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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Franklin, Tennessee Historical Markers

 
125th O.V.I. Marker image, Touch for more information
By Larry Gertner, May 2007
125th O.V.I. Marker
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 125th O.V.I."Opdycke's Tigers" — 1st Brigade 2nd Division 4th Corps U.S.
The 125th O.V.I. was formed at Camp Cleveland, Ohio in August of 1862. The regiment was stationed in Franklin in the spring of 1863. On November 30, 1864, the 125th were in reserve 150 yards north of the Carter house with Opdycke’s brigade. Without . . . — Map (db m103620) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 183rd Ohio Volunteer InfantryThird Brigade — 2nd Division 23rd Corps U.S.
The 183rd Ohio was mustered into Federal Service November 13, 1864 at Camp Dennison, Ohio. With 700 officers and enlisted men present, it arrived at Rutherford Creek on November 28th and was engaged in skirmishing at Spring Creek the following day. . . . — Map (db m103619) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3" Ordinance Gun
Made and presented to Confederate Memorial Park by Harold Winstead in honor of his ancestor, Samuel Winstead, in whose honor this hill was named and who is buried 200 yds. NW of this location. — Map (db m103588) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 430 Main Street
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m69504) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 432-438 Main Street
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m69505) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — A Crucial War Zone 1863
For the Union, 1863 brought the Emancipation Proclamation, victory at Gettysburg, and the capturing of the Mississippi River. Federal forces continued their drive toward Atlanta in hopes of ending the war altogether. But on March 5th, seven miles . . . — Map (db m103335) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — A Dream PostponedThe Struggle of Freed People in Williamson County
To assist the newly freed with court cases, education, and housing, Congress formed the Freedmen’s Bureau in 1865. An additional goal of the Bureau was to help create labor contracts between white landowners and the formerly enslaved. In October . . . — Map (db m103487) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Abram Maury
Abram Maury (1766-1825) came to this area from Virginia in 1797 to settle on 640 acres he purchased from Major Anthony Sharpe. In 1798, he reserved a square-shaped area of 109 acres for a town he intended to name Marthasville for his wife. Instead, . . . — Map (db m50694) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Advancing With Scott's BrigadeFollowing in Their Footsteps
(preface) This walkway traces the route that the men of Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott’s brigade took in the Battle of Franklin. Read below to see what it was like then and to follow in their footsteps Distance to Union Lines: 1,200 . . . — Map (db m103665) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Advancing With Scott's BrigadeFollowing in Their Footsteps
(preface) This walkway traces the route that the men of Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott’s brigade took in the Battle of Franklin. Read below to see what it was like then and to follow in their footsteps Distance to Union Lines: 1,500 . . . — Map (db m103667) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Advancing With Scott's BrigadeFollowing in Their Footsteps
(preface) This walkway traces the route that the men of Confederate Gen. Thomas Scott’s brigade took in the Battle of Franklin. Read below to see what it was like then and to follow in their footsteps Distance to Union Main Line: 1,000 . . . — Map (db m103961) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Allen Manufacturing Company
This complex of ten depression-era buildings, with a total of 310,000 square feet, housed four different factories over its industrial lifetime. The buildings were built for the Allen Manufacturing Co. (stove manufacturers) in 1929. More than . . . — Map (db m69023) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Andrew Jackson
On his return from New Orleans Andrew Jackson gave a brass cannon to Franklin A part of his soldiery camped here on their way to New Orleans. — Map (db m61730) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Attack on the Union LeftInto a Withering Fire — Hood's Campaign
(preface) In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the . . . — Map (db m70660) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Attack On The Union Left / Lot No. 1 in the Plan of Carnton
(obverse) Attack On The Union Left Confederate Regiments from Brig. Gen. Thomas Scott's, Brig. Gen. John Adams', and Brig. Gen. Winfield Featherstons's Brigades of Maj. Gen. William Loring's Division advanced under artillery fire . . . — Map (db m40107) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Bate's DivisionCheatham’s Corps — Army of Tennessee C.S.A.
