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African Americans Topic

 
Happy Hollow "Big Curve" image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, December 17, 2013
Happy Hollow "Big Curve"
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Happy Hollow
Known as Fair Road, Sixth Street from Northington Street to the big curve was called “Happy Hollow”. The road went to the Fair home place but also curved right, into Warren Circle. Here stood a small frame church where the congregation’s . . . — Map (db m70800) HM
2Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Mount Sinai Rosenwald SchoolAutauga County
In 1919, Anthony Townsend donated 5 acres of land for this school. In 1913, Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears & Roebuck, and Booker T. Washington established the Rosenwald School program to improve the quality of public education for African American . . . — Map (db m158654) HM
3Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Old Kingston Historical Cemetery
This cemetery is one of the oldest cemeteries in Autauga County having been established as a burial ground by at least 1841. The land was officially set aside as a burial ground when the county seat was in this area from 1834 to 1868. The area . . . — Map (db m82561) HM
4Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Wilson Pickett, Jr.March 18, 1941 - January 19, 2006
A native of Prattville, Wilson Pickett was raised singing gospel in local churches. Upon moving to Detroit as a teenager, he began to blend gospel-style with rhythm and blues, resulting in some of "the deepest, funkiest soul music" to come from the . . . — Map (db m70804) HM
5Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The United States Colored Troops (USCT) at the Battle of Fort Blakeley
Greater gallantry than was shown by officers and men could hardly be desired. The (troops) were burning with an impulse to do honor to their race, and rushed forward with intense enthusiasm, in face of a terrible fire." Brig. Gen. . . . — Map (db m131903) HM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Daphne — Little Bethel Baptist Church:
On April 15, 1867, Major Lewis Starke deeded these two acres to four of his ex-slaves and their heirs as trustees for this church: Nimrod Lovett, Stamford Starlin (now Sterling), Narcis Elwa, and Benjamin Franklin. In this cemetery is buried . . . — Map (db m100851) HM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Loxley — Jenkins Farm / Jenkins Farmhouse
Jenkins Farm John Wesley Jenkins, born 1874, owned a 40 acre turpentine operation in 1915 when he married Amelia Taylor. With the decline of his turpentine resources, they began growing potatoes. At the time of John Wesley’s death in . . . — Map (db m155369) HM
8Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops
This earthen mound was part of a redoubt constructed by the 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops in April, 1865. The regiment saw considerable action against Confederate warships protecting the Blakely River. These earthworks have been preserved as a . . . — Map (db m100853) HM
9Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Public Education in Baldwin County / Little Red Schoolhouse Historic Site
In 1799 the first public school in Alabama was built just north of this site at Boatyard Lake in the Tensaw Community. More than 90 small schools dotted Baldwin County in the early twentieth century. This one room school was built in 1920 by African . . . — Map (db m122669) HM
10Alabama (Barbour County), Bakerhill — Freemount Junior High School
Established c 1895, Freemount Junior High School was an important black school in the Eufaula area. It was originally established within the Freemount AME Church which once stood about 300 feet south of this site. The school was later moved to this . . . — Map (db m164938) HM
11Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Old Negro Cemetery / Fairview Cemetery
Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used . . . — Map (db m27987) HM
12Alabama (Barbour County), Midway — Ramah Baptist Church & CemeteryBarbour County
Constructed in the 1840s and constituted in 1852, Ramah Baptist Church is in the community formerly known as both Ramah and Vaughn. Records show that the land for both the church and cemetery was given by Solomon G. and Francis T. Burke in . . . — Map (db m158553) HM
13Alabama (Barbour County), Midway — Spring Hill United Methodist Church
This Greek Revival church was built in 1841 by John Fletcher Comer with lumber from his mill. The building originally had a slave balcony and exterior stairway which were removed c. 1890. At the same time, the pulpit was moved from between the two . . . — Map (db m162143) HM
14Alabama (Bibb County), Centreville — Centreville CemeteryBibb County
Centreville Cemetery is older than the town of Centreville itself. The earliest known burial is that of Willie Coleman, dated 1822, and Centreville was established in 1823. One half of the cemetery, known as Cooper Cemetery, contains mostly the . . . — Map (db m156403) HM
15Alabama (Bullock County), Aberfoil — Aberfoil SchoolBullock County
