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Davidson County Tennessee Historical Markers

417 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 217
 
Alfred Z. Kelley Marker image, Touch for more information
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, March 8, 2020
Alfred Z. Kelley Marker
Tennessee (Davidson County), Antioch — 207 — Alfred Z. Kelley
Nashville barber Alfred Z. Kelley was lead plaintiff in Kelley v. Board of Education, a federal lawsuit filed Sept. 23. 1955, on behalf of his son Robert and 20 other African American children. In December, the suit was amended to include two . . . — Map (db m146420) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Antioch — 164 — Antioch Pike
The Mill Creek Valley Turnpike Company was incorporated by the Tenn. Gen. Assembly on Jan. 21, 1846. Starting near the four mile mark of Nolensville Pike, the road went through Mill Creek valley, "crossing main Mill creek at or near Rains' mills, . . . — Map (db m147405) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Antioch — Cane Ridge Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Cane Ridge Cumberland Presbyterian Church, built in 1859, replaced a log building which occupied land donated by Edwin Austin & Thomas Boaz in 1826. One of the best known pastors was Hugh Bone Hill who also preached at the Jerusalem Church . . . — Map (db m146619) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Antioch — 165 — Locust Hill
Located near Mill Creek, Locust Hill is one of the earliest brick homes in Middle Tennessee. Built c. 1805, it was home to the Charles Hays family until after the Civil War. The Federal-style house features intricately carved mantles and millwork, . . . — Map (db m147404) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Antioch — 209 — Olive Branch Missionary Baptist Church
In 1871, District 6 school commissioners John Briley, Benjiah Gray and Jason Austin bought one acre of land from James Thompson for an African American school. In 1873, African American members of the Benevolent Society of Olive Branch No. 38 . . . — Map (db m147704) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Brentwood — 3A 21 — Hood's RetreatDec. 16, 1864
In this neighborhood, late in the evening of his decisive defeat at Nashville, Hood reorganized his army for withdrawal southward. Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee's Corps, supported by Chalmers' Cavalry Division, covered the withdrawal, fighting . . . — Map (db m54043) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Brentwood — Nobles Corner
This 5 acres on the corner of Old Hickory Boulevard and Franklin Road was bought by A. H. Noble in 1929. A registered pharmacist, he operated a drug store here for nearly 20 years when the pharmacy was converted to a restaurant by Albert's son Glenn . . . — Map (db m113948) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — Carriage House, c. 1850s[Clover Bottom Farm]
Construction details on this structure vary from the slave dwellings, and include mortise and tenon joinery and hand-planed and rabbeted lapped siding. These details suggest that the carriage house may pre-date those dwellings. Note the hand-forged . . . — Map (db m147661) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — Chicken House, c. 1920s[Clover Bottom Farm]
The chicken coop may date to the Stanford family's ownership of Clover Bottom. The Stanfords were the third and final private owners of the property. Arthur F. Stanford (1881-1939) and his brother bought Clover Bottom from Anna Gay Price in 1918 and . . . — Map (db m147636) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — 63 — Clover Bottom Mansion
Built in 1858 by Dr. James Hoggatt on land inherited from his father, Capt. John Hoggatt, a Revolutionary War soldier, this fine Italian villa style home is centered in an area of local historical significance. John Donelson settled early in this . . . — Map (db m147571) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — Horse Barn, c. 1890s[Clover Bottom Farm]
This is one of the few surviving late 19th-century horse barns in Davidson County. Architectural historians refer to the style of the building as a transverse crib barn, or a central aisle barn. The structure was erected by 1898, most likely when . . . — Map (db m147663) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — Slave Cabins, c. 1858[Clover Bottom Farm]
Until the coming of Phillips [overseer at Clover Bottom] in the spring of 1858, the colored people lived in cabins and houses promiscuously scattered about the place. Entertainments like quilting bees and dances, where people . . . — Map (db m147635) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Donelson — 10 — Two Rivers Mansion
Built in 1859 by David H. McGavock, this mansion stands on land inherited by McGavock's wife, Willie, from her father, William Harding. The smaller house to the left was built in 1802. Dr. James Priestley's Academy, established about 1816, was . . . — Map (db m147569) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 19 — Alexander Wilson
In the spring of 1810, Alexander Wilson, noted author, naturalist, and known as the "Father of American Ornithology", visited this area while on a horseback trip over the Natchez Trace to the Mississippi River. While here he lodged with the pioneer, . . . — Map (db m83282) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3B 23 — Casper Mansker1746–1820
Two blocks west is the grave of this renowned frontiersman and Goodlettsville’s first citizen. Coming first to the Cumberland Settlements in 1770, he returned in 1780 and built his fort one-half mile north on Mansker’s creek. He repeatedly fought . . . — Map (db m2428) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 204 — Goodlettsville Cumberland Presbyterian Church
In 1843, Goodlettsville Cumberland Presbyterian Church was organized near Mansker Creek and was originally known as Mansker Creek Congregation. In January 1848, the church moved to the present location and burned in 1901. The present edifice was . . . — Map (db m2583) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 72 — Mansker’s First Fort
Here on west bank of the creek that he discovered in 1772, Kasper Mansker and other first settlers built a log fort in 1779. John Donelson’s family fled here in 1780 for safety from Indians. Mansker abandoned the fort in 1781 and moved to Fort . . . — Map (db m2586) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 14 — Mansker’s Station
Here, near Mansker’s Lick, Casper Mansker established a station of the Cumberland Settlements in 1780. The road connecting with Nashboro was built in 1781. John Donelson and his family moved here after abandoning his Clover Bottom Station, following . . . — Map (db m2375) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 100 — New Bethel Baptist Church
New Bethel Baptist Church (formerly White's Creek) was organized in 1794 six miles north of Nashville on White's Creek Pike, through the labors of Daniel Brown, Joshua White, Nathan Arnett and Patrick Mooney. It was moved to Dickerson Road in 1837 . . . — Map (db m149965) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 15 — Old Stone Bridge
Immediately to the east is one of the stone bridges over which passed the old stage road from Nashville to Louisville. The stage line operated until the rail-road was completed in 1859. — Map (db m83281) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 185 — Patsy Cline's Dream House
This is the "dream house" of country music icon Patsy Cline, born Virginia Patterson Hensley in 1932. Roy Acuff offered her a job by the age of 16, but she opted to sing with a local group back home in Winchester, Va. She changed her name in 1953 . . . — Map (db m146002) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 146 — William Bowen HouseCirca 1787
Near Mansker’s Creek stands a rare example of Federal architecture built by Capt. William Bowen and Mary Henley Russell. Bowen, an early pioneer and Indian fighter had served in the French & Indian and Revolutionary wars before moving his family to . . . — Map (db m85438) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hendersonville — Davidson County/Sumner County
Davidson County. Established 1783; named in honor of Brig. Gen. William Lee Davidson of North Carolina. Distinguished officer in the Revolutionary War. Served with the Army at Valley Forge. Killed in action at Cowan’s Ford, N.C., 1781. . . . — Map (db m2374) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — "Have the Negro Houses Placed Where the Old Ones Stands"
When Jackson's plantation turned a profit in the 1820s, he invested it in slaves and buildings. Letters sent from Jackson to Andrew Jackson Jr. and his overseer in 1829 show that brick was being made for new buildings. In September 1829, Andrew . . . — Map (db m85383) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — “A Being so Gentle And Yet So Virtuous”Rachel and Andrew’s Tombs