Maj. Gen. Wm. B. Bate’s division consisted of Smith’s Tennessee-Georgia, Bullock’s Florida and Jackson’s Georgia brigades. The division, struck the main line west of Brown’s Division, their right in the locust grove and their left at the Carter’s . . . — Map (db m103616) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 49 — Battle Ground Academy
Founded in 1889 as Battle Ground Academy, named for its location where the Battle of Franklin occurred in 1864, and dedicated in an address by Confederate General William B. Bate, later governor and U.S. Senator, this boys' preparatory school was . . . — Map (db m62329) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of FranklinArtillery Hellfire
Several Federal gun crews delivered relentless fire to this portion of the Franklin battlefield late in the afternoon of November 30, 1864. At least fourteen of the Union’s thirty-six fieldpieces engaged at Franklin could hit the Eastern flank here. . . . — Map (db m103508) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of FranklinInto the Twilight
Visibility was always a critical factor in Civil War battles. Officers and enlisted men needed clear lines of sight to know where to move, when to stay in place, and in which direction to shoot. At the Battle of Franklin, two important factors . . . — Map (db m103685) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of FranklinThe Landscape Shapes the Battle
During the Civil War, topography played a major role in shaping events. The Battle of Franklin was a prime example. When Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood’s 20,000 men charged across these fields, the steep hills to their left and the angling . . . — Map (db m103686) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, AftermathUnion POWs and the Sultana Disaster
More than 700 Union soldiers were made prisoners before, during, and after the Battle of Franklin. Although the war was almost over, many of them would never see their homes again. The vast majority were taken to prison camps in Cahaba, Alabama, and . . . — Map (db m103505) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankCarnton
Today’s Carnton presents a quiet pastoral setting, but before the Civil War, John and Carrie McGavock’s farm would have looked more like a bustling agricultural factory. Their plantation encompassed 700 acres, more than three times the amount . . . — Map (db m103441) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankCarnton Becomes a Hospital
Confederate Gen. Willaim Loring’s division marched across the McGavock plantation during the battle. Anticipating heavy casualties, his officers chose Carnton for a hospital. The main house was a sound choice. Less than a mile (.6 km) from . . . — Map (db m103442) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankRecruiting For War
On September 28, 1861, local men sympathetic to the Confederacy gathered in this field to form the Williamson County Cavalry (Co. F, 4th Tennessee Cavalry). The local newspaper pronounced the company composed of “about 100 of the finest . . . — Map (db m103480) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankLoring's Division
In the Battle of Franklin, Confederate Gen. William W. Loring’s division formed the far right flank of the Confederate assault line. Numbering approximately 3,500 men, it marched across these fields and smashed into the Federal lines. The attempt to . . . — Map (db m103482) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankCasualties in Perspective
How costly was the Battle of Franklin? More Americans became casualties in this five-hour battle than were lost in the first twenty-four hours of the Invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, the largest amphibious assault in history. In both . . . — Map (db m103484) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankDistances to Local & State Landmarks
(map panels) (left) Distances to Local Landmarks (right) Distances to Major Landmarks — Map (db m103509) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankNashville & Decatur Railroad
About 600 yards (550 meters) in front of you is the Nashville & Decatur Railroad. During the war, this line was only a few years old, but it was the most direct north-south transportation route through Middle Tennessee. Consequently, it was one . . . — Map (db m103635) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankThe Average Soldier
Whether in the Union or Confederate ranks, the typical Civil War soldier at Franklin came from a rural world. More than likely, he lived in the countryside or in a town about the size of Franklin, which had a population of about 750 at the time. . . . — Map (db m103636) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankShells from Fort Granger