Side 1 In 1890, Reverend C. H. Thornton donated 10 acres of land where he organized a church and the first public school for African Americans in the Aberfoil community. The first school structure was a one room log cabin. Rev. . . . — Map (db m153582) HM
16Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — First Baptist Missionary Church 1875
The Macedonia Baptist Church, located between the communities of Midway and Mt. Coney, was constructed by freedmen after the American Civil War, replacing the brush arbors used by the area’s antebellum slaves as sites for religious worship. Four . . . — Map (db m60947) HM
17Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Old Merritt School Midway Community Center
Margaret Elizabeth Merritt of Midway sold two acres for $5 to the state of Alabama in 1921 as a site for an elementary school for African-American children. Built in 1922 with matching Rosenwald funds, the Midway Colored Public School featured oak . . . — Map (db m60910) HM
18Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — 1998 — St. James C.M.E. ChurchRailroad Street Midway, Alabama
St. James Christian Methodist Episcopal Church founded by Reverend Jack McMillan, a former slave of Midway’s Daniel McMillan. Initially meeting outdoors under a brush arbor, ex-slaves and their children constructed a wood-frame church building soon . . . — Map (db m60909) HM
19Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Union Springs, Alabama
In the early 1800s, settlers coming from the Carolinas and Georgia received land grants and some purchased land from the Indians. They settled and cleared the forest for new farms and plantations in what would become a newly formed State of Alabama . . . — Map (db m83258) HM
20Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 7 — Anniston Memorial HospitalMay 14, 1961 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
When seven injured "Freedom Riders" arrived at the Hospital on this date, the mob that had attacked them earlier in the day followed. The Riders were testing desegregation of public transportation in the South by riding buses. The bus they . . . — Map (db m106647) HM
21Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 6 — Anniston Public Library DesegregationSeptember 15-16, 1963 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Desegregation of the Library began when two African American pastors, Reverends William B. McClain and Nimrod Q. Reynolds, peacefully attempted to enter the building on September 15, 1963. Their actions were endorsed by the city of Anniston . . . — Map (db m106644) HM
22Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Freedom Riders
On May 14, 1961, a Greyhound bus left Atlanta, GA carrying among its passengers seven members of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), a.k.a. the “Freedom Riders,” on a journey to test interstate bus segregation. The bus was met by an . . . — Map (db m35737) HM
23Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 3 — Greyhound Bus Station Protest, May 14, 1961 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Front This was the site of the Greyhound bus terminal where on May 14, 1961, a bus carrying black and white Civil Rights Activists known as "Freedom Riders" was attacked by a mob of whites who were protesting desegregation of public . . . — Map (db m106621) HM
24Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Saint John United Methodist Church — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Saint John, founded at the turn of the 19th century, is the first African-American Methodist Episcopal Church in South Anniston. The original structure was built in 1922. The current building was erected in 1951 on the corner of D Street and . . . — Map (db m144905) HM
25Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 9 — Seventeenth Street Missionary Baptist Church, Organized 1887 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Seventeenth Street Missionary Baptist Church served as the home of "mass meetings" for black Annistonians who planned and executed Anniston's part of the Civil Rights Movement. Reverends D.C. Washington (1937-1960) and Nimrod Q. Reynolds (1960-2008) . . . — Map (db m106651) HM
26Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 1 — Southern Railway Station AttackJanuary 2, 1961 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Local "Jim Crow" laws in the first half of the 20th century enforced racial segregation in public transportation facilities throughout the South. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Boynton v. Virginia (1960) upheld that segregation in these . . . — Map (db m106602) HM
27Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 5 — The Human Relations Council — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
The Anniston City Commission, on May 16, 1963, established by resolution the Human Relations Council, consisting of five white men and four black men. The Council's purpose was to "make recommendations concerning human relations," and its members . . . — Map (db m106627) HM
28Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 4 — The Murder of Willie Brewster, July 15, 1965 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Willie Brewster became the target of white extremists after words spoken at a National States Rights Party encouraged them to commit acts of violence against blacks. As Brewster drove home with co-workers from the night shift at Union Foundry, he . . . — Map (db m106626) HM
29Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Trailways AttackSeeking Justice
1st Panel Two busloads of Freedom Riders arrived in Alabama on Sunday, May 14, 1961, bound for New Orleans. It was an organized effort by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to challenge the South's continued defiance of U. S. . . . — Map (db m106721) HM
30Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 2 — Trailways Bus Station AttackMay 14, 1961 — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
Throughout the first half of the 20th century, race relations in the South were dominated by local "Jim Crow" laws. Although in 1960 the Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation violated the Interstate Commerce Act, local laws persisted. . . . — Map (db m106605) HM
31Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — 8 — West 15th Street Historic District — Anniston Civil Rights Trail —
This district was once the economic and social hub of Anniston's African American community. In its heyday (1940-1950), the District was a "city within a city," with businesses that catered to the black community. Grocery stores, restaurants, . . . — Map (db m106650) HM
32Alabama (Calhoun County), Hobson City — Town of Hobson City, Alabama
Front Hobson City is Alabama's first incorporated black city. The area was first known as Mooree Quarter, a black settlement that was part of Oxford, Alabama. After a black man was elected Justice of the Peace in Oxford, one mayor . . . — Map (db m106598) HM
33Alabama (Calhoun County), Ohatchee — Janney Furnace
The furnace was constructed by Montgomery businessman Alfred A. Janney, reportedly using slaves brought from Tennessee by a "Dr. Smith." The furnace was completed and ready to produce pig iron when, on July 14, 1864, a Union cavalry raiding force of . . . — Map (db m25544) HM
34Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — Essie J. Handy Memorial CemeteryChambers County
Elisha and Essie Handy came to La Fayette in 1925. They were educators and active in civic and religious activities. In 1940 their oldest son, Ralph, died from tuberculosis and was buried in the only cemetery in La Fayette for African-Americans . . . — Map (db m151220) HM
35Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — Vines Funeral Home and Ambulance Service
Vines Funeral Home and Ambulance Service was established in 1952 and is representative of a mid-20th century rural African American funeral home. It is the only funeral home in Alabama still operating an ambulance service. The main building of . . . — Map (db m151221) HM
36Alabama (Chambers County), Valley — Lanier High School
Side 1 The school was located at three different sites on Cherry Drive. Its beginning was in The Blue Hall Building adjacent to Goodsell Methodist Church. Later it was moved to the Dallas/Jackson Home and became the Jackson Hill School. . . . — Map (db m71638) HM
37Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Hatcher School1949-1969
Hatcher School was created as a result of the dreams and sacrifices of the people of the community. Black children in Centre had to travel to Cedar Bluff to attend school. The State purchased land and citizens of the community provided funding and . . . — Map (db m133323) HM
38Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Mose Hampton 1808-1885Early Black Leader and Inventor in Cherokee County
Mose Hampton bought his freedom prior to the Civil War. He was a builder, assisted in laying out and surveying the town of Centre, a minister in the Episcopal Methodist North, and an inventor. Mr. Hampton owned land in the vicinity of this marker on . . . — Map (db m120046) HM
39Alabama (Clarke County), Carlton — Mt. Nebo Death Masks
Side 1 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Mt. Nebo Cemetery is home to the unique folk art of African American inventor and artist, Issac "Ike" Nettles, who used concrete to make images of living people's faces for . . . — Map (db m101576) HM
40Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Colored and White Soldiers of World War I
This is a replica of the original tablet from the 1924 World War I monument located in front of the Clarke County Courthouse. The monument was the first memorial ever erected to honor county war dead. It cost $1,650 and was paid for with . . . — Map (db m57385) HM
41Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Williams’ Temple CME Church
Founded by the CME (Christian Methodist Episcopal) Church as the only school for black students in the area in the early 1900’s, Williams’ Temple eventually consolidated with another school in Booker City to form Miles College near Birmingham. . . . — Map (db m101596) HM
42Alabama (Colbert County), Cherokee — A Chickasaw PlanterNatchez Trace Parkway
