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Henderson County Tennessee Historical Markers

 
Forrest's Raid - Dec. 18,1862 image, Touch for more information
By Curtis Wise, March 20, 2018
Forrest's Raid - Dec. 18,1862
Tennessee (Henderson County), Chesterfield — 4D 16 — Forrest's Raid — Dec. 18, 1862
South of here, along Beech River, Forrest struck Col. Robert G. Ingersoll's Federal Brigade, sent from Jackson to stop him. In a running fight which carried to within 4 miles of Jackson, he captured the bulk of this force, including its commander. . . . — Map (db m115231) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Darden — 4D 9 — Mills Darden
This man, born in North Carolina in 1799, lived in this neighborhood for many years, dying in 1857. His size was legendary; he is said to have been 8 ft. 6 in. tall and to have weighed over 800 pounds; three ordinary sized men could be buttoned . . . — Map (db m81849) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Lexington — Battle for Lexington — Ingersoll's Last Stand — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid
Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862-Jan 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and Vicksburg, Mississippi. Forrest . . . — Map (db m81884) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Lexington — 4 D 15 — Forrest's Raid — Dec. 18, 1862
Striking Ingersoll's brigade 5 miles east, Forrest overran the position to which they had retired on high ground to the south. Ingersoll and his artillery were captured. Returning 2 weeks later, Forrest rested briefly here, then crossed the river at . . . — Map (db m61920) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Lexington — 4D 23 — Mills Darden
Born in North Carolina in 1799, Darden settled in Henderson County about 1830. He was an innkeeper and farmer, and physically one of the heaviest men ever to live in the world. At the time of his death, Darden weighed in excess of 1,000 pounds. He . . . — Map (db m81885) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — "Charge Them Both Ways"
Just when victory seemed certain, Colonel Charles Carroll galloped up to Forrest with the news that a large Union force was fast approaching their rear along the Lexington-Huntington Road and was deploying in line of battle. Forrest, who had . . . — Map (db m72369) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — "Give 'Em Hell"
Forrest placed the burden of the battle at Parker's Crossroads on his artillery, planning to win the battle with his cannoneers. His effective use of artillery allowed the Confederates to dominate the first two-thirds of the battle. As . . . — Map (db m72263) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — A Fire Terrible In Its Intensity
Forrest planned to encircle the Union position with artillery, using his guns to fight the battle rather than engaging his dismounted troops in close small arms combat. When Forrest deployed his troops following the engagement at Hicks' field . . . — Map (db m72319) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — A Very Successful Campaign
"We have worked, rode, and fought hard" On January 1, 1863 Forrest reached the Tennessee River. By 9 p.m. the entire command, more than 2,000 men and horses, six cannon, and a train of wagons, had crossed the river on the same flatboats that had . . . — Map (db m81886) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 7
Old Split-Rail Fence December 31, 1862 At approximately 11:00 a.m., Colonel Dunham's Brigade positioned themselves behind a split-rail fence located a few feet behind this area running east and west to the Lexington/Huntingdon Road. By afternoon, . . . — Map (db m20521) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Battlefield Overview
You are standing, more or less, on the old Lexington-Huntingdon Road. Behind you is the reconstructed split-rail fence, where the Union troops took position and faced General Nathan Bedford Forrest's unrelenting artillery assault and surprise attack . . . — Map (db m20542) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Confederate Horseholders
Forrest's Cavalry fought dismounted at the Battle of Parker's Crossroads, as was customary. Cavalry depended upon their mounts and military protocol defined how horses were handled in battle. One of every four horsemen remained mounted and . . . — Map (db m72344) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Enfilading the Line
enfilade — the firing of a gun or guns so as to sweep the length of a target, such as a column of troops Confederate Artillery Position On the rise where you now stand a portion of the Confederate battery was . . . — Map (db m72468) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Flight to Safety
Forrest's command to charge both ways bought the Confederate commander some time. He ordered his men to remount and to head for the Lexington-Huntingdon Road, Forrest himself, unwilling to abandon his artillery, led about 75 men toward the . . . — Map (db m72370) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Forrest's Tactics
Nathan Bedford Forrest had no formal military education and was, as John Morton, Forrest's Chief of Artillery, put it, "the negative of a West Pointer." He regarded maneuvers and exhaustive drill as unnecessary and cared nothing for conventional . . . — Map (db m72237) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Forrest's West Tennessee Raid — December 18-31, 1862