About one mile (1.6 km) directly north of you stands Fort Granger, a large earthen fortification that provided the Union army a commanding view over much of this area. Built in the spring of 1863, Fort Granger sat on top of Figuers’ Bluff . . . — Map (db m103637) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankLewisburg Pike Toll House
Road construction boomed in Tennessee during the mid-1800s, and the Nashville area was the state’s primary highway hub. Private companies built most of the roads, and they placed tollhouses along the routes to collect fees to cover costs and create . . . — Map (db m103666) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankMcGavock Slaves and the Civil War
Of Tennessee’s 83 counties in 1860, only in three did slaves outnumber whites. Two were near the Mississippi Rover, where large plantations flourished. The third was Williamson County. The McGavocks of Carnton, who owned 39 people in 1860, were . . . — Map (db m103687) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Battle of Franklin, Eastern FlankMcGavock Gristmill and Sawmill
During the battle, Confederate forces charged a gristmill and sawmill that stood directly in front of you on the Lewisburg Pike. In antebellum Middle Tennessee, tobacco grew well in the north, while cotton blossomed in the south. Corn, wheat, and . . . — Map (db m103960) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Becoming the Front Line 1862
"Throughout 1862 first one army would be encamped in town, then the Federals. Raids were frequent, then we would run down in our cellar to get out of the range of the bullets. Sometimes we would spend a whole night there. The quiet would go on for . . . — Map (db m103333) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Brigadier's Walk
The sense of pride, honor and integrity of the everyday fighting man made the brilliant careers of these five Brigadier Generals possible. Largely non-slave holding, these brave men of the Army of Tennessee followed Adams, Carter, Strahl, Gist and . . . — Map (db m103592) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Brown's DivisionArmy of Tennessee — C.S.A.
This division, commanded by Major General John C. Brown, consisted or Gordon’s, Strahl’s and Carter’s Tennessee Brigades, and Gist’s South Carolina and Georgia Brigade. They were engaged south and west of the Carter House to the locust grove. Around . . . — Map (db m103617) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Captain Theodrick (Tod) Carter20th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Smith’s Brigade — Bate’s Division, Cheatham’s Corps, Army of Tennessee C.S.A.
Born at the Carter House March 24, 1840 and educated at the Harpeth Academy. He was an attorney-at-law and a Master Mason. Tod enlisted in Co. H, 20th Tenn. Inf. May 1, 1862. Appointed Assistant Quarter Master on Oct. 24, 1862 and served as a war . . . — Map (db m103618) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Carnton PlantationBattle of Franklin
Carnton was built ca. 1815 by Randal McGavock (1768-1843), planter, political leader and mayor of Nashville. Named after the McGavock home in Northern Ireland, the house was greatly enlarged by Randal ca.1826. His son, John, later added the Greek . . . — Map (db m62916) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Carnton PlantationCaught in the Middle — Hood's Campaign
(preface) In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the . . . — Map (db m83170) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Carter Gin House
The Carter cotton gin house, the scene of some of the bloodiest fighting of the Battle of Franklin, was located about 80 yards east of Columbia Pike. General Adams, Cleburne and Granbury were killed near here. The gin house, a weatherboarded, frame . . . — Map (db m83171) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 34 — Carter House»—→
Built 1830 by Fountain Branch Carter, and in use by three generations of his family. Here was command post of Maj. Gen. Jacob D. Cox, Federal field commander of Schofield's delaying action. The hottest fighting took place just east and south nearby, . . . — Map (db m40114) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Carter's Cotton GinBloody Ground — Hood's Campaign
(Preface): In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood let the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to . . . — Map (db m83172) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 57 — Chickasaw Treaty Council
In the spring of 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act providing the President with means to exchange the lands of the five civilized Indian nations of the Southeast for lands west of the Mississippi. On August 20, 1830 Andrew Jackson met in . . . — Map (db m61729) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Cleburne’s DivisionArmy of Tennessee — C.S.A.
