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Settlements & Settlers Historical Markers

22432 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 22232
 
Albert J. Pickett Marker image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2013
Albert J. Pickett Marker
Alabama (Autauga County), Autaugaville — Albert J. Pickett1810-1858 — Scholar-Planter-Trader —
Alabama's first historian lived on plantation nearby. From traders and Indians he gathered materials for his authentic history of early Alabama and the Southeast. — Map (db m68838) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Autaugaville — AutaugavilleIntersection of Autauga and Academy Streets — "America's First Crossroad" —
Robert Ripley's world-wide syndicated Believe It Or Not! column for July 31, 1935 read: "C. D. Abbott is the first citizen of the U.S.A. He is first alphabetically in Autaugaville, the first town in Autauga, the first county in Alabama, the . . . — Map (db m68839) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — A County Older Than the State, Autauga County
Created in 1818 by an act of Alabama Territorial Legislature. Autauga Indians lived on creek from which the county takes its name. Autaugas were members of the Alibamo tribe. They sent many warriors to resist Andrew Jackson's invasion in Creek War. . . . — Map (db m27907) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Autauga Creek
Side 1 Water has always played a significant role in the history of Prattville. Daniel Pratt chose the location for his new town because of the proximity to Autauga Creek and the Alabama River. This area was referred to as an . . . — Map (db m70815) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke
(Front): Daniel Pratt CemeteryFinal resting place of early Alabama industrialist Daniel Pratt, 1799-1873, and wife Esther Ticknor Pratt, 1803-1875. He was from New Hampshire and she, Connecticut. Married 1827 at Fortville, Jones County, . . . — Map (db m27957) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Daniel Pratt/First United Methodist Church
Side 1 Daniel Pratt Founder of Prattville Daniel Pratt, a native of New Hampshire, became an industrialist, statesman and philanthropist in Alabama. He was a Methodist in both heart and practice. He encourage the development of the . . . — Map (db m70813) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Heritage Park
Located within Daniel Pratt Historic District, this park overlooks Autauga Creek and the manufacturing complex around which this New England style village developed. Daniel Pratt founded Prattville in 1839, and patterned the town after those of his . . . — Map (db m27958) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Indian Springs Post Office/Thomas Hill House/Union Baptist Meeting House
Indian Springs Post Office Location of considerable Community activity in the early nineteenth-century Autauga County Thomas Hill House Site of first Court after Autauga became a County Union Baptist Meeting House 1830s . . . — Map (db m70798) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Pratt HomesiteCirca 1842
Daniel Pratt, Prattville’s founding father, constructed an imposing home and garden within a quarter-mile of this site on Autauga Creek, near his industrial complex. The large home was designed and erected by Pratt himself, a noted architect / . . . — Map (db m27985) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Bay Minette — Bay Minette, Alabama
Side 1 In 1860, the center of commerce in Baldwin County ran along the rivers with the remainder of the county mostly wilderness. In 1861, with secession declared, the Alabama Legislature allocated funds to finish the stalled Mobile . . . — Map (db m100846) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Ruins of the original Foundation of Baldwin County's First Courthouse
Ruins of the original Foundation of Baldwin County's First Courthouse Authorized 1820 • Constructed circa 1833 Preserved by Historic Blakely State Park 2011-12 With support in part of a Save Amerca's Treasures grant by the National Park . . . — Map (db m82019) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Apalachee Village
Just a half century prior to the founding of the town of Blakeley, an Apalachee Indian village stood on this spot. The village was founded in the early 1700s by Apalachee refugees fleeing warfare in Florida for the relative safety of French . . . — Map (db m131851) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Bottle Creek SiteAlabama Indigenous Mound Trail
The Bottle Creek site is the second largest mound center in Alabama and it represents the remnants of a large Mississippian Stage civic and ceremonial complex that dominated the Mobile-Tensaw Delta from AD 1250 to 1500. Located in the heart of the . . . — Map (db m131832) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Town of Blakeley
Blakeley was once one of the largest cities in Alabama. Envisioned by its founders as a rival to Mobile as a regional trading center, the town thrived briefly before a combination of factors brought about its decline. Today the site of the city is . . . — Map (db m131864) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Bon Secour — The Charles Swift Family / Swift Coles Historic Home
The Charles Swift Family Charles Swift came to Alabama in 1880 and married Susan Roberts in 1885. He developed a successful lumber business, including a sawmill here on the Bon Secour River. The Swifts raised their eleven children in this . . . — Map (db m122465) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Daphne — City of DaphneIncorporated July 8, 1927
The City of Daphne was incorporated July 8, 1927 with a population of 500. its history, however, dates to a much earlier period. Research and artifacts show that Tensaw, Alabama, Choctaw, Creeks, and Seminole Indians all lived in the this area prior . . . — Map (db m100843) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Daphne — Colonia Italiana 1888-The Beautiful Forest / The Founding Fathers of the Italian Colony
Colonia Italiana 1888-The Beautiful Forest In 1888, Alesandro Mastro-Valerio, realizing the plight of fellow Italian immigrants living and working in hazardous conditions in many northern states, bought land here to attract colonists. He . . . — Map (db m130913) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Fairhope — Craig Turner Sheldon1917-1997
Master woodcarver, adventurer, writer, World War II Marine Corps veteran, and Fairhope legend are just a brief summary of Craig Turner Sheldon's life and contributions. He settled here in 1946 with his Wife Annie Lowrie to raise their growing family . . . — Map (db m128894)
Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Gulf Shores Community
Officially designated “Pleasure Island” in 1949 by Governor Jim Folsom, the 32 miles of white sandy beaches in Gulf Shores has been a prime fishing and golf destination for Alabamians and tourists. Early Alabama Gulf Coast individuals . . . — Map (db m52045) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Navy Cove / Pilot Town
Navy Cove The Mobile Bay shoreline just inside Mobile Point, close to Fort Morgan, is known as Navy Cove. This was the site of Native American villages for over two thousand years. The name came after the British Navy anchored here . . . — Map (db m122441) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Josephine — Josephine
In 1841, Raphael Semmes acquired farmland at the head of this bayou. The new homestead was named Prospect Hill. Several of Semmes’ colleagues from the Pensacola Navy Yard obtained nearby property and established “a very nice colony of nautical . . . — Map (db m71957) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Lottie — History of Lottie, Alabama
Front Lottie has the highest elevation in Baldwin County. A ridge forms a divide where waters to the east flow into Pensacola Bay and waters to the west flow into Mobile Bay. Pine Log Creek begins in Lottie. Pine Log Ditch, used to . . . — Map (db m122349) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Magnolia Springs — Magnolia Springs, Alabama
Front: Settlement of this area began in the early 1700’s and was expedited by a series of Spanish land grants in the early 1800’s. During the 1819-33 time period a brick factory along the south river bank supplied brick for . . . — Map (db m66271) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Bay Circle
Front This area, located along the southern shore of Wolf Bay, was the original 'Downtown' of Orange Beach. Beginning in the 1870's, the two schooners of James C. Callaway anchored near here in the deep-water Boat Basin. The . . . — Map (db m130682) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Orange Beach Community Cemetery“Bear Point Cemetery” — Baldwin County —
(front) The property where the cemetery is located was part of a Spanish Land Grant issued to the Suarez family prior to the War of 1812. In 1925, a United States Land Patent was confirmed and issued. The property has been in use since . . . — Map (db m71618) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Orange Beach Municipal Complex
