Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Sevier County Tennessee Historical Markers

 
A Wonder of the World Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
A Wonder of the World Marker
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — A Wonder of the WorldGreat Smoky Mountains National Park
On Parkway (U.S. 441) south of River Road, on the right when traveling south.
Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of the most pristine natural areas in the eastern United States. Breathtaking mountain scenery, rushing mountain streams, and mature hardwood forests that stretch to the horizon are protected for you and . . . — Map (db m63440) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Baskins Creek
On Baskins Creek Road.
As the story goes..."a party of hunters come up from Knoxville an' kilt 'em a load o' bear an' drug ‘em down to the head o' the creek an' skinned ‘em. They tuk the meat but lef' the skins 'till they could come back atter 'em. Folk begun to talk . . . — Map (db m19386) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Chimney TopsGreat Smoky Mountains National Park
On Newfound Gap Road (U.S. 441) 0.8 miles east of Chimneys Picnic Area #1 Driveway, on the right when traveling east.
Can you imagine smoke wafting from the chimney-like formations on this ridge? Nearly vertical holes in the tops of these jutting rocks make them look like natural chimney flues, and mountain people named them so—Chimney Tops. The Cherokees . . . — Map (db m71926)
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Chimney Tops TrailThe View Is Worth the Climb
On Walker Camp Prong (U.S. 441).
This popular trail climbs to the unique summit formations the Cherokees called "Duniskwalguni," meaning forked antlers. Mountain people thought the twin pinnacles of quartzite and slate resembled the tops of chimneys breaking through the trees. . . . — Map (db m20069) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Gladys Trentham Russell
Near Parkway (U.S. 441) south of River Road, on the left when traveling south.
Birthplace of Gladys Trentham Russell Author of: Call me Hillbilly It happened in the Smokies Smoky Mountain Family Album — Map (db m63438) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Laurel Falls Trail
On Little River Road aka Fighting Creek Gap Road.
The trail ascends gradually for 1⅓ miles to Laurel Falls. It is an easy and delightful walk through a forest which was logged and ravaged by wildfire long before the park was established in 1934. For these reasons, big trees are scarce. With . . . — Map (db m105287) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Lifeblood of the Mountains
On Walker Camp Prong (U.S. 441).
More precipitation falls in the Great Smoky Mountains than anywhere else in the eastern United States. The yearly average is about 890 billion gallons - over 60 inches. Forty-four percent of it is absorbed by the atmosphere and the luxuriant blanket . . . — Map (db m20067) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Martha Jane Ogle Cabin
On The Great Smoky Mountains Pkwy. (U.S. 441) near Cherokee Orchard Rd..
This cabin is the first house built in what is now Gatlinburg. About 1802, William Ogle selected a building site near here, in what he called "The Land of Paradise." Ogle cut and hewed the logs for the house then returned to South Carolina to bring . . . — Map (db m19389) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Mount Le ConteGreat Smoky Mountains National Park
Here on top of Mount Le Conte you are standing more than one vertical mile above the valley below. Although other peaks in the park rise higher, Mount Le Conte boasts the tallest face (distance from base to summit) of any mountain east of the . . . — Map (db m137898) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Noah "Bud" Ogle FarmSelf-Guiding Trail
On Cherokee Orchard Road.
With axe, plow, and gun, the first settlers changed the mountains, cutting into forests that were centuries old. They called this place "Junglebrook" after the dense growths of rhododendron and magnolia that bordered the streams. Between 1883 and . . . — Map (db m20419) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — The American Black BearGreat Smokey Mountains National Park
On Banner Road (US 321).
Between 400 and 600 black bears live in the park, and you could see one almost anywhere. Most bears stay in the backcountry where they feed on grass, leaves, and acorns, fruits, berries, rodents, and carrion. Only a few visit roadsides and developed . . . — Map (db m99830) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — The Chimney Tops
On Walker Camp Prong (U.S. 441).
These twin summits of quartzite and hard slate are familiar landmarks. The peak on the right has a hole like a flue. Mountain people thought these formations looked like chimneys rising above the trees. Mountain laurel, rhododendron, blueberry, and . . . — Map (db m20070) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — The Ephraim Bales Place
Near Cherokee Orchard Road.
It would be difficult to find a better place to imagine mountain life than this. Picture yourself growing up here as one of Ephraim and Minerva Bales' nine children. Look around. This was your world. Imagine yourself and 10 others living in this . . . — Map (db m20423) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Village Gate
Near Parkway (U.S. 441) 0.2 miles west of Cherokee Corner Rd..