This division was commanded by Major General Patrick R. Cleburne, and consisted of Granbury’s Texas Brigade, Govan’s Arkansas Brigade, and Lowry’s Alabama and Mississippi Brigade. They were engaged around the Cotton Gin, which stood S.E. of the . . . — Map (db m103615) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Cockrell's Missouri Brigade CSA
On this field of honor Missouri men of Cockrell’s Brigade fought and died for Southern independence November 30, 1864 Franklin, Tennessee Presented by Missourians of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and his friends in memory of . . . — Map (db m103597) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 45 — Confederate CemeteryBattle of Franklin
Following the Battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, 1864, John McGavock, owner of “Carnton,” collected and buried here the bodies of 1496 Confederates. The five general officers killed there were interred elsewhere after being brought to the . . . — Map (db m83173) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Confederate Reunions at McGavock's Grove
Years after the Civil War ended, veterans slowly began to form reunions. Among the most common gathering sites were cemeteries, where survivors paid homage to their fallen comrades. The McGavock Confederate Cemetery was one such meeting place. . . . — Map (db m103488) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Courthouse
Williamson County's first courthouses, one log, one brick, were in the center of the square. This the third, completed in 1858 under the supervision of John W. Miller, is one of seven antebellum courthouses in Tennessee. The four iron columns were . . . — Map (db m61696) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Epicenter of the Battle of FranklinThe Carter House — Hood's Campaign
(Preface): In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northeast against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to . . . — Map (db m83174) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Ewen Cameron
On this site in 1798 Ewen Cameron built the first house in the town of Franklin. Cameron was born Feb. 23, 1768 in Balgalkan, Ferintosh, Scotland. He emigrated to Virginia in 1785 and from there came to Tennessee. Cameron died Feb. 28, 1846, having . . . — Map (db m61692) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Federal BreastworksBattle of Franklin
The breastworks, thirty yards south, were held by Grose’s Brigade, Kimball’s Division of the Fourth U.S. Army Corps on Nov. 30, 1864. Around 5 p.m., the brigade was attacked by two regiments of Finley’s Florida Brigade, C.S.A. The Floridians . . . — Map (db m103623) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Federal Forward Line
On November 30, 1864, Col. Joseph Conrad's and Col. John Lane's brigades of Brig. Gen. George D. Wagner's Federal Second Division, Fourth Corps, were placed east and west of the road near this position one half mile south of the Federal main line. . . . — Map (db m83176) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Field HospitalsCaring for the Wounded — Hood's Campaign
(Preface):In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to the . . . — Map (db m83178) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Fort Granger
In the spring of 1863, Federal forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger occupied Franklin. Construction of major fortifications began under the direction of Capt. W. E. Merrill, U.S. Corps of Engineers, the largest of them being placed on . . . — Map (db m40116) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Fort GrangerFranklin Stronghold — Hood's Campaign
In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman’s supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” Hood . . . — Map (db m41119) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Fort Granger Federal Garrison
The Federal Garrison at Franklin centered on the earthworks fortification on Figuers’ Bluff. Detached works included Gen Granger’s headquarters at a smaller works some 700 yards east at Ralston Lane, gun emplacement on Liberty Pike east of Ralston . . . — Map (db m103626) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Franklin Cotton Factory and Foundry / Lillie Mills
(side 1) Franklin Cotton Factory and Foundry Dyer Pearl, Thomas Parkes and Joseph L. Campbell established a manufacturing operation for the production of cotton and woolen goods on this 3.5 acres site in 1825. The first steam . . . — Map (db m83179) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 66 — Franklin Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Founded in 1871 as Franklin's first Cumberland Presbyterian Church, the cornerstone was laid on June 3, 1876. Designed by H.C. Thompson, architect of Nashville's Ryman Auditorium, the church was dedicated on April 16, 1877, with the Rev. Thomas Dale . . . — Map (db m61719) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Franklin Noon Rotary Rodeo
