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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Santa Fe Trail Historical Markers

This is an important trade route from New Franklin Mo (and parts west as the railroad moved west) to Santa Fe, Nm. The trail was in use from 1822 until the late 1880's.
 
The Santa Fe Trail Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Kirchner, September 22, 2014
The Santa Fe Trail Marker
Colorado (Las Animas County), Model — The Santa Fe Trail
Trail of Commerce The heavily laden freight wagons traveled in parallel columns to minimize dust and for convenience when circling the wagons at night or when danger threatened. A circle of wagons provided a fine defensive position. But the . . . — Map (db m77883) HM
Colorado (Las Animas County), Trinidad — Santa Fe Trail
This monument marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail 1822 - 1879 placed by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Colorado It also commemorates the faithful work of Harriett Parker Campbell . . . — Map (db m77856) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Point of Red Rocks"
We set out at the ushal time and at 8 miles West We passed point of Red Rocks about 600 yds from the river and at Eleven miles crossed the paney River….Some Cottenwood on the Banks and Some Bushis. the Red Rock is evidently a volcanic production . . . — Map (db m64249) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Rallying Point for the Indians"
No one actually knows how Pawnee Rock was named. Josiah Gregg, who had been over the Santa Fe Trail eight times beginning in 1831, wrote: the attention of the traveller is directed to the ‘Pawnee Rock' so called, it is said, on account of a . . . — Map (db m64243) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Remarkable Rocky Point"
From 1821 until late in the 1800s Pawnee Rock was a noted landmark along the Santa Fe Trail. Thousands of wagons lumbered and creaked by here carrying goods to or from the great American Southwest. Many travelers recorded their impressions of . . . — Map (db m64245) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "Along Came the Line of Wagons"
Slowly along came the line of wagons, and the prairie breeze brought us, in sound, faint and far between, the driver’s invocations to their mules. Matthew C. Field, journalist 1839 From 1821 until the late 1860s the Santa Fe Trail ran . . . — Map (db m64241) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — “One of the Grandest Sights Ever Beheld”
Standing here 175 years ago Santa Fe Trail travelers looked out over a sea of grass. About three miles to the south a line of timber marked the Arkansas River which meandered across the prairie. A few plum thickets dotted the landscape, and an . . . — Map (db m64203) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — “One of the Grandest Sights Ever Beheld”
Standing here 175 years ago Santa Fe Trail travelers looked out over a sea of grass. About three miles to the south a line of timber marked the Arkansas River which meandered across the prairie. A few plum thickets dotted the landscape, and an . . . — Map (db m64205) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Marking the Rock
Pawnee Rock changed very little for ten thousand years. The hill was grass-covered with a fifty-foot-high face on the southeast side in front of you. Wind, water, and vegetation slowly eroded the stone. But Pawnee Rock has changed. The top of . . . — Map (db m64242) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Pawnee Rock
A mile northeast is Pawnee Rock, a famous landmark on the Santa Fe Trail. Considered the mid-point of the long road between Missouri and New Mexico. Pawnee Rock was a symbol of challenges overcome. Many early travelers mentioned it in their . . . — Map (db m55303) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — 71 — Pawnee Rock
"We first rode nearly north about a mile to a remarkable Rocky Point . . .We rode upon the top which is probably 50 feet above the plain below, and from whence there is a charming view of the country in every direction." —George Sibley, . . . — Map (db m64191) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m64190) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — 50 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is marker text] — Map (db m64197) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
. . . — Map (db m64199) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail Monument
In honor of the brave men and women who passing over the old Santa Fe Trail, endured the hardships of frontier life, and blazed the path of civilization for posterity Pawnee Rock, given to the State of Kansas by Benj. P. Unruh, in . . . — Map (db m64248) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — William Becknell
Father of Santa Fe Trail Pawnee Rock, Kansas 150 Anniversary 1821 1971 — Map (db m64201) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Baldwin City — 8 — Baldwin
Here, and for the next 300 miles west, Highway 56 roughly follows the old Santa Fe Trail, and frequently crosses it. White settlement began in this area in 1854, the year Kansas became a territory, and in 1855 the town of Palmyra was founded. When . . . — Map (db m20073) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Baldwin City — Black Jack Park
(Main marker): South of this park are 18 acres of virgin prairie. Purchased 1967 by Douglas County from Russell Hays for a permanent prairie preserve and historic site. Evidence of Santa Fe Trail plainly visible. Original site of D.A.R, . . . — Map (db m20062) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Baldwin City — Palmyra
First important repair stop on the Santa Fe Trail Blacksmith~~General Store~~Hotel Well~~Saw Mill~~Post Office Lawyer Settled 1856 Surveyed 1857

The Palmyra Association Donated the Land for Baker University and City of . . . — Map (db m91202) HM

Kansas (Douglas County), Baldwin City — Palmyra Well
This well was hand dug when the town of Palmyra was established in 1857, it served travelers on the Santa Fe Trail, as well as townspeople.