On December 11, 1862 Forrest's new command, now woefully lacking in arms and ammunition, left Columbia to commence the raid that "if successful, may force the enemy to retire from Mississippi." The brigade reached the Tennessee River at Clifton four . . . — Map (db m72213) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Freeman's Battery — Forrest's Artillery
Front Dedicated to Freeman's Battery Forrest's Artillery and Samuel L. Freeman. General Nathan Bedford Forrest's First Artillery Captain Freeman's Battery fought near here during the Battle of Parker's Crossroads Dec. . . . — Map (db m72182) HM WM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Fuller's Assault
Colonel John W. Fuller's Ohio Brigade left Huntingdon well before dawn on December 31. When just north of Clarksburg, around 10:30 a.m., Fuller received orders from Generals Jeremiah Sullivan and Isham Haynie to wait for the rear guard before . . . — Map (db m72368) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Lt. Col. Alonzo Napier
Lt. Colonel Alonzo Napier fell mortally wounded at this point as he was leading a charge of troops along the Lexington-Huntingdon Road. In the excitement of the deafening roar of cannon fire and the swift barrage of small arms fire, Lt. Col. Napier . . . — Map (db m20541) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Manning the Guns
Artillery played a decisive role in many Civil War battles, including Parker's Crossroads. Few people realize, however, that manning and equipping a six-gun battery involved approximately 150 men, 110 horses and mules, and hundreds of pieces of . . . — Map (db m72296) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — McPeake Cabin
Robert and Permelia McPeake built this cabin near Rock Hill, Tennessee, in 1851. Danny and Rose Garner donated the cabin to the Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Association in 2006. After being painstakingly recorded, the cabin was dismantled and . . . — Map (db m20539) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Morton's Battery — Forrest's Artillery
FrontDedicated to Morton's Battery Forrest's Artillery and Captain John W. Morton, Jr. The Confederacy's Youngest Captain of Artillery Morton's Battery fought near here December 31, 1862 in the Battle of Parker's Crossroads, TN. with Two . . . — Map (db m72204) HM WM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Nathan Bedford Forrest — July 13, 1821 - October 29, 1877
(Front of Kiosk): Nathan Bedford Forrest was one of the Civil War's greatest cavalry generals. His ferocity as a warrior and his claim to have slain one more enemy soldier in personal combat than the 29 horses killed beneath him made him a . . . — Map (db m20506) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Parker's Cross Roads
This area was named for the Parker farm whose residence was located just south of here. John M. Parker, both a practicing physician and a Baptist preacher, was known as both Doctor and Reverend Parker. His farm straddled the intersection of . . . — Map (db m72241) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — 4D14 — Parker's Crossroads
Returning to Middle Tennessee after an extensive & successful raid, Forrest's Cavalry Brigade on Dec. 31, 1862, fought here an all-day battle with 2 separate Union brigades converging on him in an unsuccessful attempt to destroy him before he could . . . — Map (db m72197) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Parker's Crossroads — Narrowly Avoided Defeat — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid
Late in 1862, the Union army under Ulysses S. Grant threatened Vicksburg, Mississippi. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg ordered Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest to sever Grant's West Tennessee supply line which extended from Columbus, Kentucky, via the . . . — Map (db m72222) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — 4D 10 — Pleasant Exchange
2 miles southeast, this town was established in 1824 by William D. Carrington, who built there a hotel and distillery. At one time it had as many saloons as stores and was a noted gambling resort. It also had an excellent racetrack. It was virtually . . . — Map (db m52612) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — 4D 48 — Red Mound
During the second quarter of the 19th Century, on the hill immediately west of this marker was the site of the community of Red Mound, which according to oral tradition was named for Red Mountain, N. C., from where many of the early settlers came. . . . — Map (db m72202) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle Begins
On the evening of December 30, Forrest's scouts ascertained that Dunham's Brigade was just north of Clarksburg. Forrest, knowing that General Sullivan was at Huntingdon, "determined to throw his force between Dunham and Sullivan and whip the . . . — Map (db m72278) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 3
The Old Crossroads Mid-Morning, December 31, 1862 Dunham's Union troops, pressured on three sides, rallied around the crossroads near the Parker House but soon retreated beyond the roads and sought cover among the rolling hills to the southeast. . . . — Map (db m20446) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 1 - Overview of Battle Area — December 31, 1862
The north-south tree line parallel to today's Highway 22 marks the roadbed of the old Huntingdon-Lexington road. Union Colonel Cyrus L. Dunham's Brigade marched south to Parker's Crossroads on December 31, 1862 to block the route of the Confederate . . . — Map (db m72196) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 2 - Hicks Field — Early Morning, December 31, 1862
