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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail Historical Markers

Markers related to the War of 1812 in the area of the Chesapeake Bay produced by the National Park Service.
 
Wide view of Barney at Bladensburg Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. Makali Bruton, January 25, 2015
Wide view of Barney at Bladensburg Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1District of Columbia (Washington), Barney Circle — Barney at BladensburgStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Barney Circle honors U.S. Navy Commodore Joshua Barney. In August 1814, Barney, his Chesapeake Flotillamen, and a contingent of U.S. Marines guarded a bridge over the Eastern Branch (Anacostia River) on today's Bladensburg Road, NE. When it became . . . — Map (db m80473) HM
2District of Columbia (Washington), Barney Circle — Heroes of 1814Star-Spangled Banner Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Congressional Cemetery, founded 1807, is the resting ground for many War of 1812 figures. Among them are Navy Yard Commandant Thomas Tingey, the first architect of the Capitol, Dr. William Thornton, State Department Clerk Stephen Pleasonton, and . . . — Map (db m80481) HM
3District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Destroying the LibraryStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The original Library of Congress occupied a room in the U.S. Capitol. When British troops burned the Capitol in 1814, the collection was destroyed. After the war Thomas Jefferson helped re-establish the library by selling to Congress at a . . . — Map (db m80848) HM
4District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Fiery DestructionStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
“[The British] put a slow match to the [Sewall] house … and those rockets burst until … they made the rafters fly East and West.” — Enslaved African American diarist and eyewitness, Michael Shiner. As the British . . . — Map (db m87856) HM
5District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — The Capitol in FlamesStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The U.S. Capitol was the British troop's first target when they arrived in Washington on August 24, 1814, only hours after their afternoon victory at the Battle of Bladensburg. The invaders fired rockets through the Capitol's windows. When the . . . — Map (db m80844) HM
6District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Peace at Last!Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Octagon Once was the city residence of wealthy Virginia landowner Colonel John Tayloe III. After the British burned the White House and other government buildings, President James Madison accepted Tayloe's invitation to use the Octagon as a . . . — Map (db m87563) HM
7District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Georgetown RefugeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812 — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
In 1814 this was the home of the Charles Carroll family, fiends of President James Madison and his wife, Dolley. Carroll came to the President’s House on August 24, as Madison was returning from the defeat at Battle of Bladensburg. Soon word arrived . . . — Map (db m95914) HM
8District of Columbia (Washington), Georgetown — Watching the FlamesStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812 — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On August 24, 1814, as word spread that the British were coming, Dr. William Thornton and his wife Anna Marie fled their downtown F Street home and took refuge here at Tudor Place, home of their friend Martha Parke Custis Peter. That night, Mrs. . . . — Map (db m95949) WM
9District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest Federal Center — Escape Across the PotomacStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
As war with Britain wore on, some U.S. military leaders believed the nation's capital, with its inland location and military defenses, was safe. So Washingtonians were cruelly surprised when the British invaded on August 24, 1814. As the enemy . . . — Map (db m97215) HM
10Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Standing GuardStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Fort Severn and Fort Madison on this stretch of the Severn River, along with a gun battery at Horn Point in Eastport, made Annapolis the best-fortified city in Maryland at the start of the War of 1812. British ships hovered near the harbor several . . . — Map (db m79920) HM
11Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — The City SparedStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
British vessels anchored offshore several times in 1813 and 1814, giving Annapolis good reason to expect an attack. Lookouts watched enemy maneuvers from the statehouse dome. Public records were removed from the city for safekeeping. When British . . . — Map (db m79936) HM
12Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Edgewater — Prized PropertyStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
A victory off the coast of Brazil inspired John Contee to name this property “Java’s Farm.” Contee was a lieutenant on the USS Constitution when it captured and burned the British frigate HMS Java, December 29, 1812. Contee purchased a . . . — Map (db m80857) HM
13Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Linthicum Heights — The Heart SpokeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Twin Oaks - the name evokes a rural character long since lost to this part of Anne Arundel County. Built in 1857 by William Linthicum, this antebellum manor home presided over a 130-acre farm. Twin oaks was the summer retreat of . . . — Map (db m68392) HM
14Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Bitter EndStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla was trapped in the shallows just upriver from here. With orders to keep his boats out of enemy hands, Barney reluctantly ordered his men to destroy the flotilla when the British approached. They laid trains of . . . — Map (db m79987) HM
15Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Pasadena — Observing the EnemyStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Bodkin Island, having an excellent view down the Bay, was an observation station long before the war. The "Bodkin Telegraphe", a flag-signalling system based on Baltimore's Federal Hill, alerted Baltimore merchants from here as their ships . . . — Map (db m76732) HM
16Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Pasadena — Prime ViewStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
What became Fort Smallwood provided an ideal vantage point for the start - and end - of the British assalut on Baltimore in 1814. On September 11, ships anchored across the river from here. More than 4,500 troops were rowed ashore at North Point to . . . — Map (db m75087) HM
17Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Skidmore — Tense TimeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Enemy ships lying off Sandy Point kept Annapolis on edge in August 1813, as the city braced for attack. It was a trying time for the British, too. A newspaper reported August 14: “Seven deserters came on shore at Sandy Point.” It was . . . — Map (db m79916) HM
18Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Tracys Landing — OutnumberedStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
When 250-300 British troops crossed from Tilghman Island to Town Point on October 27, 1814, they easily overcame five local militiamen manning a nine-pound cannon. They burned three buildings, and a windmill. Moving up Herring Creek, they . . . — Map (db m79956) WM
19Maryland (Baltimore), Belair - Edison — Mounted MessengersStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Captain Henry Thompson, Clifton Mansion’s original owner, formed the First Baltimore Horse Artillery unit in 1813. General John Stricker chose Thompson’s troop to report on enemy movements at the August 1814 Battle of Bladensburg. Selected as . . . — Map (db m79744) WM
20Maryland (Baltimore), Bromo Arts District — In Full GloryStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
At home in the city credited with helping to turn the tide for Americans in the War of 1812, the collections of the Maryland Historical Society preserve evidence of the people who live this history. The Center for Maryland History has the nation’s . . . — Map (db m79842) HM
21Maryland (Baltimore), Canton — Former GloryStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The mouth of Harris Creek was once part of Baltimore’s thriving maritime industry. David Stodder began building ships here in the 1780s. The first U.S. Navy frigate, Constellation, launched from Stodders Shipyard in 1797 and played an active role . . . — Map (db m79670) HM
22Maryland (Baltimore), Downtown — Inspired WordsStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
After 10 harrowing days aboard ship and witnessing the British bombardment of Fort McHenry, Francis Scott Key spent his first night ashore at the Indian Queen Tavern, September 16-17, 1814. The inn operated at this site until the 1830s. Moved by . . . — Map (db m79849) WM
23Maryland (Baltimore), Fells Point — “Baltimore must be tamed…”Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Baltimore’s importance as the commercial heart of the Chesapeake region wasn’t the only reason the British wanted to capture the city in 1814. They also wanted to stifle Fell’s Point---the home port for many of the privateers that preyed on British . . . — Map (db m79711) WM
24Maryland (Baltimore), Fells Point — War in the ChesapeakeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
During the War of 1812 the young United States was embroiled in conflict with Great Britain. From 1812 to 1815 Americans fought to protect their rights and economic independence. They faced superior enemy forces on the homefront and the high . . . — Map (db m79710) HM
25Maryland (Baltimore), Fort McHenry — A Pivotal Battle
British ships launched an attack on Fort McHenry early on September 13, 1814. The fort defended the water approach to the city of Baltimore. The future of the city and possibly the United States depended on the outcome. After the American defeat at . . . — Map (db m61551) HM
26Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Baltimore Turns the TideStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
After crushing the Americans at Bladensburg and invading the Nation’s Capital, the British targeted Baltimore. If they could capture the city---the third largest in the United States and a commercial and shipbuilding hub---they could likely bring . . . — Map (db m79868) HM
27Maryland (Baltimore), Inner Harbor — Mob SceneStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Site — War of 1812 —
Incited by anti-war editorials in the Federal Republican, an angry mob destroyed the newspaper’s Gay Street office in June 1812. Rioters returned when editor Alexander Contee Hanson resumed publication from the Charles Street site on July 27. . . . — Map (db m79870) HM
28Maryland (Baltimore), Little Italy — Crafting a LegacyStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