The well is 25 ft in diameter and 56 ft deep and about 17 ft to water. — Map (db m91201) HM

Kansas (Douglas County), Baldwin City — Trail Park
This Angling Road is the Original Santa Fe Trail. Park Area Donated by I. and J. Stickle to Baker University in 1907. D.A.R. Monument Commemorates the Dispersal of Free-State and Pro-Slavery Forces after the Battle of Black Jack. Original . . . — Map (db m20075) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Centropolis — Globe
Santa Fe Trail followed high land to the SW of this marker. Two miles south of here the Marion Town Company laid out the Town of Marion in honor of Gen. Francis Marion, "The Swamp Fox" of Revolutionary War fame. Town well, . . . — Map (db m19729) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Globe — Santa Fe Trail Crossed Here
. . . — Map (db m19728) HM
Kansas (Finney County), Garden City — 73 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m65860) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Fort Dodge — 75 — Fort Dodge
Fort Dodge, named for Maj. Gen. Grenville M. Dodge, was established here in 1865. It was a supply depot and base of operations against warring Plains Tribes. Custer, Sheridan, Miles, Hancock, "Wild Bill" Hickok and "Buffalo Bill" Cody are . . . — Map (db m65406) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — A Fine Country...
"Long ago the Arapahoes had a fine country of their own. The white man came to see them, and the Indians gave him buffalo meat and a horse to ride on...the country was big enough for the white man and the Arapahoes, too...The government sent . . . — Map (db m65508) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Campsite of the U.S. Survey Team Sept. 10-21, 1825
Camping near this location Sept. 10, 1825, the survey team remained through September 21 waiting for a courier with information from the U.S. Government as to how to proceed further. West of the 100th meridian which surveyor Joseph Brown mistakingly . . . — Map (db m65720) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — 67 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is marker text] — Map (db m65439) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Santa Fe Trail Remains
has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United . . . — Map (db m65494) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Santa Fe Trail Sites to the East
Unlike the emigrant trails that took travelers west to Utah, Oregon, and California, the Santa Fe Trail mainly handled commercial traffic moving east and west. When Santa Fe became part of the United States in 1848 after the Mexican-American . . . — Map (db m65519) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Santa Fe Trail Sites to the West & South
Pioneered by William Becknell in 1821, the Santa Fe Trail was a 900-mile overland road that connected Franklin, Missouri, with Santa Fe, New Mexico, and was an important commercial trade route. Near here, trail travelers had to decide which . . . — Map (db m65496) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Santa Fe Trail, 1821 - 1880
Eighteen Miles a Day Hundreds of freight wagons laden with trade items once lumbered by here, passing just uphill from where you are standing. Large caravans took six to ten weeks to travel the 900 miles between Mexico (present-day New . . . — Map (db m65512) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — The Worst Piece of Road
For 60 years, this prairie soil was torn by the hooves of mules, oxen, and horses, and compacted by the weight of the large freight wagons they pulled. The wagons of a caravan traveled four abreast to avoid dust and to quickly form defensive . . . — Map (db m65440) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Howell — Trails on the Prairie
You are standing on a bluff above the Arkansas River, an international boundary between the United States and Mexico during the early years of the Santa Fe Trail. This area was prone to flooding and the ruts offer an excellent illustration of . . . — Map (db m65495) HM
Kansas (Ford County), Wright — 74 — The Road to Santa Fe
The Santa Fe trail, extending 750 miles from the Kansas City area to the old Spanish settlement of Santa Fe, was the great overland trade route of the 1820's to 1870s. Its commercial use began in 1821, when William Becknell headed west with a pack . . . — Map (db m55277) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Gardner — 6 — Overland Trails
Here US-56 lies directly on the route of the Oregon-California and Santa Fe trails. Nearby, the trails branched. On a rough sign pointing northwest were the words, "Road to Oregon." Another marker directed travelers southwest along the road to Santa . . . — Map (db m21669) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Gardner — Santa Fe Trail
This marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail from Kansas City to Santa Fe 1822 - 1880. — Map (db m20074) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — A Most Desirable Spot For Camping
The Lone Elm Campground The land here at Lone Elm met the three requirements for a stopover for travelers on the trail...wood, water, and grass. Wood for campfires and wagon repairs, water for the support of people and animals, and grass for . . . — Map (db m34342) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Elm Grove Campground
For over three decades starting in 1827, Elm Grove Campground, one mile east of near the bridge on Cedar Creek, was an important frontier camp site. Thousands of Santa Fe traders, Oregon and California emigrants, missionaries, mountain men, soldiers . . . — Map (db m20093) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Campground
Lone Elm is one of the most historic and important frontier trail camp sites in America and was used as a campground and rendezvous point for all three of our nation's great western roads to the frontier.....the Santa Fe, Oregon, and California . . . — Map (db m34334) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Lone Elm Park
"Travelers came to look upon it as an old friend - they felt an attachment for the tree that had so often sheltered and shaded them from storm and sun..." W.W.H. Davis (1853) Lone Elm Park was purchased by the City of Olathe in 2000 to . . . — Map (db m34339) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Rest for the Weary
"These is a romance about the stage coach that will never die. Its jolly driver with his six-in-hand, the merry passenger with his jokes ans stories, and the stations along the road where we used to stretch our tired limbs will long linger like a . . . — Map (db m20096) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Roads To The West
The Santa Fe Trail The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell led a small group of men on a trading expedition from frontier Missouri to colonial Santa Fe. Mexico had recently declared its independence from Spain and abolished . . . — Map (db m34340) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Santa Fe Trail
This marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail from Kansas City to Santa Fe 1822 - 1880 — Map (db m20065) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — 3 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Kansas — Map (db m34332) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — The Travelers
The Travelers For more than four decades, tens of thousands of travelers camped here. The Lone Elm campground was one or two nights out from the frontier "jumping off" points on the Missouri River. The great lone elm tree that gave this . . . — Map (db m34355) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trail Campground..To Farm..To Park
In 1857, Newton Ainsworth claimed this land and allowed the trail travelers to continue camping here. A decade later, the railroads began to make their way west and the great overland trails became a part of history. The need for camping at Lone . . . — Map (db m34357) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Olathe — Trails West — by Eldon Tefft
The oxen and Conestoga wagon sculpture was originally commissioned in 1994 for use at the Kansas Visitors Center at 119th & Strang Line Road. When the Center closed in 2002 the sculpture was awarded to the City of Olathe. The sculpture has been . . . — Map (db m34337) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — "A Day on the Trail"