This archway is built from bricks made by the slaves of William Rober McCroskey in 1842. They are believed to be the oldest bricks in this area having been used in the first brick building erected in Sevier County. The slate roof came from the . . . — Map (db m70486) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Gatlinburg — Wiley Oakley"Roamin Man of the Mountains"
On Chapman Hwy (U.S. 321) near Wiley Oakley Drive.
1885 - 1954 Mountain Guide....Philosopher Naturalist....Writer Wiley loved his Mountains and all God's Creatures Therein. — Map (db m20415) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Great Smoky Mountains National Park — Indian Gap Road
On Clingmans Dome Road 1.3 miles west of U.S. 441, on the right when traveling west.
Traffic of all sorts once passed through here—Indians, explorers, Confederate soldiers, farmers with livestock herds, merchants, and families traveling for varied reasons. This is Indian Gap. The road trace that descends the hill in front of . . . — Map (db m99069) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Knoxville — 1C 8 — Knox County / Sevier County
On Chapman Highway (Tennessee Route 441), on the right when traveling north.
Knox County Established 1792; named in honor of Maj. Gen. Henry Knox Washington's Chief of Artillery in the Revolutionary War. Secretary of War in Washington's Cabinet. One of the founders and first Secretery of the Society of . . . — Map (db m100507) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Kodak — 1C 5 — Dumplin Creek Treaty
On Winfield Dunn Parkway (Tennessee Route 66) at West Dumplin Valley Road, on the right when traveling south on Winfield Dunn Parkway.
About 2 mi. E., at mouth of Dumplin Creek, was Henry's Station, founded by Maj. Hugh Henry. Here, the state of Franklin, represented by John Sevier, and the Cherokee Nation, represented by Ancoo, Chief of Chota, signed, on June 10, 1785, the treaty . . . — Map (db m82598) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Kodak — 1C 43 — Henry's Station
On Douglas Dam Road (Tennessee Route 139) 0.5 miles south of W. Dumplin Valley Road, on the right when traveling south.
Founded by Maj. Hugh Henry, it was 300 yards from here. On June 10, 1785, the Treaty of Dumplin Creek was signed here by commissioners of the State of Franklin and the chiefs of the Cherokee Nation. Blount, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox and Sevier . . . — Map (db m32782) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Kodak — The Kelly Family FarmSeven Islands State Birding Park
On Kelly Lane, on the left when traveling south.
Prior to the creation of Seven Islands State Birding Park, several generations of the Kelly family farmed and lived on this land. The French Broad River's "Kelly Bend" name comes from the family, however, the Kellys called it "Seclusion Bend". . . . — Map (db m110595) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Kodak — Treaty of Dumplin Creek
On Treaty Road.
The only treaty made by the state of Franklin was signed here after some negotiation. Commissioners were John Sevier, Alexander Outlaw, and Daniel Kennedy. Signatory Cherokee chiefs were the King of the Cherokees, Ancoo of Chota, Abraham of . . . — Map (db m33197) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Newfound Gap — Land of DiversityGreat Smoky Mountains National Park
Near Newfound Gap Road (U.S. 441) north of Clingman's Dome Road, on the right when traveling north.
Few places in North America sustain a greater variety of life than the Great Smoky Mountains. The forests, streams, and meadows here support more than 100 types of native trees, some 50 kinds of fish, some 1,500 flowering plants, more than 240 bird . . . — Map (db m58920) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Newfound Gap — New Gap, New RoadMorton Overlook — Great Smoky Mountains National Park —
On Newfound Gap Road (U.S. 441) 0.8 miles north of Clingmans Dome Road, on the left when traveling north.
I do not . . . favor the scarring of a wonderful mountainside just so we can say we have a skyline drive. It sounds poetical, but it may be an atrocity. Harold Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, 1935 It’s not easy to travel through the . . . — Map (db m58919) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Newfound Gap — Rockefeller Memorial
On Newfound Gap Road (U.S. 441) near Clingman's Dome Road, on the left when traveling south.
For the permanent enjoyment of the people. This park was given one-half by the peoples and states of North Carolina and Tennessee and by the United States of America, and one-half in memory of Laura Spelman Rockefeller by the Laura Spelman . . . — Map (db m3268) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Broady Dairy
On Golf Drive at Day Springs Road, on the right on Golf Drive.
Dr. Robert A. Broady, a practicing Sevier County physician from 1937 to 1983, began a dairy at this site around the 1940s with one half-breed Jersey cow. A family whose child was suffering from diphtheria needed money for treatment in Knoxville . . . — Map (db m72720) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Dolly's Childhood Home
Near Dollywood Lane.