Rachel Jackson quietly suffered through Jackson’s bid for the White House, as his enemies attacked the circumstances of their marriage. Although Jackson easily won the presidency, Rachel dreaded the gossiping whispers of Washington’s social circles. . . . — Map (db m81403) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Future President's HomeFrom Adversity, Strength
Andrew Jackson took on life with grit and determination. Both served him well. Through persistence, ambition, and luck, the boy born into a struggling immigrant family and orphaned at age fourteen, would become a respected lawyer, judge, . . . — Map (db m81404) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A home for Jackson’s Slaves1821-1865
Andrew Jackson arrived at the Hermitage in 1804 with nine slaves. By 1821, that number had risen to fifty. In 1823, Jackson brought another thirty enslaved African Americans here from his recently sold Alabama plantation. Faced with pressing . . . — Map (db m81405) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Landscape Of InequalityEnslaved Life at The Hermitage
The idyllic planter’s life presented to white visitors by the Jackson family was based on the unpaid labor of over 150 enslaved black men, women, and children. Without the grueling labor of these individuals, the Jackson family could not have lived . . . — Map (db m52407) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Lively PlaceFinding Strength in Family and Community
For nearly thirty years – from the construction of the brick dwellings in 1829 to the sale of this parcel of land in 1856 – the Field Quarter was home to at least eight enslaved families at The Hermitage. With fifty to eighty . . . — Map (db m85429) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Abandonment and PreservationStories Lost, Then Found Again
In the years after Andrew Jackson’s death, the Jackson’s financial situation changed for the worse. The log farmhouse/slave cabin slowly fell into ruin. In 1889, the state of Tennessee entrusted the property to the Ladies’ Hermitage Association. . . . — Map (db m81406) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Alfred’s CabinA Life of Toil
While the bold and dramatic claim center stage, history is also written in the quite, humble ways...and lives. Alfred Jackson was unique among the enslaved at The Hermitage. Born at The Hermitage to Betty, the cook, and Ned, the carpenter, Alfred . . . — Map (db m81407) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 32 — Blackwood Field
In 1921 the State rented land west of Shute Lane and erected two hangars here for the 105th Observation Squadron, Tennessee National Guard. The airfield of about 100 acres was named for H. O. Blackwood, who gave $1,000 to aid the project. The first . . . — Map (db m147683) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Cabin-by-the-Spring
In 1940, The Ladies' Hermitage Association constructed this building to be used for meetings and receptions. Today, the cabin still serves as a meeting place and classroom, and is also rented for private functions. — Map (db m85380) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Civil War at The HermitageA President's Home in Wartime
Although no Civil War battles were fought here, the war touched Andrew Jackson's farm in other ways. Jackson had been a firm Unionist, putting down Nullification and its potential for civil war during his presidency. However, after his death, his . . . — Map (db m85365) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 16 — Clover Bottom
In 1780, the Gower party, tending Middle Tennessee's first cotton and corn crop, were killed or captured by Indians. On nearby Stone's River some flatboats were built for Aaron Burr's abortive expedition. The famous match races between Andrew . . . — Map (db m147672) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 54 — Confederate Cemetery
Most of the 483 Confederate soldiers buried here were veterans who died while in the Confederate Soldiers' Home which stood about 1 mile north of here. Also buried here is Ralph Ledbetter, former slave and bodyguard to a Confederate officer during . . . — Map (db m147676) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Determined ResistanceFighting for Freedom
In spite of the threat of violence, the men, women, and children who Andrew Jackson held in bondage still found ways to fight against the injustice and inhumanity of slavery. There were several instances of slaves running away. Jackson family . . . — Map (db m85475) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 187 — Dodson School
As early as 1815, school was held nearby at Stoner's Lick Methodist Church. In 1843, early settler Timothy Dodson granted land for a dedicated schoolhouse that was built c. 1855. After it burned, classes were held at the Hermitage railroad station . . . — Map (db m147673) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Explore The Hermitage Grounds
From this point, you have many tour options inviting you to think about another time here at this 1120–acre National Historic Landmark. Use the map to guide you to any of the many points of interest you’ll find throughout Andrew Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m85369) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Field Quarter Trail
This path leads to the Field Quarter, an area that was once home to at least eighty enslaved African-Americans. A series of illustrated signs near exposed building foundations at the site help you to “see” what life was like for this . . . — Map (db m81410) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Field Quarter Trail
This path leads to the Field Quarter, an area that was once home to at least eighty enslaved African-Americans. A series of illustrated signs near exposed building foundations at the site help you to "see" what life was like for this part of the . . . — Map (db m85379) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Ginning and Pressing "King Cotton"Wealth Created by Enslaved Hands
Andrew Jackson built a cotton gin and press at The Hermitage in 1807, both of which stood in the field in front of you. It was a shrewd decision on Jackson's part, not only making his plantation more self-sufficient, but also generating additional . . . — Map (db m85479) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Growing CottonA Risky Venture
Andrew Jackson called it his farm, but in reality, The Hermitage was a large cotton plantation dependent upon enslaved labor. All the agricultural activities on Jackson’s 1000 – acre plantation supported his cotton. On average, Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m81422) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 81 — Hunter's Hill
On Cumberland River, two miles north, was Andrew Jackson's plantation, Hunter's Hill, which he bought in 1796 and where he lived until 1804 when he sold it to Colonel Edward Ward and removed to the adjoining tract to which he gave the name of the . . . — Map (db m147681) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Icehouse
The Hermitage icehouse, a common feature on larger farms and plantations during the nineteenth century, stood on the north side of the smokehouse. Archaeological excavation at this site in 1993 uncovered a portion of a 20 by 20 foot . . . — Map (db m85480) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Land Conservation at The HermitagePrescribed Grazing Plan
Prescribed grazing at the Hermitage improves forage, animal, soil, and water resources. Animal resources are improved by striving to maintain quality forge 3” to 8” tall. This height allows graze animals to have optimum intake. . . . — Map (db m81424) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Land Conservation at The HermitageNative Warm Season Grasses Plan
Native warm season grasses grow well during the summer heat. These are bunch type grasses, and the bare ground between the grass clumps provides wildlife cover and nesting space. Habitat conditions are excellent for species such as bobwhite quail, . . . — Map (db m85446) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Property, Family, Humanity
For the Jackson family, the enslaved were property and the foundation of their wealth. The monetary value of the enslaved far exceeded the combined worth of the Hermitage land, mansion and other improvements. Andrew Jackson himself had no . . . — Map (db m52412) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Stone Hall/Eversong
Stone Hall and the cabin Eversong on the Stones River are situated on land that before white settlers came was Native American Indian hunting grounds controlled primarily by the Cherokee, but also used by the Shawnee and Chickasaw. . . . — Map (db m147665) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Stories Told by Things the Enslaved Left Behind