Images Art Gallery has proudly designed and painted this mural depicting "A Day on the Trail." The Santa Fe Trail was a two-way trail of commerce and cultural exchange between the United States and Mexico from 1821 to the 1870's. Oxen or mules . . . — Map (db m99304) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Opening the Floodgates

[Inset] "from 'Sappling Grove' where there is an excellent fountain spring & a very good place to camp.. The road runs a little round on the high ridge."

The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell and a . . . — Map (db m100228) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
Both the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails crossed here, northeast to southwest, beginning 1821. The trails took separate courses farther west. A route through Kansas Territory was opened north of here in the 1830's after the founding of Westport, Mo. Long . . . — Map (db m20213) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — 1 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872

[Title is text] — Map (db m99303) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Routes from Westport

The Santa Fe Trail forked into two routes as it headed south from Westport. Along the routes were campgrounds for trail travelers — to the northeast of the junction was Sapling Grove and the southwest was a campground called Flat Rock or . . . — Map (db m100264) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Two Ways West from Westport

Imagine seeing Santa Fe Trail wagon trains coursing through Overland Park! Around you swirls the sights and sounds of wagons creaking, oxen braying, and wagon masters shouting commands. You are standing between two historic branches of the . . . — Map (db m99307) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Overland Park — Voices from the Trail

The Santa Fe, Oregon, and California trails proved to be both challenging and exhilarating for the travelers in the caravans passing through this junction along one of the Westport routes. Letters and diaries are filled with adventures and . . . — Map (db m100260) HM

Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — Gum Springs
Located today at 59th Terrace and Bluejacket in the city of Shawnee, Gum Springs was the site of the Shawnee Indian church and meeting house, as well as the location of several excellent springs, all near the intersection of the Fort Leavenworth . . . — Map (db m50693) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — The Development of the Kansas City area Frontier Trails Network — Trail Map
The Santa Fe Trail went through two decades of change in the Kansas City area before evolving into it's final form by about 1840. In the early years of that decade it also became the route of the Oregon Trail and California Trail. 1821 - . . . — Map (db m50679) HM
Kansas (Johnson County), Shawnee — Wagonmaster's House — Richard Williams
Richard Williams was born in Tennessee in 1830, son of Judge Arthur Williams. As a young man, Richard came to Johnson County in the 1850s, employed as a surveyor by the U.S. government. During the 1850s and early 1860s, Dick Williams was a . . . — Map (db m50691) HM
Kansas (Kearny County), Lakin — 82 — Chouteau's Island
In the spring of 1816 Auguste P. Chouteau's hunting party traveling east with a winter's catch of furs was attacked near the Arkansas river by 200 Pawnees. Retreating to what was once an island five miles southwest of this marker the hunters . . . — Map (db m65747) HM
Kansas (Kearny County), Lakin — 78 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m65744) HM
Kansas (Kearny County), Lakin — 79 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m65749) HM
Kansas (Kearny County), Lakin — 72 — Santa Fe Trail Ruts — 1821 - 1872
Looking east, up and over the bank of the ditch, one can see the wagon ruts of the Santa Fe Trail. You will notice a difference in the color and texture of the grass in the ruts. This is characteristic of the ruts along the trail. Between Pawnee . . . — Map (db m65755) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
This cut is part of the old Santa Fe Trail. Many years ago the Missouri River came near this site and thousands of early settlers were ferried here. Their wagons and teams climbed this hill and headed west toward Santa Fe and the Oregon . . . — Map (db m66712) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Fort Leavenworth — The Oregon and Santa Fe Trails
The stone monuments to the west mark the trace of the original road leading up from the river. For many pioneers, traders, settlers and soldiers, this was the beginning of the Oregon and Santa Fe Trails leading to the Far West. The steamboat and . . . — Map (db m66713) HM
Kansas (Lyon County), Admire — 21 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m64957) HM
Kansas (Marion County), Durham — 33 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m61295) HM
Kansas (Marion County), Tampa — Old Santa Fe Trail
Operated 1822-1872 Purchased from the Indians Aug. 10, 1825 Surveyed 1827 from Independence, Mo to Santa Fe, N.M. — Map (db m76797) HM
Kansas (McPherson County), Canton — Santa Fe and Chisholm Trails
1822-1872 Santa Fe Trail 1867-1872 Chisholm Trail [trail maps through local area] — Map (db m53564) HM
Kansas (McPherson County), Elyria — 33 — Kansas Indian Treaty
In 1825 President James Monroe approved a bill providing for the survey of the Santa Fe Trail from Missouri to New Mexico and the making of treaties to insure friendly relations with Indians along the route. A mile west of this sign, on Dry Turkey . . . — Map (db m53059) HM
Kansas (McPherson County), Elyria — Sora Kansas Creek — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
Near this spot August 16, 1825 the treaty was made with the Kansas Indians for the Right of Way of the trail — Map (db m53060) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — A Well-furnished Store
"Those who have occassion to stop at Council Grove, on the Santa Fe Road, will do well to 'put up' with Charles A. Gilkey [Hays' hotel clerk]...[?] host of the Hayes House. [They]...cannot but help feeling quite at home. - Kansas Press, . . . — Map (db m45123) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Bur Oak — Quercus macrocarpa — Sprout Date 1776
This hardwood tree was part of the original grove that provided shelter, and wood for wagon repairs for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail. The grove was a continuous strip of timber near one mile in width with a rich variety of trees. The town of . . . — Map (db m44824) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Bur Oak — Quercus macrocarpa — Sprout Date 1694
This hardwood tree was part of the original grove that provided shelter, and wood for wagon repairs for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail. The grove was a continuous strip of timber near one mile in width with a rich variety of trees. The town of . . . — Map (db m44964) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Bur Oak — Quercus macrocarpa — Sprout Date 1749
This hardwood tree was part of the original grove that provided shelter, and wood for wagon repairs for travelers on the Santa Fe Trail. The grove was a continuous strip of timber near one mile in width with a rich variety of trees. The town of . . . — Map (db m44966) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Conn Store — "He fears no competition."
"In his stock were found every known variety of goods for use on the frontier, from ox yokes and repairs to cambric needles, from small boxes of pills to barrels of whiskey." - Conn Store Clerk William Shamleffer For traders on the Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m45088) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Council Oak
The hunting grounds of the Kaw (Kansa) and Osage Indians were located here when Americans and Mexicans began hauling trade goods over the Santa Fe Trail in 1821. In 1825, in response to traders and merchants who eagerly sought trade with . . . — Map (db m44981) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Council Oak Acorn — Arbor Day 1931
Acorn from Council Oak — Map (db m45454) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Custer Elm
This picture of Custer Elm was taken in 1928 and at that time the tree was estimated to be 300 years old. Dutch elm disease caused it to die in the early 1970's. General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Calvary [sic] regiment camped beneath . . . — Map (db m44938) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — First Santa Fe Pack Train — 1821 - 1921
