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African Americans Historical Markers

4108 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 3908
 
Happy Hollow "Big Curve" image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, December 17, 2013
Happy Hollow "Big Curve"
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Happy Hollow
Known as Fair Road, Sixth Street from Northington Street to the big curve was called “Happy Hollow”. The road went to the Fair home place but also curved right, into Warren Circle. Here stood a small frame church where the congregation’s . . . — Map (db m70800) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Old Kingston Historical Cemetery
This cemetery is one of the oldest cemeteries in Autauga County having been established as a burial ground by at least 1841. The land was officially set aside as a burial ground when the county seat was in this area from 1834 to 1868. The area . . . — Map (db m82561) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Wilson Pickett, Jr. — March 18, 1941 - January 19, 2006
A native of Prattville, Wilson Pickett was raised singing gospel in local churches. Upon moving to Detroit as a teenager, he began to blend gospel-style with rhythm and blues, resulting in some of "the deepest, funkiest soul music" to come from the . . . — Map (db m70804) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Daphne — Little Bethel Baptist Church:
On April 15, 1867, Major Lewis Starke deeded these two acres to four of his ex-slaves and their heirs as trustees for this church: Nimrod Lovett, Stamford Starlin (now Sterling), Narcis Elwa, and Benjamin Franklin. In this cemetery is buried . . . — Map (db m100851) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops
This earthen mound was part of a redoubt constructed by the 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops in April, 1865. The regiment saw considerable action against Confederate warships protecting the Blakely River. These earthworks have been preserved as a . . . — Map (db m100853) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Old Negro Cemetery / Fairview Cemetery
Front Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying . . . — Map (db m27987) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — First Baptist Missionary Church 1875
The Macedonia Baptist Church, located between the communities of Midway and Mt. Coney, was constructed by freedmen after the American Civil War, replacing the brush arbors used by the area’s antebellum slaves as sites for religious worship. Four . . . — Map (db m60947) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Old Merritt School Midway Community Center
Margaret Elizabeth Merritt of Midway sold two acres for $5 to the state of Alabama in 1921 as a site for an elementary school for African-American children. Built in 1922 with matching Rosenwald funds, the Midway Colored Public School featured oak . . . — Map (db m60910) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — 1998 — St. James C.M.E. Church — Railroad Street Midway, Alabama
St. James Christian Methodist Episcopal Church founded by Reverend Jack McMillan, a former slave of Midway’s Daniel McMillan. Initially meeting outdoors under a brush arbor, ex-slaves and their children constructed a wood-frame church building soon . . . — Map (db m60909) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Union Springs, Alabama
In the early 1800s, settlers coming from the Carolinas and Georgia received land grants and some purchased land from the Indians. They settled and cleared the forest for new farms and plantations in what would become a newly formed State of Alabama . . . — Map (db m83258) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Freedom Riders
On May 14, 1961, a Greyhound bus left Atlanta, GA carrying among its passengers seven members of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), a.k.a. the “Freedom Riders,” on a journey to test interstate bus segregation. The bus was met by an . . . — Map (db m35737) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Ohatchee — Janney Furnace
The furnace was constructed by Montgomery businessman Alfred A. Janney, reportedly using slaves brought from Tennessee by a "Dr. Smith." The furnace was completed and ready to produce pig iron when, on July 14, 1864, a Union cavalry raiding force of . . . — Map (db m25544) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), Valley — Lanier High School
Side 1 The school was located at three different sites on Cherry Drive. Its beginning was in The Blue Hall Building adjacent to Goodsell Methodist Church. Later it was moved to the Dallas/Jackson Home and became the Jackson Hill School. . . . — Map (db m71638) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Carlton — Mt. Nebo Death Masks
Side 1 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Mt. Nebo Cemetery is home to the unique folk art of African American inventor and artist, Issac "Ike" Nettles, who used concrete to make images of living people's faces for . . . — Map (db m101576) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Colored and White Soldiers of World War I
This is a replica of the original tablet from the 1924 World War I monument located in front of the Clarke County Courthouse. The monument was the first memorial ever erected to honor county war dead. It cost $1,650 and was paid for with . . . — Map (db m57385) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Williams’ Temple CME Church
Side 1 Founded by the CME (Christian Methodist Episcopal) Church as the only school for black students in the area in the early 1900’s, Williams’ Temple eventually consolidated with another school in Booker City to form Miles College . . . — Map (db m101596) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Percy Sledge/Producer Quin Ivy — "When A Man Loves A Woman" / NORALA and Quinvy Studios
(side 1) Percy Sledge "When A Man Loves A Woman" Hospital orderly Percy Sledge recorded 'When a Man Loves a Woman' at Quin Ivy's studio in 1966. Sledge's breakup with a girlfriend inspired the lyrics credited to songwriters . . . — Map (db m83390) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Sheffield Colored School/Sterling High School
(side 1) Sheffield Colored School Public education for Sheffield's black children began in 1889 in a framed building at E. 20th St. and S. Atlanta Ave. with Henry Hopkins as teacher. Professor Benjamin J. Sterling (1847-1941), a . . . — Map (db m82423) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Trenholm High School
(side 1) Formal education for Tuscumbia’s African American children began in 1870 at the Freedman School taught by Judge Wingo and his daughter in a church at the foot of the hill. In July 1877, the Osborne Colored Academy was established . . . — Map (db m80944) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Lime Hill — Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, D.D. — 1905-1995
Side 1 Doctor Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, who was affectionately known throughout the community as “Brown,” dedicated most of his adult life to providing spiritual guidance to blacks in Evergreen and surrounding . . . — Map (db m81292) HM
Alabama (Coosa County), Rockford — Peace & Goodwill Cemetery
Peace & Goodwill Cemetery is Coosa County's first African American Cemetery to be placed on the prestigious Alabama Historic Cemetery Register. It provides powerful insights about the diligence and commitment of our African Ancestors. Family . . . — Map (db m64587) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — The Beloit Industrial Institute
Marker Front: The Beloit Industrial Institute was founded in 1888 by Industrial Missionary Association, an area subdivision of the American Missionary Associations. The President of the Association, Dr. Charles B. Curtis, was a Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m83504) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Dallas County Courthouse
The grassed over mound of brick before you was once Dallas County's courthouse. This courthouse was built in 1834. It was dismantled prior to 1905 by brick salvagers. Cahawba was the county seat from 1818 to 1866. This brought a lot of people, . . . — Map (db m23010) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Kirk-View Farm
In 1866, shortly after the Civil War and a severe flood, the county seat was moved from Cahaba to Selma. Residents rapidly abandoned the town. Many homes were dismantled and reassembled elsewhere. Despite this trend, returning Confederate . . . — Map (db m83516) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge / U.S. Congress Approves Voting Rights Act of 1965
Side 1 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge A voting registration campaign in 1965 turned tragic Feb. 17 when an Alabama state trooper fatally shot Jimmie Lee Jackson in Marion. It prompted a protest march from . . . — Map (db m81944) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — I Had A Dream — Dr. Martin L. King Jr.