Artifacts found during excavations of the Field Quarter have much to say about daily life within the Hermitage enslaved community. Animal bones tell us a great deal about diet. Buttons and sewing equipment provide details about clothing. Marbles, . . . — Map (db m85445) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Architectural Evolution Of The HermitageA Matter of Style and Substance
Like its landscape, so too have the homes of the Hermitage been touched by time and circumstance. Andrew and Rachel Jackson's first Hermitage home was a substantial and well-furnished two-story log farmhouse, where they lived from 1804 until well . . . — Map (db m85367) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Belted Galloway
The Belted Galloway is an heirloom breed of beef cattle originating in the mountainous region of Galloway in southwestern Scotland. A hardy breed, they are naturally polled (hornless) and are distinguished by their thick heavy coats and white belt . . . — Map (db m81425) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Field QuarterLives of Labor
In 1806, Andrew Jackson purchased 640 acres north of the first Hermitage and in turn used this land mostly for field crops such as cotton and corn. Jackson chose this portion of that land to build dwellings for his field slaves because of its . . . — Map (db m85432) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Field Quarter SpringNourishing Body and Spirit
Known as “Muddy Spring” in Andrew Jackson's time, this fast flowing spring was the primary source of water for the fifty to eighty enslaved men, women, and children who lived in the nearby Field Quarter. Along with its life-sustaining . . . — Map (db m85382) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The First HermitageWorlds Apart, Side by Side
These log buildings tell a remarkable American story unlike any other. From 1804 to 1821, as a two-story farmhouse and kitchen outbuilding, the First Hermitage housed future United States President Andrew Jackson and his family. Here, Jackson lived . . . — Map (db m52420) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Garden Privy
This small brick privy or necessary is something of a mystery. No documents or illustrations record the presence of such a building when the Jackson family lived on the property. Archaelogical evidence suggests that an older building may have stood . . . — Map (db m85374) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 13 — The Hermitage
Home of Andrew Jackson (1767~1845), Major General in the Army, hero of the Battle of New Orleans, and seventh President of the United States. It was originally built in 1819; partially burned in 1834, during Jackson's second term, replaced by the . . . — Map (db m36280) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage GardenAn Ever Changing Delight
As with all living things, the Hermitage Garden cannot be wholly defined by any particular moment in time. Gardens grow and change. Few records tell us about the appearance of the garden Andrew Jackson enjoyed. Jackson hired gardener William Frost . . . — Map (db m85370) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage Landscape1804-1821
At a time when limited resources led to smaller dwellings, the distinctions between indoor and outdoor life blurred. When Jackson lived in the log farmhouse, this area buzzed with dawn-to dusk activity, sounds and smells. Cramped housing for white . . . — Map (db m81426) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage LandscapeFrontier Farm to Cotton Plantation to Shrine
At first glance, The Hermitage Landscape may seem largely untouched by time. Look more closely, however, and discover the changes brought by over 200 years of labor...living...and a changing America. White Americans and their slaves first . . . — Map (db m85360) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage MansionSymbol of Democracy?
Elegant as it is, The Hermitage Mansion is also a prime example that, indeed, beauty sometimes does lie “in the eye of the beholder.” Andrew Jackson's visitors got their first good look at his home as they rounded the graceful curves of . . . — Map (db m85366) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage OverseerBetween Two Worlds
As was common at large plantations, Jackson hired a white overseer on an annual contract to supervise farm operations, particularly the lives and work of the enslaved. The overseer's contract began on January 1, after the previous year's crop had . . . — Map (db m85477) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hunter’s Hill Farm Building
This log building was not part of Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage. In 1929, a fire destroyed one of Jackson’s original barns. To help replace it, The Ladies’ Hermitage Association purchased and moved this log building from the nearby Hunter's Hill . . . — Map (db m52416) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Jackson Family Cemetery
Andrew Jackson's strong sense of family extended beyond those he embraced during his lifetime. Reaching into the future to touch generations yet to come, he deeded a small portion of the garden in trust to serve as a family cemetery. Stones . . . — Map (db m85372) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The North Cabin
The remains of the North Cabin stood near this spot until 1988 when it was dismantled because of structural instability. The foundation of the chimney is the only part of the building visible. The North Cabin was a one-story log dwelling with a . . . — Map (db m85478) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The SpringhouseWater for The Hermitage
Of all the enticements Tennessee offered settlers, one promised both survival and a future: Water. Falling from above, bubbling up from below, flowing in broad river “highways”: Water. Two natural free-flowing springs made The . . . — Map (db m81428) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The TriplexReclaiming the Past
Rarely do facts alone uncover the past. Scholarship, judgment, and analysis all have roles in interpreting evidence, and hints, of long-ago lives. So it is with these stones marking the location of a building that Hermitage archaeologists have named . . . — Map (db m52410) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The War Road
In 1915, The Ladies' Hermitage Association planted this double line of trees to serve as the border for a new entryway intended for visitors arriving by automobile. Each tree came from a battlefield where Andrew Jackson fought, such as the Plain of . . . — Map (db m85363) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Work YardThe World Behind the Mansion
The stately trees and park-like grounds of today’s Hermitage bear scant resemblance to the working plantation of Andrew Jackson’s time. As the farm developed, trees were cleared to make room for fields and pastures. By the time the first . . . — Map (db m52408) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 11 — Tulip Grove
Designed by Jos. Reiff, who was also builder of the Hermitage, this house was built in 1836 for Andrew J. Donelson, Jackson's namesake and secretary. A West Point graduate, Donelson was at one time minister to Prussia, and held other offices. In . . . — Map (db m147680) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Joelton — 166 — Paradise Ridge
Named for the Paradise brothers, early settlers from North Carolina, this ridge was home to the Joelton Air Force Station from 1956-61, when the 799th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron operated here as a part of the integrated continental . . . — Map (db m147786) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Madison — 3A 55 — Indian Captivity
Two miles east on Cumberland River was Neely's Lick, later called Larkin's Sulphur Spring. Here, in the fall of 1780 William Neely was killed and his daughter Mary captured by Indians. Carried by her captors to Michigan, she escaped after two years, . . . — Map (db m147699) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Madison — 29 — Madison College
Madison College was founded in 1904 as Nashville Agricultural Normal Institute by Seventh-day Adventists on a farm of 412 acres. A sanitarium and campus industries were integral to the plan of work and study for students training for careers in . . . — Map (db m147701) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Madison — 13 — Mrs. John Donelson
After Col. John Donelson was killed in 1785, his widow and family continued to live here in a log house. In 1789 lawyers Andrew Jackson and John Overton boarded with the Donelsons. Here Jackson met Rachel, the Donelson's youngest daughter. They . . . — Map (db m147702) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Madison — 172 — Odom's Tennessee Pride Sausage, Inc.