During the early 1800s, a slave-owning planter class including George Colbert’s family, emerged among the Chickasaw. George’s success stemmed from a variety of endeavors. He fought with the Americans against the Shawnee and Creeks, traveled to . . . — Map (db m107261) HM
43Alabama (Colbert County), Cherokee — Something to Chew onNatchez Trace Parkway — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Inns, or stands, provided occasional shelter for travelers along the Natchez Trace. These stands offered flood to eat and food for thought: local news, information, and ideas. The ever-changing mix of diverse populations—whites, American . . . — Map (db m107263) HM
44Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — 101 MemorialWorld War I
Dedicated to Civilian defense workers in critical industry for the war. US Army directed construction and production via Air Nitrate Corp. Army Projects here in 1917-1918 required 20,000 workers recruited from across the USA. The great flu-pandemic . . . — Map (db m138776) HM WM
45Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Percy Sledge/Producer Quin Ivy"When A Man Loves A Woman" / NORALA and Quinvy Studios
(side 1) Percy Sledge "When A Man Loves A Woman" Hospital orderly Percy Sledge recorded 'When a Man Loves a Woman' at Quin Ivy's studio in 1966. Sledge's breakup with a girlfriend inspired the lyrics credited to songwriters . . . — Map (db m83390) HM
46Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — Sheffield Colored School/Sterling High School
(side 1) Sheffield Colored School Public education for Sheffield's black children began in 1889 in a framed building at E. 20th St. and S. Atlanta Ave. with Henry Hopkins as teacher. Professor Benjamin J. Sterling (1847-1941), a . . . — Map (db m82423) HM
47Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Trenholm High School
(side 1) Formal education for Tuscumbia’s African American children began in 1870 at the Freedman School taught by Judge Wingo and his daughter in a church at the foot of the hill. In July 1877, the Osborne Colored Academy was established . . . — Map (db m80944) HM
48Alabama (Conecuh County), Lime Hill — Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, D.D.1905-1995
Side 1 Doctor Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, who was affectionately known throughout the community as “Brown,” dedicated most of his adult life to providing spiritual guidance to blacks in Evergreen and surrounding . . . — Map (db m81292) HM
49Alabama (Coosa County), Rockford — Peace & Goodwill Cemetery
Peace & Goodwill Cemetery is Coosa County's first African American Cemetery to be placed on the prestigious Alabama Historic Cemetery Register. It provides powerful insights about the diligence and commitment of our African Ancestors. Family . . . — Map (db m64587) HM
50Alabama (Dale County), Ozark — D. A. Smith High School/ Professor D. A. Smith, PrincipalDale County
D. A. Smith High School Dale County The first school building on this site for African Americans was constructed in 1939 and was named Ozark Negro High School. It was replaced during the “separate but equal” period in 1952 and . . . — Map (db m132087) HM
51Alabama (Dale County), Pinckard — The Mack M. Matthews School
Front The original part of this building was home to one of the oldest African American schools in Dale County. In 1949 on this site, the new building for the Pinckard Colored School was constructed and Mack M. Matthews became its . . . — Map (db m115029) HM
52Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — The Beloit Industrial Institute
Marker Front: The Beloit Industrial Institute was founded in 1888 by Industrial Missionary Association, an area subdivision of the American Missionary Associations. The President of the Association, Dr. Charles B. Curtis, was a Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m83504) HM
53Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — A Courthouse Reduced to Rubble
Prior to 1905, workmen in search of salvageable bricks dismantled the old Dallas County Courthouse (pictured here). The grassy mound before you contains the damaged bricks the workmen left behind. Cahawba was the county seat from . . . — Map (db m112559) HM
54Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Dallas County Courthouse
The grassed over mound of brick before you was once Dallas County's courthouse. This courthouse was built in 1834. It was dismantled prior to 1905 by brick salvagers. Cahawba was the county seat from 1818 to 1866. This brought a lot of people, . . . — Map (db m23010) HM
55Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Kirk-View Farm
In 1866, shortly after the Civil War and a severe flood, the county seat was moved from Cahaba to Selma. Residents rapidly abandoned the town. Many homes were dismantled and reassembled elsewhere. Despite this trend, returning Confederate . . . — Map (db m83516) HM
56Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Methodist Church
These ruins were once a place of worship for members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Built in 1849, it was the first single denomination church in Cahawba. An earlier church for the common use of all denominations was erected about 1840. . . . — Map (db m112410) HM
57Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Who Lived Here?