This cabin is a replica of the Parton home place where Lee and Avie Lee Parton raised Dolly and her 10 brothers and sisters. The replica cabin was constructed by Dolly's brother Bobby, and the interior was reproduced by her mother Avie Lee. Most . . . — Map (db m14634) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Early Pigeon ForgeThe Growth of a Small Town
On South River Road just north of Old Mill Ave..
At the beginning of the twentieth century, Pigeon Forge was a busy farming community. Merchants, millers, blacksmiths, and other businesses clustered around the Pigeon Forge Mills to support local agriculture. J.A. Householder and Son advertised in . . . — Map (db m95993) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — First Baptist Church Pigeon Forge
On Householder Street at Dollywood Lane, on the left when traveling north on Householder Street.
Memories of First Baptist Church Pigeon Forge bring to mind a congregation whose fellowship was warm and rich, like an old homecoming and so much at ease, recalled one former pastor, Dr. William W. Cope. Baptists began meeting on River Road at a . . . — Map (db m95995) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — First United Methodist Church of Pigeon Forge and Pigeon Forge Academy
On Methodist Street, on the right when traveling west.
First United Methodist Church of Pigeon Forge was initially part of the Pigeon Forge circuit in the Knoxville District of Holston Conference. Circuit riding preachers served this church, Huskey’s Grove, Pleasant Hill, Walden’s Creek and Wear’s . . . — Map (db m134046) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Fort Wear
On Library Drive 0.2 miles north of Community Center Drive, on the right when traveling west.
Col. Samuel Wear built Fort Wear in this vicinity about 1781, the year that Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown. Fort Wear was one of nearly a dozen forts built in the 1780s in Sevier County. Its blockhouse was made from sturdy hand-hewn logs and was . . . — Map (db m65923) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Henderson Springs Resort
On Henderson Springs Road 0.4 miles north of Wears Valley Rd, on the left when traveling north.
Henderson’s Spring, as listed in early post office records, was a place name in the Pigeon Forge area as early as 1858, just before the Civil War. Elijah Henderson, son of William H. and Mary Catherine Cannon Henderson, and his family developed a . . . — Map (db m74835) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Middle Creek United Methodist Church & Settlement
On Middle Creek Road, on the right when traveling north.
The Church By 1787, Methodist Circuit Riding Preachers were traveling throughout this vast wilderness region with a Bible and a saddlebag, ministering in frontier settlements. At Middle Creek, open-air revivals known as camp meetings were . . . — Map (db m134045) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Native American Sea EagleDollywood Park
On Dollywood Lane.
Did you know…*Our National bird is of the order falconiformes and first appeared 25 million years ago. It is the only native American eagle & the only eagle species living strictly in North America.

*This regal-looking bird is a superb . . . — Map (db m99829) HM

Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — 1C-17 — Pigeon Forge
On The Great Smoky Mountains Highway (U.S. 441), in the median.
About 3/4 mile southeast, Isaac Love operated a forge on the site of the flour mill on Pigeon River in 1820, making bar iron. Ore came from an orebank about 3 miles east, later, pig-iron came from Sweden Furnace, 5 miles east. Forge hammer . . . — Map (db m82600) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Pigeon Forge Attractions
On Parkway/Hwy 441, on the right when traveling south.
When Pigeon Forge began transforming itself from a quiet farming community into one focused on tourism, the town adopted the slogan “Action-Packed.” It’s an appropriate description evidenced by the diversity and sheer number of . . . — Map (db m134050) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Pigeon Forge Elementary School/Pigeon Forge Canning Factory
Near Old Mill Avenue 0.2 miles east of The Parkway and Old Mill Avenue.
The Sevier County School Board purchased a piece of land on the old James L. Gobble farm for a brand new Pigeon Forge schoolhouse on September 1, 1917 and paid five hundred dollars. It was located on a knoll northeast of this marker between Middle . . . — Map (db m74838) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Pigeon Forge Iron WorksHow Pigeon Forge Got Its Name
Near Old Mill Avenue 0.1 miles east of Parkway (U.S. 441).
Before white settlers arrived, Native Americans called this river “Pigeon” or “woyi.” Countless numbers of wild passenger pigeons gathered at this natural habitat of abundant beech and oak trees. Their sheer numbers . . . — Map (db m66133) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Pigeon River Railroad
On Veteran's Boulevard (Tennessee Route 449) 0.1 miles north of Dollywood Lane, on the right when traveling north.