In 1943, with a $1000 loan from a friend, Douglas G. Odom, Sr., his wife Louise, and their children - Doug Jr., Richard, Judy, and June - started a four-hog a day sausage business. Before selling the company in 2012, the three generation . . . — Map (db m147698) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Madison — 171 — Smith-Carter House
This stone, Monterey-style house was built in 1925 and purchased in 1952 by “Mr. Country,” Carl Smith, just weeks before his marriage to June Carter, of the famed Carter Family. The farm remained home to June and daughter Carlene . . . — Map (db m147478) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashvile — 3A 238 — Vanderbilt Memorial Gymnasium
Vanderbilt Memorial Gymnasium was dedicated to Vanderbilt students and alumni killed in World War II on December 6, 1952. The site of civil rights activities; here in 1966 Nashville's Pearl High School won the first desegregated TSSAA basketball . . . — Map (db m135220) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 75 — "Western Harmony"
Music publishing in Nashville began in 1824 when "The Western Harmony" was published by Allen D. Carden and Samuel J. Rogers. A book of hymns and instruction for singing, it was printed by Carey A. Harris on the press of his newspaper, the Nashville . . . — Map (db m147736) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m146936) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 122 — Academic Building At Fisk University
The Academic Building at Fisk University was designed by Nashville architect Moses McKissack and was made possible by a gift from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. On May 22, 1908, William H. Taft, later 27th President of the United States, laid the . . . — Map (db m4511) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Address by President Lincoln at the Dedication of The Gettysburg National CemeteryNovember 19, 1863.
Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great Civil War, testing whether that . . . — Map (db m146957) WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 64 — Adolphus Heiman1809 - 1862
Born Potsdam, Prussia. Came to Nashville 1838. Lived in home on this site. Architect, Engineer & Builder; Designed Univ. of Nash. Main Bldg., Central State Hosp. Main Bldg., Suspension Bridge over Cumberland River. Masonic Leader; Adj. U.S. Army . . . — Map (db m4512) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 57 — Albert Gleaves
Born here Jan. 1. 1858, a graduate of the Naval Academy in 1879, he commanded the USS Cushing in the War with Spain. In 1917 took command of the Cruiser and Transport Force, US Navy, which convoyed Allied troops to France without the loss of a man. . . . — Map (db m147503) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 122 — Albertine Maxwell
Regarded as the symbol of dance in her adopted hometown of Nashville, Ellen Albertine Chaiser Maxwell (1902-96) operated the Albertine School of the Dance (1936-80). She had danced with Chicago Opera, Adolf Baum Dance Co., and Ruth St. Denis Dance . . . — Map (db m24195) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Alvin C. York
Armed with his rifle and pistol his courage and skill, this one Tennessean silenced a German Battalion of 35 machine guns, killing 25 enemy soldiers, and capturing 132 in the Argonne Forest of France, October 8, 1918

Right side: . . . — Map (db m86362) HM

Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — An Urban GreenwayAlong Nashville's Historic — Downtown Riverfront —
Side 1 From prehistory to the present, the Cumberland River has shaped our city. By the early 1800's, the town of Nashville was thriving because of its proximity to this natural water highway. Goods such as flour, tobacco, pork and iron . . . — Map (db m107696) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew JacksonJackson.
Born March 15, 1767 Died June 8, 1845 Seventh President of the United States 1829-1837 Commander of victorious American forces at Battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815 This equestrian statue by Clark Mills was erected by the Tennessee . . . — Map (db m85487) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew Johnson1808-1875
17th President of the United States of America 1865-1869 — Map (db m85485) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 108 — Anne Dallas Dudley1876-1955
Anne Dudley played a significant role in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment by the State of Tennessee. A native of Nashville, she served as president of the Nashville Equal Suffrage League, 1911-15; president of the Tennessee Equal . . . — Map (db m4524) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 153 — Arna Wendell Bontemps1902 - 1973
At this site lived Arna W. Bontemps, one of the most prolific contributors to the Harlem or Negro Renaissance. From 1943 to 1965, Bontemps, an award-winning poet, playwright, novelist, biographer, historian, editor, and author of children's books, . . . — Map (db m4959) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 10 — Assault on Montgomery Hill — Dec. 15, 1864 —
500 yards east of here, Maj. Gen. T. J. Wood led an assault by his IV Corps against the Confederate skirmish line on the hill, eventually carrying it. Attacking the main line about 600 yards south, Wood was unable to take it by direct assault, the . . . — Map (db m52302) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 73 — Assumption Church / Cardinal Stritch
(Assumption Church side): Nashville’s second oldest Catholic church, dedicated Aug. 14, 1859, its rectory on right was added in 1874, school on left in 1879. The present altar, windows, and steeple were added later. The Germantown . . . — Map (db m4517) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 180 — Avon N. Williams, Jr.1921-1994
A native of Knoxville, Tennessee, Avon N. Williams, Jr., was an attorney, statewide civil rights leader, politician, educator, and a founder of the Davidson County Independent Political Council and the Tennessee Voters Council. In 1950, as a . . . — Map (db m147486) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 149 — Bass Park
This .2-acre lot was purchased by East Nashville citizens and presented to the city on December 12, 1921 as a public park and playground. The undeveloped lot provided views of the adjacent fire hall and was intended to keep firefighters from being . . . — Map (db m147733) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 37 — Battle of NashvillePeach Orchard Hill
On Dec. 16, 1864, Gen. S.D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, held this right flank of Hood's defense line which ran south along the crest of this ridge. Violent artillery fire and infantry attacks by the corps of Wood and Steedman failed to dislodge . . . — Map (db m25651) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 12 — Battle of NashvilleOuter Federal Defenses - Dec. 2, 1864
Here the outer Federal Defensive line, which stretched 7 mi. around the city, crossed Hillsboro Pike. It was used at the commencement of the battle on Dec. 15 by Wood's IV Corps as a line of departure for the main attack. Faint traces of the old . . . — Map (db m28420) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 11 — Battle of NashvilleIV Corps Jump-off Line - Dec. 15, 1864
Using the defensive salient 500 yards east, Wood's Corps, with the XVI Corps on its right, swung southwest to envelop the left of the Confederate line, 1 1/2 miles south, and pushed it back in spite of determined resistance. The XXIII Corps . . . — Map (db m28423) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 4 — Battle of NashvilleDefense by Ector's Brigade — Dec. 15, 1864 —
In position from here northward along high ground, Ector's Brigade of French's Confederate Division commanded by Col. Daniel Coleman, outposted the left of Hood's line. Attacked by the Federal XVI Corps, supported by artillery and part of the . . . — Map (db m52597) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 17 — Battle of NashvilleLee's Position — Dec. 15, 1864 —
Here, Stephen D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, bestrode the highway and railroad. Cheatham's Corps held the right of the line, which ran northeast about 2 miles to Rain's Hill. After the Confederate left was broken in the afternoon's fighting, . . . — Map (db m52849) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 15 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Defenses — Dec. 15, 1864 —
Stewart's Corps, Army of Tennessee, held this part of Hood's original line, extending east about 1500 yards, and west and south about 1 mile to Hillsboro Pike. After the turning of his left, about 4:00 P.M., Stewart established a new position . . . — Map (db m53345) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 2 — Battle of NashvilleSmith's Assault — Dec. 16, 1864 —
