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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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NOVA Parks Historical Markers

Markers erected by NOVA Parks, formally the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
 
A Very Different View: Living and Working in 1700s Alexandria Marker image, Touch for more information
By Devry Jones, January 26, 2019
A Very Different View: Living and Working in 1700s Alexandria Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — A Very Different View: Living and Working in 1700s Alexandria
Alexandria's Changing Shoreline In 1749 the town of Alexandria was laid out on 10 to 15 foot bluffs around a crescent of shallow water. The back edge of John Carlyle's property, where you are standing now, was about 15 feet above the Potomac . . . — Map (db m129171) HM
2Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — Carlyle House Historic Park
This unique building, constructed of stone and set back from the street, was built by John Carlyle, a British merchant and one of the original founders of Alexandria. Witness to both domestic life and war, today the house stands as a museum . . . — Map (db m129168) HM
3Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — Civil War and Restoration
Civil War Comes to Carlyle House If you stood in this spot 150 years ago, you would be inside a building! In 1848 James Green purchased Carlyle House and the building in front of you, the first Bank of Alexandria. He turned it into a hotel . . . — Map (db m129170) HM
4Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Bluemont Junction
In June 1945 the scene nearby would have included the multiple tracks, gas-electric combine, electric substation, and passenger station shown below. As of 1912 Bluemont Junction served as the hub of the multi-line Washington & Old Dominion Railway. . . . — Map (db m24924) HM
5Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — East Falls Church Station
In August 1940, when this photograph was taken, passenger service on the Washington & Old Dominion was losing money and was being phased out. Passenger service stopped altogether in April 1941, but resumed two years later to support the national war . . . — Map (db m55964) HM
6Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Glencarlyn StationThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park
If you arrived here by train on a summer Sunday afternoon in the 1870s, you would find crowds of people enjoying Arlington's premier amusement park. This wooded spot near the confluence of Lubber Run and Four Mile Run was a natural place for a . . . — Map (db m67491) HM
7Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Nauck: A Neighborhood History
The Nauck community has a long and diverse history. The area that now comprises the Nauck neighborhood was originally granted to John Todd and Evan Thomas in 1719. The land was later acquired by Robert Alexander and sold to John Parke Custis in . . . — Map (db m2504) HM
8Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Rosslyn Station
If you were a passenger on the Washington & Old Dominion Railway heading into Georgetown, you would first have to pass through Rosslyn, Virginia, a 15-minute train ride from here. The first Rosslyn Terminal dated from 1906, with the establishment . . . — Map (db m24926) HM
9Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — The Great Falls Line
The Bluemont Branch of the Washington & Old Dominion was not the railroad’s only line. The Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad arose in 1906 from the vision of two prominent men. Sen. Stephen B. Elkins of West Virginia had prospered through coal, . . . — Map (db m24925) HM
10Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — This is W&OD Trail: Shirlington!
[Front left:] The 100-ft wide W&OD has been called "the skinniest park" in Virginia. But it is also one of the longest parks, 45 miles of paved trail for walking, running cycling and skating and more. Built on the roadbed of the . . . — Map (db m131543) HM
11Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Tracks Into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