In commemoration of the home coming to Council Grove June 27 - July 2 celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of the first pack train to pass over the Santa Fe Trail, led by Wm. Becknell — Map (db m45078) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Hays House — 1857 — Philomathian Heritage Plaque
Built in 1857 by Seth Hays on the site of the first permanent building (1848) in Council Grove. The original log cabin was also known as the Hays House. Used continuously as a restaurant, this building was also used for church services, court . . . — Map (db m45133) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Hermit's Cave — 1863
Father Francisco, Hermit Priest of the Santa Fe Trail, lived in this cave for 5 months. — Map (db m45148) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Hermit's Cave
"He appears rather an intelligent man, speaks nine different languages. He has lived a Hermit some thirty five years... Last winter he lived five months in a hollow tree near Westport, Mo. He refuses to eat bread or meat; his food consists of corn . . . — Map (db m45206) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Kaw Mission — A School for the Kaws
"Great father, you white people treat us like a flock of turkeys. You chase us from one steam and then chase us to another stream and then to another stream. Soon you will chase us over the mountains and into the ocean - Al-le-ga-wa-ho, . . . — Map (db m45053) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Last Chance Store
"Last chance for beans, bacon and whiskey." During the 1857 trading season, this building housed a store on the edge of Council Grove. Here was the last opportunity for the trader bound for Santa Fe to purchase supplies before venturing into the . . . — Map (db m45396) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Last Chance Store — 1857
Built by Tom Hill. The last chance for supplies between Council Grove and Santa Fe, New Mexico. — Map (db m45397) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Madonna of the Trail
N.S.D.A.R. Memorial
to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days The National Old Trails Road Here East met West when the Old Santa Fe Trail was established August 10, 1825 at a council between the United . . . — Map (db m44822) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Malcolm Conn Store — 1858 — Philomathian Heritage Plaque
Built by Malcolm Conn for mercantile business, it was the second pioneer business erected in the present business district. First known as "Stone Store", later as "Pioneer Store." Travelers traveling the Santa Fe Trail were welcome to sleep . . . — Map (db m45144) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Neosho Crossing
"The creek bank, which is short and steep, made of some little detention in the crossing of the wagons, they had to double teams several times. It is amusing here to hear the shouting of the wagoners to their animals, whooping and hallowing; the . . . — Map (db m44941) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Pioneer Cowboy Jail — City Calaboose Since 1849
"Only jail in early days on the Santa Fe Trail. Within its walls desperados, border ruffians, and robbers were held. During the Indian Raid of 1859 two Indians were taken out and hanged by a mob. A bad man, Jack McDowell, was hanged from the Neosho . . . — Map (db m44992) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Post Office Oak
From 1825 to 1847 a cache at the foot of this tree served as a post office for incoming and outgoing wagon trains — Map (db m44951) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Post Office Oak
The stump before you is all that is left of a grand old oak tree that was about 270 years old when it died in 1990. The tree, which once stood 80 feet high, was located in the campground used by Santa Fe Trail travelers. It is said to have been . . . — Map (db m44960) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Rendezvous on the Trail
This was once a place of early morning racket, dust, and confusion, as wagons bound for Santa Fe rattled and jockeyed for position to form a train. Wagonmasters shouted, "Catch up!" to the teamsters - then "Stretch out!" as the wagons began to . . . — Map (db m44942) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
. . . — Map (db m57178) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Santa Fe Trail / Council Grove — 1822 - 1872
Santa Fe Trail Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Kansas Council Grove On this spot August 10, 1825 the treaty was made with the Osage Indians for the right of way of the Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m44967) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Seth Hays Home
Seth M. Hays was a shrewd, colorful, and successful trader, rancher, tavern owner, and publisher. He built this house in 1867; it was elaborate for Council Grove at that time. Though he was a life-long bachelor, Hays adopted five-year-old Kittie . . . — Map (db m45142) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Seth Hays Home — 1867
Built by Seth Hays [b. 1811]. The first white settler in Council Grove. He lived here with his adopted daughter Kitty & his slave Sally until his death in 1873. — Map (db m45143) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — Terwilliger Home / Trail Days House — 1861 — On the way to Santa Fe
With its foundation in Kansas Territory, this house was established here, along the Santa Fe Trail as Kansas became the thirty fourth state. History Comes Alive Here! — Map (db m45450) HM
Kansas (Morris County), Council Grove — The Mormon Battalion at Council Grove, Kansas
The Mormon Battalion camped here for five days beginning 27 August 1846. The battalion's more than 500 volunteers and officers had been recruited from the Mormon pioneers (members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) at Council . . . — Map (db m45056) HM
Kansas (Osage County), Overbrook — 15 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m65041) HM
Kansas (Osage County), Scranton — 17 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872