The Federal XVI Corps attacked southward along this road. After violent artillery bombardment, McArthur's Division took the hill to the west about 4:00 p.m., precipitating the rout of Hood's Army. This hill is named for Col. W. M. Shy, 20th Tenn. . . . — Map (db m53351) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 1 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Position — Dec. 16, 1864 —
Stewart's Corps, badly mauled during the first day, withdrew at night to a line extending eastward. Lee's Corps, forming the right wing, extended the line across Franklin Pike. Cheatham's Corps, on Stewart's left, extended the line westward, and . . . — Map (db m53352) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 6 — Battle of NashvilleTaking of Redoubt No. 5 — Dec. 15, 1864 —
Hood's Redoubt No. 5 was on this hill. Couch's Division of the XXIII Corps, sweeping to the south of the route of Smith's XVI, captured it and the hills to the east late in the afternoon. Wilson's cavalry, crossing the highway about 2 miles south, . . . — Map (db m53357) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 8 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Outpost — Dec. 15, 1864 —
100 yards west was Redoubt No. 3 in the Confederate system of detached works beyond the main line. It was overrun by the enveloping attack of Wood's IV Corps from the northwest. — Map (db m53360) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 5 — Battle of NashvilleShy's Hill
On this hill was fought the decisive encounter of the Battle of Nashville December 16, 1864. At 4:15 P.M. a Federal assault at the angle on top of the hill broke the Confederate line. Col. W. M. Shy 20th Tenn. Inf. was killed and Gen. T. B. Smith . . . — Map (db m53393) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 134 — Battle of Nashville(December 16, 1864) — Confederate Final Stand —
After the withdrawal from the main Confederate line at Peach Orchard Hill, Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee formed a battle line across Franklin Pike 400 yards east of here with 200 men from the remnants of Brig. Gen. Henry Clayton's division and two cannons . . . — Map (db m53394) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 126 — Battle of Nashville(December 16, 1864) — Assault on the Barricade —
During the retreat from Nashville, Colonel Edmund Rucker's brigade attempted to block the Union pursuit by erecting a barricade of fence rails and logs across Granny White Pike, 1/2 mile south of this spot. During the ensuing night attack by Union . . . — Map (db m60230) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 4 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Defenses - Dec. 16, 1864
Lee's Corps held the right flank of the line in the final stages of the battle, linking with Stewart to the west. Here it extended east, then south around Peach Orchard Hill. Violent attacks by Steedman's brigades were repulsed bloodily: Lee did not . . . — Map (db m81429) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 3 — Battle of NashvilleFederal Defenses
The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of the town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time. — Map (db m84792) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 9 — Battle of NashvilleStewart's Line
Loring's division of Stewart's Corps, Hood's Confederate Army of Tennessee, fought behind this stone wall Dec. 16, 1864. All Federal Attacks were beaten back until the Confederate line was broken a mile to the west. The division retreated south . . . — Map (db m147098) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 89 — Battle of Nashville Confederate Line
Trenches about 20 ft. N of this point, held by Loring's Division, were the center of the Confederate main line before the Battle of Nashville. On Dec. 15, 1864, Redoubt No. 1, a key artillery salient 200 yds. NW, fired on Federal forces until . . . — Map (db m52850) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of Nashville Monument
Battle of Nashville 1864 Oh, valorous gray, in the grave of your fate, Oh, glorious blue, in the long dead years, You were sown in sorrow and harrowed in hate, But your harvest is a Nation's tears, For the message you left . . . — Map (db m76476) WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of Nashville Monument
The Battle of Nashville Monument
The Statue The Battle of Nashville Monument was commissioned by the Ladies Battlefield Association (Mrs. James E. Caldwell, President) and created by Giuseppe Moretti. (Look for his signature at the . . . — Map (db m103211) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Battle of the Bluffs
Raged around this point April 2, 1781 between Cherokee Indians and settlers. Loosed by Mrs. James Robertson, dogs from the Fort attacked the Indians allowing settlers to escape to the Fort. Many were killed including Captian James Leiper. — Map (db m72268) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade Farm Freedom
In 1865 one hundred thirty six (136) enslaved men, women, and children at Belle Meade Farm gained their freedom. With this freedom they gained the right to choose where they would live and work. Seventy-two (72) farm workers continued under the . . . — Map (db m68986) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 121 — Belle Meade Golf Links Historic District
Platted in 1915 by developer Johnson Bransford. Belle Meade Golf Links is one of the early subdivisions that arose from the dissolution of the world-famous Belle Meade Plantation. This small residential district represents early 20th century . . . — Map (db m147106) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationThe Battle of Nashville — Hood's Campaign —
(overview) In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to . . . — Map (db m68971) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Belle Meade PlantationChange of Ownership
Confederate Gen. William Hicks “Billy” Jackson (1835–1903), who acquired Belle Meade Plantation after the war, served with distinction throughout the Western Theater of the Civil War. He was an excellent horseman, a skill that . . . — Map (db m68973) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 40 — Belle Vue
The original log part of this house was built about 1818 by Abram DeMoss and named Belle Vue for the house his father, Lewis DeMoss, built in 1797 overlooking the Harpeth River a mile southwest. In time the name was given to the Nashville & . . . — Map (db m147117) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 136 — Bells Bend
Bells Bend, first known as White's Bend, is an 18-square-mile area encompassed by a U-shaped bend in the Cumberland River. Numerous archaeological sites indicate that the area has been inhabited for at least 10,000 years. Bells Bend has thrived as . . . — Map (db m147916) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 202 — Belmont Church and Koinonia Coffeehouse / Contemporary Christian Music
Belmont Church and Koinonia Coffeehouse Koinonia (Greek for 'fellowship') Coffeehouse opened in 1973 with artists such as Dogwood, Fireworks and Brown Bannister boldly sharing their faith through contemporary music. It became a destination for . . . — Map (db m147530) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 16 — Belmont Mansion
This mansion was built in 1853 as a summer home for Joseph and Adelicia Acklen. An 1860 addition by architect Adolphus Heiman expanded the mansion's size to 36 rooms. The entrance to the 177 acre estate, which featured gardens decorated with marble . . . — Map (db m52143) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 142 — Belmont-Hillsboro Neighborhood
When Adelicia Acklen's estate was sold in 1890, the Belmont Mansion and its ground became Belmont College. Other portions, and parts of the neighboring Sunnyside Mansion property, were subdivided into residential lots by the Belmont Land Co. In . . . — Map (db m52304) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 150 — Bethlehem Centers of Nashville100th Anniversary — (1894-1994) —
Formerly United Methodist Neighborhood Centers, Bethlehem Centers of Nashville began as settlement houses: Wesley House (1894), Centenary Center (1908), and Bethlehem Center (1911). Bethlehem Center was one of the first locations for African . . . — Map (db m147461) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 209 — Birth of Bluegrass
In December 1945, Grand Ole Opry star Bill Monroe and his mandolin brought to the Ryman Auditorium stage a band that created a new American musical form. With the banjo style of Earl Scruggs and the guitar of Lester Flatt, the new musical genre . . . — Map (db m24069) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 83 — Black Churches of Capitol Hill
1. First Baptist Church, Capitol Hill (1848) 2. Gay Street Christian Church (1859) 3. Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church (1887) 4. St. Andrews Presbyterian Church (1898) 5. St. John AME Church (1863) 6. Spruce Street Baptist Church (1848) These . . . — Map (db m147484) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 144 — BMIBroadcast Music, Inc.
BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.), an organization that collects performance royalties for songwriters and music publishers in all genres of music, opened its doors in New York in 1940. BMI was the first performance rights organization to represent what . . . — Map (db m60229) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 218 — Bombing of the Z. Alexander Looby Home
Z. Alexander Looby (1899-1972) was a prominent civil rights lawyer from the late 1930s until the late 1960s. He also served on the Nashville City Council and the Metropolitan Council. In the pre-dawn hours of April 19, 1960, during a boycott of . . . — Map (db m147892) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 140 — Bradley Studios
In 1955, brothers Owen and Harold Bradley built a recording studio in the basement of a house on this site. They added another studio here in an army Quonset Hut, producing hits by Patsy Cline, Red Foley, Brenda Lee, Marty Robbins, Sonny James, and . . . — Map (db m59523) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 130 — Buchanan Log House
James Buchanan (1763-1841) built this two-story single pen log house with hall and parlor plan c1807. The single pen log addition was added c1820 to accommodate the Buchanan family's sixteen children. The house displays a high level of craftsmanship . . . — Map (db m147565) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 10 — Buchanan's Station
One of Cumberland settlements, established here in 1780. The fort was attacked, Sept. 30, 1792, by about 300 Creeks and Lower Cherokees under Chiachattalla. Aided by the heroism and efficiency of Mrs. Buchanan and other women in . . . — Map (db m147557) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 170 — Capers Memorial CME Church
(side 1) The oldest known African-American congregation in Nashville, Capers Memorial Christian Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in a brick house near Sulphur Springs in 1832, as the "African Mission” of McKendree Methodist . . . — Map (db m147462) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 95 — Captain Alexander "Devil Alex" Ewing1752-1822
Lt. Alexander Ewing was commissioned in the Continental Army in Sept. 1777 and promoted to Capt. in 1781. That year, while serving as aide-de-camp to Maj. Gen. Greene, he was wounded at Guilford Courthouse. Ewing moved to Davidson Co. c. 1786 and . . . — Map (db m147789) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Captain John Gordon 1763-1819First Postmaster of Nashville 1796-1797
Born in Virginia came to Nashville in 1782. Became a noted defender against the Indians of Old Fort Nashboro and the frontier settlements. Captain of a spy company of the Davidson County Regiment, participated in the Nickajack Expedition which ended . . . — Map (db m84181) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 2 — Captain John Rains1743-1834
On Christmas Day 1779, John Rains led his family and livestock across the frozen Cumberland and settled in this vicinity. In 1784 he built a fort that enclosed this hill and the spring 75 yards east. At James Robertson's orders he often led a . . . — Map (db m147540) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 92 — Captain Ryman's Home
On this site stood the residence of Captain Thomas Green Ryman, owner of the Ryman steamboat line and builder of the Union Gospel Tabernacle, renamed Ryman Auditorium after his death in 1904. The Queen Anne frame house with a slate roof, seven . . . — Map (db m147537) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 136 — Carl Van Vechten Art Gallery
This building, completed in 1889, was the first gymnasium built at any predominantly black college in the United States. In 1949, it was rededicated as an art gallery and named in honor of Carl Van Vechten, a New York music critic, author, . . . — Map (db m4507) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Carper Homestead
Known to be one of the oldest houses remaining from the early American era. Originally located on Cane Ridge Road at Antioch, Tennessee. The materials were removed piece-by-piece and rebuilt exactly as it stood when occupied by the . . . — Map (db m104384) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 159 — Centenary Methodist Institute
Women from the Methodist Training School founded Warioto Settlement House in 1908. Renamed Centenary Methodist Institute, CMI moved to this location by 1921. CMI worked with rural migrant families in the North Nashville area called Kalb Hollow, . . . — Map (db m147773) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 178 — Centenary United Methodist Church / Rev. William Gower (1776-1851)
Centenary United Methodist Church Rev. William Gower built the first Gower's Chapel on his farm in 1805. A larger chapel, erected in 1850 on Gower land, also served as the local schoolhouse. On Oct. 5, 1884, the newly named Centenary Methodist . . . — Map (db m147425) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Central High School
Founded in 1915 as the first public high school in the county system, Central High School stood here from 1921-1971. One of the earliest student government associations in the South began here. Many graduates became city and county political . . . — Map (db m147122) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 17 — Chickasaw Treaty
In 1783, Chickasaw chiefs met with white settlers at a spring 100 yards north and agreed on land rights — the Cumberland country for the settlers, the Tennessee River lands beyond the Duck River ridge for the Chickasaw. This tribe became firm . . . — Map (db m147822) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Christ Church Cathedral / Old Christ Church (1831~1890)
Front Organized in 1829, Christ Church was Nashville's first Episcopal parish. The present Victorian Gothic church designed by Francis Hatch Kimball of New York, opened for service on Dec. 16, 1894; the tower , by local architect Russell E. . . . — Map (db m81433) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 197 — Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company
(Obverse) Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company is the oldest, continuously operated African-American bank in the United States. Formerly known as the One-Cent Savings Bank and Trust Company and organized for the uplift of African . . . — Map (db m81434) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 35 — City Cemetery
First established in 1822, the remains of many early settlers were then brought here for permanent burial. Among the more than 20,000 persons buried here are Gen. James Robertson, Gov. William Carroll, Sec. of Treasury George W. Campbell, Lt. Gen. . . . — Map (db m74357) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 27 — City of Edgefield
The portion of East Nashville known as Edgefield, the name suggested by Gov. Neill S. Brown, was incorporated as a city Jan. 2, 1869. Its approximate bounds were Shelby Ave., Sevier St., So. 10th St., Berry St., Cowan Ave. and the river. It's first . . . — Map (db m147721) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 213 — Clark Memorial United Methodist Church
Founded in South Nashville in 1865, Clark Memorial moved to North Nashville in 1936 and to this location in 1945. The church was central to the Civil Rights movement in Nashville, with activist James M. Lawson conducting classes here in 1959 on . . . — Map (db m147778) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Clover Bottom FarmJohn McCline's Story
Dr. James Hoggatt, owner of the 1,500-acre Clover Bottom Farm, also owned sixty slaves here. One of them was John McCline, who lived here with his three brothers and his grandmother. McCline cared for the farm's horses and cattle among other tasks. . . . — Map (db m147621) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 193 — Club Baron
Jefferson Street developed as a vibrant African-American commercial district in the late-19th and early-20th century. As Fisk University, Tenn. A&I (Tenn. State Univ.) and Meharry Medical College grew, more restaurants, shops and music venues opened . . . — Map (db m147885) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 192 — Cockrill Bend
In 1786, the State of N.C. granted Gen. James Robertson several large tracts of land in this area. Robertson's Bend was renamed after the Cockrill family who established several farms and a mill here before the Civil War. The Romanesque-style third . . . — Map (db m147820) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 153 — Cockrill School