The demonstration that led to the most important advance in civil rights for millions of Black Americans began here March 21, 1965. It was the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the State Capital. Defying threats of death, Dr. . . . — Map (db m83578) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — R.B. Hudson High School — Dallas County
This school was the city of Selma's first public high school for African-Americans. Completed in 1949, the school was named in honor of Richard Byron Hudson, a black educator who had served for 41 years as principal of Clark Elementary School, . . . — Map (db m82741) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Selma Army Arsenal — 1862~1865 — Battle of Selma
Confederate Army Captain James White was ordered to relocate the old Federal Arsenal from Mt. Vernon, Alabama. By 1865 it consisted of 24 buildings and had over 500 workers including men, women, boys, girls, FMofC and slaves. It made or contracted . . . — Map (db m82750) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — St. James Hotel — Headquarters of General James H. Wilson — Battle of Selma
following the Battle of Selma, April 2, 1865. This occupation protected the hotel from the arson and looting in the first 24 hours that destroyed much of downtown. In the next week Wilson methodically burned the huge military/industrial complex that . . . — Map (db m80792) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist Church — Dallas County
Side 1 In January 1885, Dr. Edward M. Brawley, President, Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School (now Selma University) formed Tabernacle Baptist Church to be an integral part of the students' Christian formation and education. . . . — Map (db m82034) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist Church — Dallas County
Side 1 Tabernacle Baptist Church was founded in 1885, and in March of that year, the congregation purchased this site. Built in 1922 under the leadership of Dr. David Vivian Jemison, the current church features bricks from the original . . . — Map (db m83677) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Selma Movement — (The Beginning) / (The Prize)
[Side A:] (The Beginning) The major civil rights protest, which focused national attention on the issue of racial discrimination in voting & led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, was centered in Selma. In January . . . — Map (db m37662) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Union Troops Charge — The Main Assault of the Outer Works — Battle of Selma
The Lightening Brigade of the 2nd Division would spearhead the attack between Redoubts No. 13 - No. 16. Artillery covered all the approaches. At 5 p.m. General Long ordered the Second Division forward. "As Long's Second Division charged . . . — Map (db m83682) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Valley Creek Presbyterian Church — One of state’s first Presbyterian churches
Established in 1816 by eight families from Rocky River Presbyterian Church in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. In 1859 this two-story brick building replaced original wooden structure. Sanctuary and former slave gallery are on second . . . — Map (db m83683) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Elmore County Training School
Constructed in 1924 on five acres, this building was one of nine schools constructed in Elmore County with funding assistance from the Julius Rosenwald Fund. Between 1912-32, Julius Rosenwald, a Jewish philanthropist and CEO of Sears, Roebuck and . . . — Map (db m70548) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Welton Blanton Doby High School — Elmore County
W. B. Doby served as the first President of the Elmore County Teachers Association, Principal of Elmore County Training School, and as an ordained minister in the A.M.E. Church. Local leaders dedicated this school for African-American students on . . . — Map (db m94614) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Wetumpka's Bridges
(side 1) In 1834, the Wetumpka Toll Bridge Co. built the first of four bridges spanning the Coosa River at this site. It was destroyed in a flood in 1844. A second toll bridge was completed the same year by John Godwin whose slave, . . . — Map (db m69449) HM
Alabama (Escambia County), Atmore — Escambia County Training School
In 1920, a wooden building was constructed as the Atmore Colored School and operated until 1925. In 1926, a new wood and a brick building was erected with assistance from Rosenwald School fund and it was renamed the Escambia County Training School. . . . — Map (db m100835) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Freetown
Side A In 1867 a group of African American men and women laid the foundations for Freetown. William, John, Albert, George, Richard, and Peter Collins; Susan and Lawrence Moore; Thomas Jeffries; the children of John Jeffries; and Louisa . . . — Map (db m38192) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Oak Grove School
Tuskegee educator Booker T. Washington and Julius Rosenwald, Sears, Roebuck & Company president, initiated one of the most ambitiuous school building programs for African Americans in the United States. The Oak Grove School is one example of the . . . — Map (db m83753) HM
Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — Henry County Training School — Established 1914
Founded by Laura L. Ward. Building designed and constructed by Jim McCauley on land given by Glass Maybin. Classes began Sept., 1917. Principals who served school were: J. H. Jackson, W. R. Rosser, Felix Blackwood, Sr., and William B. Ward, Sr. . . . — Map (db m71809) HM
Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — Rosa Parks Lived Here
Front Civil rights pioneer Rosa McCauley Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Shortly after her birth her parents James and Leona McCauley, moved here to a 260 acre farm owned by her grandparents, Anderson and Louisa . . . — Map (db m83758) HM
Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Newville High School / Newville Rosenwald School
Side 1 Newville High School The first known school in Newville was at Center Church in 1881. When Grange Hall was built in 1891, church services and school were held on the first floor. In 1913, Grange Hall was torn down and the . . . — Map (db m71812) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Dothan — Cherry Street African Methodist Episcopal Church
On this site in 1877 Gaines Chapel Church was organized. A wooden structure was erected adjacent to an existing graveyard. In 1891 and 1901 additional land was purchased. In 1908 the present building was dedicated. This structure was of early . . . — Map (db m73362) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Paint Rock — The History of Paint Rock, Alabama / Paint Rock Arrests in 1931 Began 'Scottsboro Boys' Cases
(side 1) The History of Paint Rock, Alabama Originally Camden circa 1830, the post office was renamed Redman in 1846 and became Paint Rock on May 17, 1860. After the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Co. built a depot and water . . . — Map (db m69756) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Jackson County Courthouse And The Scottsboro Boys
Marker front: Constructed in 1911-1912 and designed by architect Richard H. Hunt, the Jackson County Courthouse is a Neo-Classical, brick building situated on a town square in Scottsboro, the county seat of Jackson County. The front, . . . — Map (db m22264) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Scottsboro Railroad Depot
The Memphis and Charleston Railroad Company constructed the Scottsboro Railroad Depot in 1860-1861 as a passenger and freight facility. The rail line ran throughout the Confederacy and the Union considered its capture vital to cutting off supplies . . . — Map (db m22258) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — "Peace Be Still" — Mark 4:39
On Palm Sunday, 1963 Rev. N. H. Smith, Rev. John T. Porter and Rev. A. D. King led a sympathy march from St. Paul United Methodist Church down 6th Avenue North in support of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. Ralph . . . — Map (db m73023) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — 1963 Church Bombing Victims
This cemetery is the final resting place of three of the four young girls killed in the September 15, 1963 church bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley and Carol Robertson are buried here. The fourth victim, . . . — Map (db m61197) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — 4th Avenue District
The Fourth Avenue "Strip" thrived during a time when downtown privileges for blacks were limited. Although blacks could shop at some white-owned stores, they did not share the same privileges and services as white customers, so they created tailor . . . — Map (db m26985) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Alabama Veterans Memorial — Liberty Park
            Pearl Harbor               May 31, 1941 Dear Friend, I hope all is well with you. I am doing well but due to the present state of emergency the Pacific Fleet is held in a place known as Hawaiian Territory. Would you do me a . . . — Map (db m27409) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Arthur D. Shores — "Dean of Black Lawyers in The State of Alabama."