The community of Orange Beach goes back to at least 1838, as evidenced by property deeds. As an incorporated city, it is quite young. Following Hurricane Frederic on September 12, 1979, with all its publicity, Orange Beach was 'discovered'! . . . — Map (db m122462) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Orange Beach, Alabama
Front: Orange Beach was named for the oranges that were grown here and exported until the hard-freezes of 1916. The orange groves are gone, but the name remained. Drawn here by the game they hunted, the early Indians discovered the . . . — Map (db m81851) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Orange Beach — Romar Beach
Romar Beach began as a large homestead property with three miles of beachfront spanning from Gulf State Park to Hwy 161 in Orange Beach. The original property now covers only 480 feet. It was a true homestead and the owners were required to ‘till . . . — Map (db m122463) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Spanish FortAlabama
Historic Spot of the Deep SouthMap (db m100845) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Fort Mims And The Creek Indian War, 1813-14
Front: In 1813, people on the United State’s southwestern frontier were fearful. The Redstick faction of the Creek Indian Nation opposed growing American influence in the area and had voted for war. However, Creeks living in the Tensaw . . . — Map (db m116678) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Historic Stockton / Old Schoolyard Park
Front: Historic Stockton Modern Stockton is situated on a hill just above the original settlement, which was abandoned around 1840 because of Yellow Fever outbreaks. No verified source for the town name exists. Most likely it was . . . — Map (db m66390) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — The Mound Line(Ellicot Line) — Mile Mound No. 216 located 1200 feet East —
Surveyed in 1799 to mark the 31° North Latitude, this line charted the first southern boundary of the United States, separating the U.S. from Spanish Florida. The line was marked at one-mile intervals by earthen mounds approximately fifteen-feet . . . — Map (db m81856) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Summerdale — Sonora Community / Sonora School and Community Hall
Sonora Community The community of Sonora was named in 1901 by the wife of the first postmaster, G.L. Sharretts. Situated near Red Hill Ford on Baker Branch and the intersection of travel routes between Silverhill, Magnolia Springs, Marlow . . . — Map (db m130878) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Summerdale — Summerdale / Summerdale's Turpentine Still
Summerdale The Summerdale area was settled in the early 1850's by several families of Scotch and Irish descent. By 1900, the town had a church, a saw mill, a turpentine business, and a hotel. Many families of different nationalities moved . . . — Map (db m130868) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Batesville — Providence Methodist Church & Schoolhouse
Side 1 In 1828, Reverend John Wesley Norton left his native South Carolina with his family and a wagon train of followers, crossed into the Creek Indian Nation and just into the edge of what was then Pike County, settling near the . . . — Map (db m78123) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Clayton — History of Clayton, Alabama/Clayton’s Architectural Heritage
County Seat of Barbour County Clayton, the county seat of Barbour County is located geographically in the center of the county. The town was located at the headwaters of the Pea and Choctawhatchee rivers on the historic road from Hobdy’s . . . — Map (db m60772) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Clayton — Miller – Martin Townhouse
John H. Miller built this Gothic Revival townhouse in 1859. He and his wife moved from Orangeburg, South Carolina to Barbour County in the early 1830s, settling in an area which would become known as the Tabernacle community. He later purchased a . . . — Map (db m60755) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Clayton — Octagon House
This unusual house was built 1859 – 1861 by Benjamin Franklin Petty, a carriage and furniture merchant, who was a native of New York and a pioneer settler of Clayton. It was patterned after a design made popular by Orson S. Fowler’s book A . . . — Map (db m39121) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Clio — Barbour County's "Little Scotland"/Pea River Presbyterian Church
Barbour County’s “Little Scotland” In the 1820’s before the Creek Indian Cession, Scot immigrants from Richmond County, North Carolina, settled this area of west Barbour County. Few other regions outside the motherland of . . . — Map (db m89605) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Chief Eufaula (Yoholo Micco)In Life and Legend — Creek Heritage Trail —
"Chief Eufaula," the man often referred to in the historical record as "Yoholo Micco," was a Creek chieftain from the Upper Creek town of Eufaula. Born in the late 1700s, he fought alongside allied Creeks with United States forces against his Red . . . — Map (db m101427) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Hart House
Built by John Hart about 1850, the Hart House is recognized as an outstanding example of pure Greek Revival architecture. Hart (c. 1805-1863) moved from New Hampshire and became a prominent merchant and farmer. When constructed, the house was on the . . . — Map (db m48376) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Old Negro Cemetery / Fairview Cemetery
Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used . . . — Map (db m27987) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — The City of Eufaula — Creek Heritage Trail —
The Second Creek war resulted in the final expulsion of the Creeks from eastern Alabama and paved the way for large-scale American settlement. The town of Irwinton gradually expanded westward from the bluff overlooking the Chattahoochee in the years . . . — Map (db m101361) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — The Creek Town of Eufaula — Creek Heritage Trail —
The area surrounding Eufaula was once part of a regional Creek population center. Towns of note in the region included Sawokli (also known as Sabacola) and the town of Eufaula for which the modern city is named. Trails linked these closely-connected . . . — Map (db m101355) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — The Town of Irwinton — Creek Heritage Trail —
A small group of American settlers from Georgia formed a community called Eufaula in this vicinity as early as 1823. The settlement began to grow in importance later in the decade through the influence of prominent local landholder and Creek War . . . — Map (db m101357) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Louisville — Louisville
One of the oldest towns in southeast Alabama was settled in 1817 by Daniel Lewis who established a trading post and named the community “Louisville” after the first capital of Georgia, his hometown. By 1820 four stores, a Methodist . . . — Map (db m60768) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Louisville — The Old County Court House
Near this site stood the old Pike County court house which was the county seat of Pike from 1822 to 1827. It also served as the temporary county seat of the newly created Barbour County in 1833, until Clayton was selected. Louisville was settled . . . — Map (db m60674) HM
Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Absalom Pratt House
Absalom Pratt built this house 8 miles west of here circa 1835 though a section was constructed earlier. It was moved to this site in 1994 by the Cahaba Trace Commission, restored by the Alabama Historic Ironworks Commission, 1997-98, and dedicated . . . — Map (db m37078) HM
Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Sunshine & Dorothy Morton HouseBrierfield Iron Works Historical State Park
Originally located off Patton Chapel Road in what is today Hoover, Alabama, the Sunshine and Dorothy Morton house was moved to the Brierfield Park in March 2005 by the Morton family and restored over the next two years by restoration specialist . . . — Map (db m37177) HM
Alabama (Bibb County), West Blocton — West Blocton, Alabama
West Blocton began as a business and residential community adjoining the Cahaba Coal Mining Company's town of Blocton in 1883-84. West Blocton incorporated in 1901. Eugene D. Reynolds was the first mayor, 1901-1904, followed by Dr. L.E. Peacock, . . . — Map (db m72283) HM
Alabama (Bibb County), Woodstock — Town of Woodstock
Woodstock was first settled in the 1820’s with a formal land grant to William Houston on Feb. 27, 1826. The settlement was established along the old Tuscaloosa to Huntsville Stage Coach Line. Woodstock got its name when Dr. J.U. Ray named it after . . . — Map (db m63697) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Blountsville