This house, the Fambro / Arthur home, takes its name from two of its owners. One was a judge, the other was a former slave. The Fambro Family A. Judge W. W. Fambro built this house in the early 1840s. He may have created . . . — Map (db m112451) HM
58Alabama (Dallas County), Orrville — Whitt Cemetery
Whitt Cemetery has been placed on the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register by the Alabama Historical Commission — Map (db m112356) HM
59Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — A Grassroots MovementSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
For centuries, Selma was a city where the rules of race were enforced by humiliation and fear. But Selma gave birth to one of the greatest grassroots campaigns in history—the voting rights movement. The Selma to Montgomery march was . . . — Map (db m112370) HM
60Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge / U.S. Congress Approves Voting Rights Act of 1965
Side 1 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge A voting registration campaign in 1965 turned tragic Feb. 17 when an Alabama state trooper fatally shot Jimmie Lee Jackson in Marion. It prompted a protest march from . . . — Map (db m81944) HM
61Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Brown Chapel A.M.E. ChurchSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
Brown A.M.E. Chapel (in front of you) served as a safe haven for supporters during the voting rights campaign. Pastor P.H. Lewis and his congregation courageously broke the injunction prohibiting African Americans from holding mass meetings, making . . . — Map (db m131995) HM
62Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Campsite 1Selma to Montgomery Trail
Hall Farm March 21, 1965 — Map (db m61846) HM
63Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — First Baptist ChurchSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
First Baptist was the first church in Selma to open its doors to members of the Dallas County Voters League as well as to young activists from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. From 1963 to 1965, under the leadership of Reverend M.C. . . . — Map (db m112366) HM
64Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — George Washington Carver Homes ProjectsDr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Street
In 1952, the City of Selma accepted federal funds to build the George Washington Carver Homes Projects. The residences became “The Face of the Civil Rights Movement” to many in the 1960s because Dr. King, the Southern Christian . . . — Map (db m112354) HM
65Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — George Washington Carver NeighborhoodSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
The George Washington Carver neighborhood served as base camp for the votings rights movement during the tumultuous weeks of March 1965. These blocks of brick two-story homes—the city's first and largest federal housing project for blacks, . . . — Map (db m112365) HM
66Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Honoring: Amelia Boynton Robinson - Marie Foster
The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 Mothers of the Civil Rights Movement Before and Beyond the Bridge Didn't Let Nothing Turn Them Around! Presented by The Evelyn Gibson Lowery . . . — Map (db m111691) HM
67Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — I Had A DreamDr. Martin L. King Jr.
The demonstration that led to the most important advance in civil rights for millions of Black Americans began here March 21, 1965. It was the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the State Capital. Defying threats of death, Dr. . . . — Map (db m83578) HM
68Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — In Memory of Reverend Hosea Williams, Sr.
Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 He Fed the Hungry "Unbossed and Unbought" 1926-2000 Presented by SCLC/W.O.M.E.N. Inc. Women's Organizational Movement for Equality . . . — Map (db m111689) HM
69Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lewis ScottA Quote from Lewis - "I See With Memory"
At the age of 20, Lewis lost his sight in 1957 from Glaucoma. He learned the language of braille, other independent living and vocational skills during his attendance at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind in Talladega, Alabama. . . . — Map (db m112363) HM
70Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Lynching in America / Lynching in SelmaCommunity Remembrance Project
Lynching in America Thousands of African Americans were victims of lynching and racial violence in the United States between the Civil War and World War II. The lynching of African Americans during this era was a form of racial terrorism . . . — Map (db m132071) HM
71Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — R.B. Hudson High SchoolDallas County
This school was the city of Selma's first public high school for African-Americans. Completed in 1949, the school was named in honor of Richard Byron Hudson, a black educator who had served for 41 years as principal of Clark Elementary School, . . . — Map (db m82741) HM
72Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sanctuary to StageSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