During the first 30 years of his 54-year-old practice, Attorney Shores practiced all over the State of Alabama - from the Tennessee line to the Gulf of Mexico at Mobile Bay, and from the Mississippi borders to the Georgia limits. During the period . . . — Map (db m26720) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Brock Drugs Building
The Brock building was established in 1915, located at the intersection of Fourth Avenue and 18th Street North, was built while the area was residential. The three-story building housed a hotel upstairs that catered to professional musicians and . . . — Map (db m26723) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Carrie A. Tuggle — 1858 - 1924
In Tribute to Carrie A. Tuggle 1858 - 1924 Scholar, Teacher and Christian. A life of unselfish service to the troubled and the homeless black boys and girls. In 1903, she founded a school and orphanage, the Tuggle . . . — Map (db m27391) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Civil Rights Freedom Riders — May 14, 1961
On Mother's Day, May 14, 1961, a group of black and white CORE youth on a "Freedom Ride" from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans arrived by bus at the Birmingham Greyhound terminal. They were riding through the deep south to test a court case, "Boynton . . . — Map (db m83809) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Don't Tread on Me
Leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) learned they could apply economic pressure to White businesses with more effective results than moral persuasion alone. Therefore, the central strategy of the Birmingham Campaign . . . — Map (db m73037) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Don't Tread on Me
1963 A female protestor remains defiant as police drag her away from a demonstration in Birmingham's nearby retail district. Activists in Birmingham--led for seven years by Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth before the 1963 Birmingham Campaign--put their . . . — Map (db m83814) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Born Jan. 15, 1929 Assassinated Apr. 4. 1968 "...yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice; say that I was a drum major for peace..." His dream liberated Birmingham from itself and began a . . . — Map (db m73007) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth invited Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Birmingham in 1962. Shuttlesworth saw potential in the young minister, and their combined efforts were instrumental in Birmingham's desegregation. The campaign catapulted King into the . . . — Map (db m73031) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Dr. Ruth J. Jackson — 1898 - 1982
Dedicated to Dr. Ruth J. Jackson 1898-1982 This woman of strength and vision graduated from the Poro School of Cosmetology, the first black registered school in the State of Alabama. At the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement, she was . . . — Map (db m27090) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — East Birmingham
Marker Front: Founded in 1886 on 600 acres of land, East Birmingham was the agricultural area consisting primarily of dairy farms extending to the present Birmingham airport. The East Birmingham Land Company that developed the area was . . . — Map (db m83827) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Eddie James Kendrick — December 17, 1937 - October 5, 1992
Eddie James Kendrick, nicknamed "cornbread", was born the eldest of five children to Johnny and Lee Bell Kendrick in Union Springs, Alabama. After attending Western-Olin High School in Ensley, Alabama, Eddie was persuaded by his childhood . . . — Map (db m26724) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Foot Soldier Tribute — Ronald S. McDowell, Artist I.B.J.C.
This sculpture is dedicated to the Foot Soldiers of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. With gallantry, courage and great bravery they faced the violence of attack dogs, high powered water hoses, and bombings. They were the fodder in the . . . — Map (db m27394) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Fourth Avenue Historic District.
Marker front: Prior to 1900 a "black business district" did not exist in Birmingham. In a pattern characteristic of Southern cities found during Reconstruction, black businesses developed alongside those of whites in many sections of the . . . — Map (db m83830) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Fraternal Hotel Building
The Fraternal Hotel Building was built in 1925. Some of the businesses that were located in this building included: 1925 - 1980 Fraternal Hotel 1925 - 1970 Fraternal Cafι 1950 - 1966 Monroe Steak House 1985 - 1994 Grand Lodge Knights of . . . — Map (db m27518) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Green Acres Cafι — 1705 - 4th Avenue, North
Businesses that occupied this building between 1908 - 1970 1908 - 1913 Southern Bell Telephone Company Stockroom 1915 - 1926 OK French Dry Cleaning Company 1927 - 1938 George Kanelis Billiards 1940 - 1945 Alex’s Steak House 1946 - . . . — Map (db m27521) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Ground Zero
You are standing at Ground Zero of the 1963 civil rights struggle in Birmingham. When African-American leaders and citizens resolved to fight the oppression of a strictly segregated society, they were met with vitriol and violence despite their own . . . — Map (db m73015) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Jim Crow on the Books
The first march to City Hall was organized in 1955 by Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth when he petitioned the city to hire Negro policemen. By 1963, thousands of Blacks marched on City Hall to protest Jim Crow laws that were a constant reminder of Blacks' . . . — Map (db m73036) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Julius Ellsberry
In dedication to Julius Ellsberry, the first Black Alabama man to die in World War II; born Birmingham, Ala, 1922. Enlisted in the U.S. Navy, 1940; First Class Mate [sic] Attendant aboard battleship Oklahoma in the Battle of Pearl . . . — Map (db m63761) HM WM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Julius Ellsberry Memorial Park
In honor of Julius Ellsberry of Birmingham World War II Hero First Jefferson County Citizen to die for his country at Pearl Harbor while serving aboard the U.S.S. Oklahoma December 7, 1941 — Map (db m70261) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Kneeling Ministers
Responsible for much planning and leadership, the clergy played a central role in the Birmingham Campaign--like the famous Palm Sunday incident in 1963 (see nearby plaque). Local clergy like Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth worked with out-of-town ministers, . . . — Map (db m73080) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Non-Violent Foot Soldiers
The central principle of the American Civil Rights Movement was non-violence, based on the strategies of Mahatma Gandhi, who led India's independence struggle against the British Empire. Being non-violent did not mean being passive. Using "direct . . . — Map (db m83833) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Non-Violent Foot Soldiers
Those who participated in the marches and other demonstrations in the Birmingham Campaign agreed to a pledge of nonviolence. A few of the "Ten Commandments" of the pledge were: "Meditate daily on the teaching and life of Jesus. Remember always that . . . — Map (db m83834) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Pauline Bray Fletcher — 1878 - 1970
In Tribute to Pauline Bray Fletcher 1878 - 1970 The First Black Registered Nurse of Alabama Through self-sacrifice, perseverance founded in 1926 Camp Pauline Bray Fletcher. Renewing the faith and the good health of all black . . . — Map (db m27393) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Police Presence
May 1963 Helmeted police stand ready in Kelly Ingram Park outside the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, one of many strategic hubs from which "Project C" organizers launched marches. Police try to keep marchers away from City Hall, usually stopping . . . — Map (db m73032) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Reflecting Pool
Throughout May 1963, the pressure continued to build. The downtown business district was closed, a prominent black-owned motel was bombed, and 3,000 federal troops were dispatched to restore order before Birmingham was officially desegregated. This . . . — Map (db m73021) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth
No one did more to bring about positive change in Birmingham than the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. In his struggle for equal rights, he survived a series of assaults, including the bombing of his home and a brutal armed beating by the Ku Klux Klan. . . . — Map (db m73025) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth Bethel Baptist Church
Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's tenure as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church (1953-1961) was marked by demonstrations, bombings and passionate sermons critical of segregation laws. His activism earned him a house bombing, frequent beatings, arrests, and . . . — Map (db m83836) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Rickwood Field
Built by local industrialist A. H. "Rick" Woodward, this park opened on August 18, 1910. It is the oldest surviving baseball park in America. Rickwood served as the home park for both the Birmingham Barons (until 1987) and the Birmingham Black . . . — Map (db m22526) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Sixteenth Street Baptist Church — Has Been Designated a National Historic Landmark.