1820-1889 seat of Blount County a county older than the State. Named for Tennessee Governor W. G. Blount who sent Andrew Jackson to aid Alabama settlers in Creek Indian War, 1812-1814. Indian Chief Bear Meat lived here at crossing of . . . — Map (db m28038) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — None — Blountsville Court Square Timeline
1813: Colonel John Coffee and 800 Tennessee Volunteers see Bear Meat Cabin Cherokee Settlement near Blountsville 1816: Town settles around square 1820: Newly named Blountsville becomes county seat 1827: Town incorporated with Trustee System . . . — Map (db m49176) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Ebenezer Hearn 1794-1862Methodist Missionary
First minister assigned to Alabama Territory by Tennessee Conference. Preached first sermon two blocks west at Bear Meat Cabin (present Blountsville) April 18, 1818. He later organized churches in Shelby, St. Clair, Jefferson, Tuscaloosa and Cotaco . . . — Map (db m27991) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Locust Fork — None — History of Locust Fork
While traveling south with his troops, General Andrew Jackson camped at the fork of the river in 1813. General Jackson carved his name in a locust tree naming this area Locust Fork. In 1817, the Hanby family came from Virginia and settled in this . . . — Map (db m50125) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Nectar — Homesite and Grave of George Powell1794 – 1872
Planter, trader, historian, geologist, surveyor. Gathered authentic data from early settlers and Indians for his history of Blount County published in 1855. Made original survey of Blount County. — Map (db m50123) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Oneonta — Bailey School1893 - 1951
William M. Bailey (born 1859 in Cherokee Co.; died 1909 in Blount Co.) settled 40 acres on what became Co. Rd 36 to the west and New Home Church Rd to the east in 1893. He brought three small sons from Cherokee Co. after the death of his first wife . . . — Map (db m42599) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Oneonta — Blount CountyA County Older Than the State
Created Feb. 7, 1818 by Alabama Territorial Legislature from lands ceded by the Creek Indian Nation. Named for the Tennessee Governor W. G. Blount, who sent militia under Andrew Jackson to punish the Creeks for Fort Mims massacre. Jackson fought and . . . — Map (db m24353) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Susan Moore — None — Town of Susan Moore
In 1864, traveling in an ox cart, Dr. Robert M. Moore left his family in Walton County, Georgia, and journeyed to Blount County, Alabama. Finding fertile land, he returned to Walton County and persuaded his wife to move to Blount County with him. In . . . — Map (db m49251) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Aberfoil — Aberfoil Community
The town of Aberfoil was incorporated January 26, 1839, in then Macon County, with the first election for councilors conducted and managed by Lewis Stoudenmire, Charles G. Lynch, Thomas Scott, David Hudson, and A. J. and E. A. Jackson. Aberfoil was . . . — Map (db m61027) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Blues Old Stand — Samuel Sellers Cemetery
Samuel Sellers (1788-1857) of North Carolina arrived with his large family at Three Notch Road on January 29, 1835. Here, in what was then the Missouri Beat, Pike County, the first post office in the area was established, 2.5 miles west of . . . — Map (db m61061) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Blues Old Stand — Three Notch Road
Side 1 Built by U.S. Army engineers over the summer of 1824, Three Notch Road has served as Bullock County’s major transportation route throughout its history. It was constructed to facilitate military communication between Pensacola . . . — Map (db m89638) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Town of Midway
Pioneer Samuel Feagin Sr. settled the Village of Midway in 1836. He came from Jones County, Georgia and established his residence at what is still called “The Old Feagin Place.” Samuel purchased a large acreage of land and sold it to . . . — Map (db m61854) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Perote — Perote Bullock County
This community, settled during the mid-1830s, was first called Fulford’s Cross Roads, then Missouri Cross Roads when a post office was established here in 1846. The name Perote, adopted in 1850 was suggested by veterans returning from the Mexican . . . — Map (db m83256) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Three Notch — Three Notch Road
Side 1 Built by U.S. Army engineers over the summer of 1824, Three Notch Road has served as Bullock County’s major transportation route throughout its history. It was constructed to facilitate military communication between Pensacola . . . — Map (db m89637) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Log Cabin Museum/Old City Cemetery
Log Cabin Museum Early settlers of this area cleared land and built their first homes of logs in the early 1830s. This cabin was built by Reuben Rice Kirkland (1829-1915) about 1850. He and his first wife had ten children while living in . . . — Map (db m60969) HM
Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Union Springs, Alabama
In the early 1800s, settlers coming from the Carolinas and Georgia received land grants and some purchased land from the Indians. They settled and cleared the forest for new farms and plantations in what would become a newly formed State of Alabama . . . — Map (db m83258) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Georgiana — City of Georgiana / GA~ANA TheatreFounded in 1855 / Opened 1939
City of Georgiana Founded in 1855 Early settlers moved from Virginia, the Carolinas, Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia into the deep forests of southern Butler County. In 1855, the Rev. Pitt S. Milner established a home-stead and post . . . — Map (db m86265) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Butler CountyA County Older Than The State
Side 1 Created in 1819 by Act of Alabama Territorial Legislature from lands ceded by the Creek Indian Nation by the Treaty of Fort Jackson, 1814. Named for Captain William Butler, soldier of Creek Indian War, 1813-14, early settler . . . — Map (db m70755) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Coleman-Crenshaw House
Dr. John Coleman, born June 6, 1788 in North Carolina, was one of Butler County's earliest pioneer settlers. He built the Coleman-Crenshaw House some time between 1817 and 1821. In June 1820 the first election for Sheriff and Constable, held in . . . — Map (db m130052) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — In Memory of Captain William Butler
A native of Virginia. Pioneer settler of Butler County for whom the county is named Massacred by the Indians near Butler Springs March 18, 1818 — Map (db m130049) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Ogly-Stroud Massacre / Gary's Stockade
Ogly-Stroud Massacre William Ogly built his cabin near this site at Poplar Springs along the Federal Road, and was killed here with most of his family on March 13, 1818. His friend Eli Stroud's wife was fatally wounded and their infant . . . — Map (db m120933) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — The Camellia City/Greenville
Side 1 The Camellia City Mr. J. Glenn Stanley, an ardent camellia enthusiast, dreamed of Greenville becoming “The Camellia City” and loyally promoted this slogan as editor of The Greenville Advocate. The city’s . . . — Map (db m70754) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Oakey Streak — Oakey Streak/Oakey Streak Methodist Church
Side 1 Oakey Streak The community of Oakey Streak was so named for the abundance of oak trees in the immediate vicinity. From 1829-1843 the post office here was known as Middletown and from 1853-1935 Oakey Streak. Nearby was the . . . — Map (db m70757) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Hobson City — Town of Hobson City, Alabama
Front Hobson City is Alabama's first incorporated black city. The area was first known as Mooree Quarter, a black settlement that was part of Oxford, Alabama. After a black man was elected Justice of the Peace in Oxford, one mayor . . . — Map (db m106598) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Chief Ladiga Trail - Jacksonville
The Chief Ladiga Trail was named for a Creek Indian leader who signed the Cusseta Treaty in 1832. Under the terms of that agreement, the Creeks gave up claim to their remaining lands in northeast Alabama. Because he had signed the treaty, Ladiga was . . . — Map (db m36438) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Forney’s Corner
Jacob Forney III lived and operated a thriving mercantile establishment at Jacksonville from 1835-56 on the south-east corner of the square. He and his wife Sabina Swope Hoke were the parents of nine children. 1. Daniel Peter - b. Feb. 24, 1819, . . . — Map (db m36450) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — JacksonvilleCalhoun County, Alabama
Postoffice established July 20, 1833 as Drayton, Benton County, Alabama. Name changed to Jacksonville Aug. 6, 1834 and county changed to Calhoun Jan. 29, 1858. Office maintained by Confederate Government 1861-1865. Postmasters and dates of . . . — Map (db m36449) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — JacksonvilleFirst County Seat — Calhoun County, 1833-99 —
Town first called Drayton. Renamed in 1834 to honor President Andrew Jackson. Seat moved to Anniston in 1899. Calhoun Co. originally was Benton Co., for Col. T. H. Benton, Creek War officer, later U. S. Senator from Missouri. . . . — Map (db m36471) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Jacksonville, Alabama“Gem of the Hills”
Life here has long centered on education beginning in 1834 when a one-acre plot of land was reserved for a schoolhouse. Through the years, various institutions of higher learning developed that culminated into present-day Jacksonville State . . . — Map (db m36429) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Historic Oxford
First incorporated as a town, February 7, 1852, in Benton County, Oxford's second incorporation was approved February 21, 1860 in Calhoun County. Long before this territory was “settled”, it was inhabited by Creek Indians. In the time . . . — Map (db m106589) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Muscogee (Creek) NationArbeka (Abihka) Ceremonial Ground — Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —
Welcome! We are the Arbeka (Abihka). This is the ceremonial ground of our ancestors who once called this valley their home. When the Arbeka (Abihka) were forced to remove to Oklahoma they carried the sacred fire from this place to their new home. . . . — Map (db m144923) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Reconstructing the Cultural Landscape — Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —
The stone mound here once sat on nearby Signal Mountain and is now understood to be part of a much larger cultural landscape. Working with the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and the people of the Arbeka (Abihka) Ceremonial Ground, archaeologist Robert . . . — Map (db m144927) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Simmons Park
The town of Oxford was first incorporated by the Alabama legislature in 1852. The original boundaries included a one square mile area enlarged in 1860. Oxford became active as a cotton and trading center but during the Civil War growth slowed, and . . . — Map (db m106591) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological ComplexAlabama Indigenous Mound Trail
Centered around Boiling Spring, the Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex once consisted of at least three earthen mounds, a large stone mound, and a large snake effigy (representation) also made of stone. The largest earthen mound once . . . — Map (db m144926) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Today — Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —
Today, the people who once inhabited this region of Alabama are recognized by the federal government as belonging to several tribes: the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Kialegee Tribal Town, and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town of . . . — Map (db m144937) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Woodland1,250 BC to AD 1000 — Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —
Woodland period people established permanent communities within a climate and forest that was very similar to that experienced by today's residents of the Choccolocco Valley. By AD 100, the residents had started constructing the earthen mound . . . — Map (db m144977) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Piedmont — Cross Plains - Piedmont
Cross Plains citizens voted for incorporation March 10, 1871. A second vote was cast for reincorporation May 15, 1882. By the acts of the Alabama Legislature of 1888, Cross Plains became Piedmont September 30, 1888. Mayors for both Cross Plains and . . . — Map (db m27992) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — Chambers County
Chambers County, created December 18, 1832 from Creek Indian cession. Named for Dr. Henry C. Chambers of Madison County, member of Constitutional Convention 1819, legislature of 1820, elected U.S. Senator 1825 but died enroute to Washington. . . . — Map (db m18162) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — The LaFayette Presbyterian ChurchOrganized 1835
This structure was built by early settlers from Virginia, Tennessee, and the Carolinas, and subsequently modified. The original building has stood since 1836. Union Sunday School begun here in 1891. Many eminent ministers have filled the . . . — Map (db m83264) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), Lanett — Bluffton-Lanett, Alabama
Side 1 Known as Bluffton from about 1835-1893. Bluffton was incorporated in 1865. Name changed to Lanett, town of Lanett incorporated 1893. Its charter was approved in 1895. Early records mention academies, two near this site. The . . . — Map (db m92061) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Cedar Bluff — Indian Village of Costa
This general area is believed to be the site of the Indian village of Costa visited by DeSoto July 2, 1540. The very old cedar trees may have been here at that time. They are some of the largest in the Southeast. These cedars are among the . . . — Map (db m114988) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Cherokee County
Area 575 square miles. Aborigines inhabited area 4000 B.C. Cherokee and Creek Historic Indians about 1300-May 1838. Hernando De Soto-First white man July 1540. First white settlers about 1810 from VA, NC, SC, GA, and Tenn. Formed Cherokee Cession . . . — Map (db m133321) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Cherokee County's Beginnings
This area had long been home to the Cherokee Indians and the first white settlers did not arrive until the early 1800's. On December 29, 1835, the Cherokees signed a controversial treaty surrendering their lands here to the U.S. Government. A short . . . — Map (db m114840) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Centre — Mose Hampton 1808-1885Early Black Leader and Inventor in Cherokee County
Mose Hampton bought his freedom prior to the Civil War. He was a builder, assisted in laying out and surveying the town of Centre, a minister in the Episcopal Methodist North, and an inventor. Mr. Hampton owned land in the vicinity of this marker on . . . — Map (db m120046) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — Barry Springs Indian Stockade
One hundred feet east was one site where "The Trail of Tears" began. On May 23, 1838 the Indians of this general area, who had been held in a chestnut log stockade after being gathered by the U.S. Army, began their long trek to Oklahoma. The . . . — Map (db m114398) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — Gaylesville
Post Office est. in 1836. During the Civil War, the main body of U.S. General William Tecumseh Sherman's Army camped around the town in October 1864. A private home served as his headquarters. Despite pleas from citizens, his troops burned the mill . . . — Map (db m114532) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — History of Taff, Alabama
Cherokee County established - 1836 Area Cherokee Indians relocated - 1838 Taff Community established - 1842 Community named in honor of Taff family - 1842 Union and Confederate soldiers occupied the area - 1864 Taff post office established . . . — Map (db m114743) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Leesburg — Leesburg
The town's name was derived from the name of the Henslee Family which were early settlers in the community. A post office was established in 1837. The Rome & Decatur Railroad (later Southern Railway) began rail service through the town in 1888. The . . . — Map (db m114747) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Spring Garden — Carmel Presbyterian Church
In 1835, pioneering families migrated from Morgan County, Georgia to Cherokee County, AL, settling in the Ambersonville area, later renamed Spring Garden. These families were members of Carmel Presbyterian Church in Morgan County and brought their . . . — Map (db m132792) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Spring Garden — Site of Bluffton
Located 500 yards southeast of this marker. Incorporated in 1888, Bluffton was promoted as a future iron center of the South, due to large iron ore deposits and four furnaces within a four mile radius. The town soon boomed due to an influx of . . . — Map (db m140001) HM
Alabama (Cherokee County), Spring Garden — Spring Garden