Union Colonel Cyrus L. Dunham's Brigade marched south from Clarksburg, Tennessee, and then, turned northwest from Parker's Crossroads to block the path of Forrest's troops. Dunham's move would ensnare the Confederates between his brigade and two . . . — Map (db m72198) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 5 — Capture of the Wagons and Attack on Dunham's Rear
Mid-Day, December 31, 1862 At the beginning of the battle, the Union wagon train was north of the crossroads. It moved three times and was shelled once by Forrest's artillery. Its last location was in the creek bottom northwest of this spot. . . . — Map (db m72199) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 6 - Red Mound — Early Afternoon, December 31, 1862
Union Colonel Dunham's Brigade tried to silence Forrest's cannon by a frontal assault into the face of cannister and rifle fire. The Confederates repulsed the attack, inflicting heavy casualties. Forrest's troopers then attacked the Union battle . . . — Map (db m72201) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Tour Stop 4 — Jones Cemetery and the Old Dug Well
As the battle moved from Hicks Field through the crossroads, Forrest's troops began to move east, roughly along the Wildersville Road. Here, near Jones Cemetery, Confederate soldiers watered their horses and filled their canteens at an old dug well, . . . — Map (db m72203) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads
On December 31, 1862, the Union forces that had been pursuing General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his cavalry for two weeks finally intercepted the Confederate raiders. Colonel Cyrus Dunham commanded the Union force that met Forrest at Parker's . . . — Map (db m72216) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Battle of Parker's Crossroads — December 31, 1862 — Union and Confederate Forces
Union Forces Cyrus Livingston Dunham was born in Dryden, New York, on January 16, 1817. In 1841 he moved to Salem, Indiana, where he practiced law and served as a Democratic congressman. He entered the Union service in 1861 as Colonel of the . . . — Map (db m81888) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Lexington-Huntingdon Road
The Historic Road In front of you is the original roadbed of the Lexington-Huntingdon Road. This road, which figured so prominently in the Battle of Parker's Crossroads, connected the county seats of Henderson and Carroll counties, . . . — Map (db m72460) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — The Tides of War
Union Victory in the West — January-June 1862 After their resounding victory at Manassas, Virginia on July 21, 1861, many Confederates expected a fast and victorious end to the war. It was not to be. During the first half of 1862 . . . — Map (db m72217) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Three Desperate Charges
The Confederates pressed forward, taking possession of the high ground abandoned by the Union troops, Forrest advancing his battle line into small arms range. The Confederate artillerists manhandled their guns forward, resuming their punishing . . . — Map (db m72480) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Union Cemetery
At least 30 Union soldiers were killed during the battle at Parker's Crossroads. Those who were killed in action were buried here shortly after the battle took place. Those burials took places according to orders issued by the War Department in . . . — Map (db m87527) HM WM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Union Wagon Train
Protecting the Wagons: The success or failure of any campaign depended on the safety of the supply trains. When Dunham deployed his forces along the Lexington-Huntingdon Road the Union wagon train was sent to the rear, out of harm's way. The . . . — Map (db m72200) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parkers Crossroads — Withdrawal to the Split-Rail Fence
Two Futile Charges The Union line, positioned about one-quarter mile north of here, made two futile charges against the Confederate guns. Forrest then ordered a general advance and his line, utilizing a frightful barrage of artillery and . . . — Map (db m76942) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Parker's Crossroads — Forrest's Artillery
Forrest's Brilliant and Unconventional Use of Artillery is one of the hallmarks of the Battle of Parker's Crossroads. He placed his artillery in front of his troops, rather than behind them, and used a continuous barrage of fire from his guns . . . — Map (db m87530) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Sardis — 4D 59 — Doe Creek Cemetery
Ex-Confederate soldiers, James Kennedy and Bill Nails, brutally slain by local Unionists, were the first burials here in 1865 on land donated for the cemetery by Robert Kennedy. Additional Confederate veterans and other members of the community were . . . — Map (db m74956) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Sardis — Doe Creek Church and School — Brothers against Brothers
A classic example of the brother-against-brother feuds resulting from the Civil War began virtually in the shadows of the historic log Doe Creek Church and School. Hugh and Robert Kennedy established farms here early in the 1820s. When the war . . . — Map (db m81945) HM
Tennessee (Henderson County), Sardis — 4D 59 — Doe Creek School
Doe Creek School is one of Tennessee's last remaining one-room log schoolhouses. Built c. 1870, it has been used as a school and a church. Yellow poplar logs, hauled to the site by a team of oxen, form the walls. Schoolmaster Elmer Duck dismissed . . . — Map (db m74959) HM

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