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Maryland Civil War Trails Historical Markers

 
Capital For A Summer Marker image, Touch for more information
By Devry Becker Jones, July 3, 2020
Capital For A Summer Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
101Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Capital For A SummerFoiling Maryland Secession
The building in front of you, Kemp Hall, was the capitol of Maryland during the spring and summer of 1861, as the state came perilously close to leaving the Union. Because secession would have placed the U.S. capital, Washington, D.C., between . . . — Map (db m152357) HM
102Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — City HallFormer Frederick County Courthouse — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Connections with the Civil War abound around this Courthouse Square, where the first official act of defiance against the British crown - the 1765 Stamp Act Repudiation - occurred almost a century earlier. In 1857, Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice . . . — Map (db m2815) HM
103Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2792) HM
104Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Hospitals in FrederickCaring for the Wounded
In this building, soldiers who died in one of the many area hospitals following the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy were embalmed and prepared for interment at nearby Mount Olivet Cemetery or for shipment home. James . . . — Map (db m97908) HM
105Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Market & Patrick Streets"Scarcely any possibility of crossing the street" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Frederick found itself occupied alternatively by Confederate and Union armies during the Civil War. Citizens who frequented this "Square Corner" of Market and Patrick Streets saw Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia march west from here on . . . — Map (db m2808) HM
106Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Meade Takes Command"Come to give me trouble."
Near this spot, on the grounds of Prospect Hall, Union Gen. George Gordon Meade replaced Gen. Joseph "Fighting Joe" Hooker as commander of the Army of the Potomac on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Meade took command reluctantly because he was concerned . . . — Map (db m2775) HM
107Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — North Market Street"Now I shall see Cousin J." — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 28, 1863, Gen. John F. Reynolds rode into Federick to visit his cousin Catherine Reynolds Cramer and her sisters near the intersection of North Market and Second Streets. She would have much to write the rest of her family on July 1 about . . . — Map (db m2814) HM
108Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — North Market Street"Now I shall see Cousin J." — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 28, 1863, Union Gen. John F. Reynolds rode into Frederick to visit his cousin Catherine Reynolds Cramer and her sisters near the intersection of North Market and Second Streets. She would have much to write the rest of her family on July 1 . . . — Map (db m146084) HM
109Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Richfield“The Boy General of the Golden Lock”
It was here that George Armstrong Custer was first introduced as a general to the troops he would command. The first order signed by Gen. George G. Meade as the newly appointed commander of the Army of the Potomac on June 28, 1863 promoted three . . . — Map (db m1539) HM
110Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Rose Hill ManorUnion Artillery Reserve
You are on the grounds of Rose Hill Manor, the final home of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson. During its stay near Frederick, the Army of the Potomac's large Artillery Reserve occupied these grounds. Created after the Battle of . . . — Map (db m2803) HM
111Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Lost OrderShrouded in a Cloak of Mystery — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
After crossing the Potomac River early in September 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee reorganized the Army of Northern Virginia into three separate wings. On September 9, he promulgated his campaign strategy - to divide his army, send Gen. Thomas . . . — Map (db m18381) HM
112Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — JeffersonProwling Confederates and Pretty Girls
In June 1863, Federal troops marched through Jefferson as the Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, a menacing force to the west—but where was it headed? Fearing that Lee would push through the gaps in . . . — Map (db m2100) HM
113Maryland (Frederick County), Lewistown — LewistownI Corps’ Muddy March — Gettysburg Campaign —
When the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Invaded Maryland in June 1863, the Army of the Potomac headed north in pursuit. On Monday, June 29, a “rainy, miserable day,” the 15,000 men, 2,900 horses and mules and 475 wagons of Gen. . . . — Map (db m105250) HM
114Maryland (Frederick County), Libertytown — LibertytownHot, Humid, and Worn Out
Gettysburg Campaign On June 29, 1863, the Army of the Potomac's II Corps, commanded by Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, broke camp south of Frederick near the Monocacy River, marched into Frederick, and turned eastward on the road to Liberty . . . — Map (db m4017) HM
115Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Christ Reformed ChurchJust Before the Battle — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Eight thousand Confederates under Gen. Lafayette McLaws marched by this church on September 10-11, 1862, heading south to Harper’s Ferry. Since no Federals were in the area, McLaws expected no encounters with the enemy. Unknown to him, however, . . . — Map (db m166869) HM
116Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownUnion Left Flank — Gettysburg Campaign —
Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North for the second time. The Federal left flank under Gen. John F. Reynolds occupied the Middletown Valley, June 25–27, . . . — Map (db m418) HM
117Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownEnemies and Friends — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
When Gen. Robert E. Lee and part of the Army of Northern Virginia passes through Middletown on September 10–11, 1862, they encountered a chilly reception. The inhabitants of this single-street hamlet on the National Road loved the Union, and . . . — Map (db m21911) HM
118Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownRansom Demands — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early’s corps from Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m76668) HM
119Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownUnion Army Traffic — Gettysburg Campaign —
After Confederate Gen. Robert e. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into . . . — Map (db m143920) HM
120Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m5923) HM
121Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m167359) HM
122Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5922) HM
123Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m167358) HM
124Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketAn Electrifying Sight — Gettysburg Campaign —
Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North less than a year after the Antietam Campaign. On Monday, June 29, the Federal corps marched north toward Pennsylvania on . . . — Map (db m129752) HM
125Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketRoads to Gettysburg
Gettysburg Campaign Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North less than a year after the Antietam Campaign. On Monday, June 29, the Federal corps marched north . . . — Map (db m129753) HM
126Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksConfederates Capture Train — Gettysburg Campaign —
In mid-June 1863, with rumors of a pending reinvasion of Maryland by Confederate forces, most Baltimore and Ohio trains stopped running past here. As tension mounted, the New York Times reported that no trains were departing Baltimore, “except . . . — Map (db m743) HM
127Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksPoint of Rocks During the War
The rail line immediately before you served as an important means of supply and communication during the Civil War (the station, and tracks to Washington, D.C., on the southern or right side of the station were built later). Here at Point of Rocks, . . . — Map (db m744) HM
128Maryland (Frederick County), Thurmont — Catoctin Iron FurnaceNo Time For War
Gettysburg Campaign When Union Gen. John F. Reynolds’ I Corps marched by here on June 29, 1863, en route to Emmitsburg and soon to Gettysburg, his men were progressing “swimmingly.” The workers of the Catoctin Furnace had little time . . . — Map (db m105249) HM
129Maryland (Frederick County), Thurmont — ThurmontFormerly Mechanicstown — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 29, 1863, Mechanicstown was full of the noise of an army on the move as Union Gen. John F. Reynolds marched I Corps to Emmitsburg. Until then, residents had only heard rumors of the advancing Confederates as nervous farmers hurried horses . . . — Map (db m1540) HM
130Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — Landon HouseFrom Hospitality to Hospital — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Constructed in 1754 on the banks of the Rappahannock River in Virginia, this building was reconstructed here in 1846 and became Landon Female Academy. Early in September 1862, while infantry of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia rested . . . — Map (db m1739) HM
131Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — UrbanaCapture and Escape — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early . . . — Map (db m76643) HM
132Maryland (Garrett County), Friendsville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m139840) HM
133Maryland (Garrett County), McHenry — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2170) HM
134Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — Fort AliceRailroad Bridge Destroyed
On April 26, 1863, during the Confederate occupation of Oakland, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill's partisan rangers attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge here over the Youghiogheny River. They were part of a larger group . . . — Map (db m481) HM
135Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m484) HM
136Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — OaklandConfederate Railroad Raid