Time Line March 20, 1847 - Incorporated as the Alexandria & Harper’s Ferry Railroad. March 15, 1853 - The corporate name changes to the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad Company. February 25, 1855 - Construction . . . — Map (db m2500) HM
12Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m24920) HM
13Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Washington and Old Dominion Trail
W & OD Trail. The 100-foot-wide Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park (W&OD Trail) features a 45-mile asphalt trail for walking, running, skating, bicycling and other activities and a 33-mile parallel, gravel bridle path for . . . — Map (db m2406) HM
14Virginia (Fairfax County), Dunn Loring — Camp Alger
In May 1898 the Spanish-American War came to Northern Virginia with the establishment of Camp Russell A. Alger (below). The 1,400-acre camp, south of where you are now located, encompassed the fields and forests of the former Woodburn Manor . . . — Map (db m24873) HM
15Virginia (Fairfax County), Dunn Loring — Dunn Loring Station
As an attraction for potential home-buyers, the Loring Land and Improvement Company constructed a railroad station on the site just to your right for the planned subdivision of Dunn Loring. An 1880s advertisement notes that "Good railroad . . . — Map (db m24875) HM
16Virginia (Fairfax County), Dunn Loring — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m24874) HM
17Virginia (Fairfax County), Great Falls — Crossing the Potomac at Rowser's FordJ.E.B. Stuart's Most Difficult Achievement
Late afternoon on June 27, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart began assembling his cavalry brigades at Dranesville. To avoid the Union Army of the Potomac (90,000-strong) then crossing the Potomac upstream at Edwards Ferry, Stuart ordered . . . — Map (db m59678) HM
18Virginia (Fairfax County), Great Falls — Washington's Canal
This will become the great avenue into the Western Country. - George Washington The stone wall you see nearby is not just any stone wall; it was built here in the late 1700s as part of George Washington's Patowmack Canal. The wall is a . . . — Map (db m59681) HM
19Virginia (Fairfax County), Herndon — Herndon Station
Herndon grew up around this railroad station. The town received its name in 1858 when the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad (later the W&OD) arrived and a post office was established in the newly built station. Herndon quickly became the . . . — Map (db m152) HM
20Virginia (Fairfax County), Herndon — The Rail Strike of 1916
In the years before motor vehicles came to dominate transportation, business was never better for the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. Demand for passenger and freight service boomed, while the W&OD's owners balked at spending the money necessary . . . — Map (db m44101) HM
21Virginia (Fairfax County), Herndon — Tracks Into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m153) HM
22Virginia (Fairfax County), Occoquan — The Beehive Brick Kiln
From the turn of the century until the late 1960’s nine kilns on this site were operated by inmates of the Lorton correctional facility. The bricks stacked inside this kiln are ready to be baked. For 4 to 5 days coal fires in each of the . . . — Map (db m2346) HM
23Virginia (Fairfax County), Occoquan — Women Suffrage Prisoners at Occoquan WorkhouseOccoquan Regional Park
Adjacent to this park a group of women was imprisoned in 1917 for demanding the right to vote. The road to Occoquan Workhouse had started in 1848. In July 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in New York, officially opening the American women’s . . . — Map (db m2343) HM
24Virginia (Fairfax County), Reston — Sunset Hills Station
Sunset Hills Station, shown below in the 1960s, stands as a reminder that today's Reston was not the first "new town" to be planned for this area. In 1886 Dr. Carl Wiehle bought a large parcel of land north and south of the railroad tracks. He . . . — Map (db m25074) HM
25Virginia (Fairfax County), Reston — Train Wrecks
Accidents happened on the Washington & Old Dominion. Mishaps resulted from washouts of the roadbed, loose rails, rotting ties, or from livestock wandering across the tracks. Crew negligence also played a part. One of the earliest and most serious . . . — Map (db m25005) HM
26Virginia (Fairfax County), Seven Corners — This Is Upton Hill!