Was originally named Ambersonville after one of the early families that settled the community. A post office was established in 1842 as Liberty and changed to Spring Garden in 1844. The Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad began rail service through the . . . — Map (db m114959) HM
Alabama (Chilton County), Clanton — City of Clanton
Clanton, originally named Goose Pond, was founded in 1867 by Alfred Baker Sr. Goose Pond was renamed Clanton in honor of Confederate hero General James Holt Clanton. The city limits cover approximately 18 square miles. Clanton is located near the . . . — Map (db m54979) HM
Alabama (Chilton County), Thorsby — Thorsby: A Scandinavian Colony in the South
Side 1: Founded in 1895, the Town of Thorsby was the first planned community in Chilton County. The original settlers were people of Scandinavian origin seeking a favorable climate to locate for farming, fruit growing and better health. . . . — Map (db m73231) HM
Alabama (Chilton County), Verbena — Verbena, Alabama
The only community in the U.S. so designated, Verbena was named for the profuse wild flowers growing in the area. Settlers arrived in the area as early as 1832. Completion of the North-South Railroad and a train depot at Verbena in 1870 enabled . . . — Map (db m68286) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Claiborne — 93001517 — Dellet-Bedsole PlantationC. 1850 — National Register of Historic Places —
This 4000 acre complex has been recognized for its contribution to our understanding of the history of Monroe County and the State of Alabama. Originally developed as a cotton plantation during the Antebellum period, this farm has been in continuous . . . — Map (db m80345) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Gainestown — Gainestown
Founded in 1809 by George Strother Gaines as Choctaw-Creek Indian Trading Post on Alabama River, now Gainestown Landing. Here lived Alabama Indians for whom State & River named. At Battle of Maubila De Soto's hogs escaped, from whence . . . — Map (db m101609) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Elijah & Issac Pugh
Side 1 Near this spot are the graves of American Revolution soldier Elijah Pugh and his son Issac, a War of 1812 veteran. Elijah, born in Guilford Co., N.C. in 1760, was 18 when he joined a patriot band led by Col. Elijah Clarke at the . . . — Map (db m83270) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Grove Hill, Alabama
Front: Grove Hill, first inhabited by Choctaw Indians, was settled by pioneers in the early 1800s. The settlement was called Magoffin's Store after James Magoffin whose shop, two miles from the present courthouse, opened in 1815. Grove . . . — Map (db m47653) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — City of Jackson
Side 1 First home of Creek and Choctaw Indians, Jackson’s first pioneer settlers arrived about 1800. The little village was first called Republicville, then Pine Level, before its incorporation by an act of the Mississippi Territory . . . — Map (db m101591) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — Jackson
First village called Republicville. Town laid out in 1815 by Pine Level Land Company and named Pine Level. Incorporated 1816 and renamed Jackson for General Andrew Jackson. First commissioners, David Taylor, David White, Reuben Saffold, Peregrin . . . — Map (db m101589) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — Upper Salt Works
The area from Stave Creek to Jackson Creek was one of sites for the making of salt during the years 1862-64. Furnaces of native stone were built and salt water from dug wells evaporated by boiling in large kettles. Amount of salt six hundred . . . — Map (db m101607) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Thomasville — Thomasville's Early History
Side 1 In the summer of 1887, a notice was published confirming that the route for the Mobile and West Alabama Railroad would be the Choctaw Corner route. Soon the sounds of building could be heard over the swamp that was the . . . — Map (db m101601) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Suggsville
Town laid out in 1819 at crossing of Old Line and Old Federal Roads. Named for Wm. Suggs, storekeeper. Site of Clarke County's first newspaper, cotton gin, carriage, shoe and silk factory. Site of extensive aviation experiments by Dr. Denny 100 . . . — Map (db m47698) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Whatley, Alabama
Front Originally home to Creek and Choctaw Indians, Whatley was first settled by pioneers about 1808. Some of the most famous events in Clarke County’s history happened in or near Whatley. A Creek War battle occurred here in 1812 at Fort . . . — Map (db m110971) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — Ashland, Alabama
Side 1 Clay County was formed by an act of the Alabama General Assembly on December 7, 1866. Less than a year later, Ashland was established as the county seat on land donated by Hollingsworth Watts for the construction of a . . . — Map (db m95087) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 / Clay County and the Creek Indian Confederacy
Side 1 Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 During the Creek Indian War of 1813-14, a subset of the War of 1812 with England, numerous figures prominent in American history marched over what would become Clay . . . — Map (db m95100) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — First Baptist Church of Ashland
Side 1 Union Baptist Church. later named the First Baptist Church of Ashland, was founded with 23 charter members in 1865, six years before the town was incorporated. Members met in a log cabin in the southwestern part of Ashland. From . . . — Map (db m95101) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Lineville — Lineville Alabama Monument
  This historic site marks the first settlement known as "Lundie's Crossroads" settled in 1838. The name changed to "County Line" in 1856. Clay County was formed on this line from Randolph and Talladega Counties in 1866. The . . . — Map (db m95103) HM
Alabama (Coffee County), Elba — City of Elba
Elba began circa 1840. A ferry had been started across Pea River, thus beginning the town’s first name, Bridgeville. In 1850, the town’s name was changed to Bentonville in honor of a Missourian who had distinguished himself in service to Alabama in . . . — Map (db m54201) HM
Alabama (Coffee County), Elba — Historic Court Square
The first Coffee County Courthouse was at Wellborn and burned in 1851. This site given by John B. Simmons when Elba was selected the county seat polling 58 more votes than Indigo Head (Clintonville) in a county election on October 5, 1852. The first . . . — Map (db m54804) HM
Alabama (Coffee County), Elba — Wellborn
The first seat of justice for Coffee County was located approximately 500 yards southeast of this site. The community was named for Gen. William Wellborn, an Alabama commander during the Creek Indian War of 1836-37. Under the Act of December . . . — Map (db m95355) HM
Alabama (Coffee County), New Brockton — Arwood School Site
Established here about 1871 and served as educational, cultural, religious and social center of this community until consolidation in 1934. School land was donated by George and Georgie Arwood. Early teachers included W.E. Andrews, Mrs. M.E. Fleming . . . — Map (db m95354) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Cherokee — History of Cherokee
Side 1 By 1805, half-blood Chickasaw leaders George and Levi Colbert were operating inns and a river ferry nearby on the Natchez Trace. The Chickasaw Indian Agency was moved to Agency Creek, now Malone Creek, (3.8 miles east) in 1825. Caney . . . — Map (db m41132) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Cherokee — Trace TravelersNatchez Trace Parkway
Frontier America once walked along the Natchez Trace. The Chickasaw and Choctaw used the Trace for transportation and trade. After 1801, with tribal permission, post riders who rode the Trace connected isolated settlements in Mississippi and . . . — Map (db m107257) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), LaGrange — LaGrange College1830-1855
In the early 1820s, wealthy landowners in the Leighton, Alabama, area established a village on the crest of the mountain to the southwest of this site. This community eventually had about 400 inhabitants and became known as LaGrange. In the 1820s, . . . — Map (db m141747) HM WM
Alabama (Colbert County), LaGrange — LaGrange Military Academy1857-1862
After LaGrange College moved to Florence in January 1855, a group of LaGrange citizens organized a college in the vacant buildings under the old name. Rev. Felix Johnson was elected president. To increase the patronage, a military feature was . . . — Map (db m141750) WM
Alabama (Colbert County), Leighton — William LeighFounder of Leighton
(side 1) The town of Leighton was named in honor of the Reverend William Leigh, son and grandson of Revolutionary War veterans. He was born in Amelia County Virginia, Oct 4, 1790 and moved to Alabama about 1823.