On Sunday, April 26, 1863, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill's partisan rangers under Col. A. W. Harman attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad facilities here in Oakland. They were part of Confederate Gen. William E. . . . — Map (db m485) HM
137Maryland (Garrett County), Swanton — AltamontConfederate Railroad Raid
On April 26, 1863, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill’s partisan rangers attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad facilities here at Altamont. They were part of a larger group that entered Oakland that Sunday as Confederate Gen. . . . — Map (db m37544) HM
138Maryland (Harford County), Aldino — Alfred B. HiltonMedal of Honor Recipient
After the Emancipation Proclamation was issued in 1863, the U.S. Army recruited both free blacks and slaves. In August 1863, freedman Alfred B. Hilton and his brothers Aaron and Henry enlisted in the 4th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) in Havre de Grace. . . . — Map (db m152377) HM
139Maryland (Harford County), Bel Air — Bel AirSouthern Sympathizers Sought
On July 31, 1861, 300 men from the 12th Pennsylvania Infantry under Capt. Daniel Leasure marched into Bel Air to arrest Southern sympathizers and confiscate weapons from local militia units. The troops halted at the courthouse square, then dispersed . . . — Map (db m156302) HM
140Maryland (Harford County), Joppatowne — Gilmor's RaidBurning the Gunpowder River Bridge
On July 6, 1864, Confederate cavalrymen crossed the Potomac River into Maryland as part of a 12,000 man force under Gen. Jubal A. Early, who planned to attack lightly defended Washington, D.C., and draw off part of the Union army menacing Richmond . . . — Map (db m152186) HM
141Maryland (Howard County), Cooksville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m935) HM
142Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elkridge Furnace Inn"Neighborhood Parlor" for Healing
On May 5, 1861, U.S. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler occupied Relay, Maryland, with the 8th New York and 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments and Cook's Boston Battery of light artillery. Their mission was to prevent Confederate sympathizers from . . . — Map (db m5876) HM
143Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elkridge Furnace Inn"Neighborhood Parlor" for Healing
On May 5, 1861, the 8th New York and 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments and Cook's Boston Battery of light artillery occupied the heights around you. Their mission was to prevent Confederate sympathizers from sabotaging the strategic Thomas . . . — Map (db m150570) HM
144Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — B&O Railroad StationKeep Supplies Moving
One of the first railroads in the country, constructed in 1830 of wooden rails that carried horse-drawn cars, extended from Baltimore to Ellicott's Mills. This station was built the next year, and soon steel rails replaced wooden ones as the . . . — Map (db m29961) HM
145Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — B&O Railroad StationKeep Supplies Moving
When the Civil War began, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad became a vital transportation route for the Federal armies, with men and supplies passing by this station day and night. To protect the line, local businessman Thomas McGowan raised the . . . — Map (db m144727) HM
146Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m192) HM
147Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m144730) HM
148Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Decatur DorseyCivil War Hero
Howard County native Decatur Dorsey was one of only sixteen African American soldiers to received the Medal of Honor for courage under fire during the Civil War. Sgt. Dorsey, of Company B, 39th United States Colored Troops, earned his medal at the . . . — Map (db m5756) HM
149Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Ellicott’s MillsA Town Divided
By the 1850s, a prosperous community was located here around the Ellicott family gristmills and ironworks established in the 1770s. When the Civil War began in 1861, the town's population exceeded 2,000. Although the mill workers and merchants of . . . — Map (db m37545) HM
150Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Patapsco Female InstituteClasses and Camps
The stabilized ruin above you - the Patapsco Female Institute - served the young ladies of the North and South from 1837 to 1891. Amelia Hart Lincoln Phelps, a renowned author and educator, headed the school between 1841 and 1855. Concerned with the . . . — Map (db m74252) HM
151Maryland (Howard County), Savage — Savage MillVital Service to the Union
The mill town of Savage served a vital need for the United States Army after the Civil War began in 1861. William Baldwin who had purchased the mills in 1859 manufactured canvas for cannon covers and tents. Although cotton was in short supply, . . . — Map (db m22462) HM
152Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
War on the Chesapeake Bay. During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland’s residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in . . . — Map (db m62758) HM
153Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Charles Sumner Post, G.A.R."Fraternity, Charity, Loyalty"