In 1813, Mary Pickersgill’s flag-making business was commissioned to sew a garrison flag and a smaller storm flag for Fort McHenry, Mary’s mother, daughter, nieces, and African American servants helped complete the task in about seven weeks. On . . . — Map (db m79832) HM
29Maryland (Baltimore), Middle Branch Park — On GuardStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Three gun batteries hugging the upper shore of Ferry Branch guarded the west flank of Fort McHenry. They included the makeshift earthworks of Fort Babcock, the incomplete Fort Covington, and a temporary redoubt at Ferry Point. During the . . . — Map (db m79813) HM
30Maryland (Baltimore), Oldtown — Young MartyrsStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Daniel Wells, 19 and Henry McComas, 18, made history September 12, 1814, when they allegedly killed British commander Major General Robert Ross. The two sharpshooters fired simultaneously. Both were quickly shot dead by British . . . — Map (db m154032) HM
31Maryland (Baltimore), Patterson Park — Prelude to WarStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Events here October 4, 1808, known as “Gin Riots” were more rallies than riots. Some 1,300 horsemen, 400 sailors, and thousands of civilians paraded to Hampstead Hill to destroy 720 gallons of Dutch gin. The British, intercepting . . . — Map (db m79651) HM
32Maryland (Baltimore), Patterson Park — Show of StrengthStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
After the stinging defeat at Bladensburg and invasion of Washington, Americans rallied to save Baltimore. All available able-bodied men were called to build defenses. Black and white, slave and free, united to dig earthworks across Hampstead Hill . . . — Map (db m79653) HM
33Maryland (Baltimore), Riverside Park — Strategic PostStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Known as Lookout Hill, this high ground served as observation post, military camp, and gun battery. Although unfinished when the British arrived, the battery helped fend off a naval flanking attack September 14, 1814. Had the enemy maneuver . . . — Map (db m79809) HM
34Maryland (Baltimore), University of MD at Baltimore — Final RestStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Once Baltimore’s most prestigious cemetery, Westminster Burying Ground was the final resting place for many prominent Baltimoreans, including some 25 from the War of 1812. Notable burials include: General Samuel Smith, commander of American forces . . . — Map (db m79848) HM
35Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — At Patapsco NeckStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The narrow land shaped by Bear Creek, Bread and Cheese Creek, and Back River was the site of the Battle of North Point, September 12, 1814. Some 3,200 Americans clashed with 4,500 British to delay the advance on Baltimore. When Britain threatened . . . — Map (db m79747) WM
36Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Defenders HonoredStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The excitement was palpable as crowds gathered here September 12, 1839, to mark the 25th anniversary of the Battle of North Point. Officials laid the cornerstone for a memorial to the citizens-soldiers who defended Baltimore against British . . . — Map (db m79749) WM
37Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Delay TacticStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
In preparation for a probable British landing at North Point, defensive earthworks were partially dug at a narrows in the Patapsco Peninsula three miles south of here. Midway between North Point and the American defenses at Baltimore, British forces . . . — Map (db m88795) WM
38Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Hitting HomeStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
People living in the path of the British army as it marched toward Baltimore in September 1814 feared the worst. Some hurriedly hid valuables; others packed what they could and fled. Residents who remained faced the enemy with courage. The British . . . — Map (db m83039) HM
39Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Proud of Our StandStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
In 1814 Baltimore's defenders watched about 4,500 British troops march from North Point toward the city. Roughly 3,200 Americans, led by Brigadier General John Stricker, were sent to impede the advance. He positioned his men across a road at a . . . — Map (db m68528) HM
40Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Proud of Our StandStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
In 1814 Baltimore's defenders watched about 4,500 British troops march from North Point toward the city. Roughly 3,200 Americans, led by Brigadier General John Stricker, were sent to impede the advance. He positioned his men across a road at a . . . — Map (db m79757) HM
41Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Squeeze TacticStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
After an impressive victory at Washington, the British targeted Baltimore, the third largest city in the nation with a population of more than 40,000. Troops landed at North Point September 12, 1814, and began marching north to attack the city from . . . — Map (db m102886) HM
42Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — To Honor the HeroesStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Baltimore successfully resisted the British assault in September 1814, thanks to thousands of determined volunteer citizen-soldiers. The following year a grateful city laid the cornerstone for the Battle Monument in downtown Baltimore, the first War . . . — Map (db m83041) HM
