south.
On June 29, 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry was in Pennsylvania, and Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry arrived here on the outskirts of Westminster. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s division led the column, which numbered 6,000 including cavalrymen . . . — Map (db m13826) HM
58Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gen. Bradley T. Johnson's RaidA Ransom Cancelled — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
On Emerald Hill Lane just north of Longwell Avenue, on the right when traveling north.
In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early's corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter's army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m155346) HM
59Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
On East Main Street at North Court Street, on the right when traveling east on East Main Street.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m75738) HM
60Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat — Maryland Civil War Trails —
On Liberty Street (Maryland Route 27) at East Main Street, on the left when traveling south on Liberty Street.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m114403) HM
61Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — The Rosser Raid"Welcome into my home!" — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On West Main Street at Carroll Street, on the left when traveling north on West Main Street.
After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's smashing victory over Union Gen. John Pope at the Second Battle of Manassas, Lee decided to invade Maryland to reap the fall harvest, gain Confederate recruits, earn foreign recognition of the . . . — Map (db m114405) HM
62Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Westminster DepotPressed into Service — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Liberty Street (Maryland Route 27) at West Main Street (Maryland Route 32), on the right when traveling north on Liberty Street.
During the Civil War, railroads for the first time attained strategic importance for transporting troops and equipment. On July 1, 1863, Gen. Herman Haupt, chief of U.S. Military Railroads, assumed control here of the Western Maryland Railroad to . . . — Map (db m13828) HM
63Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — PerryvilleOne Week After the War Began
On Broad Street (Maryland Route 7) at Roundhouse Drive, on the right when traveling west on Broad Street.
On April 18-19, 1861, a week after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Confederate sympathizers attacked U.S. Army forces en route to Washington in Baltimore, 35 miles southwest of here. On the second day shots were fired and soldiers . . . — Map (db m145865) HM
64Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — The Perryville Mule SchoolObstinate Recruits
On Marion Tapp Parkway, on the left when traveling south.
(Main Text) Soon after the Civil War erupted in April 1861, Perryville became an important Union staging area. Adjacent to Fort Dare here, a riverside plantation was confiscated from Confederate sympathizers and immediately transformed . . . — Map (db m145891) HM
65Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Snow's BatteryBattery B, 1st Maryland Light Artillery
On South Main Street (Maryland Route 222) south of High Street (Route 276), on the left when traveling north.
In the summer of 1861, in prosperous Port Deposit, men volunteered for an artillery battery to fight for their beloved Union. Capt. Alonzo Snow led the approximately 155-man unit. Organized in September, Snow's Battery left the Eastern Shore in May . . . — Map (db m145880) HM
66Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Pine Thicket“the instrument of his punishment” — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
On Bel Alton Newtown Road at Wills Road, on the right when traveling north on Bel Alton Newtown Road.
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. After leaving the home of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd near . . . — Map (db m39528) HM
67Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich HillThe Fugitives Seek Shelter — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
Near Bel Alton Newtown Road 0.1 miles east of Rich Hill Farm Road, on the right when traveling west.
After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryantown. Unsure of their . . . — Map (db m129036) HM
68Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill Historic SiteHistoric Preservation/Public Archaeology
Near Rich Hill Farm Road 0.1 miles north of Bel Alton Newtown Rd.
(Right Banner) After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryanstown. . . . — Map (db m129045) HM
69Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — Camp StantonTraining Post for USCT
Near Wilmott Drive, on the left when traveling south.
Nearby stood Camp Stanton, a Civil War-era recruiting and training post for African American Union soldiers. Named for Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, the camp was established in August 1863. Although black soldiers had served in the nation’s armed . . . — Map (db m15699) HM
70Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
On Olivers Shop Road (Maryland Route 232) 1.2 miles south of Leonardtown Road (Maryland Route 5).
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
71Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — Village of BryantownCommercial Center — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
On Trotter Road (State Highway 5), on the left when traveling east.