Pictured is locomotive # 20. It ran along Smoky Mountain Railroad tracks and possibly traveled into Pigeon Forge on the Pigeon River Railroad line just before the line was abandoned about 1929. The Pigeon River Railroad was incorporated in August . . . — Map (db m65919) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Pine Grove Rural Community
On Henderson Rd..
Pine Grove was once a rural community of sprawling farmlands before it was enveloped by the rapidly expanding vacation city of Pigeon Forge in the early 1980s. The frontier settlement first became known as Fort Wear in the 1780s when Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m123730) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Sevier County Veterans Memorial
Near Old Mill Avenue.
This memorial is dedicated to the memory of the veterans of Sevier County who gave their lives to defend our country World War I United States Army Allen, Lavator L. ∙ Atchley, Amos ∙ Blazer, Victor ∙ Cate, Ashley J. . . . — Map (db m82939) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — 1C 4 — Shiloh Church
On Henderson Chapel Drive.
in 1802 Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury preached in the home of Mitchel Porter, Revolutionary Veteran, who lived 2 miles north of Sevier County and preached in the newly built log chapel, 400 yards west of here. Shiloh Cemetery grew up around . . . — Map (db m17197) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — 1C 4 — Shiloh Church
On The Great Smoky Mountains Highway (Route 441) at Henderson Chapel Drive, on the right when traveling south on The Great Smoky Mountains Highway.
in 1802 Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury preached in the home of Mitchel Porter, Revolutionary Veteran, who lived 2 miles north of Sevier County and preached in the newly built log chapel, 400 yards west of here. Shiloh Cemetery grew up around . . . — Map (db m17199) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Titanic Eternal Flame1912 - 2012
On Parkway (U.S. 441), on the right when traveling south.
In memory of those who lost their lives — Map (db m58479) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Titanic’s Center Anchor
On Parkway (U.S. 441), on the right when traveling south.
The center anchor weighed 16.8 US tons, almost twice the weight of the standard port and starboard anchors which weighed 8.84 US tons each. The replica of this anchor will give you an idea how massive the center anchor was on the Titanic. — Map (db m58478) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — Unionists Within the ConfederacySevier County Home Guard
On Old Mill Avenue west of Old Mill Street, on the right when traveling east.
When the Civil War began, Sevier County Unionists at first operated quietly in secessionist Tennessee. In 1861, they set up a secret garment factory in the second floor of this mill and made cloth for uniforms. They also made shoes for Federal . . . — Map (db m65704) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Pigeon Forge — 1C 16 — Wear's Fort
On The Great Somky Mountains Highway (Route 441).
Col. Samuel Wear settled near the Mouth of Waldens Creek in 1783. He fought at Kings Mountain and later in Indian Wars, was first county court clerk of Sevier County. State of Franklin, and held the same office later under the territorial government . . . — Map (db m17201) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 31 — "Old Dutch Settlement"
On Fox Cemetery Road 0.1 miles south of Newport Highway (U.S. 411), on the right when traveling south.
Here was an early German settlement. First settlers were Jacob Derrick, Jacob Bird, and Adam Fox. A fort stood on Derrick's land nearby. Mark Fox was killed by Indians on Muddy Creek, 1787; he was buried in Fox Cemetery. An early Lutheran church is . . . — Map (db m40732) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Battle of Fair GardenFurious Clash of Cavalry
Near Jim Hickman Drive north of Old Newport Highway, on the left when traveling west.
On January 25, 1864, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet ordered Gen. William T. Martin to eject Union cavalry from an area south of the French Broad River stretching from Dandridge to the Little Pigeon River. The next day, Union Gen. Samuel D. . . . — Map (db m110558) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Dwight and Kate Wade HouseNational Register of Historic Places
On Joy Street east of Court Avenue, on the left when traveling east.
This Property Has Been Placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m135189) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 14 — Forks of Little Pigeon Church
On Emert Ave..
100 yards N.E. this Baptist Church, established 1789, was reportedly the first of any denomination in Sevier County. Spencer Clack, a Revolutionary veteran, was first church clerk; Richard Wood first pastor until his death in 1831. The . . . — Map (db m17100) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 14 — Forks of Little Pigeon Church
On Main St. (Route 441) at Forks of the River Parkway (Route 71), on the right when traveling west on Main St..