Leigh settled nearby . . . — Map (db m106112) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Littleville — History of Littleville, Alabama
(side 1) Capt. Benjamin F. Little, a former Confederate soldier, opened a store here after the railroad from Tuscumbia to Russellville was built in 1887. A train station and several houses were soon erected. A rail spur provided access to . . . — Map (db m68954) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Muscle Shoals — History of Muscle Shoals, Alabama
The city of Muscle Shoals began with the construction of U.S. Nitrate Plant No.2 and Wilson Dam for defense purposes in 1918. The name came from the great stretch of rapids in the Tennessee River that contained rocky shoals and an abundance of . . . — Map (db m83388) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Muscle Shoals — Howell & Graves School
Marker Front: Muscle Shoals City was incorporated on April 24, 1923. Among the leading developers were New York realtors A.L. Howell and C.T. Graves. Their interest in Muscle Shoals was inspired by the vision of Henry Ford to use power from . . . — Map (db m28580) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — History of Sheffield
Side A Prehistoric man arrived in this area bout 10,000 years ago. Later Indian cultures left many stone artifacts and pottery vessels. In the 1780s, a French trading post and Indian village were located near the mouth of Spring Creek. . . . — Map (db m83389) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — American Indian History
Side 1 Oka Kapassa (Ococoposa), meaning "Cold Water", was the Chickasaw name given to Spring Creek and to a trading post established near the Tennessee River about 1780. About 1817, Michael Dickerson and others were greeted at what by . . . — Map (db m83393) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — First Presbyterian Church
First Presbyterian Church was organized April 13, 1824, by Scots-Irish settlers. The sanctuary, erected in 1827, is the oldest in continuous use in Alabama. Its Georgian Gothic style remains essentially unchanged. The brick walls are laid in . . . — Map (db m40429) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — History of Tuscumbia, Alabama
(Obverse): The area around the Big Spring was inhabited by prehistoric Native Americans as early as 10,000 years ago. The first settlement was a French trading post and Indian village about 1780 on Cold Water Creek (Spring Creek) near the . . . — Map (db m83396) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Ivy GreenBirthplace of Helen Keller
The Family Home of Captain Arthur M. & Kate Adams Keller was built 1820, being the second house erected in Tuscumbia. Here on June 27, 1880 was born America's First Lady of Courage Helen Adams Keller — Map (db m29089) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Tuscumbia Big Spring
Big Spring (average daily flow 35,000,000 gallons) provided water for town founded on its banks. Michael Dickson of Tennessee was first settler (about 1817). Town laid out in 1819 and incorporated as Ococoposo (Cold Water, 1820). Name changed to . . . — Map (db m83453) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — First School in Conecuh County
The first known school in Conecuh County, "Students Retreat," was located near this site. The land was owned by John Green, who also was the school’s first teacher. Green served the county in the state House of Representatives and the 1861 Secession . . . — Map (db m81295) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — John Green CemeteryConecuh County
War of 1812 veteran John Green (1790-1882) settled in Burnt Corn in 1816. He held many public offices, established the first school, and represented Conecuh County in the state legislature in 1824 and 1829. He was the Conecuh delegate to the . . . — Map (db m81285) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — Longmire Stagecoach Stop & First Post Office in Conecuh County
Garrett Longmire had an early trading center, tavern and stage stop near here. He served as the postmaster when his store became a post office in 1818, one of the earliest in what was then the Alabama Territory. The Burnt Corn Post Office served as . . . — Map (db m81298) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Evergreen — Alexander TravisAugust 23, 1790 – December. 2, 1852
In the fall of 1817 Reverend Alexander Travis settled his affairs in South Carolina and immigrated to Conecuh County, where, in the spring of 1818, Beulah Baptist Church was constituted. In rapid succession, Travis’ firm resolve and his devotion to . . . — Map (db m86270) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Evergreen — City of EvergreenThe Emerald City
Side 1 Evergreen, the county seat of Conecuh County, is located in the central part of the county on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. Founded in 1819 by James Cosey, George Andrews and the Clough Brothers, Evergreen was originally . . . — Map (db m81287) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Lime Hill — Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, D.D.1905-1995
Side 1 Doctor Reverend Hillary James Hawkins, who was affectionately known throughout the community as “Brown,” dedicated most of his adult life to providing spiritual guidance to blacks in Evergreen and surrounding . . . — Map (db m81292) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Midway — Midway
Midway was one of the first settlements established in Conecuh County along the Post Road which later became the Old Federal Road. Long serving as a hub for Indian trails branching out to the north, northeast and northwest, the Midway town site once . . . — Map (db m81277) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Repton — Historic and Beautiful Repton
Side 1 In the early 1900s, Repton was a bustling railroad town along the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Among other businesses, it boasted several hotels, banks, stores, a livery stable, cotton gin and the only hospital with a Board . . . — Map (db m100840) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Repton — Old Federal Road
Duncan MacMillan’s stage stop was located near here. According to traveler James Stuart in 1830, he (Duncan) “did not taste fermented liquor” and “thought coffee was the best stimulant.” Mr. McMillan came from Scotland and . . . — Map (db m81278) HM
Alabama (Coosa County), Kellyton — Socopatoy
Although the Creek Indians retained ownership of this territory after the Treaty of Fort Jackson ended the Creek War of 1812-14, whites began settling here before Alabama achieved statehood. This site included a Native American village, frontier . . . — Map (db m96064) HM
Alabama (Coosa County), Rockford — Peace & Goodwill Cemetery
Peace & Goodwill Cemetery is Coosa County's first African American Cemetery to be placed on the prestigious Alabama Historic Cemetery Register. It provides powerful insights about the diligence and commitment of our African Ancestors. Family . . . — Map (db m64587) HM
Alabama (Covington County), Andalusia — Old Courthouse Clock Bell
Old courthouse clock bell from 1897 to 1917 has been donated to Covington County this Bicentennial year 1976 by H. Speller Moates and family. Dedicated to the early settlers of Covington County Erected in honor of the . . . — Map (db m94205) HM
Alabama (Covington County), Florala — Downtown Square and Veterans Memorial Park
The name Florala came from combining the names of Florida and Alabama. Lake Jackson, located in Florala, is the state's largest natural lake. It is named for Andrew Jackson, who in 1818 camped on the lake with his soldiers while en route to . . . — Map (db m83457) HM
Alabama (Covington County), River Falls — Montezuma
On December 18, 1821, the Alabama General Assembly appointed Covington County commissioners William Carter Jr., James R. Mobley, Aaron Lockhart, Henry Jones, and Abel Polk “to fix and designate a suitable place for a seat of Justice, and to . . . — Map (db m42549) HM
Alabama (Covington County), Sanford — Town of Sanford
Side 1 Sanford first came into being as a community post office which was established on May 19, 1879. Around the turn of the century, Sanford had a period of progress that lasted for several years. The L&N Railroad had come through in . . . — Map (db m94166) HM