Through the efforts of Mark Sterling Cockrill and Lemuel Davis, a school serving West Nashville children in grades l-8 opened near here in 1888. High school grades were soon added and the school became West Nashville High School. Following . . . — Map (db m147438) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A-36 — Cockrill Spring
The house of John Cockrill, an early settler, stood about 60 yards north, near a large spring, whose waters ran northeast into Lick Branch, which emptied Great Salt Lick, around which Nashville was founded. A blacksmith shop stood under the great . . . — Map (db m12765) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 148 — Cohn School / W.R. Rochelle (1904-1989)
Cohn School Designed by architects Asmus and Clark and opened in 1928 as a junior high school, Cohn School was named in memory of Corinne Lieberman Cohn, one of the first female members of the school board. Jonas H. Sikes served as first . . . — Map (db m147440) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel James Robertson
In honor of Colonel James Robertson Born 1742 in Virginia Died 1814 in Tennessee He came from eastern North Carolina to the Watauga Settlement in what is now eastern Tennessee 1769-1770, where he was a leader in Civil and Indian . . . — Map (db m24240) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel John Donelson
In appreciation of the services of Colonel John Donelson Born in Delaware, 1718. Died in Kentucky 1786. Distinguished in early life in Virginia as a civil, industrial and military leader. Member of the House of Burgesses, iron . . . — Map (db m59376) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Colonel Richard HendersonFounder and Promoter of the noted "Transylvania Land Company"
In recognition of Colonel Richard Henderson Born in Virginia 1735 Died in North Carolina 1785 ————— Founder and Promoter of the noted "Transylvania Land Company" Whose purchase from the Cherokee . . . — Map (db m24373) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 144 — Confederate Circle at Mount Olivet
After the War Between the States, the women of Nashville bought land at Mount Olivet, and formed Confederate Circle. The remains of about 1,500 Confederate soldiers were moved here from area battlefields. Seven Confederate generals were buried in or . . . — Map (db m76477) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 14 — Confederate DefensesDec. 15, 1864
After being outflanked by the advance of the Federal XVI Corps (Smith), Loring and Walthall put their divisions in a defensive line west of this road, facing westward. Here, their determined defense brought Federal advances against the Confederate . . . — Map (db m53348) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 170 — Cora Howe's "Wildings"
This house, built from Sewanee stone, was the home of Cora Howe, who created a bucolic, English-style garden here in the early 1920s. Known as 'Wildings,' her garden contained over 300 plant types, many of them native species, and a rare, . . . — Map (db m147735) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 66 — Cornelia Fort Airport
Cornelia Fort (1919-43), Nashville's first woman flying instructor volunteer, Army's WAFS, WWII, was the first woman pilot to die on war duty in American history. "I am grateful that my one talent, flying, was useful to my country," she wrote . . . — Map (db m147711) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 154 — Cravath Hall
This neo-Gothic structure first served as the Erastus M. Cravath Memorial Library. Named for Cravath, the university's first president (1875-1900), it was designed by Nashville architect Henry Hibbs and built in 1929-30. The interior walls depict . . . — Map (db m4502) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 205 — Crieve Hall
The Crieve Hall neighborhood was part of the over 2,000-acre estate of John Overton, on which he built Travellers Rest in 1799. Jesse M. Overton built an English Tudor-style house called Overton Hall near here in 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Farrell . . . — Map (db m147409) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 23 — Cumberland Park
The Cumberland Fair and Racing Association sponsored harness racing here 1891-1894. The great match race between Hal Pointer of Tennessee and Direct of California occurred Oct. 21, 1891. Direct won all 3 heats in record time for a pacing race. . . . — Map (db m147120) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 76 — Customs House
President Rutherford B. Hayes laid its cornerstone in 1877. Designed by Treasury Department architect W.A. Potter, it was occupied in 1882 by collectors of customs and internal revenue, U.S. courts, and Nashville's main post office. Addition to rear . . . — Map (db m147164) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 138 — DeFord Bailey1899-1982
Bailey, a pioneer of the Grand Old Opry and its first black musician, lived in the Edgehill neighborhood for nearly 60 years. His shoe-shine shop was on 12th Ave., South, near this intersection. His harmonica performance of the "Pan American Blues" . . . — Map (db m74369) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 32 — Demonbreum's Cave
Jaques-Timothe De Montbrun, French Canadian fur trader and later lieutenant governor of the Illinois Country, visited in this area as early as 1769. On at least one occasion he took refuge in the cave 0.9 mile N. when attacked by Indians. He settled . . . — Map (db m83845) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 157 — Desegregating Nashville's Lunch Counters
After the pre-dawn bombing of atty. Z. Alexander Looby's home, approx. 3000 civil rights leaders and students from Tenn. St., Fisk, Meharry, American Baptist College, and Pearl High School marched along this route on April 19, 1960, to meet with . . . — Map (db m4226) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 71 — Disciples of Christ Historical Society
Library and archives of the 19th c. American religious unity movement which became: the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ); Christian Churches; and Churches of Christ. Located here, 1958, in the Thomas W. Phillips Memorial. Architects: Hoffman & . . . — Map (db m52367) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 181 — Donley Harold Turpin, D. D. S.1892-1948
Turpin, a 1918 alumnus, was appointed Professor in 1937 and acting dean of the Dental School in 1938. Attesting to his profound devotion to Meharry's School of Dentistry, which was founded in 1886, Turpin gave his personal finances to keep the . . . — Map (db m4225) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 167 — Dorothy Lavinia Brown, M.D.(1919-2004)
Dorothy Brown was born in 1919 in Philadelphia, Penn. She attended Meharry Medical College and studied under Dr. Matthew Walker, Sr., who admitted her as the first black woman to the surgery program. She was the first female African-American surgeon . . . — Map (db m147883) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 78, 95 — Downtown Presbyterian ChurchAmerican Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
From 1814 to 1955 this was the site of the First Presbyterian Church. President Andrew Jackson was received into the church in 1838. James K. Polk was inaugurated governor here in 1839. The building designed in the Egyptian style by William . . . — Map (db m121842) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 173 — Dr. Harold Dadford West, Sr.1904-1974
In 1927, Dr. West came to Meharry Medical College as Associate Professor of Chemistry. A 1930 Julius Rosenwald Fellowship Recipient and a 1935 Fellow of the General Education Board, he returned to Meharry to serve as the first Ph. D on faculty as . . . — Map (db m4519) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 189 — Dr. Matthew Walker Sr.1906-1978
Matthew Walker was born December 7, 1906 in Waterproof, La. After attending school in New Orleans, he graduated from Meharry Medical College in 1934 and began teaching at Hubbard Hospital. Walker served as Chairman of the Department of Surgery from . . . — Map (db m147775) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 132 — Dry-Stack Stone Walls
Dry-stack stone walls, a Scots-Irish building tradition adapted by slaves in the early 19th century, were common throughout middle Tennessee. During the 1864 Battle of Nashville, Brigadier General Henry Jackson was captured at this wall on the . . . — Map (db m53354) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 105 — Duncan College Preparatory School for Boys
Marvin T. Duncan, a graduate of Webb School (Bell Buckle) and Vanderbilt University, founded Duncan School in 1908 at this site on 25th Avenue S. He and his wife, Pauline, taught at the school until it closed in 1952. The Duncans dedicated their . . . — Map (db m52171) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 196 — Duncan Hotel