This property possesses National Significance in commemorating the history of the United States. In 1963 it was the staging ground for the Birmingham Campaign Civil Rights Youth Marches and the place where a bomb killed four young girls, "Martyred . . . — Map (db m63733) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Smithfield
Marker Front: This residential area was carved from the Joseph Riley Smith plantation, a 600 acre antebellum farm, one of the largest in 19th century Jefferson County. Smithfield lies to the west of Birmingham's city center on the flat land . . . — Map (db m26990) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — The Children's Crusade
On May 2, 1963, more than 1,000 students skipped school and marched on downtown, gathering at the 16th Street Baptist Church. Bull Connor responded by jailing more than 600 children that day. So the next day, another 1,000 students filled the park . . . — Map (db m73017) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — The Foot Soldiers
When notoriously racist police commissioner Eugene "Bull" Connor sicced dogs on the "Foot Soldiers" of the movement, civil rights leaders hoped it would shine a national spotlight on their plight, but the country at large remained woefully ignorant. . . . — Map (db m73398) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Tuxedo Junction
"Tuxedo Junction" was the street car crossing on the Ensley-Fairfield line at this corner in the Tuxedo Park residential area. It also refers to the fraternal dance hall operated in the 1920's and 1930s on the second floor of the adjacent building, . . . — Map (db m25623) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Water Cannons
Bull Connor ordered the fearless "Child Crusaders" to be blasted with high-pressure fire hoses, and he once again loosed the dogs on the young demonstrators. When the media finally exposed the nation to the cruel scene, President John F. Kennedy . . . — Map (db m73019) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Wilson Chapel And Cemetery — ("The Little Brown Church in the Wildwood")
Wilson Chapel was built in 1916 as a memorial to James and Frances Wilson by their daughters, Rosa Wilson Eubanks and Minerva Wilson Constantine. At the time of its construction the area was developing into a community of country homes known as . . . — Map (db m26681) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Zion Memorial Gardens
Mt. Zion Baptist Church began burying here in the mid-1800s. On June 2, 1970, New Grace Hill Cemetery, Inc., a subsidiary of the Booker T. Washington Insurance Company in Birmingham, purchased this cemetery and officially named it Zion Memorial . . . — Map (db m35602) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Brighton — Lynching In America / The Lynching of William Miller
Side 1 Lynching In America Thousands of black people were the victims of lynching and racial violence in the United States between 1877 and 1950. The lynching of African Americans during this era was a form of racial terrorism . . . — Map (db m101159) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Leeds — John Henry — Ledgendary 'Steel Drivin' Man'
The story of "steel driving' man" John Henry is one of America's most enduring legends. The strong ex-slave became a folk hero during construction of the Columbus & Western Railroad between Goodwater and Birmingham. He drilled holes for explosives . . . — Map (db m22207) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Bennett Walker Smith — City of Florence Walk of Honor
Rev. Dr. Bennett W. Smith, as president of the Progressive National Baptist Convention, expanded the organization internationally. Active in Civil Rights in America and South Africa, he counseled President Bill Clinton on racial equality. — Map (db m38645) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Burrell Normal School — Burrell High School — Burrell-Slater High School 1903~1969
This school named Burrell Academy, formerly in Selma, Alabama, was given to Florence by the American Missionary Association. In 1903, Burrell Normal School opened and served African ~American students in grades 1-12. In 1937, the Florence City Board . . . — Map (db m83940) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Capture of John A.Murrell — Natchez Trace Outlaw — 1834
John A. Murrell, known as the "Great Western Land Pirate," was captured near this site in the winter of 1834. He was said to have killed over 400 people, including many kidnapped slaves. His arrest was brought about through the clever maneuvering of . . . — Map (db m80322) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Church Spring and School — (Circa 1840-1895)
About 1849, African-Americans began holding religious services in a brick cow shed overlooking the town spring near the site. It was purchased in 1857 by the local Methodists for this congregation, with Robin Lightfoot, a slave as its pastor. In . . . — Map (db m45812) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Dr. Hicks Boulevard
This boulevard was named in honor of Dr. Leonard Jerry Hicks by the City of Florence in 1981. Dr. Hicks was a prominent Black leader of the community and was recognized for his skills as a physician across the State of Alabama. He was born September . . . — Map (db m35257) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Dred Scott — (In Florence 1820 -1830)
Dred Scott, whose name is associated with the landmark U.S. Supreme Court Dred Scott Decision of 1857, was born in Virginia between 1795~1809. In 1818 he was in Madison County, Alabama. He came to Florence with the Peter Blow family in 1820. About . . . — Map (db m35183) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Dred Scott — City of Florence Walk of Honor
Dred Scott, a slave who served as the hostler in Peter Blow's Florence Hotel, waged a 14-year legal fight for freedom that resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court's Dred Scott Decision of 1857, a pivotal event in American history. — Map (db m56375) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Florence Bethel Cumberland Presbyterian Church in America
The "Mother Church" of the Presbytery, Florence Cumberland Colored Presbyterian Church originated in 1898 on property deeded by the city. Led, in 1918, by Rev. Holt Smith, it bought property on Alabama Street and built a frame structure. In 1948 . . . — Map (db m83967) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — James Thomas Rapier — City of Florence Walk of Honor
Lawyer and statesman James T. Rapier, a son of free African-American parents in Florence, holds the distinction of being just the second African-American from Alabama to be elected, in 1873, to the U.S. Congress. — Map (db m28887) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — John Thomas Bulls, Jr — City of Florence Walk of Honor
For 21 years following the end of World War II, John Bulls served as Agricultural Extension Advisor for the U.S. State Dept. in India, Nigeria, Tunisia and Uganda, assisting farmers and organizing community development programs. — Map (db m84025) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Oscar Stanton DePriest — City of Florence Walk of Honor
In 1928, Oscar S. DePriest, son of former slaves, became the first 20th Century African-American Congressman from the north. He is credited with the Anti-discrimination Amendment to the 1933 Civilian Conservation Corps Bill. — Map (db m99374) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Patton Elementary School — (1891-1958)
First school in Florence Public school system built 1890 on land given by Governor Robert M. Patton. It was occupied in 1891. Designed originally to serve all white elementary school children of Florence. Usually served six grades divided into nine . . . — Map (db m84042) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Saint Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church — (Organized 1879 from earlier 1840 Congregation)