Bring the family for a day of outdoor fun at Upton Hill Regional Park! Splash, slide and soak at the beach-themed Ocean Dunes Waterpark. Tee up at the deluxe minigolf, practice in one of our batting cages, or take a walk on the trails – our . . . — Map (db m151009) HM
27Virginia (Fairfax County), Uniontown — Civil War Winter Quarters
During the American Civil War (1861-1865), soldiers from both the Union North and the Confederate South built huts known as "winter quarters" to live in during the winter months when fighting and troop movements were usually minimal. The Bull . . . — Map (db m152386) HM
28Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Metasequoia glyptostroboidesDawn Redwood
This tree was first identified from a fossil found in Japan in 1941. That same year a living specimen was discovered in a remote part of China. Since its discovery, fossil evidence has shown that during a warm period called the Paleocene-Eocene . . . — Map (db m151336) HM
29Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Civil War Action at Vienna
On June 17, 1861, at this bend in the railroad, a Union train carrying 271 men of the 1st Ohio Volunteers was ambushed by nearly 700 South Carolina infantry and cavalry. Amid artillery fire, the Ohioans jumped from the platform cars and took cover . . . — Map (db m26761) HM
30Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Electric Trains on the W&OD
Electrification arrived in 1912, after the Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad and the Southern Railway’s Bluemont Branch were consolidated into the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. The new owners brought modern interurban trolley cars. Wire . . . — Map (db m2095) HM
31Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Gardiner C. Means and Caroline F. Ware
Gardiner C. Means and Caroline F. Ware had a farm and home here from 1935 to 1988. They donated this land to become Meadowlark Botanical Gardens. Part of this historic log cabin was enclosed by their house and was used as their living . . . — Map (db m151340) HM
32Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Hunter StationCirca 1900
This station was called a flag stop—a passenger would step out and flag down the train to catch a ride. The railroad was owned by the Southern Railway at this time and was operated as a steam railroad. Wires were installed in 1912 when . . . — Map (db m1933) HM
33Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Hunter Station
The 1860 Alexandria, Loudoun, and Hampshire Railroad station at this junction was called a flag stop - a passenger would step out and flag down the train to catch a ride. At the time that the 1900 picture to the left was taken, the railroad was . . . — Map (db m24791) HM
34Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Strategic JunctionHunter Mill Road and the AL&H Railroad
At the beginning of the American Civil War in mid-1861, Union General Irvin McDowell, Commander, Army of Northeastern Virginia, knew that his army lacked an adequate supply of wagons. The Alexandria, Loudoun, and Hampshire Railroad (today's W&OD . . . — Map (db m24864) HM
35Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Terror by the Tracks
On October 18, 1864 Reverend John B. Read, a lay preacher at the Falls Church Baptist Church, was executed in dense pine woods by the railroad bridge here at Piney Branch. Early that morning a contingent of Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby's . . . — Map (db m24865) HM
36Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The Bell of Peace and Harmony
"The Bell of Peace and Harmony" was donated by Gyunggido Province as a symbol of peace and partnership. The Korean Bell Garden is the first Korean Bell Garden constructed in the United States. Gyunggido Province, with its long history of . . . — Map (db m151335) HM
37Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The CabinMeadowlark Botanical Gardens
The cabin may have been the earliest structure on a 966-ace tract owned by William Gunnell. Gunnell's son, Henry, possibly built the first (eastern) section around 1740-50. Constructed of hewn oak, it was a single room with a fireplace. The stone . . . — Map (db m151337) HM
38Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The Great Falls Line
The Bluemont Branch of the Washington & Old Dominion was not the railroad’s only line. The Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad arose in 1906 from the vision of two prominent men. Sen. Stephen B. Elkins of West Virginia had prospered through coal, . . . — Map (db m27121) HM
39Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The Korean Bell Garden at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens
What you see before you is one of the most unique buildings in the Washington, D.C. region. Created via a joint effort between NOVA Parks and the Korean American Cultural Committee (KACC), this endeavor began with a . . . — Map (db m155263) HM
40Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The Means-Ware FarmMeadowlark Botanical Gardens
farming began in the 18th century by the original landowner, William Gunnell, continued through most of the 20th century thanks to the efforts of Dr. Gardiner Means and his wife, Dr. Caroline Ware. The longtime New Englanders came here when Dr. . . . — Map (db m151341) HM
41Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — The Purpose of the Korean Bell Garden"A Symbol of Goodwill Towards All"
For the first time in United States history, one of the most beautiful botanic gardens will hold a Korean Bell Garden. Strategically located in Washington, DC, this bell garden will be not only in the capital of the United States but also the . . . — Map (db m151333) HM
42Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m2094) HM
43Virginia (Fairfax County), Vienna — Vienna Station
Vienna Station, shown in the center of the photograph below in 1864, has stood here since the arrival of the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railway (later the Washington & Old Dominion Railway) in 1859. The farm community of Ayr Hill consisted of . . . — Map (db m2090) HM
44Virginia, Falls Church — The Tinner Hill Historic SiteBirth Place of the first rural branch of the NAACP in the Nation, 1918
This historic site is a testament to the long African American struggle to gain equality and civil rights. It also honors a moment of triumph for the human spirit. African American life in Falls Church predates the 1700s. Enslaved . . . — Map (db m151023) HM
45Virginia, Falls Church — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m2902) HM
46Virginia, Falls Church — Train Wrecks
Accidents happened on the Washington & Old Dominion. Mishaps resulted from washouts of the roadbed, loose rails, rotting ties, or from livestock wandering across the tracks. Crew negligence also played a part. One of the earliest and most serious . . . — Map (db m2899) HM
47Virginia, Falls Church — West Falls Church Station
In 1912, from the station that stood nearby to your right, you could board a modern interuban passenger coach at 7:34 a.m. and arrive in Georgetown by 8:00 sharp. It was a new century and Washington, D.C., was on the move. The demand was heavy in . . . — Map (db m2901) HM
48Virginia (Loudoun County), Aldie — This is Gilbert's Corner!