The Duncan Hotel opened on this site in 1889. The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of American union formed here in 1914, before the hotel closed in 1916. R.H. Boyd, Preston Taylor and others purchased the building and opened the first Young Men's . . . — Map (db m145782) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 128 — Dutchman’s Curve Train Wreck
The deadliest train wreck in US history occurred on July 9, 1918, when two crowded trains collided head-on at Dutchman’s Curve. The impact caused passenger cars to derail into surrounding cornfields, and fires broke out throughout the wreckage. Over . . . — Map (db m52596) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 7 — East Nashville Fire
Nashville's worst disaster by fire occurred Wednesday, March 22, 1916. It began at 11:47 a.m. in the rear of Seagraves Planing Mill, 80 yards west, and was swept eastwardly by 44 to 51 mph gales. It was brought under control at 4:30 p.m. near So. . . . — Map (db m147761) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 170 — Eastland
The Eastwood area, a suburb originally named Eastland in 1901, was laid out as the Brownsville plan in 1855, the land carved from the Weakley tract. Their c.1855 house remains at the northeast corner of Chapel and Greenwood. Eastland Avenue, . . . — Map (db m147715) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 68 — Edmondson Home Site
Will Edmondson, born about 1883 of former slave parents in the Hillsboro area of Davidson County, worked as a railroad and hospital laborer until 1931, when he began his primitive limestone carvings. Working without formal training, he produced some . . . — Map (db m147165) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 230 — Edwin W. Craig(1893-1969)
Nashville insurance executive Edwin W. Craig launched radio station WSM on October 5, 1925 and made plans for a radio program called the "Barn Dance,” which first aired on November 28, 1925. WSM program director George D. Hay renamed the "Barn . . . — Map (db m147728) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 80 — Edwin Warner Park606.7 acres
Edwin Warner (1870-1945) succeeded his brother Percy on the Park Board in 1927 and served for eighteen years. He personally directed the acquisition of most of the Warner Park acreage and supervised WPA development of the property. Warner organized . . . — Map (db m147109) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 191 — Elizabeth Atchison Eakin1858-1936
Elizabeth Rhodes Atchison, born in Nashville on Feb. 26, 1858, married prominent banker John H. Eakin in 1882. Active in many civic causes, in 1917 she became the first woman to join the Nashville City School Board. After her death in 1936, a new . . . — Map (db m147450) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 142 — Ella Sheppard (Moore)1851 - 1914
Ella Sheppard, an original Fisk Jubilee Singer, lecturer and teacher, was born on February 4, 1851. She entered Fisk in 1868, and was selected to join the group of nine singers that set out on October 6, 1871 to raise funds to save the school. She . . . — Map (db m62508) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 115 — Ezell House
In 1805 Jeremiah Ezell (1775-1838) moved here from Virginia and purchased 17 acres of land on Mill Creek. In 1816 he served on the Court of Pleas for Davidson County. In 1888, his grandson, Henry Clay Ezell, built this brick vernacular Queen Anne . . . — Map (db m147166) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 77 — Fall School
Fall School, built in 1898, is the oldest public school building remaining in Nashville. Named after Mr. P.S. Fall, a prominent Nashville businessman and member of the Board of Education from 1865-1867, it served as an elementary school until 1970. . . . — Map (db m147507) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 13 — Federal DefensesDec. 2-15, 1864
Near here, the interior defensive lines ran southwest to cross Harding Pike; the total length of these works was about 7 miles. First garrisoned by Wood's IV Corps, it was occupied Dec. 15 by Donaldson's Division of Quarter-master employees. Part of . . . — Map (db m52145) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N-13 — Federal Defenses
The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time. — Map (db m61935) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 147 — Fehr School
Named for local merchant and former school board member Rudolph Fehr, and designed by architects Dougherty and Gardner, Fehr School opened in 1924. On Sept. 9, 1957, Fehr became one of the first schools in Nashville to desegregate, admitting four . . . — Map (db m147770) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Felix K. Zollicoffer
Ante-bellum newspaper editor and Brigadier General in Confederate Army. Killed at battle of Fishing Creek, Kentucky, January 19, 1862. He was first Confederate general killed in the West. — Map (db m86365) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 31 — First Airfield
E. L. Hampton's pasture became “Hampton Field” when transient airplanes began landing here during the first World War. About 2,000 feet long from here west, bounded north and south by Golf Club Lane and Woodmont Boulevard, it continued . . . — Map (db m53379) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 125 — First Baptist Church
Organized in 1820, this is the church's third downtown location. The elaborate Gothic tower is all that remains of the Matthews & Thompson building that stood at this location from 1886 to 1967. The Baptist Sunday School Board, now one of the . . . — Map (db m24141) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 124 — First Baptist ChurchEast Nashville
Founded in 1866 under the direction of Rev. Randall B. Vandavall, First Baptist Church East Nashville built this Classical Revival building between 1928 and 1931, during the height of Rev. W.S. Ellingson's career. Nashville artist Francis Euphemia . . . — Map (db m145790) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — First Bridge Over the Cumberland1823 Nashville Toll Bridge
Below, built into the steep bank of the Cumberland River, is a 52-foot-tall stone structure. It is the western abutment of the first bridge over the Cumberland River. Built in 1823 by the Nashville Bridge Company, it was a three-span wooden truss . . . — Map (db m147752) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 186 — First Masonic Hall
Across the alley stood the first Masonic Hall in the state, designed by architect Hugh Roland in 1818. Marquis de la Fayette was entertained there in 1825 by Past Grand Master Andrew Jackson. The 17th General Assembly of Tennessee met there in 1827. . . . — Map (db m81437) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 41 — First Steam Locomotive
On Dec. 13, 1850, the first steam engine, Tennessee No. 1, ordered by the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, arrived on the steamboat "Beauty" from Cincinnati. The one-mile trip on improvised tracks from the wharf to the S. Cherry St. crossing . . . — Map (db m74361) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 119 — Fisk Memorial Chapel
Fisk Memorial Chapel, deigned by New York architect William Bigelow, was erected in 1892 in memory of General Clinton B. Fisk, a founder of the University. The religious and cultural center of the campus, the Chapel has welcomed foreign dignitaries, . . . — Map (db m4268) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 96 — Fisk University
Fisk University, founded in 1866 by the American Missionary Association, was chartered in 1867 to provide higher education for men and women regardless of race. Named for General Clinton B. Fisk, assistant commissioner of the Freedman's Bureau for . . . — Map (db m4510) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Fort Nashborough
Named in memory of General Nash of North Carolina, who fell at Germantown, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1777, in the War of the Revolution. Erected on the bluff near this location by the pioneers of the Cumberland settlement in the year 1780, as a . . . — Map (db m24303) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 33 — Fort Nashborough
The original stockade fronted on the river slightly north of here, covering an area of about two acres. In that enclosure, on May 13, 1780, representatives of this and other settlements met and adopted the Cumberland Compact for the government of . . . — Map (db m81452) HM

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May. 26, 2020