The shooting of Jimmie Lee Jackson in nearby Marion, Alabama, transformed Brown Chapel from a sanctuary into a staging area for the Selma march, In a passionate sermon SCLC worker James Bevel suggested making a pilgrimage to the State Capitol to . . . — Map (db m112364) HM
73Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Selma Army Arsenal1862~1865 — Battle of Selma —
Confederate Army Captain James White was ordered to relocate the old Federal Arsenal from Mt. Vernon, Alabama. By 1865 it consisted of 24 buildings and had over 500 workers including men, women, boys, girls, FMofC and slaves. It made or contracted . . . — Map (db m82750) HM
74Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — St. James HotelHeadquarters of General James H. Wilson — Battle of Selma —
following the Battle of Selma, April 2, 1865. This occupation protected the hotel from the arson and looting in the first 24 hours that destroyed much of downtown. In the next week Wilson methodically burned the huge military/industrial complex that . . . — Map (db m80792) HM
75Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist ChurchDallas County
Side 1 In January 1885, Dr. Edward M. Brawley, President, Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School (now Selma University) formed Tabernacle Baptist Church to be an integral part of the students' Christian formation and education. . . . — Map (db m82034) HM
76Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Tabernacle Baptist ChurchDallas County
Side 1 Tabernacle Baptist Church was founded in 1885, and in March of that year, the congregation purchased this site. Built in 1922 under the leadership of Dr. David Vivian Jemison, the current church features bricks from the original . . . — Map (db m83677) HM
77Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Honorable John Lewis
Honoring: Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 "Get in the Way" "When We Pray, We Move Our Feet" Presented by: The Evelyn Gibson Lowery . . . — Map (db m111683) HM
78Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — The Selma Movement(The Beginning) / (The Prize)
(The Beginning) The major civil rights protest, which focused national attention on the issue of racial discrimination in voting & led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, was centered in Selma. In January of 1963 local . . . — Map (db m37662) HM
79Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Turning PointSelma to Montgomery National Historic Trail
By early 1964, the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL) and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's (SNCC) efforts to organize for voting rights had reached a turning point. In July 1964 Judge James Hare, pressured by Selma law enforcement to . . . — Map (db m112369) HM
80Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Union Troops ChargeThe Main Assault of the Outer Works — Battle of Selma —
The Lightening Brigade of the 2nd Division would spearhead the attack between Redoubts No. 13 - No. 16. Artillery covered all the approaches. At 5 p.m. General Long ordered the Second Division forward. "As Long's Second Division charged . . . — Map (db m83682) HM
81Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Valley Creek Presbyterian ChurchOne of state’s first Presbyterian churches
Established in 1816 by eight families from Rocky River Presbyterian Church in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. In 1859 this two-story brick building replaced original wooden structure. Sanctuary and former slave gallery are on second . . . — Map (db m83683) HM
82Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Elmore County Training School
Constructed in 1924 on five acres, this building was one of nine schools constructed in Elmore County with funding assistance from the Julius Rosenwald Fund. Between 1912-32, Julius Rosenwald, a Jewish philanthropist and CEO of Sears, Roebuck and . . . — Map (db m70548) HM
83Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Welton Blanton Doby High SchoolElmore County
W. B. Doby served as the first President of the Elmore County Teachers Association, Principal of Elmore County Training School, and as an ordained minister in the A.M.E. Church. Local leaders dedicated this school for African-American students on . . . — Map (db m94614) HM
84Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Wetumpka's Bridges
(side 1) In 1834, the Wetumpka Toll Bridge Co. built the first of four bridges spanning the Coosa River at this site. It was destroyed in a flood in 1844. A second toll bridge was completed the same year by John Godwin whose slave, . . . — Map (db m69449) HM
85Alabama (Escambia County), Atmore — Escambia County Training School
In 1920, a wooden building was constructed as the Atmore Colored School and operated until 1925. In 1926, a new wood and a brick building was erected with assistance from Rosenwald School fund and it was renamed the Escambia County Training School. . . . — Map (db m100835) HM
86Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Lynching in America / The Lynching of Bunk RichardsonCommunity Remembrance Project