43Maryland (Baltimore County), Dundalk — Witness to BattleStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Methodist Meeting House that stood near this site saw action September 11-12, 1814. Brigadier General John Stricker camped 3,200 troops here to await the enemy’s advance. When the Americans withdrew, British soldiers camped on the same grounds. . . . — Map (db m83036) HM
44Maryland (Baltimore County), Fort Howard — The LandingStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Transport ships carrying a British invasion force arrived in Old Road Bay, September 11, 1814. Before dawn the next day, troops were ferried to this landing site to begin the 15-mile march to Baltimore. Reinforced by navy warships, they expected . . . — Map (db m79775) HM
45Maryland (Baltimore County), Sparrows Point — A Heavy PriceStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Private Bernard Todd paid dearly for having his home used for military purposes. When the British threatened Baltimore in 1813, it was headquarters for American troops who guarded the Patapsco Neck. Todd’s property also served as a signal house and . . . — Map (db m80869) HM
46Maryland (Baltimore County), Sparrows Point — Unexpected ResistanceStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
British troops landing at North Point on September 12, 1814, could almost taste victory. Three weeks earlier they defeated the Americans at Bladensburg and invaded Washington. Now 4,500 men marched up North Point Road toward Baltimore, while the . . . — Map (db m79759) HM
47Maryland (Baltimore County), Towson — Hometown HeroStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Nathan Towson, born 1784 in the area named for his family, served in the U.S. Army for 42 years. He enlisted in 1812 when war with Britain seemed imminent. As an artillery captain, Towson distinguished himself in nearly every major engagement on the . . . — Map (db m83413) HM
48Maryland (Baltimore County), Towson — Wartime SupportStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Northampton Iron Furnace, operating from 1761 to about 1830 approximately a mile north of here, played a significant role in the War of 1812. Part of the prosperous Hampton estate, the foundry’s workforce was made up primarily of enslaved . . . — Map (db m83051) HM
49Maryland (Baltimore County), Woodbrook — Fire PowerStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Bellona Gunpowder Company mills, operating from 1801 to 1856, was located in present-day Robert E. Lee Park along the banks of the Jones Falls. Bellona was one of several Baltimore powder mills and produced explosives used in the defense of . . . — Map (db m114575) HM WM
50Maryland (Calvert County), Huntingtown — Warships and Raids
War vessels passed by here in 1814. The Chesapeake Flotilla, consisting of 50- and 75-foot gun barges, sought safety in shallow waters upstream. British ships hotly pursued, and Americans eventually scuttled the flotilla to keep it from . . . — Map (db m68044) HM
51Maryland (Calvert County), Lower Marlboro — Town RavagedStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
A British force of about 160 Royal Marines and 30 Colonial Marines (former slaves) took Lower Marlboro on June 15, 1814, without and resistance. Occupying the town overnight, they burned warehouses full of tobacco, stole a schooner, livestock, and . . . — Map (db m80885) HM
52Maryland (Calvert County), Owings — A County in RuinStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
British raiding parties brought the war to Calvert County in 1814, destroying plantations and towns and carrying away the spoils. With the county’s tobacco-based economy and England as its primary market at the start of the war, Britain’s blockade . . . — Map (db m80882) HM
53Maryland (Calvert County), Prince Frederick — British VengeanceStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
British forces landed at Hallowing Point July 21, 1814. They took 21 slaves and destroyed the home and barn of Colonel Benjamin Mackall. This was perhaps retaliation for the house being used by Calvert County militia. “About 300 men landed . . . — Map (db m80892) HM
54Maryland (Calvert County), Prince Frederick — Panic in Prince Frederick
Imagine the horror of a night-time raid! Residents of Prince Frederick must have known they were British targets, as recent raids had already devastated nearby Lower Marlboro, St. Leonard, and Huntingtown. Alarm spread with news of . . . — Map (db m68045) HM
55Maryland (Calvert County), Solomons — Apt AnchorageStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The point to the north protruding into the river is appropriately called “Point Patience” as it was difficult to maneuver around in the era of sail. The south side of the point provided good anchorage, visibility, protection from other . . . — Map (db m81121) HM
56Maryland (Calvert County), Solomons — Enemy BlockadeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
British warships blockaded the mouth of the Patuxent River after the Chesapeake Flotilla and Royal Navy skirmished off Cedar Point to the south June 1, 1814. Drum Point to the north served as a major British anchorage. The British made mischief in . . . — Map (db m81120) HM
57Maryland (Calvert County), Solomons — Menace on the HorizonStar-Spangled Banner National Historical Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Terror reigned along the Patuxent River in 1814. British invaders plundered and burned towns and plantations on both sides of the river. Menacing warships within view on Somervell’s Island (present-day Solomons) blockaded the river’s mouth, cutting . . . — Map (db m81097) HM