The Franklin Noon Rotary Club was chartered in 1948 by nineteen leading Williamson County businessmen, professionals, and farmers. The organization is best known for founding the Franklin Rodeo in 1950, an annual event which has grown into one of . . . — Map (db m83285) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Franklin Special School DistrictEstablished in 1906
(side 1) On October 27, 1906, the Franklin School Board was created by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. In April 1907, the Tennessee Legislature officially recognized District Nine, Franklin City School System. The original Franklin . . . — Map (db m83180) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Freeman's Battery, Forrest's Artillery
Dedicated to Freeman’s Battery, Forrest’s Artillery and Samuel L. Freeman, Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first artillery captain. The battery was captured on the Lewisburg Pike near Franklin, TN, April 10, 1863 — Map (db m103587) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Hincheyville
In early 1819, Alfred Balch, Felix Grundy, James Irwin, Randal McGavock, and James Trimble developed Hincheyville, Franklin's first subdivision. The ninety acres, extending from Fair to Eleventh Avenues, including 26 lots on Fair Street, 25 lots on . . . — Map (db m61716) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 11 — Hood and SchofieldNov. 30, 1864
Schofield, slipping his army past Hood's at Spring Hill, entrenched in the southern edge of Franklin, 2 mi. N. Here Hood attacked him frontally about 4 p.m., sustaining heavy losses. Schofield withdrew to Nashville, Hood followed. Hood's command . . . — Map (db m62198) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Hood's Retreat
Following the Battle of Franklin, the Union army dashed north into their supply base of Nashville and its vast network of fortifications where Gen. George H. Thomas had assembled a sizeable force. In pursuit came Gen. John Bell Hood’s battered . . . — Map (db m103490) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 56 — John H. Eaton
On this site stood the home of John H. Eaton, U.S. Senator (1818-1829) and Secretary of War under Andrew Jackson (1829-1831). He resigned from the Cabinet after a scandal which reflected on the reputation of his controversial wife, Peggy. He served . . . — Map (db m61693) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 30 — John Price Buchanan
Born 3 miles, NE, Oct. 24,1847; member of the Legislature, 1887 to 1891, he was governor from 1891 to 1893. Elected by a farmer-labor coalition, his administration was marked by labor unrest and reform, extension of the public school system, and . . . — Map (db m68998) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Leigh-Morgan Property at Grassland
(Side One) In 1898 Thomas J. and Mattie Dudley Leigh purchased a 103-acre parcel of land on the west side of Hillsboro Pike in the area known as the Grassland community. Supporting the family as farm land and orchids, the property evolved . . . — Map (db m68996) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Lot 60 at the Corner of Cameron & Church Street / "Bucket of Blood" Neighborhood
(side 1) Lot 60 at the Corner of Cameron & Church Street In 1867 Rev. Otis O. Knight of Nashville purchased Lot 60, selling the southern half to ex-slave A.N.C. Williams, and the northern half for the construction of Wiley Memorial . . . — Map (db m69010) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D69 — Lotz House
In 1858, the Lotz House was built on property purchased from Fountain B. Carter by German immigrant Albert Lotz, a master carpenter and piano maker. On November 30, 1864, before the Battle of Franklin, the Lotz family sought refuge across the street . . . — Map (db m62335) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Lotz HouseUnion Counterattack — Hood's Campaign
(Preface): In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood let the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to . . . — Map (db m83181) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Main Entrenchment Federal Battle Line
Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864. Federal commander, Gen. John M. Schofield. Confederate commander, Gen. John B. Hood. Bloodiest battle of the War Between the States for numbers involved. In this battle fell six Confederate generals: Cleburne, . . . — Map (db m103601) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Maj. Gen. William W. Loring's Division
During the Battle of Franklin this Confederate division composed of three brigade commanded by Brig. Gens. Winfield Scott Featherston, Thomas Moore Scott,and John Adams, swept past Carnton as it approached the Federal line just after 4 p.m. on . . . — Map (db m103337) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Major General Patrick R. Cleburne CSA
“Well, Govan, if we are to die, let us die like men.” Nov. 30, 1864 Presented as a tribute to General Cleburne and his gallant division by Dr. and Mrs. David R. Watts — Map (db m103598) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Masonic Temple