African American Civil War veterans constructed this meeting hall for Charles Sumner Post No. 25, Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) in 1908. The hall is one of only two known to survive that were built for soldiers who served in . . . — Map (db m156672) HM
154Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — John Leeds BarrollPublisher Accused of Treason and Exiled
John Leeds Barroll first walked these courthouse grounds, as a prominent Kent County lawyer before becoming a newspaper publisher. He was admitted to the bar in 1852 and served as the county State’s Attorney, 1854–1856, then founded the . . . — Map (db m3066) HM
155Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Senator George VickersHelped Acquit President Andrew Johnson
At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, George Vickers opposed secession and used his influence to keep Maryland in the Union. He became a major general of the 2nd Division, Maryland Militia, and helped form the 2nd Regiment Eastern Shore . . . — Map (db m156850) HM
156Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — White & Black, Blue & GraySocial Battlefield Split Kent Families
In June 1917, Judge James A. Pearce commemorated the Civil War soldiers of Kent County by erecting a monument to honor the patriotism and valor of a once divided, but now reunited country. The rough-cut and polished granite monument behind you . . . — Map (db m5585) HM
157Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnesville — Barnesville“... a bad night of it...” — Gettysburg Campaign —
The advance of Union Gen. John F. Reynolds’ I Corps began slogging through Barnesville on the morning of Friday, June 26, 1863, having crossed the Potomac River the afternoon before and camped west of town. Continuous heavy rain made marching muddy . . . — Map (db m1678) HM
158Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnesville — Barnesville“Before night our town changed hands five times!” — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On the evening of September 5, 1862, Gen. Wade Hampton’s and Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s Confederate cavalry brigades bivouacked around Barnesville. They rode the next day to their base camp at Urbana, leaving the 9th Virginia Cavalry to guard Barnesville. . . . — Map (db m156129) HM
159Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — BeallsvilleSquabble at the cemetery: Whose flag flies today? — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
On September 9, 1862, the running engagement between Illinois, Indiana, and Virginia cavalry units that began the day before in Poolesville continued in Beallsville when two Federal regiments forced the single regiment of Virginia cavalrymen posted . . . — Map (db m1681) HM
160Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — BrookevillePrisoners Paroled — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart left Rockville with three cavalry brigades, 125 captured Union supply wagons, and more than 400 military and civilian prisoners, arriving in Brookeville that night. At every opportunity, prisoners . . . — Map (db m366) HM
161Maryland (Montgomery County), Comus — Mt. Ephraim CrossroadsSharpshooters Hold the Line — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
You are looking at Sugarloaf Mountain, where the running cavalry fight that began in the late afternoon on September 9, 1862, in Barnesville came to a halt. By the next morning, the 7th and 9th Virginia Cavalry had been brought to bay here at the . . . — Map (db m1683) HM
162Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — DarnestownConfederate Visit — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 25-27, 1863, the Federal Army of the Potomac used two temporary pontoon bridges to cross the Potomac River from Virginia back into Maryland at Edwards Ferry. On the evening and morning of June 27-28, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart led 5,000 . . . — Map (db m1684) HM
163Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m809) HM
164Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m76266) HM
165Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m808) HM
166Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Monocacy AqueductToo Tough To Crack — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Confederate Gen. D. H. Hill’s division crossed the Potomac at Point of Rocks on September 4, 1862, and marched south to clear Union forces from the area. His men breached and drained the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at several places, burned canal . . . — Map (db m65210) HM
167Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryInvasion or Liberation? — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
The serenity of the Maryland countryside was shattered on September 4-6, 1862, as 35,000 Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia waded across the Potomac River. Gen. Robert E. Lee, hoping to rally support in the divided state, sent . . . — Map (db m807) HM
168Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FordCrossing the Potomac — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
A wing of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia commanded by Gen. James Longstreet, as well as part of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, crossed into Maryland just south of here on September 5-6, 1862. Other parts of the 40,000-man force, . . . — Map (db m812) HM
169Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — GaithersburgSummit Hall Farm — Gettysburg Campaign —
On Sunday, June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville en route to Gettysburg. Armed with a list of Union supporters, Stuart’s men planned to arrest John T. DeSellum as he left Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m1709) HM
170Maryland (Montgomery County), Hyattstown — HyattstownUninvited Guests — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
The roadside village of Hyattstown became the front line when Confederate cavalry stationed to the north in Urbana clashed with Union cavalry reconnoitering from Clarksburg to the south. On the evening of September 8, 1862, Maj. Alonzo W. Adams and . . . — Map (db m1727) HM
171Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Edwards FerryStrategic Crossing — Gettysburg Campaign —
Gen. Joseph Hooker’s 75,000-man, seven-corps Army of the Potomac crossed the Potomac River here, June 25-27, 1863, on the way to Gettysburg. The army crossed on two 1,400-foot-long pontoon bridges. Heavy rains during those three days made the single . . . — Map (db m33741) HM
172Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleWarm Reception — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
Located at the intersection of the two main roads, mid-19th century Poolesville was Montgomery County’s second-largest town. Its residents had decidedly secessionist tendencies and many sons fighting for the South. In the fall of 1862, as the . . . — Map (db m1729) HM
173Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleStrategic Union Encampment — Gettysburg Campaign —
During the Civil War, more soldiers passed through Poolesville than any other Montgomery County town. Union forces occupied this bustling village throughout most of the war, protecting the strategic road network, lines of communication and . . . — Map (db m1730) HM
174Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson HouseSlavery in Rockville — Gettysburg Campaign —
In April 1862, Congress abolished slavery in Washington, D.C. District slaveholders were eligible for monetary compensation when they manumitted (freed) their slaves. Because the Beall sisters held several slaves who worked in the District, they . . . — Map (db m5416) HM
175Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Christ Episcopal ChurchVestrymen Arrested — Gettysburg Campaign —
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, 5,000 of Confederate Gen J.E.B. Stuart's cavarlymen rode into Rockville and arrested Union supporters. They sought merchant John H. Higgins at his home, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church (across . . . — Map (db m37574) HM
176Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Court House Square"Burning with Enthusiasm" — Gettysburg Campaign —
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville, the Montgomery County seat, on June 28, 1863, to a boisterous reception. One soldier described “a spectacle which was truly pleasing . . . It was Sunday, . . . — Map (db m65) HM
177Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m73) HM
178Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Higgins HouseArresting Civilians — Gettysburg Campaign —
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, Confederate cavalrymen arrived at merchant John Higgins' house to arrest him, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church. Instead they captured Eblen, a 17 year-old Union soldier recuperating here. When . . . — Map (db m102790) HM
179Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Prettyman HouseConfederates in Rockville — Gettysburg Campaign —
From his home, E. Barrett Prettyman, a prominent Rockville citizen and educator, watched approximately 5,000 Confederate cavalrymen ride into Rockville in three columns on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Like many other Montgomery County residents, Prettyman . . . — Map (db m37575) HM
180Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Stonestreet Medical MuseumConflicting Loyalties
Of the four presidential candidates in 1860, Abraham Lincoln received only 50 of Montgomery County's 2429 votes. Some of Rockville's 365 residents surrendered government jobs in Washington, refusing to sign the Oath of Loyalty, rather than face . . . — Map (db m102181) HM
181Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Rowser’s Ford5,000 Confederate Cavalrymen Crossed — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 24, 1863, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, leaving 3,000 cavalrymen in Rectortown, Virginia, to monitor Federal activity, led three Confederate cavalry brigades to Haymarket. Encountering Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s corps marching north, Stuart sent . . . — Map (db m761) HM
182Maryland (Montgomery County), Stronghold — Sugarloaf MountainA Signalman’s Lot — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
You are at the foot of Sugarloaf Mountain, where on September 5-6, 1862, Union observers watched the Army of Northern Virginia cross the Potomac River to invade Maryland. A signal station had been established here in the summer of 1861, one in a . . . — Map (db m147010) HM
183Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m60164) HM
184Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Surratt TavernConfederate Safe House — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