Alabama (Crenshaw County), Dozier — Daniel Dozier(August 15, 1805-November 4, 1878)
Born in South Carolina and orphaned as a young child, Daniel Dozier arrived in Alabama around 1817. As an adult, he operated a large farm and grist mill and served as minister for several area churches. He was a moderator and leader in the . . . — Map (db m115007) HM
Alabama (Crenshaw County), Dozier — Sports
The area known as Sports was settled by Jonathan Sport and his son, William, who migrated from South Carolina in 1842. Jonathan and William owned 600 acres of land in the area at one time, farming and operating a grist mill. William’s sons John . . . — Map (db m42825) HM
Alabama (Crenshaw County), Rutledge — Rutledge
Rutledge was the first county seat of Crenshaw County and held that position from March 1867 to May 1893. Originally called Barber’s Cross Roads, it was briefly named Crenshaw; but June 10, 1867, it was changed to Rutledge in honor of Captain Henry . . . — Map (db m72053) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — “Die Deutsche Kolonie Von Nord Alabama”Historic District
“Die Deutsche Kolonie Von Nord Alabama” (The German Colony of North Alabama) lies south of Highway 278E and consists of 27 blocks containing 135 buildings representing various types of historic architecture. The . . . — Map (db m33837) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Colonel John G. CullmannFounder of Cullman, Alabama 1873 — 1823 - 1895 —
Col. John G. Cullmann July 2, 1823 - December 3, 1895 Thrifty German Colonists led by Col. John G. Cullmann in 1873 settled this thinly populated plateau of Alabama. — Map (db m35629) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Cullman, Alabama
The city of Cullman is the county seat of Cullman County, which had scattered settlers as early as 1823. Called "The Crossroads of the True South," Cullman was founded by Col. Johann Gottfried Cullmann. After fleeing his German homeland and living . . . — Map (db m66397) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Evangelical Protestant Church
The first church in the City of Cullman was established on this block of land donated by the North and South Railroad in February 1874. Lots 154, 155, and 181 were granted to Henry Dietz, August Henning, and George Stoback as trustees of the . . . — Map (db m33841) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Johann Gottfried Cullmann
Born Frankwetler, Bavarta, Germany July 2, 1823 Died Cullman, Alabama December 3, 1895 Colonel Cullmann Founded the City of Cullman, Alabama, in 1873. Later, in 1877, he founded Cullman County. He also established the Alabama Towns of Bangor, . . . — Map (db m83459) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Sand Mountain Plateau
Thrifty German colonists, led by Col. John G. Cullman, in 1873 settled this thinly populated plateau. This section, previously thought unproductive, became famous for its diversified crops.Map (db m29976) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — St. John’s Evangelical Protestant Church
The first church at the town site of Cullman. Founded May 1, 1874, at the beginning of the second year of settlement. An ethnic German church formed by immigrant families. Services held exclusively in the German language until 1932. In 1937, . . . — Map (db m33840) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Weiss CottageCullman’s Oldest House
Preservation of this Weiss Cottage was initiated by the Cullman County Historical Society and implemented by the Cullman County Federation of Women’s Clubs, City of Cullman Bicentennial Commission and the City of Cullman Community Development . . . — Map (db m33836) HM
Alabama (Cullman County), Logan — Shady Grove Methodist Church And Cemetery
Early settlers to Cullman County established Shady Grove Methodist Episcopal Church as a brush arbor in the 1870s on land homesteaded and donated by Richard McCain. Trustees, J. J. McKissack, W. H. Martin, J. C. Vickery, J. W. Kilgo, together with . . . — Map (db m34244) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Daleville — 1840's Split Log Cabin
Side 1 Double-pen split log cabin built in 1840's by early settlers who fled disease carrying mosquitoes along Claybank Creek, the first permanent location in this area. This house was the gathering place for many families. The logs tell . . . — Map (db m74202) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Daleville — Daleville, Alabama
Daleville, originally called Dale, was the county seat of Dale County from 1831-1841. William Harper was probate judge of Dale County, which was originally included in present-day Coffee County until 1841, present-day Geneva County until 1868, and . . . — Map (db m41145) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Level Plains — Town of Level Plains
Side 1 At the request of community residents James A. Waters Sr., Jesse C. Thomas and William C. Grantham, the Town of Level Plains, population 133, was granted incorporation by the Honorable S. Kirke Adams, Dale County Judge of Probate, . . . — Map (db m74187) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Midland City — Richmond - First County Seat Henry County / Richmond - First County Seat Dale County
Richmond - First County Seat Henry County Henry County was created December 13, 1819; David Caldwell first Probate Judge, held court in homes of early settlers. Richmond was selected in 1822 for first county seat. Creation of Dale . . . — Map (db m71585) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Midland City — The Block House/River Port - Fort - Ferry
(Front): The Block House 1814 The first public structure in what later became Dale County was erected one mile east of this marker at the confluence of the East and West Choctawhatchee Rivers. Called the Block House, it was built of . . . — Map (db m64863) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Newton — NewtonTown on the Hill 1834 / Third County Seat of Dale County
Newton Town on the Hill - 1843 Newton was hub of Dale County activities from 1843 until 1870. During War Between the States (1861-1865), Newton was center of recruiting, including the Home Guards. In March 1865, local militia repulsed . . . — Map (db m71586) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Ozark — Early Ozark/Ozark's Role in the Origin of Fort Rucker
(Front): Early Ozark From 1824, when Dale County was created by an act of the Alabama Legislature, until 1870, the area now comprising the “City of Ozark” was gradually settled mostly by farmers who came and bought the . . . — Map (db m65250) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Ozark — Merrick's - Woodshop - Ozark / Ozark
Side A In the 1820's pioneers, including John Merrick, began settling in vicinity of present-day Ozark, first called "Merrick's". Dale County formed December 22, 1824. In the 1830's wooden stores and cotton gin were built about one mile north . . . — Map (db m36509) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Beloit — Cahawba
Site of Alabama's first permanent capital 1820-26. County seat Dallas County, 1820-66. Prison for Union soldiers during the War Between the States 1863-65. Indians were the first inhabitants over 4000 years ago. Their large fortified village could . . . — Map (db m75779) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Anna Gayle Fry House
Home site of the author of "Memories of Old Cahaba," whose family lived here from the Capital's earliest days as landowners and lawyers, giving her a rich legacy of town history. Married to a doctor, she moved to Galveston, Texas, and returned here . . . — Map (db m112360) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba First State Capital1818-1826
This stone marks the site of Cahaba, selected November 21, 1818 as the first permanent capital of Alabama. The seat of goverment remaining here until removed to Tuscaloosa by the Legislature, January 1825. On December 13, 1819, it was fixed as . . . — Map (db m22609) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba's Changing Landscape