This Masonic Temple, home of Hiram Lodge No. 7, built in 1823, was the first three-story building in Tennessee, and was at that time, the tallest building west of the Allegheny Mountains. It has been occupied by Hiram Lodge No. 7 since its . . . — Map (db m61690) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — McGavock Confederate Cemetery
After the Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864, the Union Army withdrew into Nashville. Casualties of over 8,000 Union and Confederate soldiers lay upon the field. In pursuit of the withdrawing Union forces, Confederate General John Bell Hood left . . . — Map (db m69042) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — McGavock Confederate CemeteryLabor of Devotion
In the spring of 1866, the bodies of Confederate soldiers killed at the Battle of Franklin were exhumed from their temporary graves and reburied here, on this two-acre plot adjacent to Carnton, home of John and Carrie McGavock. Over about ten weeks, . . . — Map (db m83183) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — McGavock Confederate Cemetery
In the spring of 1866, Col. John McGavock, seeing the deteriorating condition of the Confederate graves on the Franklin battlefield, set aside 2 acres of Carnton Plantation as the nation's largest private Confederate cemetery. The dead were . . . — Map (db m84205) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — McGavock Family Cemetery
Buried here, beginning ca. 1818, are the remains of numerous family members. Among them are Randal McGavock (1768-1843), planter and political leader who built Carnton; his son, Col. John McGavock (1815-1893), successful farmer and civic leader who . . . — Map (db m84174) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Mississippi
Twas November Thirtieth, Eighteen Sixty-Four Mississippi’s sons and fathers into battle again were poured. The young and the old. The brave and the bold. Their mission all too plain – to charge across what would be Franklin’s bloody plain. . . . — Map (db m103590) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Natchez Street Community
After the Civil War, Natchez Street became Franklin’s primary African-American community. Black businesses included: Undertakers J.T. Patton, Maggie Betsy Prince, Henry Ewing; Plumber Morton Thomas; Plasterer Bud Cheatham; Bricklayers Son Scruggs, . . . — Map (db m69021) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Old Factory Store
(side 1) In 1799 Franklin founder Abram Maury sold Lot 20 to Joseph McBride. By 1825 Dyer Pearl, Thomas Parkes, and Joseph L. Campbell operated a steam-powered cotton & grist mill on East Margin and owned Lot 20 upon which was built a brick . . . — Map (db m61727) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Opdycke's Bridgade
Col. Emerson Opdycke's Federal brigade was positioned in this area 150 yards north of the Carter House, east and west of Columbia Pike. Without orders, the Federal brigade attacked a portion of Cleburne's and Brown's Confederate divisions after they . . . — Map (db m40115) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Original St. Philip Catholic ChurchBuilt In 1871
James Woods, a local farmer, sold this property in 1847 to Bishop Miles of Nashville. He purchased the land with $400 in gold donated by the Franklin Female Academy for the purpose of building a church. Thus was begun the St. Philip Catholic . . . — Map (db m83184) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Presbyterian Church
The Presbyterian Church was organized in Franklin by the Reverend Gideon Blackburn on June 8, 1811 and first located near City Cemetery. The church moved to this location in 1842. The Reverend A.N. Cunningham was pastor from 1843 to 1857. In 1847, . . . — Map (db m61726) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Retreat Action at Franklin
On Dec 17, 1864, perhaps the largest cavalry engagement on American soil took place along Franklin Pike and the Nashville & Decatur RR sweeping across what is now Harlinsdale farm. Maj Gen James H. Wilson’s US Cavalry Corps pursued Hood’s retreating . . . — Map (db m103625) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Riverview
Built in 1902 by Henry Hunter Mayberry (1861-1931), a native of Williamson County and a man of integrity, broad vision and generosity. He was the developer of Franklin’s water system and gave the only spring large enough to service it. In 1908 he . . . — Map (db m68999) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Samuel Winstead (1778-1851)
(side 1) Samuel Winstead, a native of Virginia, came here in 1799. At his death, his $34,000 estate included several tracts of land and 78 slaves. His will granted freedom and passage to Liberia for all his slaves upon the death of his . . . — Map (db m62197) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — 3D 51 — St. Paul's Episcopal Church
This "Mother Church of the diocese of Tennessee," was begun in 1831, four years after its congregation was organized in 1827. Here James H Otey, its first rector, was elected the first bishop of Tennessee. It was so damaged through use as a Civil . . . — Map (db m61697) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — St. Philip Catholic Church