Lynching in America Thousands of Black people were the victims of lynching and racial violence in the United States between 1877 and 1950. The lynching of African Americans during this era was a form of racial terrorism intended to . . . — Map (db m116817) HM
87Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Southern Hill CemeteryEtowah County
Established in 1826 as "The Colored Cemetery," this site is the first and largest African-American cemetery in Gadsden. In 1918, the Mosaic Templars of America, a fraternal organization who provided African Americans with death and burial . . . — Map (db m167227) HM
88Alabama (Etowah County), Rainbow City — Harmony Baptist Church
Oldest church in Etowah County. Organized Saturday, April 2, 1831, at Harmony Meeting House, which was built in 1821, by Edmond Jones at this location. It was here that the Wills Creek Baptist Association was organized in 1836, Harmony being . . . — Map (db m156370) HM
89Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Freetown
In 1867 a group of African American men and women laid the foundations for Freetown. William, John, Albert, George, Richard, and Peter Collins; Susan and Lawrence Moore; Thomas Jeffries; the children of John Jeffries; and Louisa Conway and her . . . — Map (db m38192) HM
90Alabama (Hale County), Gallion — Oak Grove School
Tuskegee educator Booker T. Washington and Julius Rosenwald, Sears, Roebuck & Company president, initiated one of the most ambitiuous school building programs for African Americans in the United States. The Oak Grove School is one example of the . . . — Map (db m83753) HM
91Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — Greensboro Presbyterian Church
Organized 1823 by Rev. James Hillhouse of South Carolina, with Patrick Norris and William Hillhouse, veterans of American Revolution, as founding elders. Original wooden structure replaced by brick building in 1841 under pastorate . . . — Map (db m33746) HM
92Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — Henry County Training SchoolEstablished 1914
Founded by Laura L. Ward. Building designed and constructed by Jim McCauley on land given by Glass Maybin. Classes began Sept., 1917. Principals who served school were: J. H. Jackson, W. R. Rosser, Felix Blackwood, Sr., and William B. Ward, Sr. . . . — Map (db m71809) HM
93Alabama (Henry County), Abbeville — Rosa Parks Lived Here
Front Civil rights pioneer Rosa McCauley Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Shortly after her birth her parents James and Leona McCauley, moved here to a 260 acre farm owned by her grandparents, Anderson and Louisa . . . — Map (db m83758) HM
94Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Newville High School / Newville Rosenwald School
Side 1 Newville High School The first known school in Newville was at Center Church in 1881. When Grange Hall was built in 1891, church services and school were held on the first floor. In 1913, Grange Hall was torn down and the . . . — Map (db m71812) HM
95Alabama (Houston County), Dothan — Cherry Street African Methodist Episcopal Church
On this site in 1877 Gaines Chapel Church was organized. A wooden structure was erected adjacent to an existing graveyard. In 1891 and 1901 additional land was purchased. In 1908 the present building was dedicated. This structure was of early . . . — Map (db m73362) HM
96Alabama (Jackson County), Paint Rock — The History of Paint Rock, Alabama / Paint Rock Arrests in 1931 Began 'Scottsboro Boys' Cases
(side 1) The History of Paint Rock, Alabama Originally Camden circa 1830, the post office was renamed Redman in 1846 and became Paint Rock on May 17, 1860. After the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Co. built a depot and water . . . — Map (db m69756) HM
97Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Jackson County Courthouse And The Scottsboro Boys
Marker front: Constructed in 1911-1912 and designed by architect Richard H. Hunt, the Jackson County Courthouse is a Neo-Classical, brick building situated on a town square in Scottsboro, the county seat of Jackson County. The front, . . . — Map (db m22264) HM
98Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Scottsboro Railroad Depot
The Memphis and Charleston Railroad Company constructed the Scottsboro Railroad Depot in 1860-1861 as a passenger and freight facility. The rail line ran throughout the Confederacy and the Union considered its capture vital to cutting off supplies . . . — Map (db m22258) HM
99Alabama (Jackson County), Stevenson — Averyville
During the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War, a freedmen’s community was established in this area called Averyville, named for the Pennsylvania minister and successful businessman Charles Avery, a longtime and faithful champion of Negro . . . — Map (db m108803) HM
100Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — "Peace Be Still"Mark 4:39
On Palm Sunday, 1963 Rev. N. H. Smith, Rev. John T. Porter and Rev. A. D. King led a sympathy march from St. Paul United Methodist Church down 6th Avenue North in support of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. Ralph . . . — Map (db m73023) HM

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Feb. 27, 2021