Discover a slice of Civil War history, part of the study area for the battle of Aldie, at Gilbert's Corner Regional Park in Aldie, Virginia. The 156 acre park offers hiking trails, interpretive signage and rolling countryside with a view of the . . . — Map (db m151324) HM
49Virginia (Loudoun County), Aldie — Welcome to Gilbert's Corner Regional ParkTransportation hub, eyewitness to the Civil War, preserved open space & wetlands…
Imagine this landscape thousands of years ago, when Native Americans passed through the area on their foot path. Traveling along the eastern section of the current United States, south before winter arrived and north before the summer months, . . . — Map (db m151326) HM
50Virginia (Loudoun County), Ashburn — Ashburn Station
At least two different railroad stations stood where you are now standing. When the Alexandra, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad (later the W&OD) arrived in 1860, the aptly named crossroads of Farmwell became one of the many rail stops that served . . . — Map (db m20282) HM
51Virginia (Loudoun County), Ashburn — Norman's Station
The shelter or "waiting shed" in the photograph below stood across the road from where you are now located. Crossing the track was Norman's Station Road (now called Smith's Switch Road). These three-sided shelters were typical of many small stops . . . — Map (db m20277) HM
52Virginia (Loudoun County), Brambleton — Lyon Family Cemetery and Pvt. Richard MoranHistory of the Northern Virginia Regional Parks
"Mount up, the Yankees are coming!" -Pvt. Richard Moran April 1, 1863 prior to the "Battle of Miskel's Farm" Pvt. Richard (Dick) Moran is buried at this site. Moran was a member of the 43rd Va. Cavalry and leading member of "Mosby's . . . — Map (db m20011) HM
53Virginia (Loudoun County), Hamilton — Hamilton Station
One of the oldest on the line, Hamilton's train station dates from 1870. It was not in the original plan. When the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railway (later the Washington & Old Dominion) was established in the 1840s, its owners intended to . . . — Map (db m26961) HM
54Virginia (Loudoun County), Hamilton — Tracks into HistoryThe Washington & Old Dominion Railroad
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the . . . — Map (db m27066) HM
55Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 15th Massachusetts Infantry
The 15th Massachusetts Infantry provided an initial scouting patrol on the night of October 20 and the troops for the raiding party the next morning. Five companies, roughly 300 men, were to attack a Confederate camp. Devens positioned his men . . . — Map (db m2223) HM
56Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 17th Mississippi Infantry
The 17th Mississippi Infantry was the last Confederate unit to arrive on the field. These 600-700 fresh troops showed up late in the afternoon and tipped the balance of what had been a hard but evenly fought contest up to that point. The . . . — Map (db m2234) HM
57Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 18th Mississippi Infantry
The 18th Mississippi Infantry was sent from nearby Edward's Ferry and arrived near here around 3:00 p.m. Colonel Erasmus Burt ordered his men forward across the then open field unknowingly into a deadly crossfire between the two winds of the Union . . . — Map (db m2233) HM
58Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 1st California Regiment
The 1st California was one of four regiments that made up the “California Brigade” commanded by Colonel Edward D. Baker, U.S. Senator from Oregon and close friend of President Lincoln. In April, 1861, Baker helped to organize what was . . . — Map (db m2230) HM
59Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 20th Massachusetts Infantry
Companies D and I of the 20th Massachusetts (the “Harvard Regiment”) followed the 15th Massachusetts across the Potomac with orders to serve as a rear guard and cover the withdrawal of the 15th Massachusetts following what was hoped . . . — Map (db m2229) HM
60Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 42nd New York Infantry
The 42nd New York (“Tammany Regiment”) was commanded by Col. Milton Cogswell, the only West Point-trained officer among the senior Union commanders at Ball’s Bluff. Five companies of the 42nd participated in the battle. With the death . . . — Map (db m2231) HM
61Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — 8th Virginia Infantry