In early 1840s about 14 African-American members from First Methodist formed own congregation “Church Springs” near South Court Street. In 1857, a nearby brick cow shed was converted for its use under Rev. Robin Lightfoot who became a . . . — Map (db m84050) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — The Greater Mount Moriah — Primitive Baptist Church — ~1896~
The congregation first met in home of Mrs. Betsy Key. Organized as "Fairgrounds Church" in 1896 at nearby site of early Florence Racetrack and Fairgrounds, with Andy Sloss as pastor. Later, the church was moved to Irvine Avenue (formerly Fish-Trap . . . — Map (db m56355) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — W. C. Handy Birthplace
(side 1) William Christopher Handy, widely honored as the “Father of the Blues,” was born in this house on November 16, 1873. In his autobiography, Handy traced the key events in his discovery of the blues back to his time in . . . — Map (db m90306) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Weeden Heights — early 1900s
This Twentieth century business and residential area was developed by John D. Weeden Jr. during the building of Wilson Dam and the World War I Defense Plants. Weeden Heights was carved from 3,800-acre Sweetwater Plantation, the former home of his . . . — Map (db m35632) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — William Christopher Handy — City of Florence Walk of Honor
Born in Florence in 1873, W.C. Handy wrote some of the country's most recognizable blues music such as the "St. Louis Blues." He became internationally known as the "Father of the Blues." — Map (db m28890) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — William Christopher Handy — Home-Museum-Library
(side 1) William Christopher Handy was born on November 16, 1873, in this two-room log cabin, which was located approximately one-half mile north of this site. In 1954, the cabin was dismantled, placed in storage, and restored to its . . . — Map (db m90292) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Wilson Family Cemetery 19th Century / Slave Cemetery 19th Century
Side A In 1818 three Wilson brothers John, Matthew and Samuel, came from Virginia to purchase large farms in this area. The plantations of John and Matthew joined near this cemetery. All three brothers and their families are buried here. . . . — Map (db m28160) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — The African ~ American Experience
Marker Front: African~Americans played a very significant role in the early history of Courtland. Most came as slaves from the older southern states to help clear the land, to plant crops of cotton and corn, and to serve as household . . . — Map (db m29009) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Danville — James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens
Born near this site 12 September 1913 to Henry Cleveland and Emma (Fitzgerald) Owens, who were sharecroppers and the offspring of freed slaves, Jesse was destined to attain immortality in the 1936 Olympic Games at Berlin, Germany. Although he moved . . . — Map (db m80969) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Baptist Hill
(Side 1) Auburn's first separate black community cemetery offers a rich source of the city’s black heritage. Much of the history is oral but it is known that a white man gave most of the land in the early 1870’s. The four acre cemetery . . . — Map (db m74453) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Desegregation at Auburn
The first African American student entered the library to register at Auburn University at this site. Acting on a court order, Auburn president Ralph Brown Draughon accepted the application of Harold Franklin as the first African American student in . . . — Map (db m90861) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Ebenezer Baptist Church — Baptist Hill — East Thach Avenue
(Side 1) This simple frame structure was built by newly freed black men and women before 1870. The property on which the building stands was given to a member of the Ebenezer congregation in 1865, the year the War Between the States . . . — Map (db m74450) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — J. F. Drake High School / Alma Mater
(Side 1) J. F. Drake High School J.F. Drake High School, formerly Lee County Training School, educated Black children of the community from 1958 to 1970. It bears the name of Dr. Joseph Fanning Drake. Drake consisted of 12 . . . — Map (db m74457) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Noble Hall
Marker Front: The Greek Revival rock and mortar house was built by Addison Frazer (1809-1873) between 1852 and 1854 and served as the center for a 2,000 acre cotton plantation. Frazer owned 100 slaves and was on the Board of Trustees of . . . — Map (db m25988) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Robert Wilton Burton — 1848-1917
(Side 1) Near this site once stood "Four-Story Cottage," the home of Robert Wilton Burton. A one-story house with wide porch and bay window, Burton built it in 1885 with proceeds from the sale of four stories to children's magazines. Born . . . — Map (db m74440) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Loachapoka — First Rosenwald School
Side 1 On this site once stood the first of over 5,300 Rosenwald schools for black children built between 1913 and 1932. The schools were started in a collaboration between Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears, Roebuck, and Company and Booker . . . — Map (db m73539) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Opelika — African-American Rosemere Cemetery — Lee County
Side 1 On February 9, 1876, the City of Opelika paid D.B. Preston $80 for two acres of land to establish an African-American section of Rosemere Cemetery. This rectangular area of the cemetery contains 176 blocks, with 16 being partial . . . — Map (db m75139) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Opelika — Darden House
Dr. John Wesley Darden, was the first African American physician to treat patients within a 30-mile radius of Opelika. He built the Darden House in 1904, and later married Maude Jean Logan of Montgomery. Dr. and Mrs. Darden shaped many lives through . . . — Map (db m75131) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Opelika — Thompson Chapel — American Methodist Episcopal Zion Church
Organized c. 1872 by Rev. John Ford, Tom Isaiah, Julius Crockrum, Daniel Billingslea, Fannie Bryant, Charity Harris, Sarah Chambers and others, and named for presiding Bishop J. P. Thompson. This congregation first met in a house near the oil mill . . . — Map (db m75157) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Faces of Market Street
From the 1850s to the 1970s, the Louisville & Nashville Depot was located between Market and Washington streets. The building has been used as a dress ship, a photographer's studio, and in 2004 was remodeled for the Limestone County Archives. . . . — Map (db m93878) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Fort Henderson / Trinity School - 1865-1970
Fort Henderson Built on this site in 1863 by federal forces occupying Athens. It was a five-sided earthen fort with some frame buildings and underground bomb-proofs. Abatis lined the fifteen-foot deep perimeter ditch, a small portion of which . . . — Map (db m41787) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Lucy's Branch/Legacy of The Little Elk Community
Lucy's Branch This site is named for Lucy Bedingfield, daughter of a slave and a Cherokee Indian. She was born 1832, and her Indian name was Finch. She married Meredith Bedingfield, a slave and had 9 children. Lucy was an astute and avid . . . — Map (db m85421) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Trinity School Cistern