[Title is the text] — Map (db m81098) HM

Kansas (Pawnee County), Fort Larned National Historic Site — A Soldier Town
For travelers arriving on the Santa Fe Trail, Fort Larned must have looked more like a small town than a fortified place. In the early years, about 150 soldiers lived here in the summers. During the Indian Wars, as many as 400 troops called Fort . . . — Map (db m95839) HM
Kansas (Pawnee County), Fort Larned National Historic Site — 55 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872

Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Kansas 1906 — Map (db m95810) HM

Kansas (Pawnee County), Fort Larned National Historic Site — The Frontier Army and the U.S. Mail

The cavalry company are used entirely for escorting the mails between this post and Fort Dodge 55 miles west and Fort Zarah 33 miles east. The mails come and depart twice a week. William Forwood, captain, Fort Larned post surgeon, . . . — Map (db m95846) HM

Kansas (Pawnee County), Fort Larned National Historic Site — The Great Wagon Road to the Southwest — Santa Fe Trail 1821-1880
It all started over trade that promised great profits. Once Mexico won independence from Spain in 1821 Americans were welcomed and encouraged to trade. Trade quickly flourished, creating opportunities and profits linking the economies of Missouri . . . — Map (db m40127) HM
Kansas (Pawnee County), Larned — Ak'a Onikashin ga • People of the Southwind

The Kanza Indians left their homelands east of the Mississippi River during the 1600s. They settled into what is today the northeast part of Kansas. Waterways provided sustenance for their people and were part of the tribe's culture. The . . . — Map (db m95883) HM

Kansas (Pawnee County), Larned — 54 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872

Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Kansas 1906 — Map (db m40108) HM