The 8th Virginia Infantry was a local unit made up of six companies from Loudoun, two from Fauquier, and one each from Fairfax and Prince William counties. Commanded by Colonel Eppa Hunton, the Regiment arrived on the field about 12:30 p.m. . . . — Map (db m2211) HM
62Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County
On April 12, 1861, with the firing on Fort Sumter, America went to war with itself. Just as the country was divided, so were Virginia and Loudoun County. The western portion of Virginia became the separate state of West Virginia in 1863. Here in . . . — Map (db m2251) HM
63Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Aftermath of Ball’s Bluff
Ball’s Bluff is the only battlefield where on which a United States senator was killed in combat. Edward Dickinson Baker, senator from Oregon, was also a colonel and one of Brig. Gen. Charles Stone’s three brigade commanders. Baker was a long-time . . . — Map (db m2203) HM
64Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Ball’s Bluff National Cemetery
The twenty-five graves here in one of America’s smallest national cemeteries contain the partial remains of 54 Union soldiers killed at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, October 21, 1861. All are unidentified except Pvt. James Allen of Northbridge, . . . — Map (db m2235) HM
65Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Ball’s Bluff Overlook
Ball's Bluff is a 600 yard long shale and sandstone cliff. It rises up a shallow bell curve from two ravines approximately 300 yards north and south of where you are standing. At this point, it is about 100 feet high, though just to the north (left) . . . — Map (db m150419) HM
66Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Battle of Ball’s Bluff, October 21, 1861
The Battle of Ball’s Bluff was the result of a mistake. The previous evening, Capt. Chase Philbrick, Co. H, 15th Massachusetts, led a small reconnaissance patrol across the river to determine the results of some earlier Confederate troop movements. . . . — Map (db m2252) HM
67Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Battlefield Historic Restoration Project
In 2004, Ball's Bluff Battlefield Regional Park began a restoration project on the battlefield where you stand today. The objective of the effort is to return about 12 acres of the battlefield to its approximate appearance in 1861. First hand . . . — Map (db m150412) HM
68Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Carriage House
The carriage house was used for storage of house drawn carriages and other equipment. This building was constructed in the 1880s and was in use until the 1930s. After horse drawn carriages were no longer commonly used, the building was used as a . . . — Map (db m7831) HM
69Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Clarkes Gap
At 582 feet, Clarkes Gap, up the hill to your left, was the highest point on the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad. The stone bridge dates from the 1870s, when the tracks were completed to Clarkes Gap. The station stood on the site where you are . . . — Map (db m2031) HM
70Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Diesel Trains on the W&OD
The Washington & Old Dominion Railroad switched from electric to diesel power during World War II. In 1941-42 the railroad bought its first three diesel-electric engines. Each General Electric engine had 380 horsepower and weighed 44 tons. Later . . . — Map (db m2111) HM
71Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Electric Trains on the W&OD
Electrification arrived in 1912, after the Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad and the Southern Railway’s Bluemont Branch were consolidated into the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. The new owners brought modern interurban trolley cars. Wire . . . — Map (db m2107) HM
72Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Ice House
In winter this building was filled with ice cut from the Potomac River. The tick stone walls and many layers of straw provided sufficient insulation to preserve a supply of ice for summer use. When the family needed ice, large chucks were retrieved . . . — Map (db m7836) HM
73Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Jenifer’s Cavalry
Lieutenant Colonel Walter H. Jenifer commanded the 300-man cavalry force in Colonel Nathan “Shanks” Evan’s Confederate brigade. Jenifer had some 70 troopers with him at Ball’s Bluff, including portions of the Chesterfield Light Dragoons, . . . — Map (db m2213) HM
74Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Leesburg Freight Station