This cistern is the last remnant of Trinity School located here 1865-1907. The cistern was used to store rainwater collected from the roof. No physical evidence remains of the Ross Hotel, the Chapman Quarters, and other buildings on this block, . . . — Map (db m72219) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Tanner — Oakland United Methodist Church
Generations of African~American families have worshiped here, beginning with services held under a brush arbor prior to the Civil War. In August of 1879, the land for the Oakland Methodist church was deeded to parishioners. In a wooden one-room . . . — Map (db m29094) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), Lowndesboro — Elmore Bolling — May 10, 1908 - December 4, 1947
Lowndesboro, AL—Enraged whites, jealous over the business success of a Negro are believed to be the lynchers of Elmore Bolling. Bolling, 39, was found riddled with shot gun and pistol shots 150 yards from his general merchandise store. . . . — Map (db m85460) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), Lowndesboro — Viola Liuzzo
In memory of our sister Viola Liuzzo who gave her life in the struggle for the right to vote... March 25, 1965 Presented by SCLC/WOMEN Evelyn G. Lowery, National Convener - 1991 - The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Joseph E. . . . — Map (db m85461) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), Mt. Carmel — Lynching in America / Lynching in Letohatchee
Side 1 Lynching in America Thousands of black people were the victims of lynching and racial violence in the United States between 1877 and 1950. The lynching of African Americans during this era was a form of racial terrorism . . . — Map (db m97983) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), White Hall — Campsite 2 — Selma to Montgomery Trail
Rosie Steele Farm March 22, 1965 — Map (db m70954) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), White Hall — Mount Gillard Baptist Church
The roots of this house of worship date to 1868 when 26 African American members of Mount Gilead Church left to form their own congregation. The present building was constructed in 1901, with several enlargements and renovations throughout the . . . — Map (db m104068) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Franklin — Franklin's Educational Legacy
(obverse) Franklin School, originally constructed on this lot, was in operation as early as the 1890s teaching grades 1-11. By the mid 1930s, it was downsized to grades 1-6. There were northern and southern classrooms adjoined by a common . . . — Map (db m68028) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Notasulga — Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church "The Tree"
It was under this tree that participants in the U.S. Public Health Study of Untreated Syphilis in Negro Males in Macon County, Alabama, met to wait for Nurse Rivers, the Shiloh School nurse, to come and either administer treatment, update health . . . — Map (db m95113) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Notasulga — Shiloh-Rosenwald School / Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church
Side 1 Shiloh-Rosenwald School The Shiloh-Rosenwald School, located in Notasulga, was a collaboration between educator Booker T. Washington and Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears. Rosenwald schools are landmarks in the history of . . . — Map (db m95109) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Shorter — Prairie Farms Resettlement Community
(obverse) Beginning in the mid-1930s during the Great Depression, the federal New Deal promoted Land Resettlement to move farmers across the nation off worn out soil to new farmland. The Resettlement Administration, and its successor the . . . — Map (db m68000) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Booker T. Washington
. . . — Map (db m69096) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Brief History of Tuskegee, Alabama
Front Tuskegee consists of 80 square miles and is the county seat of Macon County, Alabama. Tuskegee rests in the heart of the rural Alabama Black Belt and is 40 miles east of Montgomery. Tuskegee was founded by General Thomas S. . . . — Map (db m99679) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Butler Chapel AME Zion Church
Before the mid-1960s, Tuskegee’s black population faced many challenges when attempting to register to vote. Furthermore, the State of Alabama redrew the town’s political boundaries in an effort to prevent registered blacks from voting in local . . . — Map (db m69048) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Fred David Gray — Civil Rights Attorney and Legislator / Advocate for Victims and History
Side 1 Born in 1930 in Montgomery, Gray was among the foremost civil rights attorneys of the 20th century. Forced by segregation to leave Alabama to attend law school, he vowed to return and "destroy everything segregated I could find." . . . — Map (db m101898) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Macon County Legal Milestone
Front Macon County was created by the Alabama Legislature on December 18, 1832 and formed out of land formerly belonging to the Creek Indians. The County was named for Nathaniel Macon, a Revolutionary War soldier and long-serving . . . — Map (db m99677) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — The Oaks — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
The actual sight of a first-class house that a Negro has built is ten times more potent than pages of discussion about a house that he ought to build, or perhaps could build. —Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery . . . — Map (db m101919) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — The Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital
The Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital (VA), established in 1923, is significant as the first VA hospital in the nation to be administered by an all African American medical staff. After WWI, African American veterans found it difficult . . . — Map (db m101900) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — A Bit to Eat
Known as the Tea Room, this small lunchroom was built during the initial expansion phase of Moton Field in 1942 and 1943, when amenities such as offices and bathrooms not built into the original hangar were added. Here, personnel stationed at . . . — Map (db m64362) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — A Typical Day
Try to imagine how Moton Field looked and sounded when the cadets trained here. Compare the scene today to the photograph below, taken from your vantage point around 1944. As the pace of training accelerated during the war, Moton Field became a . . . — Map (db m64366) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Anticipation
During World War II a guard house stood just outside the brick entrance gates to Moton Field. The framed structure closest to you is a representation of the guard house. The historic entrance gates are just beyond. How excited the young cadets must . . . — Map (db m99927) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Bath and Locker House
This building was completed in 1941 as a restroom, shower, and locker room for administrative and support personnel. It had facilities for both men and women. Both black and white may have used the building. If so, it almost certainly would have . . . — Map (db m64361) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Fire Suppression Pond
A fire at an airfield, with highly flammable materials everywhere, could be catastrophic. The Bath and Locker House fire shown here highlighted the need for a dependable water supply for firefighting. A pond met that need. It also helped control . . . — Map (db m100251) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — FIRE!