Kansas (Rice County), Lyons — Cow Creek Station
One mile south is the hand-dug wel that served the U.S. Cavalry and Santa Fe Trail travelers in the 1860s. For five days in July, 1864, 600 Indians besieged a trading post near the well and a wagon train nearby. When the attackers tried to . . . — Map (db m53319) HM
Kansas (Rice County), Lyons — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Content in title] [Part of the markers denoting the route of the trail] — Map (db m53321) HM
Missouri (Howard County), New Franklin — Franklin — "Cradle of the Santa Fe Trail" — 1821
This Trail One of the Great Highways of the World Stretched nearly one thousand miles from Franklin, Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico "From Civilization to Sundown" [Relief Caption] Captain William Becknell of Franklin "Father of . . . — Map (db m44292) HM
Missouri (Howard County), New Franklin — Santa Fe Trail
Father of the Santa Fe Trail William Becknell led a small group out of Franklin in 1821 on the first trip along what would be known as the Santa Fe Trail. If his trip across the Great Plains was successful, the group would make money trading . . . — Map (db m46932) HM
Missouri (Howard County), New Franklin — Santa Fe Trail Marker
In March 1909, the Daughters of the American Revolution marked the Boonslick and Santa Fe Trails across the state of Missouri. This monument in New Franklin marks the end of the Boonslick Trail traversed by Daniel Boone and the beginning of William . . . — Map (db m46505) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Independence — Independence
Side A: Independence, famed "City of the Trails," was for two decades the starting point of the great western trade and travel routes to Santa Fe, Oregon, and California. Settled mainly by Southerners on land ceded the U.S. by the Osage . . . — Map (db m44323) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Independence — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909 Independence — Map (db m34755) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Independence — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872 — Salem Church
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909. — Map (db m90347) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Historic Harris-Kearney House
Built in 1855 by John and Henrietta Harris this Greek revival style all brick house was located on a slightly five acre tract on the ridge just east of Westport, MO. This site was on the southwest corner of Westport Rd. (Santa Fe Trail) and Main . . . — Map (db m44411) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — McCoy's Trading Post
Near this point John McCoy built a log trading post in 1833 which launched the settlement of Westport, with the town becoming the westernmost point of American civilization. From Westport, the Santa Fe, California, and Oregon Trails reached out as . . . — Map (db m21064) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — New Santa Fe / Trail Remnants
(black marker) New Santa Fe, also known as Little Santa Fe, was not much more than an Indian settlement when the first wagon trains passed through on the Santa Fe Trail in the early 1820's. A popular stopping place because of its grass, . . . — Map (db m20724) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Original Site of Harris House — 1844 - 1912
Famous for its hospitality and as the western outpost of civilization on the Santa Fe Trail Rededicated 1961 & 1974 — Map (db m20819) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Santa Fe Trail — Camino de Santa Fe — 1821 - 1880
(limestone marker) "A Highway Between Nations" Sen. Thomas Hart Benton, 1825 (red granite marker) Santa Fe Trail 1821 - 1872 Marked by the Daugters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909 . . . — Map (db m20610) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — The Albert G. Boone Store
(Main Marker) Originally used as an outfitting store for wagon trains, this building was completed in 1850 by Indian traders George and William Ewing and was sold in 1854 to Albert Gallatin Boone for $7,000. Boone operated the store . . . — Map (db m20921) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — The French and the Santa Fe Trail
The Santa Fe Trail extended nearly 1,000 miles overall from the Missouri River ports Southwest to Taos and Santa Fe. The first exploration and trading on the direct overland trail was conducted by the colonial French. The 1680 pueblo revolt in New . . . — Map (db m86227) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Where Wagons Rolled / Wieduwilt Swales
Thousands of wagon wheels, animal hooves, and human feet once passed this way – creating the deep depression in front of you. The swale, now worn by erosion, is grassed-over evidence of three trails once connecting frontier Missouri to . . . — Map (db m87293) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Raytown — William Ray Blacksmith Shop
was located at this point on the Santa Fe Trail, 1849-1851. It is generally believed that Raytown was named for William Ray. — Map (db m69744) HM
Missouri (Lafayette County), Dover — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872 — Tabo
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909. — Map (db m90421) HM
Missouri (Lafayette County), Dover — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872 — Dover

[Title is text] — Map (db m90895) HM

Missouri (Lafayette County), Dover — Tabo Creek — The Santa Fe Trail
A ferry built by Adam Lightner in 1821 may have carried William Becknell's first trade expedition to Santa Fe in that year. — Map (db m100375) HM
Missouri (Lafayette County), Napoleon — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909 — Map (db m90356) HM
Missouri (Saline County), Marshall — Santa Fe Trail — 1821 - 1872
Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Missouri 1909 Marshall — Map (db m89821) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Cimarron — Santa Fe Trail
Side A: The difficulty of bringing caravans over rocky and mountainous Raton Pass kept most wagon traffic on the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail until the 1840's. Afterwards, the Mountain Branch, which here approaches Raton Pass, . . . — Map (db m45821) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Cimarron — The Saint James Hotel
The Saint James Hotel Has been placed on the National Register Of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior 1872 — Map (db m45779) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Springer — Point of Rocks / The Dorsey Mansion
This is a two sided marker Side A: Point of Rocks Point of Rocks was a major landmark along the Santa Fe Trail. Located in Jicarilla Apache country, it was near here that the party of Santa Fe merchant J.W. White was attacked . . . — Map (db m55207) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Wagon Mound — Wagon Mound
This last great landmark on the Santa Fe Trail was named for its resemblance to the top of a covered wagon. At Wagon Mound, travelers could cross from the Cimarron Cutoff to Fort Union, which is located on the Mountain Branch of the Trail. The two . . . — Map (db m45824) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Fort Union National Monument / Santa Fe Trail — 1851-1891
Side A: Fort Union National Monument 1851-1891 Once the largest post in the Southwest, Fort Union was established to control the Jicarilla Apaches and Utes, to protect the Santa Fe Trail, and to serve as a supply depot for . . . — Map (db m45829) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Santa Fe Trail
Opened by William Becknell in 1821, the Santa Fe Trail became the major trade route to Santa Fe from Missouri River towns. The two main branches, the Cimarron Cutoff and the Mountain Branch, joined at Watrous. Travel over the Trail ceased with the . . . — Map (db m55199) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Watrous
The Mountain Branch and the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail meet at Watrous. This important spot on the Trail was first known at La Junta, "junction" in Spanish. In 1879, with the coming of the railroad, it was named for Samuel B. Watrous, a . . . — Map (db m55198) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Fort Union National Monument — 1851-1891 — 18 Miles
Once the largest post in the Southwest, Fort Union was established to control the Jicarilla Apaches and Utes, to protect the Santa Fe Trail, and to serve as a supply depot for other New Mexico forts. The arrival of the railroad and the pacification . . . — Map (db m55197) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Hogbacks
Interstate 25 cuts through dipping strata that form hogback ridges between the Great Plains and the south end of the Rocky Mountains. The Santa Fe Trail from here to Santa Fe, followed a natural valley eroded in less resistant strata between the . . . — Map (db m55196) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Las Vegas — Population 16,507 - Elevation 6,470
Las Vegas served as an important stop on the Santa Fe Trail and later as a major railroad center. Here General Kearny announced the annexation of New Mexico by the U.S. in 1846. In 1862, during the Confederate occupation of Santa Fe, Las Vegas . . . — Map (db m45887) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post
Built in 1810 — Map (db m65857) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Caρoncito at Apache Canyon
Strategically located where the Santa Fe Trail emerges from Glorieta Pass, Caρoncito is where the New Mexico Governor Manuel Armijo weakly defended New Mexico against the American Army in 1846. In 1862, Union forces destroyed a Confederate supply . . . — Map (db m24315) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — End of Santa Fe Trail
This stone marks the end of the Santa Fe Trail 1822 – 1879 — Map (db m45576) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Trail
This marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail, Kansas City to Santa Fe. 1822–1880. — Map (db m61884) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Clayton — Population 2,968 ~ Elevation 4,969
Trade caravans and homesteaders traveling the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail passed near here. Clayton was founded in 1887 and named for the son of cattleman and ex-Senator Stephen W. Dorsey, one of its developers. It became a major livestock . . . — Map (db m55209) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Clayton — Population 2,968 ~ Elevation 4,969
Trade caravans and homesteaders traveling the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail passed near here. Clayton was founded in 1887 and named for the son of cattleman and ex-Senator Stephen W. Dorsey, one of its developers. It became a major livestock . . . — Map (db m55218) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Rabbit Ear Mountain
These two striking mounds were the first features to become visible to Santa Fe Trail traffic crossing into New Mexico from Oklahoma, and so became important landmarks for caravans. From here, traffic on this major 19th century commercial route . . . — Map (db m55217) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Rabbit Ear Mountain
These two striking mounds were the first features to become visible to Santa Fe Trail traffic crossing into New Mexico from Oklahoma, and so became important landmarks for caravans. From here, traffic on this major 19th century commercial route . . . — Map (db m55219) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Santa Fe Trail
This is a two sided marker Side A: William Bucknell, the first Santa Fe Trail trader, entered Santa Fe in 1821 after Mexico became independent from Spain and opened its frontier to foreign traders. The Mountain Branch over Raton . . . — Map (db m55235) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Clayton — Santa Fe Trail - Cimarron Cutoff / Clayton
This is a two sided marker Side A: Santa Fe Trail Cimarron Cutoff The Santa Fe Trail was the major trade route between New Mexico and Missouri from 1821 until arrival of the railroad in 1880. The Cimarron Cutoff, a . . . — Map (db m55236) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Grenville — Santa-Fe Trail
. . . — Map (db m88749) HM
New Mexico (Union County), Grenville — The Santa Fe Trail — Santa Fe Trail National Scenic Byway
Stretching 900 miles from Franklin, Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Santa Fe Trail was one of the most important North American trade routes of the nineteenth century. Begun in 1821, it was in use for 60 years until the arrival of the . . . — Map (db m88753) HM
Oklahoma (Cimarron County), Wheeless — Fort Nichols — 7 mi S.W.
Established in May 1865, by Kit Carson, hero of Valverde and Brig. Gen., New Mexico Volunteers, to guard Santa Fe Trail and furnish escorts for caravans engaged in Santa Fe trade. Santa Fe Trail crossed this highway here and was first traveled by . . . — Map (db m39798) HM
Texas (Oldham County), Vega — 2016 — Fort Smith-Santa Fe Trail
What came to be known as the Fort Smith - Santa Fe Trail was first blazed in 1840 by Josiah Gregg, a trader seeking a route to Santa Fe along the south side of the Canadian River. In 1849, Gregg's route was closely followed by a military escort led . . . — Map (db m91758) HM

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