58Maryland (Calvert County), Solomons — Perils along the PatuxentStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Southern Maryland was a dangerous place to live in the hot summer of 1814. British raiding parties traveled the Patuxent River and swept through the countryside terrorizing civilians and taking provisions for British troops gathering in the area. . . . — Map (db m81096) HM
59Maryland (Calvert County), St. Leonard — Fate of the FlotillaStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Some of the fiercest fighting of the war occurred here, where St. Leonard Creek meets the Patuxent River. During the summer of 1814, the British navy tried to flush out and destroy Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla—a rag-tag . . . — Map (db m80899) HM
60Maryland (Calvert County), St. Leonard — Turning PointStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The original St. Leonard’s Town, at the head of St. Leonard Creek, served as the Chesapeake Flotilla’s base in June 1814. The flotilla moved out after intense fighting on June 26, exposing the town to destructive British raids. The town site . . . — Map (db m80893) HM
61Maryland (Calvert County), St. Leonard — War on the WaterStar-Spangled National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The largest naval engagement in Maryland took place in St. Leonard Creek in June 1814. Americans prevailed in a series of skirmishes June 8-10, but the British ultimately trapped them in the creek. The first battle had little effect. On June 26, . . . — Map (db m80898) HM
62Maryland (Cecil County), Charlestown — Shrewd DecisionStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Hard Pressed Militiamen were often assigned elsewhere, leaving hometown defense to those exempted from service due to age or infirmity. Outnumbered, and with limited artillery and ammunition, even the bravest defenders rarely rebuffed an . . . — Map (db m79526) HM
63Maryland (Cecil County), Earleville — Hilltop ViewStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Mount Harmon offered a vantage point for events unfolding along the Sassafras May 6, 1813. Barges of British marines passed by en route to Georgetown and Fredericktown. As they returned, smoke rose in the skies behind them from the burning of . . . — Map (db m156570) HM
64Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — "O! say can you see..."Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail traces the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Along the trail you'll encounter tangible evidence of the war and stories that bring the people and events to life. Discover the far-reaching impacts of . . . — Map (db m154170) HM
65Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Fighting BackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
British raiders traveled along rivers to Upper Bay towns in 1813. Elkton, at the head of Elk River, expected to be a target, because it could be a landing site for an advance on Philadelphia. Citizens of Elkton built three earthen forts and . . . — Map (db m154174) HM
66Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Spirited RebuffStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The British took their terror campaign to the Elk River in April 1813. Their target—Elkton—was protected by several forts. After capturing a gun battery at Frenchtown, British raiders destroyed its storehouses, a fishery, and . . . — Map (db m146172) HM
67Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Strong DefenseStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812 — Fort Hollingsworth-Elk Landing —
Three defensive earthworks safeguarded Elkton---Fort Hollingsworth, here, plus Defiance and Frederick downriver. A 60-foot chain across the channel secured the Elk River. On April 29, 1813, defenders at Fort Defiance fired on approaching . . . — Map (db m145611) HM
68Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — War in the ChesapeakeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
During the War of 1812 the young United States was embroiled in conflict with Great Britain. From 1812 to 1815 Americans fought to protect their rights and economic independence. They faced superior enemy forces on the homefront and the high . . . — Map (db m154177) HM
69Maryland (Cecil County), North East — “O! say can you see…”Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail traces the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Along the trail you'll encounter tangible evidence of the war and stories that bring the people and events to life. Discover the far-reaching impacts of the . . . — Map (db m145483) HM
70Maryland (Cecil County), North East — Bird’s Eye ViewStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
From Bulls (or Bull) Mountain, American militia had a commanding view of Elk Neck peninsula. They observed the Upper Chesapeake Bay and North East River to the north and west, and Elk River to the south and east. As enemy ships approached on . . . — Map (db m152170) HM
71Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — Revered SonStar Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812 — Rodgers Tavern —
John and Elizabeth Rodgers owned and operated the mid-18th century Rodgers Tavern here plus a tavern in Havre de Grace. They ran a ferry business between the two. The hostelry here was a popular stop on the Old Post Road. Their famous . . . — Map (db m145747) HM
72Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — Striking a BlowStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