The Fire Protection Shed in front of you was used to store equipment such as hoses, fire extinguishers, and tools for fighting fires. Fire was always a danger at the airfield because of the flammable materials used in airplanes and the fuels . . . — Map (db m64364) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Ghost Structures
The Cadet House and the Army Supply Building provided much-needed space when training operations expanded in 1942 and 1943. The Cadet House also held a cadet classroom and waiting room, a coat room, and the Flight Surgeon's Office. The Army Supply . . . — Map (db m100252) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Hangar No. 1
In Hangar No. 1 flying became real for the aviation cadet. The hangar housed the main activities of the airfield, including flight debriefings, flight record-keeping, aircraft maintenance, and military and civilian management. Several smaller . . . — Map (db m64365) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — It Was Called "Dope"
During World War II primary training airplanes were built mostly of wood and fabric. Ground crews sealed and strengthened the fabric with several applications of a highly flammable, explosive acetate coating called "dope." This shed was used to . . . — Map (db m100253) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Moton Field Expands
This is the site of Hangar No. 2, completed in early 1944 in response to the tremendous increase in the number of cadets training at Moton Field. The building, nearly identical to Hangar No. 1, contained classrooms, a briefing room, a medical . . . — Map (db m99931) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — New Vistas
Moton Field was built by Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University, in 1941 after the school contracted with the U.S. Army to provide primary flight training for the nation's first African American military pilots. By the end of World War II . . . — Map (db m99940) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Oil Storage Shed
This ventilated shed provided safe and convenient storage for the large quantities and various grades of oil used at Moton Field for the maintenance of airplanes and service vehicles. It has been adapted to house the site's fire protection system. . . . — Map (db m100254) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Prepared to Fight and Die
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site commemorates the contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II—and to American society afterward. The site preserves Moton Field, where the airmen trained before going to war. Their courageous . . . — Map (db m99938) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — The Control Tower
From Moton Field’s Control Tower, controllers directed flight operations and signaled landing instructions to pilots through a system of flashing colored lights. Dispatchers called cadets for their flights. The tower overlooked the busy – . . . — Map (db m64363) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — The Place Where We Learned to Fly
Over 1,000 cadets learned to fly here at Moton Field, taking off and landing on an open, grassy field beyond the structures below. The field was used so intensely for primary flight training during World War II that the aircraft soon rutted the . . . — Map (db m99941) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — The Tuskegee Airmen
The first African American fighter pilots in the U.S. Army Air Corps were the public face of the Tuskegee Airmen. They made extraordinary contributions to the Allied victory in Europe during World War II. But their success was made possible by the . . . — Map (db m99934) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — They Came to Tuskegee
Young African American men came to Tuskegee from all over the nation to train as military pilots. They began with primary flight training here at Tuskegee Institute's Moton Field. Tuskegee Institute also had a smaller field, Kennedy Field, where . . . — Map (db m100255) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Waiting for the Bus
The tarmac between the two hangars was a busy part of Moton Field. Cadets arriving by bus were dropped off here and went to their duties in preparation for flight training. Others boarded the buses to return to the Tuskegee Institute campus. Fuel . . . — Map (db m99681) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site — Warehouse/Vehicle Storage
This building served as the garage for Moton Field's small fleet of support vehicles. It provided storage at night and "drive-through" vehicle maintenance by day. Rooms on the north side provided office space for maintenance staff and file storage . . . — Map (db m100256) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Birth of Trades Program — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
We shall prosper . . . as we learn to dignify and glorify labor and put brains and skills into the common occupations of life. —Booker T. Washington Tuskegee Institute's vocational training program began in this . . . — Map (db m101934) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Booker T Washington — 1856   1915
[Center] He lifted the Veil of Ignorance from his people and pointed the way to progress through education and industry [Far left] We shall prosper in proportion as we learn to dignify and glorify labor . . . — Map (db m100163) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Campus Architect — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
. . . I should consider it a far-reaching calamity for us to lose Mr. Taylor at Tuskegee. —Booker T. Washington Look at the buildings around the main quadrangle. Much of what you see is the work of Robert R. Taylor, . . . — Map (db m101929) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Carver Research Foundation — 1951
On February 10, 1940 George Washington Carver signed the deed of gift establishing the Carver Foundation with a $33,000 contribution from his personal savings. According to Carver, the foundation was established "for the purpose of combining . . . — Map (db m101912) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Carver's Laboratory — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
The primary idea in all of my work was to help the farmer and fill the poor man's empty dinner pail . . . —George Washington Carver George Washington Carver taught classes and developed new products from peanuts, . . . — Map (db m101938) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Dining and Social Center — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
The young women all seated first, and then the young men march in. But no conversation is allowed until . . . a simple grace is chanted by the chorus of a thousand voices. —Booker T. Washington, The Working . . . — Map (db m101926) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Dorothy Hall — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
We also felt that we must not only teach the students how to prepare their food but how to serve and eat it properly. Booker T. Washington, The Story of My Life and Work Hospitality continues to reign in this . . . — Map (db m100274) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Enhancing Health Care — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
Let our societies spend less money in taking care of the sick, and much more money in promoting the health of the race . . . . Let us make health contagious in every community rather than disease. —Booker T. Washington, Address . . . — Map (db m101940) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Frederick Douglass Hall — 1904
Named for Frederick Douglass, famed runaway slave, abolitionist and statesman. Douglass came to Tuskegee in 1892 and delivered the 11th Annual Commencement address in which he "urged economy, thrift and common sense." Those words of Douglass echoed . . . — Map (db m101908) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — George Washington Carver — Died in Tuskegee Alabama — January 5, 1943
A life that stood out as a gospel of self-forgetting service. He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happi- ness and honor in being helpful to the world. The centre of his world was the South where he . . . — Map (db m100165) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Great Philanthropists — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
I will be very glad to pay the bills for the library building . . . and I am glad of this opportunity to show the interest I have in your noble work. —Andrew Carnegie Carnegie Hall is named for Andrew Carnegie, . . . — Map (db m101923) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Historic Quadrangle — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
When school is in session, the broad expanse in front of you—the university's main quadrangle—buzzes with activity just as it did in the early 1900s, but life was much more regimented then. Students received demerits if they did not obey . . . — Map (db m101920) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Huntington Hall — 1900
Built as a girls dormitory with funds donated by the widow of Collis P. Huntington, philanthropist, and president of the C & O (Chesapeake & Ohio) Railroad. Huntington Hall was designed by architect, Robert R. Taylor, the first African American . . . — Map (db m101907) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Lifting the Veil of Ignorance