Leesburg’s first railroad depot opened here in 1860 to accommodate passengers, mail, express packages, and freight. All but the freight operations were moved west to King Street in 1887 when the new passenger station opened. An industrial area known . . . — Map (db m2109) HM
75Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Leesburg Passenger Station
When the Alexandria, Loudoun, & Hampshire Railroad (later W&OD) arrived on May 17, 1860, Leesburg realized a dream. A local newspaper praised the railroad, which “throws us within an hour or two’s ride of the cities of the seaboard, and opens . . . — Map (db m2110) HM
76Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Red Rock Wilderness Overlook Regional Park
Red Rock Wilderness Overlook Regional Park is a 67-acre mostly wooded area situated along the Potomac River on the outskirts of Leesburg. Frances Speek donated a portion of the property to the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority in 1978. The . . . — Map (db m7820) HM
77Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Rust Manor House
Henry and Anne Harrison purchased the land that is now Rust Sanctuary in 1909 and built the Manor House. William and Mary Rust bought the property in 1929, renovating portions of the house, adding the front and rear porches and a new grand . . . — Map (db m130063) HM
78Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Temple Hall
Temple Hall was the home of William Temple Thomson Mason, son of Thomson Mason of Raspberry Plain and nephew of George Mason, author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights. The house was constructed about 1810 and was the centerpiece for the farm . . . — Map (db m106399) HM
79Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Role in PreservingHeritage Livestock Breeds
What are Heritage livestock breeds and why are they important? Heritage livestock breeds are old breeds that were created before the onset of industrial agriculture. Industrialization of agriculture has greatly reduced the number of variety of . . . — Map (db m12956) HM
80Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The Battle at Ball’s Bluff
On the night of October 20, 1861, a small Federal scouting party crossed the Potomac River from Maryland to determine whether recent troop movements indicated a Confederate withdrawal from Leesburg. Advancing inland from Ball’s Bluff, the Federals . . . — Map (db m2205) HM
81Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The Creation of Temple Hall Farm Regional Park
In 1940, after a succession of owners, the property was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Symington. The Symingtons set about restoring the house and making improvements to the farm. The Symingtons succeed in restoring the mansion house, making . . . — Map (db m12955) HM
82Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The Great Falls Line
The Bluemont Branch of the Washington & Old Dominion was not the railroad’s only line. The Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad arose in 1906 from the vision of two prominent men. Sen. Stephen B. Elkins of West Virginia had prospered through coal, . . . — Map (db m2106) HM
83Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The Leesburg Lime Company
The arrival of the railroad in the 1860s spawned new businesses. One such enterprise was the Leesburg Lime Company, which operated at the site where you are now located. In 1868 a local newspaper announced: New Lime Kiln— Messrs. Orr . . . — Map (db m2108) HM
84Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The Lost Locomotive
At the outbreak of the Civil War in spring 1861, Maj.Gen. Robert E. Lee sent orders to Col. Eppa Hunton in Loudoun County. Anticipating Federal seizure of the Alexandria to Leesburg railroad, Lee told Hunton to tear up track, burn bridges, and . . . — Map (db m136596) HM
85Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The North: Union Leaders at Ball's Bluff
b>Brigadier General Charles Pomeroy Stone As the overall commander of Union forces at Ball’s Bluff, Stone was a rising star in the Union army at the time of the battle. He become the scapegoat for the defeat. Stone was born September 30, 1824, . . . — Map (db m2238) HM
86Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — The South: Confederate Leaders at Ball’s Bluff
Colonel Nathan George “Shanks” Evans Nathan Evans was born in South Carolina in 1824. An 1848 West Point graduate, he was jokingly nicknamed “Shanks” by his classmates because he was knock-kneed. During the next decade he . . . — Map (db m2241) HM
87Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — This Is W&OD Trail: Leesburg!