100 yds, N. E. this Baptist Church, established 1789, was reportedly the first of any denomination in Sevier County. Spencer Clack, Revolutionary veteran was first church clerk; Richard Wood; first pastor until his death in 1831. The Church moved to . . . — Map (db m62675) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Forks of the Little Pigeon Cemetery
On Emert St.
This churchyard is one of the oldest Baptist churchyards in Tennessee, (Established in 1789). It is the final resting place for many prominent pioneers. Deeded to the City of Sevierville by The First Baptist Church of Sevierville in 1975. It was . . . — Map (db m17110) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Forks of The River Cemetery Park
Near North Parkway just from E. Main Street.
Established in 1976 as a community bicentennial project, this park is significant because it is both the final resting place for several early settlers and decision makers and it is one of the last undeveloped areas that was part of the State of . . . — Map (db m38417) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Harrisburg Covered Bridge
On Old Covered Bridge Road at Harrisburg Road, on the right when traveling west on Old Covered Bridge Road.
The Harrisburg Covered Bridge, located in Sevier County, Tennessee, was built by Elbert Stephenson Early in 1875 and restored in 1972. That restoration was a joint effort through the Great Smokies Chapter and the Spencer Clark Chapter of the . . . — Map (db m40731) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 55 — Harrisburg Covered Bridge
On Old Covered Bridge Road at Harrisburg Road on Old Covered Bridge Road.
400 yards south, this bridge was built over the East Fork of the Little Pigeon River in 1875 by Elbert Stephenson Early, an area resident who owned Newport Mills. The bridge had deteriorated and its loss was threatened until it was restored in 1972 . . . — Map (db m82601) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Hon. Lieut. Spencer Clack1740-1832
On Commerce Street west of Court Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Pioneer settler of Sevier Co. Named Sevier Co. for his friend the great John Sevier Member Convention 1796 Member Legislature 1801 Served under Gen. Washington in Revolutionary War Erected by The Spencer Clack Chapter Daughters of The . . . — Map (db m135190) HM WM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 81 — Isaac Dockery1832 - 1910
On Commerce Street near Ct Avenue.
A native of Sevier County, Isaac Dockery, an African-American brick maker and mason, established brick kilns near Sevierville. After the Civil War, he built or made bricks for many buildings in Sevierville including the Masonic Lodge (1893), New . . . — Map (db m82669) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Isaac Thomas1735 - 1819
On W. Main St (U.S. 441).
A soldier of the American Revolution, Isaac Thomas guided John Sevier's army to King's Mountain as well as serving with him in many battles against the Indians. Believed to be the first permanent white settler in this area, Thomas lived with and . . . — Map (db m82670) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — James Crawford Murphy1807-1894
On West Main Street (U.S. 411) at Court Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West Main Street.
Benefactor of Murphy College 1890-1936, for whom it was named, this prominent farmer and merchant first come to Sevierville as a tanner in 1833. He returned again to Sevier county 1847 with his wife, Mary “Polly” Smith (1811-1894), . . . — Map (db m52079) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — James McMahan1750 -1831
On W Maine Street (U.S. 441) at Court Avenue on W Maine Street.
First Register of deeds of Sevier County, Tennessee, in 1796, James McMahan set aside the original twenty-five acres for the creation of the township at "The Forks of The Little Pigeon" in 1795. An immigrant from Ireland, McMahan was married to . . . — Map (db m17107) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 44 — John Porter McCown
On The Great Smoky Mountains Highway (U.S. 441).
Born 1/4 mi. SE, Aug. 19 1815. Graduate USMA, 1840. Brevetted captain at Cerro Gordo, Mexican War. Resigned 1861 for the Confederacy; rose to rank of major general. Commanded at New Madrid, Madrid Bend, Island No. 10 and later East Tenn. Dept. . . . — Map (db m82671) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 88 — Knoxville, Sevierville & Eastern Railway(KS & E)
On W Main (U.S. 441).
The eastern terminal of this 28-mile shortline stood southwest of this site. It was established in 1907 by Knoxville industrialist W.J. Oliver and constructed by his firm. The KS & E and its successor companies were dubbed "Knoxville, Slow & . . . — Map (db m82672) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 13 — Nancy Academy
On The Great Smoky Mountains Highway (U.S. 441), on the right when traveling south.