In 1818, Alabama's first governor carved the capital city of Cahawba out of the wilderness. In less than 50 years, Cahawba grew from a frontier capital full of log cabins to one of America's wealthiest communities, with some of the . . . — Map (db m112690) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahawba - circa 1500
Two Ghost Towns? Long before Cahawba was built as Alabama's first state capital, there was another village at this location. Just like Cahawba, it thrived for about 50 years, then disappeared. About the year 1500 a group of . . . — Map (db m112450) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Commissary - R.R. Depot
This cellar was under Joseph Babcock's brick store. During the Civil War the building was used as a commissary. Babcock's warehouse and cotton shed were located to your right on the bluff overlooking the river. The family home, kitchen, and . . . — Map (db m23287) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Death in the Street
On a May afternoon in 1856, an angry John A. Bell rounded this corner carrying a large hickory stick. He passed by Edward Perine's fine brick store, and continued south down the sidewalk. Under his coat, he carried two pistols and a . . . — Map (db m112527) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Footprint of a Church
St. Luke's Episcopal Church was built at Cahawba in 1854 but was dismantled and moved sometime after 1884 but before 1888. It was reassembled fifteen miles away in a rural community called Martin's Station. The raised outline before you indicates . . . — Map (db m83510) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Kirk-View Farm
In 1866, shortly after the Civil War and a severe flood, the county seat was moved from Cahaba to Selma. Residents rapidly abandoned the town. Many homes were dismantled and reassembled elsewhere. Despite this trend, returning Confederate . . . — Map (db m83516) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Methodist Church
These ruins were once a place of worship for members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Built in 1849, it was the first single denomination church in Cahawba. An earlier church for the common use of all denominations was erected about 1840. . . . — Map (db m112410) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Missing Pieces
"We by-and-by discovered...a pair of those splendid birds, the Ivory-billed Woodpeckers (Picus principalis). They were engaged in rapping some tall dead pines, in a dense part of the forest, which rang with their loud notes." . . . — Map (db m112801) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — New Cemetery
Burials in this cemetery, which served Cahaba from 1848 to 1900, tell a story of the town in which many deaths resulted from diseases of infancy, childhood and early adult life, Yellow Fever being a large factor because of proximity to Gulf of . . . — Map (db m23322) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Old Cemetery
This site was set aside by the 1820 General Assembly, burials here date from 1818 to 1847. Interred are some of the state's earliest figures. There is no record of names, many handsome tombs have been destroyed, seven marked ones remaining, six are . . . — Map (db m23355) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Perine Well
This artesian well was drilled to serve a factory which did not materialize. It was then used to water the grounds, a garden and pastures. In addition, by forcing water through pipes into his $50,000 home, E. M. Perine, a merchant prince, had the . . . — Map (db m83518) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Saltmarsh Hall
In the late 1850s, Cahaba experienced a building boom. Everyone expected the town to prosper because of the new railroad. One of the first large brick structures built in this prosperous period was completed in 1856 by Dr. Saltmarsh. He . . . — Map (db m23009) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Site of Alabama's Statehouse1820 - 1825
This structure collapsed in 1833 and its fallen remains were reportedly heaped into a railroad embankment. Consequently, we have no picture of the Statehouse that was drawn by someone who actually saw the building. Any modern picture you see of this . . . — Map (db m75909) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Crocheron Columns
The Crocherons were from Staten Island, New York. Richard Conner Crocheron arrived in town about 1837 to help run the family store. He traveled north for his bride in 1843 after building her this brick home. The back wall adjoined the brick store . . . — Map (db m22870) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Duke of Cahaba
Look around you. There are hundreds of pecan trees growing nearby. All were planted by Clifton Kirkpatrick, a.k.a. The Duke of Cahaba." (Note: Cahawba lost its "w" by the late 19th century.) In 1889 Samuel and Sarah Kirkpatrick . . . — Map (db m112473) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Hole That Was Once a Row
1822 - Crocheron's Row Cahawba's First Shopping Center This large hole was dug in 1822 to be the basement beneath Cahawba's first brick store. In the 19th century the word "row" described a building that consisted of . . . — Map (db m112577) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Old Brick Store
By 1858 many brick stores had been built in Cahaba, so everyone called this the "old brick store." Merchant Sam M. Hill turned the building into one huge dry goods store where shoppers could buy just about anything! Col. Hill, like most of the . . . — Map (db m23242) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Vine Street
Vine Street was Cahawba's business district. Stores, offices and hotels were tightly packed together along these three blocks. Homes were scattered over an entire square mile. Nearly every house had a yard of one or two acres. — Map (db m83520) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Welcome to Downtown Cahawba
Cahawba's homes were spread over an entire square mile, many with yards of one or two acres. That was not the case here on Vine Street. Offices, stores and hotels were tightly packed along this main street. The steamboat landings on the . . . — Map (db m112560) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Who Lived Here?
This house, the Fambro / Arthur home, takes its name from two of its owners. One was a judge, the other was a former slave. The Fambro Family A. Judge W. W. Fambro built this house in the early 1840s. He may have created . . . — Map (db m112451) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Fairoaks Square
Once a gracious turn-of-the-century neighborhood, many of the homes here were close to condemnation when purchased by Circle “S” Industries, Inc. in 1980. In all, 12 Victorian cottages were renovated in the area. Built between 1870 . . . — Map (db m37651) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Highlights of Selma History / William Rufus DeVane King 1786-1853
[Side A:] Highlights of Selma History Dallas County was created by Territorial Legislature Feb. 9, 1818. Selma Land Company formed Mar. 19, 1819 by George Phillips, William Rufus King, Jesse Beene, Gilbert Shearer and Caleb Tate. . . . — Map (db m37679) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Temple Mishkan Israel
The earliest Jewish settlers came to Selma prior to the Civil War, some as early as the 1830’s. A group of Jewish citizens assembled as the Mishkan Israel Congregation and began meeting in private homes in 1867. The congregation was formally . . . — Map (db m37677) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — William Rufus de Vane King1786-1853
Native Sampson County, North Carolina. Admitted to bar, 1806. North Carolina House of Commons 1807-1809. U.S. Congressman 1811-16. Secretary U.S. Legation Naples and St. Petersburg 1816-1818. Moved to Dallas County, Alabama, 1818. . . . — Map (db m37654) HM
Alabama (DeKalb County), Collinsville — Collinsville Historic District
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in February 2006, the district includes 117 commercial and residential properties dating from around 1875 to 1950. The district lies along and adjacent to Grand Avenue, South Valley Avenue and Main . . . — Map (db m62367) HM

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May. 30, 2020