The 100-ft wide W&OD has been called "the skinniest park" in Virginia. But it is also one of the longest parks, 45 miles of paved trail for walking, running, cycling and skating and more. Built on the roadbed of the former Washington & Old Dominion . . . — Map (db m143133) HM
88Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Two-Chambered Granary
The two-chambered granary was used for storing threshed grain until it was either sold or consumed. The presence of two chambers indicates that the owner could grow two different crops and store them simultaneously. Grain was often transported . . . — Map (db m7832) HM
89Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Union Artillery
The Federals crossed three pieces of artillery to Ball’s Bluff. Two mountain howitzers from the 2nd New York State Militia, detached under Lt. Frank French of Battery I, 1st U.S. Artillery, occupied this area for much of the afternoon. A 12-pdr . . . — Map (db m2224) HM
90Virginia (Loudoun County), Leesburg — Well House
The well house was constructed of poured concrete and was used for storing water on the farm. One room housed a pump, which drew water from a shallow well outside. The second room housed a cistern that was used for storing water after it had been . . . — Map (db m7834) HM
91Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 4 — Horse Artillery at Mt. DefianceBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
The artillery piece before you, a replica of a 12-pounder (4.62 inch) Napoleon, sits along a line where two Confederate batteries from Virginia were rapidly put into position facing east toward Middleburg on the early morning of June 19, 1862. . . . — Map (db m134768) HM
92Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 2 — Mt. Defiance, the Turnpike, and MiddleburgBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
The stone home beside you, built in stages beginning in the mid-18th century, was like many buildings in this section of Virginia—old by 1863 (the oldest part facing the turnpike). It was owned then by the Barton family—Maryland . . . — Map (db m134766) HM
93Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 5 — Phase Two of the Battle: Fighting Along the TurnpikeBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
In 1863, the Ashby’s Gap Turnpike followed the east-bound lanes of today’s Route 50 that you see before you. Stone walls with two wooden rails on top (“stone fences”) lined both sides of the turnpike here along the crest of Mt. . . . — Map (db m134769) HM
94Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 3 — The Battle Begins: Fighting East and Southeast of Mt. DefianceBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
On a day that promised “scorching” temperatures, the Union attack in the Battle of Middleburg began about 6:00 a.m. The 4th Pennsylvania Cavalry, supported by the 16th Pennsylvania and 10th New York, led the advance. The Southern pickets . . . — Map (db m134767) HM
95Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 7 — The Battle Concludes: Buford's Flanking Movement & Stuart's WithdrawalBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
Under pressure to drive the Southern cavalry through Ashby’s Gap and thereby locate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, Union General Alfred Pleasonton had determined to attack on June 19th along two fronts. General David Gregg’s . . . — Map (db m134771) HM
96Virginia (Loudoun County), Middleburg — 6 — The Prussian Warrior Heros Von Borcke Goes DownBattle of Middleburg/Mt. Defiance
Johann August Heinrich Heros von Borcke stepped ashore in Charleston, South Carolina on May 24, 1862, having run the Union Navy’s blockade on a rebel blockade runner. He presented an imposing figure—muscular, standing 6’3” and weighing . . . — Map (db m134770) HM
97Virginia (Loudoun County), Paeonian Springs — Paeonian Springs Station
In its heyday, Paeonian Springs attracted folks such as those men gathered for a raccoon hunt sponsored by The Washington Post in October 1912. The station shown at right stood where the three-sided shelter stands today. Two things happened . . . — Map (db m2903) HM
98Virginia (Loudoun County), Purcellville — Beyond Purcellville
The trail ends here but the story does not. The founders of the Alexandria, Loudoun, & Hampshire (later the W&OD) sought to rival the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for the coal of West Virginia and the trade of the Ohio Valley. By 1900 the railroad . . . — Map (db m24307) HM
99Virginia (Loudoun County), Purcellville — Electric Trains on the W&OD
Electrification arrived in 1912, after the Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad and the Southern Railway’s Bluemont Branch were consolidated into the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. The new owners brought modern interurban trolley cars. Wire . . . — Map (db m19330) HM
100Virginia (Loudoun County), Purcellville — Purcellville Station
The tracks are long gone, but Purcellville's train station still occupies the ground it has stood on since 1904. It replaced a depot built at about the same time that the railroad arrived in 1874 and accommodated passengers, mail, and freight. The . . . — Map (db m24360) HM

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Sep. 19, 2020