After burning much of Havre de Grace May 3, 1813, British raiders crossed the Susquehanna to Cecil County. At Principio Iron Works they captured a five-gun battery and destroyed the foundry complex and the bridge across Principio Creek. More than 40 . . . — Map (db m145868) HM
73Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — On AlertStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Port Deposit, then called Creswell’s Ferry, was on high alert May 3, 1813. Smoke rising from towns across the river meant British raiders might strike here. Port Deposit was spared, perhaps due to its well-defended battery. Or, as legend claims, . . . — Map (db m145934) HM
74Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — The British are ComingStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Residents along the Patuxent watched nervously as wave after wave of British warships approached the tiny town of Benedict. For months enemy raiders had terrorized Southern Maryland. Benedict felt their sting twice in June 1814. Now, August 19-20, . . . — Map (db m68046) HM
75Maryland (Charles County), Hughesville — Enemy CampStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
More than 4,000 British troops camped in this valley and surrounding hills August 19, 1814. Leaving their ships anchored at Benedict, they headed north on August 20. Over the next ten days they marched through grueling heat and storms, defeated . . . — Map (db m81190) WM
76Maryland (Charles County), Hughesville — Solid GroundStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
More than 4,000 British troops camped here August 20, 1814, awaiting orders. After sailing from Bermuda in cramped quarters, they appreciated being on firm ground. One noted they were “made happy by the very feeling of the green sod under . . . — Map (db m81188) HM
77Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Potomac DiversionStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
British vessels labored through Kettle Bottom Shoals near here in August 1814 during a diversionary expedition up the Potomac. When Americans destroyed Fort Washington (also called Fort Warburton) without firing a shot, the British proceeded . . . — Map (db m97034) WM
78Maryland (Dorchester County), Taylors Island — TrappedStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Local militia attacked a British raiding party whose vessel was icebound near James Island February 7, 1815. Protected by a breastwork of ice, the Americans continued firing until the crew of 20 surrendered. The two-hour skirmish, the “Battle . . . — Map (db m78799) WM
79Maryland (Harford County), Aberdeen — "O! say can you see..."Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail traces the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Along the trail you'll encounter tangible evidence of the war and stories that bring the people and events to life. Discover the far-reaching impacts of the . . . — Map (db m80609) HM
80Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — "O! say can you see..."Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail traces the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Along the trail you'll encounter tangible evidence of the war and stories that bring the people and events to life. Discover the far-reaching impacts of . . . — Map (db m152380) HM
81Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Attack at FrenchtownStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Frenchtown, on the Elk River, was struck on the morning of April 29, 1813. Rear Admiral Cockburn attempted a surprise attack and was greeted with a barrage from the town's battery. The guns had little effect and the British landed and burned the . . . — Map (db m64176) HM
82Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — British LandingStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The town's defenders -- numbering about 20 -- failed to prevent some 400 British troops from coming ashore May 3, 1813. A gun battery, probably located north of where the lighthouse now stands, was manned single-handedly by John . . . — Map (db m69226) HM
83Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Hero's RewardStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
John O'Neill led a futile defense when British raiders attacked Havre de Grace May 3, 1812. As other defenders fled, O'Neill briefly manned a cannon alone. His courage earned O'Neill a presidential appointment as first keeper of the Concord Point . . . — Map (db m69182) HM
84Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Home BaseStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Five days before the 1813 attack on Havre de Grace, British ships anchored at Spesutia Island, just south of here. Island residents were "greatly terrified" upon their arrival, but were assured they would not be harmed. The Royal Navy used the . . . — Map (db m64165) HM
85Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Home of RefugeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
As the British savagely burned the buildings in Havre de Grace during their morning attack May 3, 1813, the townspeople ran west for protection to a home that stood near this location. The home, known as Bloomsbury, was owned by Baltimore . . . — Map (db m80342) HM
86Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Invasion at DawnStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The British fleet approached Havre de Grace at dawn on the morning of May 3, 1813 in small launches. Rear Admiral Cockburn favored attacking towns at first light. Havre de Grace residents awoke to the terrifying sounds of bombs exploding and rockets . . . — Map (db m64167) HM
87Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Nineteenth Century TravelStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Travelers on the Post Road, the main route of north/south travel, passed through Havre de Grace and crossed the Susquehanna River on a ferry to Perryville. The ferry was chartered in 1695 and remained in use until the first railroad bridge was built . . . — Map (db m64140) HM
88Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — No RespectStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
St. John's Episcopal Church survived the British attack on Havre de Grace May 3, 1813. The enemy spared the 1809 structure but damaged the interior. According to a newspaper account: "Finding nothing to steal (the raiders) 'magnanimously' . . . — Map (db m152375) HM
89Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Out of the FlamesStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Rodgers House miraculously survived the 1813 burning of Havre de Grace. Dating from 1788, this is the town's oldest documented structure. John and Elizabeth Rodgers, parents of U.S. Naval hero John Rodgers, operated a tavern here. They also . . . — Map (db m64144) HM
90Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Principio DestroyedStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
A target of the British during the War of 1812, Principio Iron Foundry was destroyed on May 3, 1813. the foundry, located on the Northeast River was owned by Samuel Hughes and had a contract with the U.S. Navy. In this raid Hughes' losses included . . . — Map (db m64177) HM
91Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — River CrossingStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Little evidence remains of what was once the northernmost navigable deep-water port on the Susquehanna River. The “Upper Ferry” crossed between here and Port Deposit. When the British attacked May 3, 1813, they helped themselves to a . . . — Map (db m80344) HM
92Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Screaming RocketsStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
On the morning of May 3, 1813, the British came ashore at several points and set to work plundering and burning the town. they used Congreve rockets, which made horrible whizzing and popping sounds, to create chaos and terror. The British . . . — Map (db m64209) HM
93Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — State of ReadinessStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
During the War of 1812, Havre de Grace was a fishing village, but also played host to many travelers. The Post Road, the main route of land travel in the day, came through town, and travelers used the local ferry at the north end of town to cross . . . — Map (db m64166) HM
94Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Surprise AttackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
Cannon and rocket fire shook residents of Havre de Grace from their sleep as the British attacked at dawn May 3, 1813. An eyewitness reported: "Distressed people, women and children half naked" ran from their homes. The local militia fled, . . . — Map (db m59832) HM
95Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Susquehanna Lower FerryStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
The taverns and the ferry made Havre de Grace, originally called Susquehanna Lower Ferry, a successful town in the early 19th century. People arrived via the Post Road, the major route of north/south travel in the day, and crossed the Susquehanna . . . — Map (db m64141) HM
96Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Under AttackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The British under Rear Admiral George Cockburn attacked Havre de Grace on May 3, 1813. They went from house to house, burning and confiscating belongings along the way. Beds were ripped apart, and furniture and clothing were ruined. "The hills . . . — Map (db m64142) HM
97Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — War in the ChesapeakeStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
During the War of 1812 the young United States was embroiled in conflict with Great Britain. From 1812 to 1815 Americans fought to protect their rights and economic independence. They faced superior enemy forces on the homefront and the high . . . — Map (db m59827) HM
98Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — American MettleStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
When four British barges entered Worton Creek in July 1814, local militia sprang into action. They ambushed the barges and forced them out of the creek. The Americans claimed they killed about 15 of the 20 enemy soldiers without losing any of their . . . — Map (db m80623) HM
99Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Common CauseStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
The people of Chestertown---a commercial center connected to international trade---generally opposed going to war with Great Britain. Yet when war came, most supported the American effort. Chestertown sent many distinguished fighters to battle. The . . . — Map (db m80629) HM
100Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Rude AwakeningStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812 —
Early September 3, 1814, at Mitchell House, British raiders roused Joseph T. Mitchell and his wife from their bed, shot their horses, and abducted Mitchell. They believed he ws commissary general for all of Maryland. His was a lesser job as . . . — Map (db m80628) HM

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Oct. 29, 2020