(side 1) Missionary priests first celebrated mass in Franklin in 1821 in a private home for the two resident Catholic families. The Nashville bishopric planned a Catholic church in Williamson County as early as 1843, but it was the influx . . . — Map (db m83185) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Standing at the Crossroads 1861
Pre-war Middle Tennessee thrived. Residents free and enslaved grew copious amounts of corn, wheat, timber, cattle, and horses, and no area of the South produced more mules and hog. Toads, rails, and telegraph wires webbed across the center of the . . . — Map (db m103328) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Tennessee Association,Sons of Confederate Soldiers
Side A The association was established at Franklin on Sept. 14, 1892, in conjunction with the annual reunion of the Tennessee Association of Confederate Soldiers which was held in McGavock's Grove 500 yards Southeast of this marker. The . . . — Map (db m77127) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Tennessee Valley Divide
The high ground you are on is part of a long ridge that divides central Tennessee. Streams south of the divide flow to the Duck and Tennessee Rivers, while streams to the north empty into the Cumberland River. Travelers in the early days of the . . . — Map (db m83186) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Tennessee, A Grave or a Free Home
No words can describe the courage, endurance, and gallantry of the Army of Tennessee. They marched, fought, bled, and died for a Cause they knew was right. On that Indian Summer afternoon of November 30, 1864, the courageous Army of Tennessee . . . — Map (db m103589) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — The Battle of Franklin
Soon after passing this point, the Southern assault came within range of Federal artillery. Just west of here, an advanced line of 3,000 Union troops began to fall back, and the Confederates pursued them into the main Union line. In moments, the . . . — Map (db m103360) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — The Cotton Gin Assault
Into this area rushed elements of four Confederate divisions on November 30, 1864 as they assaulted the Federal lines near the Carter cotton gin. Crossed largely by troops from Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s Division, the area was flooded by men from . . . — Map (db m83187) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — The Final Campaign 1864
In late 1864, the last major campaign of the Civil War swept into Middle Tennessee. The Confederate Army of Tennessee commanded by Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood, moved out of Georgia after the fall of Atlanta, marched across Alabama, and pushed north . . . — Map (db m103359) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — The Long Road to Recovery
The last state to leave the Union, Tennessee became the first to reenter in 1866. But the end of the Civil War did not bring an end to hardships. no other state except Virginia except Virginia experienced more military engagements than Tennessee. . . . — Map (db m103485) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Trinity Church
This United Methodist church was an outgrowth of Mt. Zion Methodist church, established about 1840 in Burke Hollow near the Tom Page house. Mt. Zion was destroyed in 1863 by Union soldiers who used its materials for a signal station on Daddy's Knob. . . . — Map (db m54053) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — U.S.D. 1812
This Monument memorializes War of 1812 soldiers buried along the Old Natchez Trace, and it honors the service of all brave volunteers who marched on the Natchez Trace during the War of 1812 to help establish American Independence. The Natchez . . . — Map (db m83188) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Union HeadquartersPlanning for Battle — Hood's Campaign
(Preface):In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to the . . . — Map (db m83189) HM WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Williamson County
Dedicated to the men and women of Williamson County who served their country in time of need October 26, 1799 • October 26, 1999 — Map (db m61731) WM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Willow Plunge
Opened in 1924, this was the largest outdoor concrete swimming pool in the South. Willow Plunge was owned, and for many years operated, by the Claiborne Kinnard family. Water was piped 1,023 feet from a spring to the willow-shaded double pool which . . . — Map (db m69031) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Winstead HillFateful Decision — Hood's Campaign
(Preface): In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to . . . — Map (db m83190) HM
Tennessee (Williamson County), Franklin — Winstead Hill Observation PostBattle of Franklin — Wed. November 30, 1864
“The line advanced at 4 p.m. with orders to drive the enemy into or across the Big Harpeth River… Never did troops fight more gallantly.” Gen. John Bell Hood Army of Tennessee Confederate States of America — Map (db m103599) HM WM

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