In this sculpture by Charles Keck, Booker T. Washington lifts the veil of ignorance from the face of a former slave. The open book, plow, and anvil symbolize Washington's guiding principles of opening the path to education through agriculture and . . . — Map (db m99942) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Managing the School — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
. . . the school is not dependent upon the presence of any one individual. The whole executive force . . . is so organized . . . that the machinery of the school goes on day by day like clockwork. —Booker T. Washington, . . . — Map (db m101922) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Porter Hall 1883 / Huntington Academic Building 1905
Porter Hall 1883 Porter Hall was the first building erected on the Tuskegee campus. The building housed administrative offices, library reading and recitation rooms, chapel, kitchen, dining room, living quarters and laundry. It . . . — Map (db m101915) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Site of Olivia Davidson Hall — Men's Dormitory
Site of Olivia Davidson Hall Men's Dormitory 1886 – 1954 Originally Samuel Armstrong Hall 1886 - 1892 — Map (db m101914) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — The Burnt Place — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
At the time we occupied the place there were standing upon it a cabin, formerly used as the dining room, an old kitchen, a stable, and an old hen-house. Within a few weeks we had all of these structures in use.   —Booker T. . . . — Map (db m101916) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — The Tuskegee Airmen's Plaza
This plaza is dedicated to the memory of the Tuskegee Airmen, including General Daniel "Chappie" James, whose training at Tuskegee University and the Tuskegee Army Air Field enabled them to prove for all time the competence and bravery of Black . . . — Map (db m20076) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Thomas Monroe Campbell
. . . — Map (db m102540) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Thrasher Hall
Thrasher Hall, renovated in 1983. Was built in 1893 by teachers and students using brick they made. Only the exterior walls remain from the original building. The bell above rang for class changes. It was located in the building's bell tower until . . . — Map (db m101905) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Tuskegee Cemetery — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
More than 8,000 people, White and Colored, rich and poor, from the lowliest farm and the richest Fifth Avenue mansion crowded in and around the school chapel to pay homage [to Booker T. Washington]. —Baltimore Afro-American, . . . — Map (db m99943) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Tuskegee Chapel — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
. . . I always make it a rule to read a chapter [in the Bible] or a portion of a chapter in the morning, before beginning the work of the day. —Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery The chapel, designed by Paul . . . — Map (db m100162) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Tuskegee University — F-4C Phantom
This U.S. Air Force F-4C Phantom Jet Fighter was flown by General "Chappie" James, Tuskegee University graduate and first Black Four-Star General in the U.S. Armed Services, on his last combat mission--Operation Bold--over Southeast Asia. It flies . . . — Map (db m101902) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Up From Slavery — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
I determined when quite a small child . . . I would in some way get enough education to enable me to read common books and newspapers. —Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery Booker T. Washington changed the . . . — Map (db m101932) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Buffalo Soldiers — Huntsville, AL
(south side) After the Civil War, the future of African-Americans in the United States Army was in doubt. In July 1866, Congress passed legislation establishing two cavalry and four infantry regiments to be made up of African-American . . . — Map (db m75092) HM WM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Fifth Avenue School — Site of Alabama's First Public School Integration
Opened in 1944, the Fifth Avenue School became the focal point for major educational change on September 9, 1963, when Sonnie Hereford IV became the first African-American student to integrate public schools in Alabama. Following a lengthy court . . . — Map (db m55722) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Oakwood College — Founded 1896
Oakwood College, which began as an industrial school, was founded by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1896 to educate African Americans in the South. The school was erected on 380 acres purchased during the previous year for $6,700. Additional . . . — Map (db m34953) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Oakwood College — Founded 1896
Oakwood College, which began as an industrial school, was founded by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1896 to educate African Americans in the South. The school was erected on 380 acres purchased during the previous year for $6,700. Additional . . . — Map (db m34955) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Original Site of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University
(Front) Original site of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (now located at Normal, Alabama) Legislature approved 9 December 1873 "a normal school for the education of colored teachers" in Huntsville. Ex-slave William Hooper . . . — Map (db m85546) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery Boyhood Home Site — (Dean of Civil Rights Movement)
Side A Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery was born in Huntsville on Oct 6, 1921, to Dora and Leroy Lowery. He grew up in Lakeside (Methodist) church. He began his education in Huntsville, spent his middle school years in Chicago, and returned to . . . — Map (db m85550) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Saint Bartley Primitive Baptist Church — Located here 1872-1964 — Oldest Negro congregation in Alabama
Organized 1820 by William Harris, a slave, who was minister more than 50 years. Original church, called Huntsville African Baptist, stood 4 blocks south in Old Georgia Graveyard. In 1870, this church and 3 others formed Indian Creek Primitive . . . — Map (db m35960) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Site of the Huntsville Slave Cemetery
On September 3, 1818, the Huntsville City Commissioners purchased two acres of land from LeRoy Pope for a "burying ground" for slaves. This cemetery was located within the NE quarter of Section 1, Township 4, Range 1 West of the Base Meridian. It . . . — Map (db m35214) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Slave Cemetery — 1800s
This cemetery site was used as a burial ground for slaves who lived on both the Peter Blow and Job Key plantations from 1811 to 1865. Dred Scott's first wife and their two children are believed to have been buried here. The cemetery continued to be . . . — Map (db m31562) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — War of 1812 — 1812 - 1815
I am Private Darbin Abolt of the 7th US Infantry Regiment, part of which is commanded by Captain Zachary Taylor, our future president. I was already in the Army when we declared war on the British in June 1812. We were fed up with the British . . . — Map (db m85617) WM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — William Hooper Councill High School Site — 1892-1966
The first public school for African-Americans in the city of Huntsville was named for the founder of the Alabama A&M University. The site, selected by a committee headed by the Rev. W.E. Gaston, was donated by the Davis-Lowe family. Founded in 1867 . . . — Map (db m36065) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Madison — Pension Row
Pension Row is representative of many small town African American neighborhoods. Once a thriving community with its own schools, churches, businesses, lodges, and recreation areas, it has been a part of Madison since Madison was incorporated in . . . — Map (db m99420) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — Alabama A&M University former names / Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University — Normal, Alabama
Alabama A&M University former names 1873 - Colored Normal School at Huntsville 1885 - The Huntsville State Colored Normal and Industrial School 1896 - The State Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes 1919 - The State Agricultural and . . . — Map (db m39760) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — Councill Training School — (1919 - 1970)
Side A In 1919, the first building was erected nearby with funds provided locally and supplemented with a Julius Rosenwald Foundation grant. Named for William H. Councill, Alabama A&M University founder, the three-room structure was built . . . — Map (db m39761) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Normal — William Hooper Councill — Founder — Alabama A&M University
"...A tower of knowledge, of strength, of power ...Let us build..." Dr. William Hooper Councill served as President of Alabama A&M University and was the catalyst for its early development from its founding in 1875 until his death in 1909. . . . — Map (db m39763) HM

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