Owned and operated by the ardently pro-Southern Surratt family, this building was used by Confederate agents as a safe house during the Civil War. Built in 1852, the structure was a tavern, hostelry and post office. Surratt's son, John, Jr., a . . . — Map (db m4188) HM
185Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Surratt TavernConfederate Safe House — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
Owned and operated by the ardently pro-Southern Surratt family, this building was used by Confederate agents as a safe house during the Civil War. Built in 1852, the structure was a tavern, hostelry, and post office. Surratt's son, John, . . . — Map (db m154461) HM
186Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Chester — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began . . . — Map (db m8329) HM
187Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — QueenstownDivided Loyalties
Queenstown, like most of the Eastern Shore in 1861, was a slaveholding community, and the impending conflict was regarded with concern and fear. When war erupted, families were torn apart because of their conflicting loyalities. It was not uncommon . . . — Map (db m3113) HM
188Maryland (St. Mary's County), Chaptico — ChapticoA History of Rebellion
Tiny Chaptico was home to many daring men, beginning with John Coode who led Maryland's 1689 Protestant Rebellion. During the Civil War, Chaptico's blockade runners carried medicin and other supplies at night across the Potomac River past Union . . . — Map (db m17426) HM
189Maryland (St. Mary's County), Coltons Point — St. Clement's Island Lighthouse"None of the Lighthouses ... are Safe"
On May 19, 1864 Confederates raided St. Clement's Island to destroy the 1851 lighthouse. Capt. John Goldsmith, a county residence who had once owned the island, led the attack, having joined the Confederate army in Virginia. In a thirty-foot . . . — Map (db m9181) HM
190Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — LeonardtownSpies, Intriguers and Blockade Runners
When the white citizens of St. Mary’s County voted here in the 1860 presidential election, John Breckenridge, the secessionist candidate who carried Maryland, got 920 votes. Abraham Lincoln received 9 percent of the popular Maryland vote; the . . . — Map (db m955) HM
191Maryland (St. Mary's County), Piney Point — Piney Point LighthouseThe Potomac Flotilla
In 1861, the U. S. created the Potomac Flotilla (gunboats and other armed vessels) to patrol the river and intercept Confederate blockade runners. Nevertheless, St. Mary's County residents frequently ferried supplies and men across to Virginia. A . . . — Map (db m65046) HM
192Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1000) HM
193Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout State ParkHammond General Hospital
Hammond General Hospital, opened at Point Lookout, Maryland, in August 1862, was named for Surgeon General William A. Hammond. The massive structure, built to accommodate 1,400 amen, was set on piles about two to three feet above ground and . . . — Map (db m1001) HM
194Maryland (Talbot County), Oxford — Oxford WharfRecruiting United States Colored Troops
The Emancipation Proclamation, issued January 1, 1863, authorized the recruiting of African Americans as United States soldiers. Blacks on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Delaware sought freedom for themselves and their families in return their . . . — Map (db m34451) HM
195Maryland (Talbot County), Trappe — Nathaniel HopkinsSoldier from Trappe
This was the home of Nathaniel Hopkins, known affectionately in Talbot County as "Uncle Nace." He was born a slave near here in 1831. After leaving his owner, Percy McKnett, and serving in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m154465) HM
196Maryland (Talbot County), Unionville — UnionvilleFounded to Honor their Service
From the beginning of the Civil War, Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman urged President Abraham Lincoln to allow blacks to enlist in the U.S. Army and fight for their freedom. On May 22, 1863, General Orders 143 were issued stating "A Bureau is . . . — Map (db m61390) HM
197Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickA Witness to War
Built by the Maryland colony in 1756 during the French and Indian War, Fort Frederick’s stone walls surrounded three large buildings. The colonists abandoned the frontier fort in 1759, when the threat of Indian raids subsided. During the . . . — Map (db m821) HM
198Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m32675) HM
199Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Nathan WilliamsA Prosperous Farm
Nathan Williams was the son of Samuel “Big Sam” Williams, a slave who in 1826 bought freedom for himself, his wife, and his four children. In 1839, the elder Williams purchased a farm near Four Locks, about 3.5 miles east of Fort . . . — Map (db m5571) HM
200Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Battle of BoonsboroBuying Time — Gettysburg Campaign —
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart faced a difficult assignment: to locate the Union cavalry and prevent it from severing Gen. Robert E. Lee’s avenue of retreat to Williamsport and the Potomac River after the Battle of Gettysburg. The result was the . . . — Map (db m1630) HM

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Mar. 1, 2021