This building in the Bryantown Tavern, constructed about 1815. On April 15, 1865, the morning after President Lincoln’s assassination, Lt. David D. Dana made it his headquarters while pursuing John Wilkes Booth, the assassin, with a detachment of . . . — Map (db m4500) HM
72Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Crossing the PotomacOff into the Darkness — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
On Popes Creek Road 3 miles south of Crain Highway (U.S. 301), on the left when traveling south.
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two . . . — Map (db m128807) HM
73Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Near Crain Highway (U.S. 301) 0.7 miles south of Rock Point Road (Maryland Route 257).
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m24540) HM
74Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Near Chapel Point Road, on the right when traveling east.
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1104) HM
75Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Dr. Samuel A. MuddTreating an Assassin — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
On Dr. Samuel Mudd Road (Maryland Route 232) near Poplar Hill Road (Maryland Route 382).
This house was the home of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd and his wife, Sarah Frances Dyer. Early on the morning of April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth arrived here with a companion, David E. Herold, and asked Mudd to set Booth’s broken leg. Afterward, as . . . — Map (db m921) HM
76Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
On Dr. Samuel Mudd Road (Maryland Route 232) south of Poplar Hill Road (Maryland Route 382).
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m922) HM
77Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Eastern Shore InfantryGlorious Achievements
On Gay Street at Spring Street, on the left when traveling east on Gay Street.
During the Civil War, U.S. Col. James Wallace, commander of the 1st Regiment, Eastern Shore Maryland Volunteers, used this building as his headquarters. The regiment which camped east of here, drew most of its members directly from the Eastern . . . — Map (db m113141) HM
78Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
On Rose Hill Place at Radiance Drive, on the right when traveling north on Rose Hill Place.
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began . . . — Map (db m8331) HM
79Maryland (Dorchester County), Woolford — Anna Ella CarrollUnofficial Cabinet Member
On Taylors Island Road (Maryland Route 16) at Old Trinity Church Road, on the right when traveling east on Taylors Island Road.
Anna Ella Carroll was born on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1815. Often called an unofficial member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet, she was a Unionist author and newspaper reporter who had traveled extensively throughout the South and Midwest . . . — Map (db m45304) HM
80Maryland (Frederick County), Adamstown — Carrollton ManorGreen Corn March — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Buckeystown Pike (Maryland Route 85), on the right when traveling north.
On Saturday, September 6, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia was spread along the entire length of Buckeystown Turnpike all the way to Frederick. The soldiers camped in the fields on either side of the road on the evenings of September 5-6, and by . . . — Map (db m152272) HM
81Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — BrunswickFormerly Berlin — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Railroad Square, on the right when traveling east.
Union troops pursuing the Confederate army to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 crossed the Potomac River here. Called Berlin at the time of the Civil War, this town truly experienced the challenges of life on the border. Both the . . . — Map (db m1863) HM
82Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
On Gapland Road at Arnoldstown Road, on the right when traveling west on Gapland Road.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1958) HM
83Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Battle for Crampton’s Gap“Sealed With Their Lives” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Gapland Road at Arnoldstown Road, on the right when traveling west on Gapland Road.
The Battle of South Mountain struck Crampton’s Gap late in the afternoon of September 14, 1862, when Union Gen. William B. Franklin finally ordered an attack against Confederate Gen. Lafayette McLaws’s force here. As the Confederate defensive line . . . — Map (db m1909) HM
84Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — BurkittsvilleHouses of Worship Become Houses of Misery — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On East Main Street at Potomac Street (Maryland Route 17), on the right on East Main Street.
Union surgeons turned Burkittsville, a quiet rural village of some 200 people, into a hospital complex after the September 14, 1862, Battle of Crampton’s Gap. The building in front of you, the German Reformed Church, was Hospital D. Twenty-year-old . . . — Map (db m1864) HM
85Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — George Alfred TownsendA Man and His Mountain — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On Gapland Road at Arnoldstown Road, on the right when traveling west on Gapland Road.
None of the structures you see here in Crampton’s Gap existed during the battle on September 14, 1862. George Alfred Townsend constructed all the stone buildings and walls, as well as the Correspondents’ Arch, between 1884 and 1896. Townsend, . . . — Map (db m1931) HM
86Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
On Dickerson Road (State Highway 28), on the right when traveling west.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m4028) HM
87Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
On Dickerson Road (State Highway 28), on the right when traveling west.
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m4033) HM
88Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Daughters of Charity"O, it was beyond description" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Reported permanently removed.
Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph's here in 1809 (after 1850, called Daughters of Charity). The sisters played a prominent role during the Civil War as nurses and human service . . . — Map (db m9483) HM
89Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Daughters of Charity"O, it was beyond description" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15) 1.7 miles north of Catoctin Mountain Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north.
Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph's here in 1809 (in1 1850, merged with the Daughters of Charity). The sisters played a prominent role during the Civil War as nurses and . . . — Map (db m147294) HM
90Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — EmmitsburgRoad to Gettysburg
Near Catoctin Mountain Highway (U.S. 15), on the right.
President Abraham Lincoln replaced Army of the Potomac commander Gen. Joseph Hooker with Gen. George G. Meade on June 28, 1863, as the army pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Meade placed Gen. John F. Reynolds, I Corps . . . — Map (db m1546) HM
91Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Gen. John F. Reynolds"Dear Kate" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Reported permanently removed.
On the last day of June 1863, Emmitsburg became a Union army supply base. Union Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing of the Army of the Potomac (I, III, and XI Corps), arrived as I Corps came into Emmitsburg to obtain needed supplies, . . . — Map (db m9489) HM
92Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Gen. John F. Reynolds"Dear Kate" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15) 1.7 miles north of Catoctin Mountain Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north.
On the last day of June 1863, Emmitsburg became a Union army supply base. Union Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing of the Army of the Potomac (I, III and XI Corps), arrived as I Corps came into Emmitsburg to obtain needed supplies, . . . — Map (db m147296) HM
93Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — St. Joseph's Valley Camp"I did not see it multiplied, but saw it there!" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Reported permanently removed.
About 80,000 Union troops settled here in Saint Joseph's Valley as June 1863 drew to a close, "until the grounds around were actually covered with Soldiers." Emmitsburg was placed under martial law, and the Vincentian priests at Saint Joseph's . . . — Map (db m9485) HM
94Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — St. Joseph's Valley Camp"The poor fellows looked half-starved" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Near South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15) 1.7 miles north of Catoctin Mountain Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north.
About 38,000 Union troops from three corps passed through Saint Joseph's Valley during the five days before the Battle of Gettysburg, until it seemed to the sisters that "the grounds around were actually covered with Soldiers." Emmitsburg was . . . — Map (db m147295) HM
95Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
On West Patrick Street (State Highway 144), on the left when traveling west.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m2708) HM
96Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Near Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling north.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m18382) HM
97Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
On East Patrick Street (State Highway 144), on the left when traveling west.
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m97907) HM
98Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — B & O Railroad Station"No malice in my heart" — Antietam Campaign —
On South Market Street at All Saints Street on South Market Street.
At this intersection, President Abraham Lincoln spoke from a railroad car platform to Frederick residents assembled in the street on October 4, 1862. He had just returned from viewing the battlefields of South Mountain and Antietam and had called on . . . — Map (db m60166) HM
99Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Barbara Fritchie House“Shoot if you must this old gray head, but spare your country’s flag.” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On West Patrick Street (State Highway 144), on the left when traveling west.
As the Confederate army marched through Frederick on September 10, 1862, feisty local Unionists—mostly women—showed their defiance by waving the Stars and Stripes. The poet John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized one of them in “The . . . — Map (db m2693) HM
100Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Battle of Frederick"Best little battle of the war" — Early's 1864 Washington Raid —
Near West Patrick Street (U.S. 40) at Linden Avenue, on the right when traveling east.
(preface) Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early drove Union Gen. David Hunter into West Virginia after the Battle of Lynchburg, Va., clearing the Shenandoah Valley of Federal forces. To draw Union troops from Petersburg, Early launched a raid . . . — Map (db m167015) HM

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Feb. 27, 2021