Founded on this site in 1806, this school was named for Nancy Rogers, first white child born south of French Broad River. First trustees were James Reagan Hopkins Lacey, Thomas Hill, Allen Bryant, Isaac Love. The Legislature authorized a lottery to . . . — Map (db m17195) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C-86 — New Salem Baptist Church
Near Eastgate Road west of Henderson Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Isaac Dockery, an African-American artisan, along with African-American families of Sevierville, built New Salem Baptist Church in 1886. It is Sevierville's oldest surviving building and the county's oldest brick church and only historic . . . — Map (db m133730) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — New Salem Baptist ChurchBuilt 1886
Near Eastgate Road west of Henderson Avenue, on the left when traveling west.
Built as a Union church for the worship of any denomination that chose to use it. Leaders in the church movement were Isaac Dockery, Alf McMahan, John Burden, Mrs. Addie McMahan, Mrs. Nancy Coleman and Witt McMahan. Squire and Mrs. Bob . . . — Map (db m133837) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Sevier County VeteransPast - Present -Future
On Court Avenue at W Bruce Street on Court Avenue.
Dedicated to the Sevier County Veterans Past - Present - Future Nov. 11, 1995 Vernon Dale Gillespie, Sculptor Separate Marker: Honor list of dead Sevier Countians who have given their lives during and since World War I . . . — Map (db m17159) WM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1B44 — Sevierville
On W Main St (U.S. 441).
Settled about 1783, this town, first called "Forks of Little Pigeon," was organized as county seat of Sevier Co.,1795. Indian trader, Isaac Thomas' home was first courthouse, fort and tavern. Jas. McMahon gave 25 acre tract for the town, which . . . — Map (db m17102) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 32 — Sweden Furnace
On Long Springs Road (Tennessee Route 339) at Newport Highway (Tennessee Route 411), on the left when traveling north on Long Springs Road.
5 miles northwest, this was first called Short Mountain Furnace, using local orebank ore. Started about 1820 by Robert Shields; William K. Love and brothers operated it about 1830. Micajah C. Rogers bought it and changed its name in 1836. It closed . . . — Map (db m100497) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — The Mayors of the City of Sevierville
On West Main Street (U.S. 411) at Court Avenue, on the left when traveling west on West Main Street.
Several attempts were made in the incorporation of the city of Sevierville since its founding in 1795, but it was not until 1901 that a continuous chartered city government was established. Ambrose M. Paine was elected Sevierville's first mayor on . . . — Map (db m52081) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — 1C 69 — The McMahan Indian Mound
On Chapman Hwy /The Great Smoky Mountains Hwy. (Route 441), on the right when traveling south.
This Mississippian substructure,16 ft. high and 240 ft.in circumference, built during the Dallas phase (1200-1500), was first excavated in 1881, with artifacts being sent to the Smithsonian. Later excavations exposed nearby villages of the Woodland . . . — Map (db m17194) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Thomas Atchley1755-1836
On W. Main Street.
A soldier of the colonial army of 1776, and a veteran of the American Revolution, 1776-1781, Thomas Atchley served alongside private Andrew Jackson in 1794 under the command of Brigadier General James Robertson in the Indian Wars of the lower . . . — Map (db m17103) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — Timothy Reagan1750 - 1830
On W. Main St (U.S. 441).
A soldier of The American Revolution, Timothy Reagan fought in the Battle of Brandywine in 1777 with Major General Marquis de Lafayette where both men were wounded in 1795, Reagan forged into the wilderness of The Middle Creek area of Sevier County . . . — Map (db m17105) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Sevierville — William M. Whaley1789-1880
On West Main Street at Court Avenue, on the left when traveling west on West Main Street.
One of the many volunteers of the War of 1812 which earned Tennessee its nickname, William Whaley came to Sevier County in 1810. A farmer and later Baptist minister, Whaley married in 1811 Mary Ann Ogle (1793-1880). A resident of the White Oak Flats . . . — Map (db m52080) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Seymour — 1C 3 — Newell's Station
On Chapman Highway (U.S. 441,) 0.5 miles south of Boyd's Creek Highway (Tennessee Route TN 35), on the right when traveling south.
Early fort established here, 1783 by settlers in Boyd's Creek Valley. Samuel Newell, Revolutionary Captain, was leader of the settlement. Sevier Co., state of Franklin, held its first court here. Also seat of government for the . . . — Map (db m32780) HM
Tennessee (Sevier County), Seymour — 1C 12 — The Great Indian War Trail
On Chapman Highway (U.S. 441) 2 miles south of 411 and 441 (U.S. 411).
A branch of the Great Indian War & Trading Path came up the valley of this creek, named for a Virginia trader killed by Indians in 1775. Col. William Christian's punitive expedition used it in 1776, crossing the French Broad River. John Sevier broke . . . — Map (db m32686) HM

75 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement